Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

George Bernard Shaw

+ Save concept

George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856 – 2 November 1950), known at his insistence simply as Bernard Shaw, was an Irish playwright, critic, polemicist, and political activist. [1]

379 relations: Abbey Theatre, Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay, Academy Awards, Adelphi, London, Adolf Hitler, Alan Ayckbourn, Alan Jay Lerner, Allies of World War I, Alvin Langdon Coburn, American Journal of Public Health, Anarchism, Androcles, Androcles and the Lion (play), Anglo-Irish people, Anglo-Irish Treaty, Anglo-Swedish Literary Foundation, Annajanska, the Bolshevik Empress, Annie Besant, Anthony Fokker, Anthony Holden, Antihero, Anton Chekhov, Anton Lang, Antony and Cleopatra, Arms and the Man, Art for art's sake, August Strindberg, Augusta, Lady Gregory, Augustus Does His Bit, Ayot St Lawrence, Éamon de Valera, Back to Methuselah, Barabbas, Bardolatry, Baritone, Barry Jackson (director), Basset horn, Battle of the Boyne, Beauty's Duty, Bedford Park, London, Benito Mussolini, Birmingham Repertory Theatre, Blank verse, Bloody Sunday (1887), Boston, British and French declaration of war on Germany, British Empire, British Interplanetary Society, British Library, British Museum, ..., Broadway theatre, Brooks Atkinson, Buoyant Billions, Caesar and Cleopatra (film), Caesar and Cleopatra (play), Cambridge University Press, Candida (play), Canonization, Captain Brassbound's Conversion, Carl Rosa Opera Company, Cashel Byron's Profession, Cecil Arthur Lewis, Cecil B. DeMille, Charles Villiers Stanford, Charlotte Payne-Townshend, Charlotte Wilson, Chelsea, London, Christian socialism, Clifford Sharp, Cliveden, Cockney, Conradh na Gaeilge, Covent Garden, Creative Evolution (book), Croydon, Curtain raiser, Cymbeline Refinished, D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, Daily Mail, Dalkey, Dalkey Hill, Daniel Kevles, Das Kapital, David Lloyd George, Deborah Kerr, Der Ring des Nibelungen, Dictionary of National Biography, Didacticism, Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig, Dublin, Duff Cooper, Easter Rising, Edith Evans, Edward Elgar, Edward McNulty, Edward R. Pease, Edward VII, Elizabeth I of England, Ellen Terry, Elmer Rice, Eric Bentley, Ethel Voynich, Eugene O'Neill, Eugenics, Fabian Society, Fanny's First Play, Farce, Farfetched Fables, Farringdon, London, Fellowship of the New Life, Florence Farr, Frank Harris, Frederick Loewe, G. K. Chesterton, Gabriel Pascal, Gareth Griffiths (academic), Gene Tunney, Geneva (play), George Frideric Handel, George Lansbury, George William Russell, Getting Married, Ghostwriter, Gingold Theatrical Group, Golders Green Crematorium, Great Catherine: Whom Glory Still Adores, H. G. Wells, Harley Granville-Barker, Harold Laski, Harold Nicolson, Harold Pinter, Heartbreak House, Henrik Ibsen, Henry Campbell-Bannerman, Henry George, Henry Hyndman, Henry Livings, Herbert Beerbohm Tree, Hertfordshire, Hilaire Belloc, History of the socialist movement in the United Kingdom, Hollywood, Homer, How He Lied to Her Husband, How These Doctors Love One Another!, Hubert Parry, Ian Dalrymple, In Good King Charles's Golden Days, Independent Labour Party, Inheritance tax, Invasion of Poland, Irish Civil War, Irish Free State, Irish Home Rule movement, Irish Literary Revival, Irish republicanism, J. M. Barrie, Jaeger (clothing), James Agate, James Joyce, Joan of Arc, Johannes Brahms, John Bull's Other Island, John Eugene Vedrenne, John Galsworthy, John Gielgud, John Millington Synge, John Osborne, John Ruskin, Joseph Stalin, Karl Marx, Kidney failure, Kilkenny, Killiney, King Lear, Knight Bachelor, Labour Party (UK), Labour Representation Committee (1900), Lacock Abbey, Laurence Olivier, Laurentia McLachlan, League of Nations, Liberal government, 1892–1895, List of covers of Time magazine (1920s), London County Council, London School of Economics, Lord Alfred Douglas, Macbeth Skit, Major Barbara, Major Barbara (film), Malvern Festival (1929–39), Man and Superman, Margaret Cole, Margaret Leighton, Mark Lawson, Maurice Valency, Melodrama, Methodist Church in Ireland, Metropolitan Borough of St Pancras, Metropolitan Opera House (39th Street), Mezzo-soprano, Michael Billington (critic), Michael Collins (Irish leader), Michael Holroyd, Misalliance, Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, Mrs Patrick Campbell, Mrs. Warren's Profession, Murder in the Cathedral, My Fair Lady, Nancy Astor, Viscountess Astor, Napoleon, National Gallery of Ireland, National Telephone Company, National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, Nazi Party, New Statesman, New Woman, New York Harbor, New York Herald Tribune, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Noël Coward, Nobel Prize in Literature, Nuremberg trials, O'Flaherty V.C., Old Testament, On the Rocks (play), One-act play, Oratorio, Order of Merit, Oscar Straus (composer), Oscar Wilde, Overruled (play), Paget's disease of bone, Parish councils in England, Partition of Ireland, Passion Play: a dramatic fragment, Passion, Poison, and Petrifaction, Pelican Books, Penguin Books, Peter Nichols, Philip Merivale, Pinewood Studios, Platonic love, Polemic, Pope Benedict XV, Portobello, Dublin, Press Cuttings, Progress and Poverty, Protestant Ascendancy, Provisional Government of Ireland (1922), Public trustee, Pygmalion (play), Quintessence of Ibsenism, Ralph Richardson, Ramsay MacDonald, Register office (United Kingdom), Richard Mansfield, Richard Wagner, Robert Donat, Robert Loraine, Robert Prescott Stewart, Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, Royal Automobile Club, Royal Court Theatre, Royal Economic Society, Royal Flying Corps, Royal National Theatre, Ruritania, S. N. Behrman, Saint Joan (play), Salvador de Madariaga, San Francisco, Saturday Review (London newspaper), Savoy Theatre, Seán O'Casey, Second Boer War, Sentimentality, Serial (literature), Sermon on the Mount, Shakes versus Shav, Shavian alphabet, Shaw Festival, Shaw's Corner, Sidney Webb, 1st Baron Passfield, Sinecure, Sinn Féin, Sloane Square, Smallpox, Social Democratic Federation, Soprano, South Kensington, South Shields, Soviet Union, St Pancras, London, St. John Greer Ervine, Stanley Weintraub, Suffragette, Sybil Thorndike, Sydney Cockerell, Symphony No. 3 (Elgar/Payne), T. S. Eliot, Taoiseach, Teetotalism, The Adventures of the Black Girl in Her Search for God, The Apple Cart, The Blitz, The Cherry Orchard, The Chocolate Soldier, The Confidential Clerk, The Dark Lady of the Sonnets, The Devil's Disciple, The Doctor's Dilemma (play), The Fascinating Foundling, The Gadfly, The Gadfly (play), The Glimpse of Reality, The Guardian, The Inca of Perusalem, The Interlude at the Playhouse, The Jewish Chronicle, The Man of Destiny, The Master Builder, The Millionairess (play), The Music Cure, The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, The New York Times, The Perfect Wagnerite, The Philanderer, The Salvation Army, The Severn Suite, The Shewing-Up of Blanco Posnet, The Simpleton of the Unexpected Isles, The Six of Calais, The Star (London), The Times Literary Supplement, The Way of the World, The World (journal), Theatre of the Absurd, Thirteen Colonies, Thomas Becket, Thomas Davidson (philosopher), Time (magazine), To be, or not to be, Tom Stoppard, Too True to Be Good, Trafalgar Square, Trinity College Dublin, Tuberculosis, Un Petit Drame, Union of South Africa, United Kingdom general election, 1895, United Kingdom general election, 1906, United States in World War I, University of Texas at Austin, Vaccination, Vaccine controversies, Vegetarianism, Village Wooing, Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia, Vivisection, Vladimir Lenin, W. B. Yeats, W. P. Lipscomb, W. S. Gilbert, Wesley College (Dublin), West End theatre, Western Front (World War I), Whitehall Court, Why She Would Not, Widowers' Houses, William Archer (critic), William Congreve, William III of England, William Morris, William Saroyan, William Shakespeare, World War I, You Never Can Tell (play). Expand index (329 more) »

Abbey Theatre

The Abbey Theatre (Amharclann na Mainistreach), also known as the National Theatre of Ireland (Amharclann Náisiúnta na hÉireann), in Dublin, Republic of Ireland, first opened its doors to the public on 27 December 1904.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Abbey Theatre · See more »

Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay

The Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay is one of the Academy Awards, the most prominent film awards in the United States.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay · See more »

Academy Awards

The Academy Awards, also known as the Oscars, are a set of 24 awards for artistic and technical merit in the American film industry, given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), to recognize excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Academy Awards · See more »

Adelphi, London

Adelphi (from the Greek ἀδελφοί adelphoi, meaning "brothers") is a district of the City of Westminster in London.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Adelphi, London · See more »

Adolf Hitler

Adolf Hitler (20 April 1889 – 30 April 1945) was a German politician, demagogue, and revolutionary, who was the leader of the Nazi Party (Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei; NSDAP), Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Adolf Hitler · See more »

Alan Ayckbourn

Sir Alan Ayckbourn, (born 12 April 1939) is a prolific English playwright and director.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Alan Ayckbourn · See more »

Alan Jay Lerner

Alan Jay Lerner (August 31, 1918 – June 14, 1986) was an American lyricist and librettist.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Alan Jay Lerner · See more »

Allies of World War I

The Allies of World War I, or Entente Powers, were the countries that opposed the Central Powers in the First World War.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Allies of World War I · See more »

Alvin Langdon Coburn

Alvin Langdon Coburn (June 11, 1882 – November 23, 1966) was an early 20th-century photographer who became a key figure in the development of American pictorialism.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Alvin Langdon Coburn · See more »

American Journal of Public Health

The American Journal of Public Health is a monthly peer-reviewed public health journal published by the American Public Health Association covering health policy and public health.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and American Journal of Public Health · See more »

Anarchism

Anarchism is a political philosophy that advocates self-governed societies based on voluntary institutions.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Anarchism · See more »

Androcles

Androcles (Ἀνδροκλῆς) or Androclus is the name given by some sources to the main character of a common folktale that is included in the Aarne–Thompson classification system as type 156.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Androcles · See more »

Androcles and the Lion (play)

Androcles and the Lion is a 1912 play written by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Androcles and the Lion (play) · See more »

Anglo-Irish people

Anglo-Irish is a term which was more commonly used in the 19th and early 20th centuries to identify a social class in Ireland, whose members are mostly the descendants and successors of the English Protestant Ascendancy.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Anglo-Irish people · See more »

Anglo-Irish Treaty

The Anglo-Irish Treaty (An Conradh Angla-Éireannach), commonly known as The Treaty and officially the Articles of Agreement for a Treaty Between Great Britain and Ireland, was an agreement between the government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and representatives of the Irish Republic that concluded the Irish War of Independence.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Anglo-Irish Treaty · See more »

Anglo-Swedish Literary Foundation

Anglo-Swedish Literary Foundation is a fund for the development of cultural relations between the UK and Sweden.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Anglo-Swedish Literary Foundation · See more »

Annajanska, the Bolshevik Empress

Annajanska, the Bolshevik Empress: A Revolutionary Romancelet is a one-act play by George Bernard Shaw, written in 1917.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Annajanska, the Bolshevik Empress · See more »

Annie Besant

Annie Besant, née Wood (1 October 1847 – 20 September 1933) was a British socialist, theosophist, women's rights activist, writer and orator and supporter of Irish and Indian self-rule.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Annie Besant · See more »

Anthony Fokker

Anton Herman Gerard "Anthony" Fokker (6 April 1890 – 23 December 1939) was a Dutch aviation pioneer and aircraft manufacturer.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Anthony Fokker · See more »

Anthony Holden

Anthony Holden (born 22 May 1947) is an English writer, broadcaster and critic, particularly known as a biographer of artists including Shakespeare, Tchaikovsky, Leigh Hunt, Lorenzo da Ponte and Laurence Olivier, and of members of the British Royal family, notably Charles, Prince of Wales.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Anthony Holden · See more »

Antihero

An antihero, or antiheroine, is a protagonist in a story who lacks conventional heroic qualities and attributes such as idealism, courage, and morality.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Antihero · See more »

Anton Chekhov

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (ɐnˈton ˈpavɫəvʲɪtɕ ˈtɕɛxəf; 29 January 1860 – 15 July 1904) was a Russian playwright and short-story writer, who is considered to be among the greatest writers of short fiction in history.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Anton Chekhov · See more »

Anton Lang

Anton Lang (17 January 1875 – 30 May 1938) was a German studio potter and an actor in the Oberammergau Passion Play.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Anton Lang · See more »

Antony and Cleopatra

Antony and Cleopatra is a tragedy by William Shakespeare.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Antony and Cleopatra · See more »

Arms and the Man

Arms and the Man is a comedy by George Bernard Shaw, whose title comes from the opening words of Virgil's Aeneid, in Latin: Arma virumque cano ("Of arms and the man I sing").

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Arms and the Man · See more »

Art for art's sake

"Art for art's sake" is the usual English rendering of a French slogan from the early 19th century, "l'art pour l'art", and expresses a philosophy that the intrinsic value of art, and the only "true" art, is divorced from any didactic, moral, or utilitarian function.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Art for art's sake · See more »

August Strindberg

Johan August Strindberg (22 January 184914 May 1912) was a Swedish playwright, novelist, poet, essayist and painter.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and August Strindberg · See more »

Augusta, Lady Gregory

Isabella Augusta, Lady Gregory (née Persse; 15 March 1852 – 22 May 1932) was an Irish dramatist, folklorist and theatre manager.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Augusta, Lady Gregory · See more »

Augustus Does His Bit

Augustus Does His Bit, A True to Life Farce (1916) is a comic one-act play by George Bernard Shaw about a dim-witted aristocrat who is outwitted by a female spy during World War I.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Augustus Does His Bit · See more »

Ayot St Lawrence

Ayot St Lawrence is a small village and civil parish in Hertfordshire, between Harpenden and Welwyn.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Ayot St Lawrence · See more »

Éamon de Valera

Éamon de Valera (first registered as George de Valero; changed some time before 1901 to Edward de Valera; 14 October 1882 – 29 August 1975) was a prominent statesman and political leader in 20th-century Ireland.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Éamon de Valera · See more »

Back to Methuselah

Back to Methuselah (A Metabiological Pentateuch) by George Bernard Shaw consists of a preface (An Infidel Half Century) and a series of five plays: In the Beginning: B.C. 4004 (In the Garden of Eden), The Gospel of the Brothers Barnabas: Present Day, The Thing Happens: A.D. 2170, Tragedy of an Elderly Gentleman: A.D. 3000, and As Far as Thought Can Reach: A.D. 31,920.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Back to Methuselah · See more »

Barabbas

Barabbas (ישוע בר אבא Bar ʾAbbaʾ, literally "son of the father") is a figure mentioned in the New Testament of the Bible, in which he is an insurrectionary held by the Roman governor at the same time as Jesus, and whom Pontius Pilate freed at the Passover feast in Jerusalem, while keeping Jesus as a prisoner.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Barabbas · See more »

Bardolatry

Bardolatry is the worship, particularly when considered excessive, of William Shakespeare.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Bardolatry · See more »

Baritone

A baritone is a type of classical male singing voice whose vocal range lies between the bass and the tenor voice types.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Baritone · See more »

Barry Jackson (director)

Sir Barry Vincent Jackson (6 September 1879 – 3 April 1961), was an English theatre director, entrepreneur and the founder of the Birmingham Repertory Theatre and, alongside George Bernard Shaw, the Malvern Festival.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Barry Jackson (director) · See more »

Basset horn

The basset horn (sometimes written basset-horn) is a musical instrument, a member of the clarinet family.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Basset horn · See more »

Battle of the Boyne

The Battle of the Boyne (Cath na Bóinne) was a battle in 1690 between the forces of the deposed King James II of England, and those of Dutch Prince William of Orange who, with his wife Mary II (his cousin and James's daughter), had acceded to the Crowns of England and Scotland in 1688.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Battle of the Boyne · See more »

Beauty's Duty

Beauty's Duty (1913) is a short uncompleted "playlet" by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Beauty's Duty · See more »

Bedford Park, London

Bedford Park is a suburban development in west London, England.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Bedford Park, London · See more »

Benito Mussolini

Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini (29 July 1883 – 28 April 1945) was an Italian politician and journalist who was the leader of the National Fascist Party (Partito Nazionale Fascista, PNF).

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Benito Mussolini · See more »

Birmingham Repertory Theatre

Birmingham Repertory Theatre, commonly called Birmingham Rep or just The Rep, is a producing theatre based on Centenary Square in Birmingham, England.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Birmingham Repertory Theatre · See more »

Blank verse

Blank verse is poetry written with regular metrical but unrhymed lines, almost always in iambic pentameter.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Blank verse · See more »

Bloody Sunday (1887)

Bloody Sunday took place in London on 13 November 1887, when a march against unemployment and coercion in Ireland, as well as demanding the release of MP William O'Brien, was attacked by the Metropolitan Police and the British Army.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Bloody Sunday (1887) · See more »

Boston

Boston is the capital city and most populous municipality of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Boston · See more »

British and French declaration of war on Germany

The Declaration of war by France and the United Kingdom was given on 3 September 1939, after German forces invaded Poland.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and British and French declaration of war on Germany · See more »

British Empire

The British Empire comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and British Empire · See more »

British Interplanetary Society

The British Interplanetary Society (BIS), founded in Liverpool in 1933 by Philip E. Cleator, is the oldest space advocacy organisation in the world.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and British Interplanetary Society · See more »

British Library

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and the largest national library in the world by number of items catalogued.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and British Library · See more »

British Museum

The British Museum, located in the Bloomsbury area of London, United Kingdom, is a public institution dedicated to human history, art and culture.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and British Museum · See more »

Broadway theatre

Broadway theatre,Although theater is the generally preferred spelling in the United States (see American and British English spelling differences), many Broadway venues, performers and trade groups for live dramatic presentations use the spelling theatre.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Broadway theatre · See more »

Brooks Atkinson

Justin Brooks Atkinson (November 28, 1894 – January 14, 1984) was an American theatre critic.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Brooks Atkinson · See more »

Buoyant Billions

Buoyant Billions (1948) is a play by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Buoyant Billions · See more »

Caesar and Cleopatra (film)

Caesar and Cleopatra is a 1945 British Technicolor film directed by Gabriel Pascal and starring Claude Rains and Vivien Leigh.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Caesar and Cleopatra (film) · See more »

Caesar and Cleopatra (play)

Caesar and Cleopatra is a play written in 1898 by George Bernard Shaw that depicts a fictionalized account of the relationship between Julius Caesar and Cleopatra.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Caesar and Cleopatra (play) · See more »

Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Cambridge University Press · See more »

Candida (play)

Candida, a comedy by playwright George Bernard Shaw, was written in 1894 and first published in 1898, as part of his Plays Pleasant.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Candida (play) · See more »

Canonization

Canonization is the act by which a Christian church declares that a person who has died was a saint, upon which declaration the person is included in the "canon", or list, of recognized saints.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Canonization · See more »

Captain Brassbound's Conversion

Captain Brassbound's Conversion (1900) is a play by G. Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Captain Brassbound's Conversion · See more »

Carl Rosa Opera Company

The Carl Rosa Opera Company was founded in 1873 by Carl Rosa, a German-born musical impresario, to present opera in English in London and the British provinces.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Carl Rosa Opera Company · See more »

Cashel Byron's Profession

Cashel Byron's Profession is George Bernard Shaw's fourth novel.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Cashel Byron's Profession · See more »

Cecil Arthur Lewis

Cecil Arthur Lewis (29 March 1898 – 27 January 1997) was a British fighter pilot who flew in World War I. He went on to co-found the British Broadcasting Company and enjoy a long career as a writer, notably of the aviation classic Sagittarius Rising (some scenes from which were represented in the film Aces High).

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Cecil Arthur Lewis · See more »

Cecil B. DeMille

Cecil Blount DeMille (August 12, 1881 – January 21, 1959) was an American filmmaker.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Cecil B. DeMille · See more »

Charles Villiers Stanford

Sir Charles Villiers Stanford (30 September 1852 – 29 March 1924) was an Irish composer, music teacher, and conductor.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Charles Villiers Stanford · See more »

Charlotte Payne-Townshend

Charlotte Frances Payne-Townshend (20 January 1857–12 September 1943) was an Irish political activist in Britain.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Charlotte Payne-Townshend · See more »

Charlotte Wilson

Charlotte M. Wilson (6 May 1854, Kemerton, Worcestershire – 28 April 1944, Irvington-on-Hudson, New York) was an English Fabian and anarchist who co-founded Freedom newspaper in 1886 with Peter Kropotkin, and edited, published, and largely financed it during its first decade.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Charlotte Wilson · See more »

Chelsea, London

Chelsea is an affluent area of South West London, bounded to the south by the River Thames.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Chelsea, London · See more »

Christian socialism

Christian socialism is a form of religious socialism based on the teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Christian socialism · See more »

Christmas

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ,Martindale, Cyril Charles.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Christmas · See more »

Christmas and holiday season

The Christmas season, also called the festive season, or the holiday season (mainly in the U.S. and Canada; often simply called the holidays),, is an annually recurring period recognized in many Western and Western-influenced countries that is generally considered to run from late November to early January.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Christmas and holiday season · See more »

Christmas Eve

Christmas Eve is the evening or entire day before Christmas Day, the festival commemorating the birth of Jesus.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Christmas Eve · See more »

Christmas traditions

Christmas traditions vary from country to country.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Christmas traditions · See more »

Clifford Sharp

Clifford Dyce Sharp (1883–1935) was a British journalist.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Clifford Sharp · See more »

Cliveden

Cliveden (pronounced) is a National Trust-owned estate in Buckinghamshire, on the border with Berkshire.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Cliveden · See more »

Cockney

The term cockney has had several distinct geographical, social, and linguistic associations.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Cockney · See more »

Conradh na Gaeilge

Conradh na Gaeilge (historically known in English as the Gaelic League) is a social and cultural organisation which promotes the Irish language in Ireland and worldwide.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Conradh na Gaeilge · See more »

Covent Garden

Covent Garden is a district in Greater London, on the eastern fringes of the West End, between Charing Cross Road and Drury Lane.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Covent Garden · See more »

Creative Evolution (book)

Creative Evolution (L'Évolution créatrice) is a 1907 book by French philosopher Henri Bergson.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Creative Evolution (book) · See more »

Croydon

Croydon is a large town in south London, England, south of Charing Cross.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Croydon · See more »

Curtain raiser

A curtain raiser is a performance, stage act, show, actor or performer that opens a show for the main attraction.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Curtain raiser · See more »

Cymbeline Refinished

Cymbeline Refinished (1937) is a play-fragment by George Bernard Shaw in which he writes a new final act to Shakespeare's play Cymbeline.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Cymbeline Refinished · See more »

D'Oyly Carte Opera Company

The D'Oyly Carte Opera Company is a professional light opera company that staged Gilbert and Sullivan's Savoy operas nearly year-round in the UK and sometimes toured in Europe, North America and elsewhere, from the 1870s until 1982.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and D'Oyly Carte Opera Company · See more »

Daily Mail

The Daily Mail is a British daily middle-marketPeter Wilby, New Statesman, 19 December 2013 (online version: 2 January 2014) tabloid newspaper owned by the Daily Mail and General Trust and published in London.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Daily Mail · See more »

Dalkey

Dalkey is one of the most affluent suburbs of Dublin, and a seaside resort southeast of the city, and the town of Dun Laoghaire, in Ireland.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Dalkey · See more »

Dalkey Hill

Dalkey Hill (Cnoc Dheilginse) is the northernmost of the two hills which form the southern boundary of Dublin Bay (the other being Killiney Hill).

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Dalkey Hill · See more »

Daniel Kevles

Daniel J. Kevles (born 2 March 1939 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American historian of science.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Daniel Kevles · See more »

Das Kapital

Das Kapital, also known as Capital.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Das Kapital · See more »

David Lloyd George

David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor, (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman of the Liberal Party and the final Liberal to serve as Prime Minister.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and David Lloyd George · See more »

Deborah Kerr

Deborah Jane Kerr-Trimmer CBE (30 September 192116 October 2007), known professionally as Deborah Kerr, was a Scottish film, theatre and television actress.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Deborah Kerr · See more »

Der Ring des Nibelungen

(The Ring of the Nibelung), WWV 86, is a cycle of four German-language epic music dramas composed by Richard Wagner.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Der Ring des Nibelungen · See more »

Dictionary of National Biography

The Dictionary of National Biography (DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published from 1885.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Dictionary of National Biography · See more »

Didacticism

Didacticism is a philosophy that emphasizes instructional and informative qualities in literature and other types of art.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Didacticism · See more »

Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig

Field Marshal Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig, (19 June 1861 – 29 January 1928), was a senior officer of the British Army.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig · See more »

Dublin

Dublin is the capital of and largest city in Ireland.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Dublin · See more »

Duff Cooper

Alfred Duff Cooper, 1st Viscount Norwich, (22 February 1890 – 1 January 1954), known as Duff Cooper, was a British Conservative Party politician, diplomat and author.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Duff Cooper · See more »

Easter Rising

The Easter Rising (Éirí Amach na Cásca), also known as the Easter Rebellion, was an armed insurrection in Ireland during Easter Week, April 1916.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Easter Rising · See more »

Edith Evans

Dame Edith Mary Evans, (8 February 1888 – 14 October 1976) was an English actress.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Edith Evans · See more »

Edward Elgar

Sir Edward William Elgar, 1st Baronet (2 June 1857 – 23 February 1934) was an English composer, many of whose works have entered the British and international classical concert repertoire.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Edward Elgar · See more »

Edward McNulty

(Matthew) Edward McNulty (1856–1943) was an Irish playwright and novelist, known for his penned portrayals of Irish peasant life.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Edward McNulty · See more »

Edward R. Pease

Edward Reynolds Pease (23 December 1857 – 5 January 1955) was an English writer and a founding member of the Fabian Society.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Edward R. Pease · See more »

Edward VII

Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death in 1910.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Edward VII · See more »

Elizabeth I of England

Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Elizabeth I of England · See more »

Ellen Terry

Dame Alice Ellen Terry, (27 February 1847 – 21 July 1928), known professionally as Ellen Terry, was an English actress who became the leading Shakespearean actress in Britain. Born into a family of actors, Terry began performing as a child, acting in Shakespeare plays in London, and toured throughout the British provinces in her teens. At 16 she married the 46-year-old artist George Frederic Watts, but they separated within a year. She soon returned to the stage but began a relationship with the architect Edward William Godwin and retired from the stage for six years. She resumed acting in 1874 and was immediately acclaimed for her portrayal of roles in Shakespeare and other classics. In 1878 she joined Henry Irving's company as his leading lady, and for more than the next two decades she was considered the leading Shakespearean and comic actress in Britain. Two of her most famous roles were Portia in The Merchant of Venice and Beatrice in Much Ado About Nothing. She and Irving also toured with great success in America and Britain. In 1903 Terry took over management of London's Imperial Theatre, focusing on the plays of George Bernard Shaw and Henrik Ibsen. The venture was a financial failure, and Terry turned to touring and lecturing. She continued to find success on stage until 1920, while also appearing in films from 1916 to 1922. Her career lasted nearly seven decades.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Ellen Terry · See more »

Elmer Rice

Elmer Rice (born Elmer Leopold Reizenstein, September 28, 1892 – May 8, 1967) was an American playwright.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Elmer Rice · See more »

Eric Bentley

Eric Russell Bentley (born September 14, 1916) is a British-born American critic, playwright, singer, editor and translator.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Eric Bentley · See more »

Ethel Voynich

Ethel Lilian Voynich, née Boole (11 May 1864 – 27 July 1960) was an Irish novelist and musician, and a supporter of several revolutionary causes.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Ethel Voynich · See more »

Eugene O'Neill

Eugene Gladstone O'Neill (October 16, 1888 – November 27, 1953) was an American playwright and Nobel laureate in Literature.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Eugene O'Neill · See more »

Eugenics

Eugenics (from Greek εὐγενής eugenes 'well-born' from εὖ eu, 'good, well' and γένος genos, 'race, stock, kin') is a set of beliefs and practices that aims at improving the genetic quality of a human population.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Eugenics · See more »

Fabian Society

The Fabian Society is a British socialist organization whose purpose is to advance the principles of democratic socialism via gradualist and reformist effort in democracies, rather than by revolutionary overthrow.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Fabian Society · See more »

Fanny's First Play

Fanny's First Play is a 1911 play by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Fanny's First Play · See more »

Farce

In theatre, a farce is a comedy that aims at entertaining the audience through situations that are highly exaggerated, extravagant, and thus improbable.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Farce · See more »

Farfetched Fables

Farfetched Fables (1948) is a collection of six short plays by George Bernard Shaw in which he outlines several of his most idiosyncratic personal ideas.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Farfetched Fables · See more »

Farringdon, London

Farringdon is a historic area of the City of London, represented today by the Wards of Farringdon Within and Farringdon Without.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Farringdon, London · See more »

Fellowship of the New Life

The Fellowship of the New Life was a British organization in the 19th century, most famous for a splinter group, the Fabian Society.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Fellowship of the New Life · See more »

Florence Farr

Florence Beatrice Emery (née) Farr (7 July 1860 – 29 April 1917) was a British West End leading actress, composer and director.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Florence Farr · See more »

Frank Harris

Frank Harris (14 February 1855 – 26 August 1931) was an Irish editor, novelist, short story writer, journalist and publisher, who was friendly with many well-known figures of his day.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Frank Harris · See more »

Frederick Loewe

Frederick Loewe (originally German Friedrich (Fritz) Löwe; June 10, 1901 – February 14, 1988), was an Austrian-American composer.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Frederick Loewe · See more »

G. K. Chesterton

Gilbert Keith Chesterton, KC*SG (29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936), was an English writer, poet, philosopher, dramatist, journalist, orator, lay theologian, biographer, and literary and art critic.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and G. K. Chesterton · See more »

Gabriel Pascal

Gabriel Pascal (born Gábor Lehel) (4 June 1894 – 6 July 1954) was a Hungarian-born film producer and director whose best known films were made in the United Kingdom.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Gabriel Pascal · See more »

Gareth Griffiths (academic)

Gareth Griffiths (Wales, 1943) is Winthrop Professor of English and Cultural Studies at the University of Western Australia.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Gareth Griffiths (academic) · See more »

Gene Tunney

James Joseph "Gene" Tunney (May 25, 1897 – November 7, 1978) was an American professional boxer who competed from 1915 to 1928.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Gene Tunney · See more »

Geneva (play)

Geneva, a Fancied Page of History in Three Acts (1938) is a topical play by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Geneva (play) · See more »

George Frideric Handel

George Frideric (or Frederick) Handel (born italic; 23 February 1685 (O.S.) – 14 April 1759) was a German, later British, Baroque composer who spent the bulk of his career in London, becoming well-known for his operas, oratorios, anthems, and organ concertos.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and George Frideric Handel · See more »

George Lansbury

George Lansbury (22 February 1859 – 7 May 1940) was a British politician and social reformer who led the Labour Party from 1932 to 1935. Apart from a brief period of ministerial office during the Labour government of 1929–31, he spent his political life campaigning against established authority and vested interests, his main causes being the promotion of social justice, women's rights and world disarmament. Originally a radical Liberal, Lansbury became a socialist in the early-1890s, and thereafter served his local community in the East End of London in numerous elective offices. His activities were underpinned by his Christian beliefs which, except for a short period of doubt, sustained him through his life. Elected to Parliament in 1910, he resigned his seat in 1912 to campaign for women's suffrage, and was briefly imprisoned after publicly supporting militant action. In 1912, Lansbury helped to establish the Daily Herald newspaper, and became its editor. Throughout the First World War the paper maintained a strongly pacifist stance, and supported the October 1917 Russian Revolution. These positions contributed to Lansbury's failure to be elected to parliament in 1918. He devoted himself to local politics in his home borough of Poplar, and went to prison with 30 fellow-councillors for his part in the Poplar "rates revolt" of 1921. After his return to Parliament in 1922, Lansbury was denied office in the brief Labour government of 1924, although he served as First Commissioner of Works in the Labour government of 1929–31. After the political and economic crisis of August 1931, Lansbury did not follow his leader, Ramsay MacDonald, into the National Government, but remained with the Labour Party. As the most senior of the small contingent of Labour MPs that survived the 1931 general election, Lansbury became the Leader of the Labour Party. His pacifism and his opposition to rearmament in the face of rising European fascism put him at odds with his party, and when his position was rejected at the 1935 Labour Party conference, he resigned the leadership. He spent his final years travelling through the United States and Europe in the cause of peace and disarmament.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and George Lansbury · See more »

George William Russell

George William Russell (10 April 1867 – 17 July 1935) who wrote with the pseudonym Æ (sometimes written AE or A.E.), was an Irish writer, editor, critic, poet, painter and Irish nationalist.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and George William Russell · See more »

Getting Married

Getting Married is a play by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Getting Married · See more »

Ghostwriter

A ghostwriter is hired to write literary or journalistic works, speeches, or other texts that are officially credited to another person as the author.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Ghostwriter · See more »

Gingold Theatrical Group

Gingold Theatrical Group, often abbreviated as GTG, is a New York-based non-profit theatre company.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Gingold Theatrical Group · See more »

Golders Green Crematorium

Golders Green Crematorium and Mausoleum was the first crematorium to be opened in London, and one of the oldest crematoria in Britain.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Golders Green Crematorium · See more »

Great Catherine: Whom Glory Still Adores

Great Catherine: Whom Glory Still Adores is a 1913 one-act play by Irish dramatist George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Great Catherine: Whom Glory Still Adores · See more »

H. G. Wells

Herbert George Wells.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and H. G. Wells · See more »

Harley Granville-Barker

Harley Granville-Barker (25 November 1877 – 31 August 1946) was an English actor, director, playwright, manager, critic, and theorist.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Harley Granville-Barker · See more »

Harold Laski

Harold Joseph Laski (30 June 1893 – 24 March 1950) was a British political theorist, economist, author, and lecturer.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Harold Laski · See more »

Harold Nicolson

Sir Harold George Nicolson (21 November 1886 – 1 May 1968) was a British diplomat, author, diarist and politician.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Harold Nicolson · See more »

Harold Pinter

Harold Pinter (10 October 1930 – 24 December 2008) was a Nobel Prize-winning British playwright, screenwriter, director and actor.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Harold Pinter · See more »

Heartbreak House

Heartbreak House: A Fantasia in the Russian Manner on English Themes is a play written by George Bernard Shaw, first published in 1919 and first played at the Garrick Theatre in November 1920.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Heartbreak House · See more »

Henrik Ibsen

Henrik Johan Ibsen (20 March 1828 – 23 May 1906) was a Norwegian playwright, theatre director, and poet.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Henrik Ibsen · See more »

Henry Campbell-Bannerman

Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman (7 September 183622 April 1908) was a British statesman of the Liberal Party who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1905 to 1908 and Leader of the Liberal Party from 1899 to 1908.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Henry Campbell-Bannerman · See more »

Henry George

Henry George (September 2, 1839 – October 29, 1897) was an American political economist and journalist.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Henry George · See more »

Henry Hyndman

Henry Mayers Hyndman (7 March 1842 – 20 November 1921) was an English writer and politician.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Henry Hyndman · See more »

Henry Livings

Henry Livings (20 September 1929 – 20 February 1998) was an English playwright and screenwriter, who worked extensively in British television and theatre from the 1960s to the 1990s.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Henry Livings · See more »

Herbert Beerbohm Tree

Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree (17 December 1852 – 2 July 1917) was an English actor and theatre manager.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Herbert Beerbohm Tree · See more »

Hertfordshire

Hertfordshire (often abbreviated Herts) is a county in southern England, bordered by Bedfordshire to the north, Cambridgeshire to the north-east, Essex to the east, Buckinghamshire to the west and Greater London to the south.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Hertfordshire · See more »

Hilaire Belloc

Joseph Hilaire Pierre René Belloc (27 July 187016 July 1953) was an Anglo-French writer and historian.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Hilaire Belloc · See more »

History of the socialist movement in the United Kingdom

Socialism in the United Kingdom is thought to stretch back to the 19th century from roots arising in the aftermath of the English Civil War.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and History of the socialist movement in the United Kingdom · See more »

Hollywood

Hollywood is a neighborhood in the central region of Los Angeles, California.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Hollywood · See more »

Homer

Homer (Ὅμηρος, Hómēros) is the name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems that are the central works of ancient Greek literature.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Homer · See more »

How He Lied to Her Husband

How He Lied to Her Husband is a one-act comedy play by George Bernard Shaw, who wrote it, at the request of actor Arnold Daly, over a period of four days while he was vacationing in Scotland in 1904.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and How He Lied to Her Husband · See more »

How These Doctors Love One Another!

How These Doctors Love One Another! (1931) is a short playlet by George Bernard Shaw which satirises a dispute between two doctors about the use of antiseptics in surgery.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and How These Doctors Love One Another! · See more »

Hubert Parry

Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry, 1st Baronet (27 February 18487 October 1918) was an English composer, teacher and historian of music.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Hubert Parry · See more »

Ian Dalrymple

Ian Dalrymple (26 August 1903 – 28 March 1989) was a British screenwriter, film director, film editor and film producer.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Ian Dalrymple · See more »

In Good King Charles's Golden Days

In Good King Charles's Golden Days is a play by George Bernard Shaw, subtitled A True History that Never Happened.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and In Good King Charles's Golden Days · See more »

Independent Labour Party

The Independent Labour Party (ILP) was a British political party of the left, established in 1893, when the Liberals appeared reluctant to endorse working-class candidates, representing the interests of the majority.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Independent Labour Party · See more »

Inheritance tax

A tax paid by a person who inherits money or property or a levy on the estate (money and property) of a person who has died.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Inheritance tax · See more »

Invasion of Poland

The Invasion of Poland, known in Poland as the September Campaign (Kampania wrześniowa) or the 1939 Defensive War (Wojna obronna 1939 roku), and in Germany as the Poland Campaign (Polenfeldzug) or Fall Weiss ("Case White"), was a joint invasion of Poland by Germany, the Soviet Union, the Free City of Danzig, and a small Slovak contingent that marked the beginning of World War II.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Invasion of Poland · See more »

Irish Civil War

The Irish Civil War (Cogadh Cathartha na hÉireann; 28 June 1922 – 24 May 1923) was a conflict that followed the Irish War of Independence and accompanied the establishment of the Irish Free State, an entity independent from the United Kingdom but within the British Empire.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Irish Civil War · See more »

Irish Free State

The Irish Free State (Saorstát Éireann; 6 December 192229 December 1937) was a state established in 1922 under the Anglo-Irish Treaty of December 1921.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Irish Free State · See more »

Irish Home Rule movement

The Irish Home Rule movement was a movement that campaigned for self-government for Ireland within the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Irish Home Rule movement · See more »

Irish Literary Revival

The Irish Literary Revival (also called the Irish Literary Renaissance, nicknamed the Celtic Twilight) was a flowering of Irish literary talent in the late 19th and early 20th century.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Irish Literary Revival · See more »

Irish republicanism

Irish republicanism (poblachtánachas Éireannach) is an ideology based on the belief that all of Ireland should be an independent republic.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Irish republicanism · See more »

J. M. Barrie

Sir James Matthew Barrie, 1st Baronet, (9 May 1860 19 June 1937) was a Scottish novelist and playwright, best remembered today as the creator of Peter Pan.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and J. M. Barrie · See more »

Jaeger (clothing)

Jaeger is a United Kingdom-based fashion brand and retailer of menswear and womenswear.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Jaeger (clothing) · See more »

James Agate

James Evershed Agate (9 September 1877 – 6 June 1947) was an English diarist and an influential theatre critic between the two world wars.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and James Agate · See more »

James Joyce

James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist, short story writer, and poet.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and James Joyce · See more »

Joan of Arc

Joan of Arc (Jeanne d'Arc; 6 January c. 1412Modern biographical summaries often assert a birthdate of 6 January for Joan, which is based on a letter from Lord Perceval de Boulainvilliers on 21 July 1429 (see Pernoud's Joan of Arc By Herself and Her Witnesses, p. 98: "Boulainvilliers tells of her birth in Domrémy, and it is he who gives us an exact date, which may be the true one, saying that she was born on the night of Epiphany, 6 January"). – 30 May 1431), nicknamed "The Maid of Orléans" (La Pucelle d'Orléans), is considered a heroine of France for her role during the Lancastrian phase of the Hundred Years' War and was canonized as a Roman Catholic saint.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Joan of Arc · See more »

Johannes Brahms

Johannes Brahms (7 May 1833 – 3 April 1897) was a German composer and pianist of the Romantic period.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Johannes Brahms · See more »

John Bull's Other Island

John Bull's Other Island is a comedy about Ireland, written by George Bernard Shaw in 1904.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and John Bull's Other Island · See more »

John Eugene Vedrenne

John Eugene Vedrenne (July 13, 1867-February 12, 1930), often known as J. E. Vedrenne, was a West End theatre producer who co-managed the Savoy Theatre with Harley Granville-Barker, and then (from 1904 to 1907, also with Granville-Barker) the Royal Court Theatre.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and John Eugene Vedrenne · See more »

John Galsworthy

John Galsworthy (14 August 1867 – 31 January 1933) was an English novelist and playwright.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and John Galsworthy · See more »

John Gielgud

Sir Arthur John Gielgud (14 April 1904 – 21 May 2000) was an English actor and theatre director whose career spanned eight decades.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and John Gielgud · See more »

John Millington Synge

Edmund John Millington Synge (16 April 1871 – 24 March 1909) was an Irish playwright, poet, prose writer, travel writer and collector of folklore.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and John Millington Synge · See more »

John Osborne

John James Osborne (Fulham, London, 12 December 1929 – 24 December 1994) was an English playwright, screenwriter and actor, known for his excoriating prose and intense critical stance towards established social and political norms.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and John Osborne · See more »

John Ruskin

John Ruskin (8 February 1819 – 20 January 1900) was the leading English art critic of the Victorian era, as well as an art patron, draughtsman, watercolourist, a prominent social thinker and philanthropist.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and John Ruskin · See more »

Joseph Stalin

Joseph Vissarionovich Stalin (18 December 1878 – 5 March 1953) was a Soviet revolutionary and politician of Georgian nationality.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Joseph Stalin · See more »

Karl Marx

Karl MarxThe name "Karl Heinrich Marx", used in various lexicons, is based on an error.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Karl Marx · See more »

Kidney failure

Kidney failure, also known as end-stage kidney disease, is a medical condition in which the kidneys no longer work.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Kidney failure · See more »

Kilkenny

Kilkenny.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Kilkenny · See more »

Killiney

Killiney is an affluent seaside resort and suburb in Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown, Ireland.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Killiney · See more »

King Lear

King Lear is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and King Lear · See more »

Knight Bachelor

The dignity of Knight Bachelor is the most basic and lowest rank of a man who has been knighted by the monarch but not as a member of one of the organised orders of chivalry; it is a part of the British honours system.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Knight Bachelor · See more »

Labour Party (UK)

The Labour Party is a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Labour Party (UK) · See more »

Labour Representation Committee (1900)

The Labour Representation Committee (LRC) was a pressure group founded in 1900 as an alliance of socialist organisations and trade unions, aimed at increasing representation for labour interests in the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Labour Representation Committee (1900) · See more »

Lacock Abbey

Lacock Abbey in the village of Lacock, Wiltshire, England, was founded in the early 13th century by Ela, Countess of Salisbury, as a nunnery of the Augustinian order.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Lacock Abbey · See more »

Laurence Olivier

Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, (22 May 1907 – 11 July 1989) was an English actor and director who, along with his contemporaries Ralph Richardson and John Gielgud, dominated the British stage of the mid-20th century.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Laurence Olivier · See more »

Laurentia McLachlan

Dame Laurentia McLachlan, OSB, née Margaret McLachlan, (11 January 1866 – 23 August 1953) was a Scottish Benedictine nun, Abbess of Stanbrook Abbey, and an authority on church music.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Laurentia McLachlan · See more »

League of Nations

The League of Nations (abbreviated as LN in English, La Société des Nations abbreviated as SDN or SdN in French) was an intergovernmental organisation founded on 10 January 1920 as a result of the Paris Peace Conference that ended the First World War.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and League of Nations · See more »

Liberal government, 1892–1895

In the 1892 general election, the Conservative Party, led by the Marquess of Salisbury, won the most seats but not an overall majority.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Liberal government, 1892–1895 · See more »

List of covers of Time magazine (1920s)

This is a list of people appearing on the cover of ''Time'' magazine in the 1920s.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and List of covers of Time magazine (1920s) · See more »

London County Council

London County Council (LCC) was the principal local government body for the County of London throughout its existence from 1889 to 1965, and the first London-wide general municipal authority to be directly elected.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and London County Council · See more »

London School of Economics

The London School of Economics (officially The London School of Economics and Political Science, often referred to as LSE) is a public research university located in London, England and a constituent college of the federal University of London.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and London School of Economics · See more »

Lord Alfred Douglas

Lord Alfred Bruce Douglas (22 October 187020 March 1945), nicknamed Bosie, was a British author, poet, translator, and political commentator, better known as the friend and lover of Oscar Wilde.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Lord Alfred Douglas · See more »

Macbeth Skit

Macbeth Skit (1916) is a short comic skit by George Bernard Shaw on Shakespeare's portrayal of Macbeth's relationship with Lady Macbeth.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Macbeth Skit · See more »

Major Barbara

Major Barbara is a three-act English play by George Bernard Shaw, written and premiered in 1905 and first published in 1907.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Major Barbara · See more »

Major Barbara (film)

Major Barbara is a 1941 British film starring Wendy Hiller and Rex Harrison.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Major Barbara (film) · See more »

Malvern Festival (1929–39)

The Malvern Festival was first held in 1929 and ran annually until 1939.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Malvern Festival (1929–39) · See more »

Man and Superman

Man and Superman is a four-act drama written by George Bernard Shaw in 1903.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Man and Superman · See more »

Margaret Cole

Dame Margaret Isabel Cole, DBE (née Postgate; 6 May 1893 – 7 May 1980) was an English socialist politician and writer.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Margaret Cole · See more »

Margaret Leighton

Margaret Leighton, CBE (26 February 1922 – 13 January 1976) was an English actress.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Margaret Leighton · See more »

Mark Lawson

Mark Gerard Lawson (born 11 April 1962) is an English journalist, broadcaster and author.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Mark Lawson · See more »

Maurice Valency

Maurice Valency (March 22, 1903 – September 28, 1996) was a playwright, author, critic, and popular professor of Comparative Literature at Columbia University, best known for his award winning adaptations of plays by Jean Giraudoux and Friedrich Dürrenmatt.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Maurice Valency · See more »

Melodrama

A melodrama is a dramatic work in which the plot, which is typically sensational and designed to appeal strongly to the emotions, takes precedence over detailed characterization.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Melodrama · See more »

Methodist Church in Ireland

The Methodist Church in Ireland (Ulster-Scots: Methody Kirk in Airlann) is a Wesleyan Methodist church that operates across both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on an all-Ireland basis.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Methodist Church in Ireland · See more »

Metropolitan Borough of St Pancras

St Pancras was a civil parish and metropolitan borough in London, England.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Metropolitan Borough of St Pancras · See more »

Metropolitan Opera House (39th Street)

The Metropolitan Opera House was an opera house located at 1411 Broadway in New York City.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Metropolitan Opera House (39th Street) · See more »

Mezzo-soprano

A mezzo-soprano or mezzo (meaning "half soprano") is a type of classical female singing voice whose vocal range lies between the soprano and the contralto voice types.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Mezzo-soprano · See more »

Michael Billington (critic)

Michael Keith Billington OBE (born 16 November 1939) is a British author and arts critic.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Michael Billington (critic) · See more »

Michael Collins (Irish leader)

Michael Collins (Mícheál Ó Coileáin; 16 October 1890 – 22 August 1922) was an Irish revolutionary, soldier and politician who was a leading figure in the early-20th-century Irish struggle for independence.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Michael Collins (Irish leader) · See more »

Michael Holroyd

Sir Michael de Courcy Fraser Holroyd CBE FRHistS FRSL (born 27 August 1935) is an English biographer.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Michael Holroyd · See more »

Misalliance

Misalliance is a play written in 1909–1910 by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Misalliance · See more »

Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact

The Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, also known as the Nazi–Soviet Pact,Charles Peters (2005), Five Days in Philadelphia: The Amazing "We Want Willkie!" Convention of 1940 and How It Freed FDR to Save the Western World, New York: PublicAffairs, Ch.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact · See more »

Mrs Patrick Campbell

Mrs Patrick Campbell (9 February 1865 – 9 April 1940), born Beatrice Rose Stella Tanner and known informally as "Mrs Pat", was an English stage actress.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Mrs Patrick Campbell · See more »

Mrs. Warren's Profession

Mrs.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Mrs. Warren's Profession · See more »

Murder in the Cathedral

Murder in the Cathedral is a verse drama by T.S. Eliot, first performed in 1935, that portrays the assassination of Archbishop Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral in 1170.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Murder in the Cathedral · See more »

My Fair Lady

My Fair Lady is a musical based on George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion, with book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and My Fair Lady · See more »

Nancy Astor, Viscountess Astor

Nancy Witcher Langhorne Astor, Viscountess Astor, CH (19 May 18792 May 1964) was the first female Member of Parliament to take her seat.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Nancy Astor, Viscountess Astor · See more »

Napoleon

Napoléon Bonaparte (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a French statesman and military leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution and led several successful campaigns during the French Revolutionary Wars.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Napoleon · See more »

National Gallery of Ireland

The National Gallery of Ireland (Gailearaí Náisiúnta na hÉireann) houses the national collection of Irish and European art.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and National Gallery of Ireland · See more »

National Telephone Company

The National Telephone Company (NTC) was a British telephone company from 1881 until 1911 which brought together smaller local companies in the early years of the telephone.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and National Telephone Company · See more »

National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty

The National Trust, formally the National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, is a conservation organisation in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and the largest membership organisation in the United Kingdom.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty · See more »

Nazi Party

The National Socialist German Workers' Party (abbreviated NSDAP), commonly referred to in English as the Nazi Party, was a far-right political party in Germany that was active between 1920 and 1945 and supported the ideology of Nazism.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Nazi Party · See more »

New Statesman

The New Statesman is a British political and cultural magazine published in London.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and New Statesman · See more »

New Woman

The New Woman was a feminist ideal that emerged in the late nineteenth century and had a profound influence on feminism well into the twentieth century.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and New Woman · See more »

New Year

New Year is the time or day at which a new calendar year begins and the calendar's year count increments by one.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and New Year · See more »

New Year's Day

New Year's Day, also called simply New Year's or New Year, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and New Year's Day · See more »

New Year's Eve

In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December which is the seventh day of Christmastide.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and New Year's Eve · See more »

New York Harbor

New York Harbor, part of the Port of New York and New Jersey, is at the mouth of the Hudson River where it empties into New York Bay and into the Atlantic Ocean at the East Coast of the United States.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and New York Harbor · See more »

New York Herald Tribune

The New York Herald Tribune was a newspaper published between 1924 and 1966.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and New York Herald Tribune · See more »

Niagara-on-the-Lake

Niagara-on-the-Lake is a town in Ontario, Canada.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Niagara-on-the-Lake · See more »

Noël Coward

Sir Noël Peirce Coward (16 December 189926 March 1973) was an English playwright, composer, director, actor and singer, known for his wit, flamboyance, and what Time magazine called "a sense of personal style, a combination of cheek and chic, pose and poise".

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Noël Coward · See more »

Nobel Prize in Literature

The Nobel Prize in Literature (Nobelpriset i litteratur) is a Swedish literature prize that has been awarded annually, since 1901, to an author from any country who has, in the words of the will of Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel, produced "in the field of literature the most outstanding work in an ideal direction" (original Swedish: "den som inom litteraturen har producerat det mest framstående verket i en idealisk riktning").

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Nobel Prize in Literature · See more »

Nuremberg trials

The Nuremberg trials (Die Nürnberger Prozesse) were a series of military tribunals held by the Allied forces under international law and the laws of war after World War II.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Nuremberg trials · See more »

O'Flaherty V.C.

O'Flaherty V.C., A Recruiting Pamphlet (1915) is a comic one-act play written during World War I by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and O'Flaherty V.C. · See more »

Old Testament

The Old Testament (abbreviated OT) is the first part of Christian Bibles, based primarily upon the Hebrew Bible (or Tanakh), a collection of ancient religious writings by the Israelites believed by most Christians and religious Jews to be the sacred Word of God.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Old Testament · See more »

On the Rocks (play)

On the Rocks: A political Comedy (1932) is a play by George Bernard Shaw which deals with the social crisis of the Great Depression.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and On the Rocks (play) · See more »

One-act play

A one-act play is a play that has only one act, as distinct from plays that occur over several acts.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and One-act play · See more »

Oratorio

An oratorio is a large musical composition for orchestra, choir, and soloists.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Oratorio · See more »

Order of Merit

The Order of Merit (Ordre du Mérite) is an order of merit recognising distinguished service in the armed forces, science, art, literature, or for the promotion of culture.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Order of Merit · See more »

Oscar Straus (composer)

Oscar Nathan Straus (6 March 1870 – 11 January 1954) was a Viennese composer of operettas and film scores and songs.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Oscar Straus (composer) · See more »

Oscar Wilde

Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde (16 October 185430 November 1900) was an Irish poet and playwright.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Oscar Wilde · See more »

Overruled (play)

Overruled (1912) is a comic one-act play written by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Overruled (play) · See more »

Paget's disease of bone

Paget's disease of bone (commonly known as Paget's disease or historically, osteitis deformans) is a condition involving cellular remodeling and deformity of one or more bones.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Paget's disease of bone · See more »

Parish councils in England

A parish council is a civil local authority found in England and is the first tier of local government.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Parish councils in England · See more »

Partition of Ireland

The partition of Ireland (críochdheighilt na hÉireann) was the division of the island of Ireland into two distinct jurisdictions, Northern Ireland and Southern Ireland.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Partition of Ireland · See more »

Passion Play: a dramatic fragment

Passion Play: A Dramatic Fragment is an early and incomplete play in blank verse by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Passion Play: a dramatic fragment · See more »

Passion, Poison, and Petrifaction

Passion, Poison, and Petrifaction is a short play by Bernard Shaw, subtitled The Fatal Gazogene: a Brief Tragedy for Barns and Booths.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Passion, Poison, and Petrifaction · See more »

Pelican Books

Pelican Books is a non-fiction imprint of Penguin Books.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Pelican Books · See more »

Penguin Books

Penguin Books is a British publishing house.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Penguin Books · See more »

Peter Nichols

Peter Richard Nichols CBE, FRSL (born 31 July 1927) is an English playwright, screenwriter, director and journalist.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Peter Nichols · See more »

Philip Merivale

Philip Merivale (2 November 1886, Rehutia, Manickpur, India – 12 March 1946, Los Angeles, California, United States) was an English film and stage actor and screenwriter.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Philip Merivale · See more »

Pinewood Studios

Pinewood Studios is a British film and television studio located in Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire, about from Slough, from Uxbridge, and approximately west of central London.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Pinewood Studios · See more »

Platonic love

Platonic love (often lower-cased as platonic) is a term used for a type of love, or close relationship that is non-sexual.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Platonic love · See more »

Polemic

A polemic is contentious rhetoric that is intended to support a specific position by aggressive claims and undermining of the opposing position.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Polemic · See more »

Pope Benedict XV

Pope Benedict XV (Latin: Benedictus; Benedetto), born Giacomo Paolo Giovanni Battista della Chiesa (21 November 1854 – 22 January 1922), was head of the Catholic Church from 3 September 1914 until his death in 1922.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Pope Benedict XV · See more »

Portobello, Dublin

In Dublin, Portobello (– meaning 'beautiful harbour') is an area stretching westwards from South Richmond Street as far as Upper Clanbrassil Street bordered on the north by the South Circular Road and on the south by the Grand Canal.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Portobello, Dublin · See more »

Press Cuttings

Press Cuttings (1909), subtitled "A Topical Sketch Compiled from the Editorial and Correspondence Columns of the Daily Papers" is a play by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Press Cuttings · See more »

Progress and Poverty

Progress and Poverty: An Inquiry into the Cause of Industrial Depressions and of Increase of Want with Increase of Wealth: The Remedy is an 1879 book by social theorist and economist Henry George.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Progress and Poverty · See more »

Protestant Ascendancy

The Protestant Ascendancy, known simply as the Ascendancy, was the political, economic and social domination of Ireland between the 17th century and the early 20th century by a minority of landowners, Protestant clergy and members of the professions, all members of the Church of Ireland or the Church of England.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Protestant Ascendancy · See more »

Provisional Government of Ireland (1922)

The Provisional Government of Ireland (Rialtas Sealadach na hÉireann) was the provisional government for the administration of Southern Ireland from 16 January 1922 to 5 December 1922.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Provisional Government of Ireland (1922) · See more »

Public trustee

The public trustee is an office established pursuant to national (and, where applicable, state or territory) statute, to act as a trustee, usually where a sum is required to be deposited as security by legislation, where courts remove another trustee, or for estates where either no executor is named by will or the testator elects to name the Public Trustee.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Public trustee · See more »

Pygmalion (play)

Pygmalion is a play by George Bernard Shaw, named after a Greek mythological figure.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Pygmalion (play) · See more »

Quintessence of Ibsenism

The Quintessence of Ibsenism is an essay written in 1891 by George Bernard Shaw, providing an extended analysis of the works of Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen and of Ibsen's critical reception in England.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Quintessence of Ibsenism · See more »

Ralph Richardson

Sir Ralph David Richardson (19 December 1902 – 10 October 1983) was an English actor who, along with his contemporaries John Gielgud and Laurence Olivier, dominated the British stage of the mid-20th century.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Ralph Richardson · See more »

Ramsay MacDonald

James Ramsay MacDonald, (né James McDonald Ramsay; 12 October 18669 November 1937) was a British statesman who was the first Labour Party politician to become Prime Minister, leading minority Labour governments in 1924 and in 1929–31.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Ramsay MacDonald · See more »

Register office (United Kingdom)

A register office, much more commonly registry office (except in official use), is a British government office where births, deaths and marriages are officially recorded and civil marriages take place.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Register office (United Kingdom) · See more »

Richard Mansfield

Richard Mansfield (24 May 1857 – 30 August 1907) was an English actor-manager best known for his performances in Shakespeare plays, Gilbert and Sullivan operas, and the play Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Richard Mansfield · See more »

Richard Wagner

Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 181313 February 1883) was a German composer, theatre director, polemicist, and conductor who is chiefly known for his operas (or, as some of his later works were later known, "music dramas").

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Richard Wagner · See more »

Robert Donat

Friedrich Robert Donat (18 March 19059 June 1958) was an English film and stage actor.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Robert Donat · See more »

Robert Loraine

Robert Bilcliffe Loraine (14 January 1876 – 23 December 1935) was a successful London and Broadway British stage actor, actor-manager and soldier who later enjoyed a side career as a pioneer aviator.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Robert Loraine · See more »

Robert Prescott Stewart

Sir Robert Prescott Stewart (16 December 1825 – 24 March 1894) was an Irish composer, organist, conductor, and teacher – one of the most influential (classical) musicians in 19th-century Ireland.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Robert Prescott Stewart · See more »

Royal Academy of Dramatic Art

The Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) is a drama school in London, England that provides training for film, television and theatre.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Royal Academy of Dramatic Art · See more »

Royal Automobile Club

The Royal Automobile Club is a British private club and is not to be confused with RAC, an automotive services company, which it formerly owned.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Royal Automobile Club · See more »

Royal Court Theatre

The Royal Court Theatre, at different times known as the Court Theatre, the New Chelsea Theatre, and the Belgravia Theatre, is a non-commercial West End theatre on Sloane Square, in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, London, England.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Royal Court Theatre · See more »

Royal Economic Society

The Royal Economic Society (RES) is a professional association that promotes the study of economic science in academia, government service, banking, industry, and public affairs.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Royal Economic Society · See more »

Royal Flying Corps

The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) was the air arm of the British Army before and during the First World War, until it merged with the Royal Naval Air Service on 1 April 1918 to form the Royal Air Force.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Royal Flying Corps · See more »

Royal National Theatre

The Royal National Theatre in London, commonly known as the National Theatre (NT) is one of the United Kingdom's three most prominent publicly funded performing arts venues, alongside the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Royal Opera House.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Royal National Theatre · See more »

Ruritania

Ruritania is a fictional country in central Europe which forms the setting for three books by Anthony Hope: The Prisoner of Zenda (1894), The Heart of Princess Osra (1896), and Rupert of Hentzau (1898).

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Ruritania · See more »

S. N. Behrman

Samuel Nathaniel Behrman (June 9, 1893 – September 9, 1973) was an American playwright, screenwriter, biographer, and longtime writer for The New Yorker.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and S. N. Behrman · See more »

Saint Joan (play)

Saint Joan is a play by George Bernard Shaw about 15th century French military figure Joan of Arc.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Saint Joan (play) · See more »

Salvador de Madariaga

Salvador de Madariaga y Rojo (23 July 1886 – 14 December 1978) was a Spanish diplomat, writer, historian and pacifist.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Salvador de Madariaga · See more »

San Francisco

San Francisco (initials SF;, Spanish for 'Saint Francis'), officially the City and County of San Francisco, is the cultural, commercial, and financial center of Northern California.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and San Francisco · See more »

Saturday Review (London newspaper)

The Saturday Review of politics, literature, science, and art was a London weekly newspaper established by A. J. B. Beresford Hope in 1855.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Saturday Review (London newspaper) · See more »

Savoy Theatre

The Savoy Theatre is a West End theatre in the Strand in the City of Westminster, London, England.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Savoy Theatre · See more »

Seán O'Casey

Seán O'Casey (Seán Ó Cathasaigh; born John Casey; 30 March 1880 – 18 September 1964) was an Irish dramatist and memoirist.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Seán O'Casey · See more »

Second Boer War

The Second Boer War (11 October 1899 – 31 May 1902) was fought between the British Empire and two Boer states, the South African Republic (Republic of Transvaal) and the Orange Free State, over the Empire's influence in South Africa.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Second Boer War · See more »

Sentimentality

Sentimentality originally indicated the reliance on feelings as a guide to truth, but current usage defines it as an appeal to shallow, uncomplicated emotions at the expense of reason.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Sentimentality · See more »

Serial (literature)

In literature, a serial, is a printing format by which a single larger work, often a work of narrative fiction, is published in smaller, sequential installments.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Serial (literature) · See more »

Sermon on the Mount

The Sermon on the Mount (anglicized from the Matthean Vulgate Latin section title: Sermo in monte) is a collection of sayings and teachings of Jesus, which emphasizes his moral teaching found in the Gospel of Matthew (chapters 5, 6, and 7).

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Sermon on the Mount · See more »

Shakes versus Shav

Shakes versus Shav (1949) is a puppet play written by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Shakes versus Shav · See more »

Shavian alphabet

The Shavian alphabet (also known as the Shaw alphabet) is an alphabet conceived as a way to provide simple, phonetic orthography for the English language to replace the difficulties of conventional spelling.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Shavian alphabet · See more »

Shaw Festival

The Shaw Festival is a major not for profit /charitable theatre festival in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada, the second largest repertory theatre company in North America.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Shaw Festival · See more »

Shaw's Corner

Shaw's Corner was the primary residence of the renowned Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw; now a National Trust property open to the public as a writer's house museum.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Shaw's Corner · See more »

Sidney Webb, 1st Baron Passfield

Sidney James Webb, 1st Baron Passfield, (13 July 1859 – 13 October 1947) was a British socialist, economist, reformer and a co-founder of the London School of Economics.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Sidney Webb, 1st Baron Passfield · See more »

Sinecure

A sinecure (from Latin sine.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Sinecure · See more »

Sinn Féin

Sinn Féin (isbn) is a left-wing Irish republican political party active in both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Sinn Féin · See more »

Sloane Square

Sloane Square is a small hard-landscaped square on the boundaries of the central London districts of Knightsbridge, Belgravia and Chelsea, located southwest of Charing Cross, in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Sloane Square · See more »

Smallpox

Smallpox was an infectious disease caused by one of two virus variants, Variola major and Variola minor.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Smallpox · See more »

Social Democratic Federation

The Social Democratic Federation (SDF) was established as Britain's first organised socialist political party by H. M. Hyndman, and had its first meeting on 7 June 1881.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Social Democratic Federation · See more »

Soprano

A soprano is a type of classical female singing voice and has the highest vocal range of all voice types.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Soprano · See more »

South Kensington

South Kensington is an affluent district of West London in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and South Kensington · See more »

South Shields

South Shields is a coastal town at the mouth of the River Tyne, England, about downstream from Newcastle upon Tyne.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and South Shields · See more »

Soviet Union

The Soviet Union, officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) was a socialist state in Eurasia that existed from 1922 to 1991.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Soviet Union · See more »

St Pancras, London

St Pancras is an area of central London.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and St Pancras, London · See more »

St. John Greer Ervine

St.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and St. John Greer Ervine · See more »

Stanley Weintraub

Stanley Weintraub (born April 17, 1929) is an American historian and biographer.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Stanley Weintraub · See more »

Suffragette

Suffragettes were members of women's organisations in the late-19th and early-20th centuries who, under the banner "Votes for Women", fought for women's suffrage, the right to vote in public elections.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Suffragette · See more »

Sybil Thorndike

Dame Agnes Sybil Thorndike (24 October 18829 June 1976) was an English actress who toured internationally in Shakespearean productions, often appearing with her husband Lewis Casson.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Sybil Thorndike · See more »

Sydney Cockerell

Sir Sydney Carlyle Cockerell (16 July 1867 – 1 May 1962) was an English museum curator and collector.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Sydney Cockerell · See more »

Symphony No. 3 (Elgar/Payne)

Edward Elgar's Third Symphony was incomplete at the time of his death in 1934.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Symphony No. 3 (Elgar/Payne) · See more »

T. S. Eliot

Thomas Stearns Eliot, (26 September 1888 – 4 January 1965), was an essayist, publisher, playwright, literary and social critic, and "one of the twentieth century's major poets".

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and T. S. Eliot · See more »

Taoiseach

The Taoiseach (pl. Taoisigh) is the prime minister, chief executive and head of government of Ireland.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Taoiseach · See more »

Teetotalism

Teetotalism is the practice or promotion of complete personal abstinence from alcoholic beverages.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Teetotalism · See more »

The Adventures of the Black Girl in Her Search for God

The Adventures of the Black Girl in Her Search for God (and Some Lesser Tales) is a book of short stories written by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Adventures of the Black Girl in Her Search for God · See more »

The Apple Cart

The Apple Cart: A Political Extravaganza is a 1928 play by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Apple Cart · See more »

The Blitz

The Blitz was a German bombing offensive against Britain in 1940 and 1941, during the Second World War.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Blitz · See more »

The Cherry Orchard

The Cherry Orchard (translit) is the last play by Russian playwright Anton Chekhov.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Cherry Orchard · See more »

The Chocolate Soldier

The Chocolate Soldier (German title: Der tapfere Soldat or Der Praliné-Soldat) is an operetta composed in 1908 by Oscar Straus (1870–1954) based on George Bernard Shaw's 1894 play, Arms and the Man.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Chocolate Soldier · See more »

The Confidential Clerk

First edition cover (Faber & Faber) The Confidential Clerk is a comic verse play by T. S. Eliot.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Confidential Clerk · See more »

The Dark Lady of the Sonnets

The Dark Lady of the Sonnets is a 1910 short comedy by George Bernard Shaw in which William Shakespeare, intending to meet the "Dark Lady", accidentally encounters Queen Elizabeth I and attempts to persuade her to create a national theatre.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Dark Lady of the Sonnets · See more »

The Devil's Disciple

The Devil's Disciple is an 1897 play written by Irish dramatist George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Devil's Disciple · See more »

The Doctor's Dilemma (play)

The Doctor's Dilemma is a play by George Bernard Shaw first staged in 1906.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Doctor's Dilemma (play) · See more »

The Fascinating Foundling

The Fascinating Foundling (1909) is a short comic play by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Fascinating Foundling · See more »

The Gadfly

The Gadfly is a novel by Irish writer Ethel Voynich, published in 1897 (United States, June; Great Britain, September of the same year), set in 1840s Italy under the dominance of Austria, a time of tumultuous revolt and uprisings.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Gadfly · See more »

The Gadfly (play)

The Gadfly or The Son of the Cardinal (1897-8) is a dramatic adaptation by George Bernard Shaw of Anglo-Irish writer Ethel Lilian Voynich (née Boole)'s novel The Gadfly.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Gadfly (play) · See more »

The Glimpse of Reality

The Glimpse of Reality, A Tragedietta (1909) is a short play by George Bernard Shaw, set Italy during the 15th century.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Glimpse of Reality · See more »

The Guardian

The Guardian is a British daily newspaper.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Guardian · See more »

The Inca of Perusalem

The Inca of Perusalem, An Almost Historical Comedietta (1915) is a comic one-act play written during World War I by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Inca of Perusalem · See more »

The Interlude at the Playhouse

The Interlude at the Playhouse (1907) is a short comic sketch written by George Bernard Shaw to be delivered by Cyril Maude and his wife Winifred Emery as a curtain raiser at the opening of The Playhouse, a newly renovated theatre managed by Maude.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Interlude at the Playhouse · See more »

The Jewish Chronicle

The Jewish Chronicle (The JC) is a London-based Jewish weekly newspaper.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Jewish Chronicle · See more »

The Man of Destiny

The Man of Destiny is an 1897 play by George Bernard Shaw, set in Italy during the early career of Napoleon.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Man of Destiny · See more »

The Master Builder

The Master Builder (Bygmester Solness) is a play by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Master Builder · See more »

The Millionairess (play)

The Millionairess is a play written in 1936 by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Millionairess (play) · See more »

The Music Cure

The Music Cure, a Piece of Utter Nonsense (1913) is a short comedy sketch by George Bernard Shaw, satirising therapeutic fads of the era and the Marconi scandal of 1912.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Music Cure · See more »

The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians

The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians is an encyclopedic dictionary of music and musicians.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians · See more »

The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The New York Times · See more »

The Perfect Wagnerite

The Perfect Wagnerite: A Commentary on the Niblung's Ring (originally published London, 1898) is a philosophical commentary on Richard Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen, by the Irish writer George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Perfect Wagnerite · See more »

The Philanderer

The Philanderer is a play by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Philanderer · See more »

The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army is a Protestant Christian church and an international charitable organisation structured in a quasi-military fashion.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Salvation Army · See more »

The Severn Suite

The Severn Suite, Opus 87, is a musical work written by Sir Edward Elgar.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Severn Suite · See more »

The Shewing-Up of Blanco Posnet

The Shewing-Up of Blanco Posnet: A Sermon in Crude Melodrama is a one-act play by George Bernard Shaw, first produced in 1909.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Shewing-Up of Blanco Posnet · See more »

The Simpleton of the Unexpected Isles

The Simpleton of the Unexpected Isles: A Vision of Judgement is a 1934 play by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Simpleton of the Unexpected Isles · See more »

The Six of Calais

The Six of Calais is a one-act play by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Six of Calais · See more »

The Star (London)

The Star was a London evening newspaper founded May 3, 1788 under the original title Star and Evening Advertiser and was the first daily evening newspaper in the world.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Star (London) · See more »

The Times Literary Supplement

The Times Literary Supplement (or TLS, on the front page from 1969) is a weekly literary review published in London by News UK, a subsidiary of News Corp.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Times Literary Supplement · See more »

The Way of the World

The Way of the World is a play written by the English playwright William Congreve.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The Way of the World · See more »

The World (journal)

The World was a British weekly paper, published from 1874 to 1920.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and The World (journal) · See more »

Theatre of the Absurd

The Theatre of the Absurd (théâtre de l'absurde) is a post–World War II designation for particular plays of absurdist fiction written by a number of primarily European playwrights in the late 1950s, as well as one for the style of theatre which has evolved from their work.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Theatre of the Absurd · See more »

Thirteen Colonies

The Thirteen Colonies were a group of British colonies on the east coast of North America founded in the 17th and 18th centuries that declared independence in 1776 and formed the United States of America.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Thirteen Colonies · See more »

Thomas Becket

Thomas Becket (also known as Saint Thomas of Canterbury, Thomas of London, and later Thomas à Becket; (21 December c. 1119 (or 1120) – 29 December 1170) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 until his murder in 1170. He is venerated as a saint and martyr by both the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion. He engaged in conflict with Henry II, King of England, over the rights and privileges of the Church and was murdered by followers of the king in Canterbury Cathedral. Soon after his death, he was canonised by Pope Alexander III.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Thomas Becket · See more »

Thomas Davidson (philosopher)

Thomas Davidson (25 October 1840, Old Deer – 14 September 1900, Montreal) was a Scottish-American philosopher and lecturer.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Thomas Davidson (philosopher) · See more »

Time (magazine)

Time is an American weekly news magazine and news website published in New York City.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Time (magazine) · See more »

To be, or not to be

"To be, or not to be" is the opening phrase of a soliloquy spoken by Prince Hamlet in the so-called "nunnery scene" of William Shakespeare's play Hamlet.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and To be, or not to be · See more »

Tom Stoppard

Sir Tom Stoppard (born Tomáš Straussler; 3 July 1937) is a Czech-born British playwright and screenwriter.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Tom Stoppard · See more »

Too True to Be Good

Too True to Be Good (1932) is a comedy written by playwright George Bernard Shaw at the age of 76.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Too True to Be Good · See more »

Trafalgar Square

Trafalgar Square is a public square in the City of Westminster, Central London, built around the area formerly known as Charing Cross.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Trafalgar Square · See more »

Trinity College Dublin

Trinity College (Coláiste na Tríonóide), officially the College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin, is the sole constituent college of the University of Dublin, a research university located in Dublin, Ireland.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Trinity College Dublin · See more »

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease usually caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB).

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Tuberculosis · See more »

Un Petit Drame

Un Petit Drame (1884) is a short play by George Bernard Shaw.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Un Petit Drame · See more »

Union of South Africa

The Union of South Africa (Unie van Zuid-Afrika, Unie van Suid-Afrika) is the historic predecessor to the present-day Republic of South Africa.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Union of South Africa · See more »

United Kingdom general election, 1895

The 1895 United Kingdom general election was held between 13 July and 7 August 1895.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and United Kingdom general election, 1895 · See more »

United Kingdom general election, 1906

The 1906 United Kingdom general election was held from 12 January to 8 February 1906.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and United Kingdom general election, 1906 · See more »

United States in World War I

The United States declared war on Germany on April 6, 1917, over 2 years after World War I started.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and United States in World War I · See more »

University of Texas at Austin

The University of Texas at Austin (UT, UT Austin, or Texas) is a public research university and the flagship institution of the University of Texas System.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and University of Texas at Austin · See more »

Vaccination

Vaccination is the administration of antigenic material (a vaccine) to stimulate an individual's immune system to develop adaptive immunity to a pathogen.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Vaccination · See more »

Vaccine controversies

Vaccine controversies have occurred since almost 80 years before the terms vaccine and vaccination were introduced, and continue to this day.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Vaccine controversies · See more »

Vegetarianism

Vegetarianism is the practice of abstaining from the consumption of meat (red meat, poultry, seafood, and the flesh of any other animal), and may also include abstention from by-products of animal slaughter.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Vegetarianism · See more »

Village Wooing

Village Wooing, A Comedietta for Two Voices is a play by George Bernard Shaw, written in 1933 and first performed in 1934.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Village Wooing · See more »

Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia

Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia, of which pernicious anemia is a type, is a disease in which not enough red blood cells are produced due to a deficiency of vitamin B12.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia · See more »

Vivisection

Vivisection is surgery conducted for experimental purposes on a living organism, typically animals with a central nervous system, to view living internal structure.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Vivisection · See more »

Vladimir Lenin

Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov, better known by the alias Lenin (22 April 1870According to the new style calendar (modern Gregorian), Lenin was born on 22 April 1870. According to the old style (Old Julian) calendar used in the Russian Empire at the time, it was 10 April 1870. Russia converted from the old to the new style calendar in 1918, under Lenin's administration. – 21 January 1924), was a Russian communist revolutionary, politician and political theorist.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Vladimir Lenin · See more »

W. B. Yeats

William Butler Yeats (13 June 186528 January 1939) was an Irish poet and one of the foremost figures of 20th-century literature.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and W. B. Yeats · See more »

W. P. Lipscomb

W.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and W. P. Lipscomb · See more »

W. S. Gilbert

Sir William Schwenck Gilbert (18 November 1836 – 29 May 1911) was an English dramatist, librettist, poet and illustrator best known for his collaboration with composer Arthur Sullivan, which produced fourteen comic operas.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and W. S. Gilbert · See more »

Wesley College (Dublin)

Wesley College is an independent co-educational secondary school for day and boarding students in Ballinteer, Dublin, Ireland. Wesley College is under the control of a Board of Governors, appointed each year by the Methodist Church in Ireland. Wesley College was founded on 1 October 1845 and counts two Nobel laureates among its alumni. Strong emphasis is put on religious education for all denominations and both extra-curricular activities and sport play an important part in this school. The College offers pupils an opportunity to explore the humanities, sciences, technology, business studies, English literature, music and the arts. Wesley College offers a range of extracurricular and sporting activities in the belief that these assist a sound general education and contribute to the whole person.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Wesley College (Dublin) · See more »

West End theatre

West End theatre is a common term for mainstream professional theatre staged in the large theatres of "Theatreland" in and near the West End of London.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and West End theatre · See more »

Western Front (World War I)

The Western Front was the main theatre of war during the First World War.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Western Front (World War I) · See more »

Whitehall Court

Whitehall Court in London, England, is one contiguous building but consists of two separate constructions; the end occupied by the National Liberal Club was designed by Alfred Waterhouse, the major part (including the Royal Horseguards Hotel) was designed by Archer & Green.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Whitehall Court · See more »

Why She Would Not

Why She Would Not: A Little Comedy (1950) is the last play written by George Bernard Shaw, comprising five short scenes.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Why She Would Not · See more »

Widowers' Houses

Widowers' Houses (1892) was the first play by George Bernard Shaw to be staged.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and Widowers' Houses · See more »

William Archer (critic)

William Archer (23 September 1856 – 27 December 1924) was a Scottish writer and theatre critic, based, for most of his career, in London.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and William Archer (critic) · See more »

William Congreve

William Congreve (24 January 1670 – 19 January 1729) was an English playwright and poet of the Restoration period.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and William Congreve · See more »

William III of England

William III (Willem; 4 November 1650 – 8 March 1702), also widely known as William of Orange, was sovereign Prince of Orange from birth, Stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht, Gelderland and Overijssel in the Dutch Republic from 1672 and King of England, Ireland and Scotland from 1689 until his death in 1702.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and William III of England · See more »

William Morris

William Morris (24 March 1834 – 3 October 1896) was an English textile designer, poet, novelist, translator, and socialist activist.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and William Morris · See more »

William Saroyan

William Saroyan (August 31, 1908 – May 18, 1981) was an Armenian-American novelist, playwright, and short story writer.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and William Saroyan · See more »

William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 (baptised)—23 April 1616) was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as both the greatest writer in the English language, and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and William Shakespeare · See more »

World War I

World War I (often abbreviated as WWI or WW1), also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and World War I · See more »

You Never Can Tell (play)

You Never Can Tell is an 1897 four-act play by George Bernard Shaw that debuted at the Royalty Theatre.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and You Never Can Tell (play) · See more »

2018

2018 has been designated as the third International Year of the Reef by the International Coral Reef Initiative.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and 2018 · See more »

2019

2019 (MMXIX) will be a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2019th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 19th year of the 3rd millennium, the 19th year of the 21st century, and the 10th and last year of the 2010s decade.

New!!: George Bernard Shaw and 2019 · See more »

Redirects here:

Bernard Shaw, Bernard Shaw (footballer), Bernard shaw, G B Shaw, G. B. Shaw, G. Bernard Shaw, G.B. Shaw, G.B.Shaw, GB Shaw, George Barnard Shaw, George bernard shaw, Maxims for Revolutionists, Plays Pleasant, Plays Unpleasant, Shaw, Bernard, Shaw, George Bernard.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Bernard_Shaw

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »