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Government spending

Index Government spending

Government spending or expenditure includes all government consumption, investment, and transfer payments. [1]

78 relations: Aggregate demand, Armed Forces of Saudi Arabia, Automatic stabilizer, British Armed Forces, Bundeswehr, Business, Business cycle, Cancer, Cancer staging, Capital (economics), Capital formation, Capital market, China, Classical economics, Consumption (economics), Crowding out (economics), Deficit spending, Demand, Demand curve, Economics, Economist, Emergency department, Employment, Eurostat, Factors of production, Factory, Fiscal policy, French Armed Forces, Goods, Government budget, Government debt, Government final consumption expenditure, Government operations, Government spending in the United Kingdom, Government spending in the United States, Government waste, Gross domestic product, Gross fixed capital formation, Indian Armed Forces, Inflation, Infrastructure, Intermediate consumption, Investment, Investor, Japan Self-Defense Forces, John Maynard Keynes, Keynesian economics, List of countries by GDP (nominal), Loanable funds, Macroeconomics, ..., Mandatory spending, Measures of national income and output, Net present value, Output (economics), People's Liberation Army, Preventive healthcare, Private sector, Public expenditure, Public finance, Public sector, Rahn curve, Rail transport, Recession, Republic of Korea Armed Forces, Russian Armed Forces, Seigniorage, Social security, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, Subsidy, Supply (economics), Tax, Tax revenue, Taxpayer groups, The Heritage Foundation, The Wall Street Journal, Unemployment benefits, United States Armed Forces, Welfare. Expand index (28 more) »

Aggregate demand

In macroeconomics, aggregate demand (AD) or domestic final demand (DFD) is the total demand for final goods and services in an economy at a given time.

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Armed Forces of Saudi Arabia

The Royal Saudi Arabian Armed Forces (al-Quwwāt al-Musallaḥah as-Su‘ūdiyyah) is the Armed Forces, consists of the Saudi Arabian Army, the Royal Saudi Air Force, the Royal Saudi Navy, the Royal Saudi Air Defense, and the Royal Saudi Strategic Missile Force.

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Automatic stabilizer

In macroeconomics, automatic stabilizers are features of the structure of modern government budgets, particularly income taxes and welfare spending, that act to dampen fluctuations in real GDP.

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British Armed Forces

The British Armed Forces, also known as Her/His Majesty's Armed Forces, are the military services responsible for the defence of the United Kingdom, its overseas territories and the Crown dependencies.

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Bundeswehr

The Bundeswehr (Federal Defence) is the unified armed forces of Germany and their civil administration and procurement authorities.

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Business

Business is the activity of making one's living or making money by producing or buying and selling products (goods and services).

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Business cycle

The business cycle, also known as the economic cycle or trade cycle, is the downward and upward movement of gross domestic product (GDP) around its long-term growth trend.

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Cancer

Cancer is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body.

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Cancer staging

Cancer staging is the process of determining the extent to which a cancer has developed by growing and spreading.

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Capital (economics)

In economics, capital consists of an asset that can enhance one's power to perform economically useful work.

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Capital formation

Capital formation is a concept used in macroeconomics, national accounts and financial economics.

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Capital market

A capital market is a financial market in which long-term debt (over a year) or equity-backed securities are bought and sold.

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China

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a unitary one-party sovereign state in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around /1e9 round 3 billion.

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Classical economics

Classical economics or classical political economy (also known as liberal economics) is a school of thought in economics that flourished, primarily in Britain, in the late 18th and early-to-mid 19th century.

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Consumption (economics)

Consumption is the process in which consumers (customers or buyers) purchase items on the market.

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Crowding out (economics)

In economics, crowding out is argued by some economists to be a phenomenon that occurs when increased government involvement in a sector of the market economy substantially affects the remainder of the market, either on the supply or demand side of the market.

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Deficit spending

Deficit spending is the amount by which spending exceeds revenue over a particular period of time, also called simply deficit, or budget deficit; the opposite of budget surplus.

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Demand

In economics, demand is the quantities of a commodity or a service that people are willing and able to buy at various prices, over a given period of time.

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Demand curve

In economics, the demand curve is the graph depicting the relationship between the price of a certain commodity and the amount of it that consumers are willing and able to purchase at any given price.

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Economics

Economics is the social science that studies the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.

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Economist

An economist is a practitioner in the social science discipline of economics.

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Emergency department

An emergency department (ED), also known as an accident & emergency department (A&E), emergency room (ER), emergency ward (EW) or casualty department, is a medical treatment facility specializing in emergency medicine, the acute care of patients who present without prior appointment; either by their own means or by that of an ambulance.

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Employment

Employment is a relationship between two parties, usually based on a contract where work is paid for, where one party, which may be a corporation, for profit, not-for-profit organization, co-operative or other entity is the employer and the other is the employee.

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Eurostat

Eurostat is a Directorate-General of the European Commission located in Luxembourg.

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Factors of production

In economics, factors of production, resources, or inputs are which is used in the production process to produce output—that is, finished goods and services.

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Factory

A factory or manufacturing plant is an industrial site, usually consisting of buildings and machinery, or more commonly a complex having several buildings, where workers manufacture goods or operate machines processing one product into another.

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Fiscal policy

In economics and political science, fiscal policy is the use of government revenue collection (mainly taxes) and expenditure (spending) to influence the economy.

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French Armed Forces

The French Armed Forces (Forces armées françaises) encompass the Army, the Navy, the Air Force, the National Guard and the Gendarmerie of the French Republic.

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Goods

In economics, goods are materials that satisfy human wants and provide utility, for example, to a consumer making a purchase of a satisfying product.

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Government budget

A government budget is an annual financial statement presenting the government's proposed revenues and spending for a financial year that is often passed by the legislature, approved by the chief executive or president and presented by the Finance Minister to the nation.

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Government debt

Government debt (also known as public interest, public debt, national debt and sovereign debt) is the debt owed by a government.

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Government final consumption expenditure

Government final consumption expenditure (GFCE) is an aggregate transaction amount on a country's national income accounts representing government expenditure on goods and services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual needs (individual consumption) or collective needs of members of the community (collective consumption).

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Government operations

This article aims to describe the extent of operations and processes of governments around the world at all levels.

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Government spending in the United Kingdom

Central government spending in the United Kingdom, also called public expenditure, is the responsibility of the UK government, the Scottish Government, the Welsh Government and the Northern Ireland Executive.

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Government spending in the United States

Government spending in the United States is the spending of the federal government of the United States of America, and the spending of its state and local governments.

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Government waste

Government waste is the opinion that the government does not spend money in an acceptable manner.

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Gross domestic product

Gross domestic product (GDP) is a monetary measure of the market value of all final goods and services produced in a period (quarterly or yearly) of time.

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Gross fixed capital formation

Gross fixed capital formation (GFCF) is a macroeconomic concept used in official national accounts such as the United Nations System of National Accounts (UNSNA), National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) and the European System of Accounts (ESA).

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Indian Armed Forces

The Indian Armed Forces (Hindi (in IAST): Bhāratīya Saśastra Senāeṃ) are the military forces of the Republic of India.

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Inflation

In economics, inflation is a sustained increase in price level of goods and services in an economy over a period of time.

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Infrastructure

Infrastructure is the fundamental facilities and systems serving a country, city, or other area, including the services and facilities necessary for its economy to function.

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Intermediate consumption

Intermediate consumption (also called "intermediate expenditure") is an economic concept used in national accounts, such as the United Nations System of National Accounts (UNSNA), the US National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) and the European System of Accounts (ESA).

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Investment

In general, to invest is to allocate money (or sometimes another resource, such as time) in the expectation of some benefit in the future – for example, investment in durable goods, in real estate by the service industry, in factories for manufacturing, in product development, and in research and development.

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Investor

An investor is a person that allocates capital with the expectation of a future financial return.

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Japan Self-Defense Forces

The (JSDF), occasionally referred to as the Japan Defense Forces (JDF), Self-Defense Forces (SDF), or Japanese Armed Forces, are the unified military forces of Japan that were established in 1954, and are controlled by the Ministry of Defense.

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John Maynard Keynes

John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes (5 June 1883 – 21 April 1946), was a British economist whose ideas fundamentally changed the theory and practice of macroeconomics and the economic policies of governments.

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Keynesian economics

Keynesian economics (sometimes called Keynesianism) are the various macroeconomic theories about how in the short run – and especially during recessions – economic output is strongly influenced by aggregate demand (total demand in the economy).

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List of countries by GDP (nominal)

Gross domestic product (GDP) is the market value of all final goods and services from a nation in a given year.

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Loanable funds

In economics, the loanable funds doctrine is a theory of the market interest rate.

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Macroeconomics

Macroeconomics (from the Greek prefix makro- meaning "large" and economics) is a branch of economics dealing with the performance, structure, behavior, and decision-making of an economy as a whole.

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Mandatory spending

The United States federal budget is divided into three categories: mandatory spending, discretionary spending, and interest on debt.

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Measures of national income and output

A variety of measures of national income and output are used in economics to estimate total economic activity in a country or region, including gross domestic product (GDP), gross national product (GNP), net national income (NNI), and adjusted national income also called as NNI at factor cost (NNI* adjusted for natural resource depletion).

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Net present value

In finance, the net present value (NPV) or net present worth (NPW) is a measurement of profit calculated by subtracting the present values (PV) of cash outflows (including initial cost) from the present values of cash inflows over a period of time.

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Output (economics)

Output in economics is the "quantity of goods or services produced in a given time period, by a firm, industry, or country", whether consumed or used for further production.

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People's Liberation Army

The Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) is the armed forces of the People's Republic of China (PRC) and Communist Party of China (CPC).

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Preventive healthcare

Preventive healthcare (alternately preventive medicine, preventative healthcare/medicine, or prophylaxis) consists of measures taken for disease prevention, as opposed to disease treatment.

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Private sector

The private sector is the part of the economy, sometimes referred to as the citizen sector, which is run by private individuals or groups, usually as a means of enterprise for profit, and is not controlled by the State.

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Public expenditure

Public expenditure is spending made by the government of a country on collective needs and wants such as pension, provision, infrastructure, etc.

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Public finance

Public finance is the study of the role of the government in the economy.

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Public sector

The public sector (also called the state sector) is the part of the economy composed of both public services and public enterprises.

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Rahn curve

The Rahn curve is a graph used to illustrate an economic theory, proposed in 1996 by American economist Richard W. Rahn, which indicates that there is a level of government spending that maximises economic growth.

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Rail transport

Rail transport is a means of transferring of passengers and goods on wheeled vehicles running on rails, also known as tracks.

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Recession

In economics, a recession is a business cycle contraction which results in a general slowdown in economic activity.

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Republic of Korea Armed Forces

The Republic of Korea Armed Forces, also known as the ROK Armed Forces, are the armed forces of South Korea.

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Russian Armed Forces

The Armed Forces of the Russian Federation (r) are the military service of the Russian Federation, established after the dissolution of the Soviet Union.

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Seigniorage

Seigniorage, also spelled seignorage or seigneurage (from Old French seigneuriage "right of the lord (seigneur) to mint money"), is the difference between the value of money and the cost to produce and distribute it.

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Social security

Social security is "any government system that provides monetary assistance to people with an inadequate or no income." Social security is enshrined in Article 22 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states: Everyone, as a member of society, has the right to social security and is entitled to realization, through national effort and international co-operation and in accordance with the organization and resources of each State, of the economic, social and cultural rights indispensable for his dignity and the free development of his personality.

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Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) is an international institute based in Sweden, dedicated to research into conflict, armaments, arms control and disarmament.

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Subsidy

A subsidy is a form of financial aid or support extended to an economic sector (or institution, business, or individual) generally with the aim of promoting economic and social policy.

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Supply (economics)

In economics, supply is the amount of something that firms, consumers, labourers, providers of financial assets, or other economic agents are willing to provide to the marketplace.

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Tax

A tax (from the Latin taxo) is a mandatory financial charge or some other type of levy imposed upon a taxpayer (an individual or other legal entity) by a governmental organization in order to fund various public expenditures.

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Tax revenue

Tax revenue is the income that is gained by governments through taxation.

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Taxpayer groups

Taxpayer groups, also known as taxpayers unions, are formal nonprofit or informal advocacy groups that promote lower taxation, reductions in government spending, and limits to government debt.

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The Heritage Foundation

The Heritage Foundation (abbreviated to Heritage) is an American conservative public policy think tank based in Washington, D.C. The foundation took a leading role in the conservative movement during the presidency of Ronald Reagan, whose policies were taken from Heritage's policy study Mandate for Leadership.

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The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal is a U.S. business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City.

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Unemployment benefits

Unemployment benefits (depending on the jurisdiction also called unemployment insurance or unemployment compensation) are payments made by the state or other authorized bodies to unemployed people.

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United States Armed Forces

The United States Armed Forces are the military forces of the United States of America.

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Welfare

Welfare is a government support for the citizens and residents of society.

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Redirects here:

Budget spending, Government Spending, Government allocation, Government expense, Government purchases, Government-related spending, Public Purse, Public fund, Public funds, Public investment, Public money, Public purse, Public spending, Social spending, State spending.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Government_spending

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