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Fluid ounce

Index Fluid ounce

A fluid ounce (abbreviated fl oz, fl. oz. or oz. fl., old forms ℥, fl ℥, f℥, ƒ ℥) is a unit of volume (also called capacity) typically used for measuring liquids. [1]

18 relations: Avoirdupois system, Code of Federal Regulations, Dram (unit), Gallon, Gill (unit), Imperial units, International yard and pound, Litre, Mass, Ounce, Pint, Pound (mass), Quart, Troy weight, United States customary units, Volume, Weight, Wine gallon.

Avoirdupois system

The avoirdupois system (abbreviated avdp) is a measurement system of weights which uses pounds and ounces as units.

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Code of Federal Regulations

The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) is the codification of the general and permanent rules and regulations (sometimes called administrative law) published in the Federal Register by the executive departments and agencies of the federal government of the United States.

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Dram (unit)

The dram (alternative British spelling drachm; apothecary symbol ʒ or ℨ; abbreviated dr) Earlier version first published in New English Dictionary, 1897.

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Gallon

The gallon is a unit of measurement for fluid capacity in both the US customary units and the British imperial systems of measurement.

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Gill (unit)

The gill (pronounced) or teacup is a unit of measurement for volume equal to a quarter of a pint.

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Imperial units

The system of imperial units or the imperial system (also known as British Imperial or Exchequer Standards of 1825) is the system of units first defined in the British Weights and Measures Act of 1824, which was later refined and reduced.

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International yard and pound

The international yard and pound are two units of measurement that were the subject of an agreement among representatives of six nations signed on 1 July 1959, namely the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.

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Litre

The litre (SI spelling) or liter (American spelling) (symbols L or l, sometimes abbreviated ltr) is an SI accepted metric system unit of volume equal to 1 cubic decimetre (dm3), 1,000 cubic centimetres (cm3) or 1/1,000 cubic metre. A cubic decimetre (or litre) occupies a volume of 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm (see figure) and is thus equal to one-thousandth of a cubic metre. The original French metric system used the litre as a base unit. The word litre is derived from an older French unit, the litron, whose name came from Greek — where it was a unit of weight, not volume — via Latin, and which equalled approximately 0.831 litres. The litre was also used in several subsequent versions of the metric system and is accepted for use with the SI,, p. 124. ("Days" and "hours" are examples of other non-SI units that SI accepts.) although not an SI unit — the SI unit of volume is the cubic metre (m3). The spelling used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures is "litre", a spelling which is shared by almost all English-speaking countries. The spelling "liter" is predominantly used in American English. One litre of liquid water has a mass of almost exactly one kilogram, because the kilogram was originally defined in 1795 as the mass of one cubic decimetre of water at the temperature of melting ice. Subsequent redefinitions of the metre and kilogram mean that this relationship is no longer exact.

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Mass

Mass is both a property of a physical body and a measure of its resistance to acceleration (a change in its state of motion) when a net force is applied.

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Ounce

The ounce (abbreviated oz; apothecary symbol: ℥) is a unit of mass, weight, or volume used in most British derived customary systems of measurement.

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Pint

The pint (symbol pt, sometimes abbreviated as "p") is a unit of volume or capacity in both the imperial and United States customary measurement systems.

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Pound (mass)

The pound or pound-mass is a unit of mass used in the imperial, United States customary and other systems of measurement.

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Quart

The quart (abbreviation qt.) is an English unit of volume equal to a quarter gallon.

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Troy weight

Troy weight is a system of units of mass customarily used for precious metals and gemstones.

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United States customary units

United States customary units are a system of measurements commonly used in the United States.

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Volume

Volume is the quantity of three-dimensional space enclosed by a closed surface, for example, the space that a substance (solid, liquid, gas, or plasma) or shape occupies or contains.

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Weight

In science and engineering, the weight of an object is related to the amount of force acting on the object, either due to gravity or to a reaction force that holds it in place.

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Wine gallon

A wine gallon is a unit of capacity that was used routinely in England as far back as the 14th century, and by statute under Queen Anne since 1707.

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Redirects here:

Fl oz, Fl. oz, Fl. oz., Fl.oz, Fld oz, Fld. oz., Floz, Floz., Fluid ounces, Fluid oz, Fluidounce, Imperial fluid ounce, Liquid ounce, Liquid oz, Oz. fl., US fluid ounces.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluid_ounce

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