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Geoffrey of Monmouth

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Geoffrey of Monmouth (Galfridus Monemutensis, Galfridus Arturus, Gruffudd ap Arthur, Sieffre o Fynwy; c. 1095 – c. 1155) was a British cleric and one of the major figures in the development of British historiography and the popularity of tales of King Arthur. [1]

73 relations: Adam of Usk, Aeneas, Age of majority, Archbishop of Canterbury, Archdeacon of Oxford, Bard, Bede, Bishop of St Asaph, Bournemouth University, Bretons, Brut y Brenhinedd, Brutus of Troy, C. Warren Hollister, Cadwaladr, Cambro-Normans, Canon (priest), Catholic Church, Catuvellauni, Cunobeline, De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae, Descriptio Cambriae, Ecclesiastical History of the English People, Frank Stenton, Gerald of Wales, Gildas, Great Britain, Henry of Huntingdon, Hexameter, Historia Brittonum, Historia Regum Britanniae, Historians of England in the Middle Ages, Itinerarium Cambriae, John Allen Giles, Julius Caesar, King Arthur, King Lear, Lambeth, Latin, Layamon, Layamon's Brut, Leir of Britain, Lewis Thorpe, Lincoln, England, Matthew Parker, Merlin, Miles Russell, Monmouth, Monmouth Priory, National myth, Order of Saint Benedict, ..., Owain Gwynedd, Oxford, Polydore Vergil, Ranulf Higden, Robert of Torigni, Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester, Roman de Brut, Sebastian Evans, The Cambridge History of English and American Literature, Theobald of Bec, Trinovantes, Troy, Vita Merlini, Vortigern, Wace, Wales, Walter Map, Walter of Oxford, Welsh Marches, William of Malmesbury, William of Newburgh, William Shakespeare, William the Conqueror. Expand index (23 more) »

Adam of Usk

Adam of Usk (Adda o Frynbuga, c. 1352 – 1430) was a Welsh priest, canonist, and late medieval historian and chronicler.

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Aeneas

In Greco-Roman mythology, Aeneas (Greek: Αἰνείας, Aineías, possibly derived from Greek αἰνή meaning "praised") was a Trojan hero, the son of the prince Anchises and the goddess Aphrodite (Venus).

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Age of majority

The age of majority is the threshold of adulthood as recognized or declared in law.

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Archbishop of Canterbury

The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior bishop and principal leader of the Church of England, the symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Canterbury.

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Archdeacon of Oxford

The Archdeacon of Oxford is a senior ecclesiastical officer in the Diocese of Oxford, England.

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Bard

In medieval Gaelic and British culture, a bard was a professional story teller, verse-maker and music composer, employed by a patron (such as a monarch or noble), to commemorate one or more of the patron's ancestors and to praise the patron's own activities.

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Bede

Bede (italic; 672/3 – 26 May 735), also known as Saint Bede, Venerable Bede, and Bede the Venerable (Bēda Venerābilis), was an English Benedictine monk at the monastery of St.

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Bishop of St Asaph

The Bishop of St Asaph heads the Church in Wales diocese of St Asaph.

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Bournemouth University

Bournemouth University (abbreviated BU) is a public university in Bournemouth, Dorset, England, with its main campus situated in neighbouring Poole.

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Bretons

The Bretons (Bretoned) are a Celtic ethnic group located in the region of Brittany in France.

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Brut y Brenhinedd

Brut y Brenhinedd ("Chronicle of the Kings") is a collection of variant Middle Welsh versions of Geoffrey of Monmouth's Latin Historia Regum Britanniae.

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Brutus of Troy

Brutus, or Brute of Troy, is a legendary descendant of the Trojan hero Aeneas, known in medieval British history as the eponymous founder and first king of Britain.

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C. Warren Hollister

Charles Warren Hollister (November 2, 1930 – September 14, 1997) was an American author and historian.

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Cadwaladr

Cadwaladr ap Cadwallon (also spelled Cadwalader or Cadwallader in English) was king of Gwynedd in Wales from around 655 to 682.

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Cambro-Normans

Cambro-Normans were Normans who settled in southern Wales after the Norman conquest of England in 1066.

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Canon (priest)

A canon (from the Latin canonicus, itself derived from the Greek κανονικός, kanonikós, "relating to a rule", "regular") is a member of certain bodies subject to an ecclesiastical rule.

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Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.299 billion members worldwide.

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Catuvellauni

The Catuvellauni were a Celtic tribe or state of southeastern Britain before the Roman conquest, attested by inscriptions into the 4th century.

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Cunobeline

Cunobeline (or Cunobelin, from Latin Cunobelinus, derived from Greek Kynobellinus, Κυνοβελλίνος) was a king in pre-Roman Britain from about AD 10 until about AD 40.

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De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae

De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae (Latin for "On the Ruin and Conquest of Britain", sometimes just "On the Ruin of Britain") is a work by the 6th-century AD British cleric St Gildas.

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Descriptio Cambriae

The Descriptio Cambriae or Descriptio Kambriae (Description of Wales) is a geographical and ethnographic treatise on Wales and its people dating from 1193 or 1194.

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Ecclesiastical History of the English People

The Ecclesiastical History of the English People (Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum), written by the Venerable Bede in about AD 731, is a history of the Christian Churches in England, and of England generally; its main focus is on the conflict between the pre-Schism Roman Rite and Celtic Christianity.

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Frank Stenton

Sir Frank Merry Stenton (17 May 1880 – 15 September 1967) was a 20th-century historian of Anglo-Saxon England, and president of the Royal Historical Society (1937–1945).

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Gerald of Wales

Gerald of Wales (Giraldus Cambrensis; Gerallt Gymro; Gerald de Barri) was a Cambro-Norman archdeacon of Brecon and historian.

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Gildas

Gildas (Breton: Gweltaz; c. 500 – c. 570) — also known as Gildas the Wise or Gildas Sapiens — was a 6th-century British monk best known for his scathing religious polemic De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae, which recounts the history of the Britons before and during the coming of the Saxons.

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Great Britain

Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe.

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Henry of Huntingdon

Henry of Huntingdon (Henricus Huntindoniensis; 1088 – AD 1157), the son of a canon in the diocese of Lincoln, was a 12th-century English historian, the author of a history of England, the Historia Anglorum, "the most important Anglo-Norman historian to emerge from the secular clergy".

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Hexameter

Hexameter is a metrical line of verses consisting of six feet.

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Historia Brittonum

The History of the Britons (Historia Brittonum) is a purported history of the indigenous British (Brittonic) people that was written around 828 and survives in numerous recensions that date from after the 11th century.

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Historia Regum Britanniae

Historia regum Britanniae (The History of the Kings of Britain), originally called De gestis Britonum (On the Deeds of the Britons), is a pseudohistorical account of British history, written around 1136 by Geoffrey of Monmouth.

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Historians of England in the Middle Ages

Historians of England in the Middle Ages helped to lay the groundwork for modern historical historiography, providing vital accounts of the early history of England, Wales and Normandy, its cultures, and revelations about the historians themselves.

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Itinerarium Cambriae

The Itinerarium Cambriae ("The Itinerary Through Wales") is a medieval account of a journey made by Gerald of Wales, written in Latin.

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John Allen Giles

Rev.

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Julius Caesar

Gaius Julius Caesar (12 or 13 July 100 BC – 15 March 44 BC), known by his cognomen Julius Caesar, was a Roman politician and military general who played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire.

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King Arthur

King Arthur is a legendary British leader who, according to medieval histories and romances, led the defence of Britain against Saxon invaders in the late 5th and early 6th centuries.

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King Lear

King Lear is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare.

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Lambeth

Lambeth is a district in Central London, England, in the London Borough of Lambeth.

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Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

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Layamon

Layamon or Laghamon – spelled Laȝamon or Laȝamonn in his time, occasionally written Lawman – was a poet of the late 12th/early 13th century and author of the Brut, a notable work that was the first to present the legends of Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in English poetry.

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Layamon's Brut

Layamon's Brut (ca. 1190 - 1215), also known as The Chronicle of Britain, is a Middle English poem compiled and recast by the English priest Layamon.

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Leir of Britain

Leir was a legendary king of the Britons whose story was recounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his pseudohistorical 12th-century History of the Kings of Britain.

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Lewis Thorpe

Lewis Thorpe L.-ès-L. D. de l'U FIAL FRSA FRHistS (died 10 October 1977) was a British philologist and translator.

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Lincoln, England

Lincoln is a cathedral city and the county town of Lincolnshire in the East Midlands of England.

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Matthew Parker

Matthew Parker (6 August 1504 – 17 May 1575) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1559 until his death in 1575.

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Merlin

Merlin (Myrddin) is a legendary figure best known as the wizard featured in Arthurian legend and medieval Welsh poetry.

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Miles Russell

Miles Russell, (born 8 April 1967) is a British archaeologist best known for his work and publications on the prehistoric and Roman periods and for his appearances in television programmes such as Time Team and Harry Hill's TV Burp.

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Monmouth

Monmouth (Trefynwy meaning "town on the Monnow") is the historic county town of Monmouthshire, Wales.

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Monmouth Priory

Monmouth Priory, Priory Street, Monmouth, Monmouthshire is a building that incorporates the remains of the monastic buildings attached to St Mary’s Priory Church.

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National myth

A national myth is an inspiring narrative or anecdote about a nation's past.

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Order of Saint Benedict

The Order of Saint Benedict (OSB; Latin: Ordo Sancti Benedicti), also known as the Black Monksin reference to the colour of its members' habitsis a Catholic religious order of independent monastic communities that observe the Rule of Saint Benedict.

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Owain Gwynedd

Owain ap Gruffudd (23 or 28 November 1170) was King of Gwynedd, North Wales, from 1137 until his death in 1170, succeeding his father Gruffudd ap Cynan.

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Oxford

Oxford is a city in the South East region of England and the county town of Oxfordshire.

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Polydore Vergil

Polidoro Virgili, commonly Latinised as Polydorus Vergilius, or anglicised as Polydore Vergil (or Virgil), and often known as Polydore Vergil of Urbino (c. 1470 – 18 April 1555) was an Italian humanist scholar, historian, priest and diplomat, who spent most of his life in England.

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Ranulf Higden

Ranulf Higden or Higdon (– 12 March 1364) was an English chronicler and a Benedictine monk of the monastery of St. Werburgh in Chester.

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Robert of Torigni

Robert of Torigni (also known as Roburtus de Monte) (c.1110–1186) was a Norman monk, prior, abbot and an important twelfth century chronicler.

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Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester

Robert FitzRoy, 1st Earl of Gloucester (before 1100 – 31 October 1147David Crouch, ‘Robert, first earl of Gloucester (b. before 1100, d. 1147)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2006) (alias Robert Rufus, Robert de Caen, Robert Consul) was an illegitimate son of King Henry I of England.

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Roman de Brut

Roman de Brut (meaning "Novel of Brut") or "Brut" is a verse literary history of Britain by the poet Wace.

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Sebastian Evans

Sebastian Evans (2 March 1830 – 19 December 1909) was an English journalist and political activist, known also as a man of letters and artist.

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The Cambridge History of English and American Literature

The Cambridge History of English and American Literature is an encyclopedia of literary criticism that was published by Cambridge University Press between 1907 and 1921.

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Theobald of Bec

Theobald of Bec (c. 1090 – 18 April 1161) was a Norman archbishop of Canterbury from 1139 to 1161.

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Trinovantes

The Trinovantes or Trinobantes were one of the Celtic tribes of pre-Roman Britain.

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Troy

Troy (Τροία, Troia or Τροίας, Troias and Ἴλιον, Ilion or Ἴλιος, Ilios; Troia and Ilium;Trōia is the typical Latin name for the city. Ilium is a more poetic term: Hittite: Wilusha or Truwisha; Truva or Troya) was a city in the far northwest of the region known in late Classical antiquity as Asia Minor, now known as Anatolia in modern Turkey, near (just south of) the southwest mouth of the Dardanelles strait and northwest of Mount Ida.

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Vita Merlini

Vita Merlini, or The Life of Merlin, is a work by the Norman-Welsh author Geoffrey of Monmouth, composed in Latin around 1150.

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Vortigern

Vortigern (Old Welsh Guorthigirn, Guorthegern; Gwrtheyrn; Wyrtgeorn; Old Breton Gurdiern, Gurthiern; Foirtchern; Vortigernus, Vertigernus, Uuertigernus, etc), also spelled Vortiger, Vortigan, and Vortigen, was possibly a 5th-century warlord in Britain, known perhaps as a king of the Britons, at least connoted as such in the writings of Bede.

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Wace

Wace (1110 – after 1174), sometimes referred to as Robert Wace, was a Norman poet, who was born in Jersey and brought up in mainland Normandy (he tells us in the Roman de Rou that he was taken as a child to Caen), ending his career as Canon of Bayeux.

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Wales

Wales (Cymru) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain.

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Walter Map

Walter Map (Gualterius Mappus; 1140 – 1210) was a medieval writer of works written in Latin.

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Walter of Oxford

Walter of Oxford (died 1151) (Valterus Calenius) was a British cleric and writer.

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Welsh Marches

The Welsh Marches (Y Mers) is an imprecisely defined area along and around the border between England and Wales in the United Kingdom.

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William of Malmesbury

William of Malmesbury (Willelmus Malmesbiriensis) was the foremost English historian of the 12th century.

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William of Newburgh

William of Newburgh or Newbury (Guilelmus Neubrigensis, Wilhelmus Neubrigensis, or Willelmus de Novoburgo. 1136?–1198?), also known as William Parvus, was a 12th-century English historian and Augustinian canon of Anglo-Saxon descent from Bridlington, Yorkshire.

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William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 (baptised)—23 April 1616) was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as both the greatest writer in the English language, and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.

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William the Conqueror

William I (c. 1028Bates William the Conqueror p. 33 – 9 September 1087), usually known as William the Conqueror and sometimes William the Bastard, was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087.

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Redirects here:

Galfridian, Galfridus Artur, Galfridus Arturus, Galfridus Monemutensis, Galfridus Monumetensis, Geoffrey Monmouth, Geoffrey de Monmouth, Geoffrey of monmouth, Geoffrey, of Monmouth, Bishop of St. Asaph, 1100, Gruffudd ap Arthur, Gruffudd ap Arthur, Sieffre o Fynwy, Pre-Galfridian, Sieffre o Fynwy.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffrey_of_Monmouth

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