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Greek scholars in the Renaissance

Index Greek scholars in the Renaissance

The migration waves of Byzantine scholars and émigrés in the period following the Crusader sacking of Constantinople and the end of the Byzantine Empire in 1453, is considered by many scholars key to the revival of Greek and Roman studies that led to the development of the Renaissance humanism and science. [1]

132 relations: Ancient Greece, Ancient Greek, Ancient Greek philosophy, Ancient Rome, Andreas Musalus, Andronicus Contoblacas, Andronikos Kallistos, Angelos Pitzamanos, Anna Notaras, Antonio de Ferraris, Antonio Vassilacchi, Antonios Eparchos, Aristotle, Arsenius Apostolius, Averroism, Barlaam of Seminara, Basilios Bessarion, Belisario Corenzio, Byzantine art, Byzantine Empire, Byzantine Rite, Byzantine science, Byzantium, Chalkokondyles, Constantine Lascaris, Cretan School, Crete, Dalmatia, Demetrios Chalkokondyles, Demetrios Kydones, Doukas, Early Middle Ages, Egypt, El Greco, Elia del Medigo, Emmanuel Tzanes, Erasmus, Europe, Exegesis, Fall of Constantinople, Flanginian School, Florence, Fourth Crusade, Francesco Filelfo, Francesco Maurolico, Francisco Leontaritis, Franciscus Portus, Gemistus Pletho, George Amiroutzes, George Hermonymus, ..., George of Trebizond, Georgios Kalafatis (professor), Gerasimos Vlachos, Giovanni Boccaccio, Giovanni Pontano, Greek College, Oxford, Greek War of Independence, Greeks, Gregory Tifernas, Guillaume Budé, Henry Aristippus, History of science in the Renaissance, Humanism, Iakovos Trivolis, Icon, Ioannis Kigalas, Ioannis Kottounios, Isidore of Kiev, Italy, Jacques Lefèvre d'Étaples, Janus Lascaris, Janus Plousiadenos, Johann Reuchlin, Johannes Crastonis, John Argyropoulos, John Chrysoloras, John Rhosos, John Servopoulos, Konstantinos Kallokratos, Laonikos Chalkokondyles, Latin school, Leo Allatius, Leonard of Chios, Leonardos Philaras, Leontius Pilatus, List of Byzantine scholars, Lorenzo Valla, Manuel Chrysoloras, Marco Basaiti, Marcus Musurus, Mathew Devaris, Matthaios Kamariotis, Maximos Margunios, Maximus Planudes, Maximus the Greek, Melkite, Michael Apostolius, Michael Damaskinos, Michael Tarchaniota Marullus, Milos, New Testament, Nicholas Kalliakis, Nicholas Leonicus Thomaeus, Nikolaos Loukanis, Nikolaos Sophianos, Otranto, Padua, Paolo Veronese, Petrarch, Plato, Pontifical Greek College of Saint Athanasius, Pope Gregory XIII, Renaissance, Renaissance humanism, Robert Gaguin, Rome, Ruthenians, Sack of Constantinople (1204), Simon Atumano, Southern Italy, Spain, Syria (region), Theodore Poulakis, Theodorus Gaza, Thomas Flanginis, Totius Graeciae Descriptio, University of Messina, University of Paris, Vatican Library, Venice, Vulgate, Zacharias Calliergi. Expand index (82 more) »

Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (AD 600).

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Ancient Greek

The Ancient Greek language includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD.

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Ancient Greek philosophy

Ancient Greek philosophy arose in the 6th century BC and continued throughout the Hellenistic period and the period in which Ancient Greece was part of the Roman Empire.

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Ancient Rome

In historiography, ancient Rome is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic and Roman Empire until the fall of the western empire.

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Andreas Musalus

Andreas Musalus (Andreas Musalus, Andrea Musalo, Ανδρέας Μουσάλος; ca. 1665/6 – ca. 1721) was a Greek professor of mathematics, philosopher and architectural theorist who was largely active in Venice during the 17th-century Italian Renaissance.

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Andronicus Contoblacas

Andronicus Contoblacas (Ἀνδρόνικος Κοντοβλάκας) was a Greek Renaissance humanist and scholar.

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Andronikos Kallistos

Andronikos Kallistos (Ανδρόνικος Καλλίστος) was a teacher of Greek literature in Bologna, Rome, Florence, Paris and London.

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Angelos Pitzamanos

Angelos Pitzamanos (Άγγελος Πιτζαμάνος) (1467–1535) was a Greek Renaissance painter.

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Anna Notaras

Anna Notaras (Greek Ἄννα Νοταρᾶ; died 8 July 1507) was the daughter of Loukas Notaras, the last Megas Doux of the Byzantine Empire.

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Antonio de Ferraris

Antonio de Ferraris (Antonius de Ferraris, Ἀντώνιος Φεράρις; c. 1444 – 12 November 1517), also known by his epithet Galateo (Galateus, Γαλάτειος), was an Italian scholar of Greek ethnicity, academic, doctor and humanist.

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Antonio Vassilacchi

Antonio Vassilacchi (1556–1629) (Greek: Αντώνιος Βασιλάκης, Antonios Vasilakis, Italian: Antonio Vassilacchi) also called L'Aliense, was a Greek painter, who was active mostly in Venice and the Veneto.

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Antonios Eparchos

Antonios Eparchos (1491–1571) was a Greek Renaissance humanist, soldier and poet.

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Aristotle

Aristotle (Ἀριστοτέλης Aristotélēs,; 384–322 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher and scientist born in the city of Stagira, Chalkidiki, in the north of Classical Greece.

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Arsenius Apostolius

Arsenius Apostolius (Ἀρσένιος Ἀποστόλιος or Ἀρσένιος Ἀποστόλης; c. 1468 – 1538) was a Greek scholar who lived for a long time in Venice.

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Averroism

Averroism refers to a school of medieval philosophy based on the application of the works of 12th-century Andalusian Islamic philosopher Averroes, a Muslim commentator on Aristotle, in 13th-century Latin Christian scholasticism.

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Barlaam of Seminara

Barlaam of Seminara (Bernardo Massari, as a layman), c. 1290–1348, or Barlaam of Calabria (Βαρλαὰμ Καλαβρός) was a southern Italian scholar (Aristotelian scholastic) and clergyman of the 14th century, as well as a Humanist, a philologist, and a theologian.

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Basilios Bessarion

Basilios (or Basilius) Bessarion (Greek: Βασίλειος Βησσαρίων; 2 January 1403 – 18 November 1472), a Roman Catholic Cardinal Bishop and the titular Latin Patriarch of Constantinople, was one of the illustrious Greek scholars who contributed to the great revival of letters in the 15th century.

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Belisario Corenzio

Belisario Corenzio (c. 1558–1643) was a Greek-Italian painter, active in a Mannerist style, mainly in Naples, Italy.

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Byzantine art

Byzantine art is the name for the artistic products of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, as well as the nations and states that inherited culturally from the empire.

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Byzantine Empire

The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire and Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium).

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Byzantine Rite

The Byzantine Rite, also known as the Greek Rite or Constantinopolitan Rite, is the liturgical rite used by the Eastern Orthodox Church as well as by certain Eastern Catholic Churches; also, parts of it are employed by, as detailed below, other denominations.

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Byzantine science

Byzantine science played an important role in the transmission of classical knowledge to the Islamic world and to Renaissance Italy, and also in the transmission of Islamic science to Renaissance Italy.

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Byzantium

Byzantium or Byzantion (Ancient Greek: Βυζάντιον, Byzántion) was an ancient Greek colony in early antiquity that later became Constantinople, and later Istanbul.

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Chalkokondyles

Chalkokondyles or Chalcocondyles (Χαλκοκονδύλης), also seen as Chalkokandeles (Χαλκοκαντήλης) or Charchandeles (Χαρχαντήλης), was a Byzantine Greek noble family of Athens which was elected during the Florentine possession of the city.

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Constantine Lascaris

Constantine Lascaris (Κωνσταντῖνος Λάσκαρις - Kōnstantĩnos Láskaris; 1434 – 15 August 1501) was a Greek scholar and grammarian, one of the promoters of the revival of Greek learning in Italy during the Renaissance, born at Constantinople.

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Cretan School

Cretan School describes an important school of icon painting, under the umbrella of post-Byzantine art, which flourished while Crete was under Venetian rule during the late Middle Ages, reaching its climax after the Fall of Constantinople, becoming the central force in Greek painting during the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries.

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Crete

Crete (Κρήτη,; Ancient Greek: Κρήτη, Krḗtē) is the largest and most populous of the Greek islands, the 88th largest island in the world and the fifth largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, after Sicily, Sardinia, Cyprus, and Corsica.

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Dalmatia

Dalmatia (Dalmacija; see names in other languages) is one of the four historical regions of Croatia, alongside Croatia proper, Slavonia and Istria.

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Demetrios Chalkokondyles

Demetrios Chalkokondyles (Δημήτριος Χαλκοκονδύλης), Latinized as Demetrius Chalcocondyles and found variously as Demetricocondyles, Chalcocondylas or Chalcondyles (14239 January 1511) was one of the most eminent Greek scholars in the West.

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Demetrios Kydones

Demetrios Kydones, Latinized as Demetrius Cydones or Demetrius Cydonius (Δημήτριος Κυδώνης; 1324, Thessalonica – 1398, Crete), was a Byzantine theologian, translator, writer and influential statesman, who served an unprecedented three terms as Mesazon (Imperial Prime Minister or Chancellor) of the Byzantine Empire under three successive emperors: John VI Kantakouzenos, John V Palaiologos and Manuel II Palaiologos.

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Doukas

Doukas, Latinized as Ducas (Δούκας; feminine: Doukaina/Ducaena, Δούκαινα; plural: Doukai/Ducae, Δοῦκαι), from the Latin tile dux ("leader", "general", Hellenized as δοὺξ), is the name of a Byzantine Greek noble family, whose branches provided several notable generals and rulers to the Byzantine Empire in the 9th–11th centuries.

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Early Middle Ages

The Early Middle Ages or Early Medieval Period, typically regarded as lasting from the 5th or 6th century to the 10th century CE, marked the start of the Middle Ages of European history.

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Egypt

Egypt (مِصر, مَصر, Khēmi), officially the Arab Republic of Egypt, is a transcontinental country spanning the northeast corner of Africa and southwest corner of Asia by a land bridge formed by the Sinai Peninsula.

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El Greco

Doménikos Theotokópoulos (Δομήνικος Θεοτοκόπουλος; October 1541 7 April 1614), most widely known as El Greco ("The Greek"), was a painter, sculptor and architect of the Spanish Renaissance.

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Elia del Medigo

Elia del Medigo, also called Elijah Delmedigo or Elias ben Moise del Medigo and sometimes known to his contemporaries as Helias Hebreus Cretensis or in Hebrew Elijah Mi-Qandia (c. 1458 – c. 1493).

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Emmanuel Tzanes

Emmanuel Tzanes (Εμμανουήλ Τζάνες, 1610 – 28 March 1690), also known as Buniales (Μπουνιαλής), was a Greek Renaissance painter.

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Erasmus

Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus (28 October 1466Gleason, John B. "The Birth Dates of John Colet and Erasmus of Rotterdam: Fresh Documentary Evidence," Renaissance Quarterly, The University of Chicago Press on behalf of the Renaissance Society of America, Vol. 32, No. 1 (Spring, 1979), pp. 73–76; – 12 July 1536), known as Erasmus or Erasmus of Rotterdam,Erasmus was his baptismal name, given after St. Erasmus of Formiae.

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Europe

Europe is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere.

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Exegesis

Exegesis (from the Greek ἐξήγησις from ἐξηγεῖσθαι, "to lead out") is a critical explanation or interpretation of a text, particularly a religious text.

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Fall of Constantinople

The Fall of Constantinople (Ἅλωσις τῆς Κωνσταντινουπόλεως, Halōsis tēs Kōnstantinoupoleōs; İstanbul'un Fethi Conquest of Istanbul) was the capture of the capital of the Byzantine Empire by an invading Ottoman army on 29 May 1453.

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Flanginian School

The Flanginian School (Φλαγγίνειος Σχολή, Collegio Flanginiano) was a Greek educational institution that operated in Venice, Italy, from 1664-1665 to 1905.

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Florence

Florence (Firenze) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany.

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Fourth Crusade

The Fourth Crusade (1202–1204) was a Latin Christian armed expedition called by Pope Innocent III.

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Francesco Filelfo

Francesco Filelfo (Franciscus Philelphus; July 25, 1398 – July 31, 1481) was an Italian Renaissance humanist.

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Francesco Maurolico

Francesco Maurolico (Greek: Φραγκίσκος Μαυρόλυκος, Frangiskos Mavrolikos; Latin: Franciscus Maurolycus; Francisci Maurolyci; Italian: Francesco Maurolico; 16 September 1494 - 21/22 July 1575) was a mathematician and astronomer from Sicily.

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Francisco Leontaritis

Francisco Leontaritis or Francesco Londarit or Francesco Londarit, Franciscus Londariti, Leondaryti, Londaretus, Londaratus or Londaritus (1518-1572) was a Greek composer, singer and hymnographer from today's Heraklion of the Venetian-dominated Crete (Candia) at the Renaissance age.

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Franciscus Portus

Franciscus Portus (Latin; Greek: Φραγκίσκος Πόρτος, Italian: Francesco Porto) (1511 – 1581) was a Greek-Italian Renaissance humanist and classical scholar.

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Gemistus Pletho

Georgius Gemistus (Γεώργιος Γεμιστός; /1360 – 1452/1454), later called Plethon (Πλήθων), was one of the most renowned philosophers of the late Byzantine era.

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George Amiroutzes

George Amiroutzes (Γεώργιος Αμιρουτζής) (1400–1470) was a Pontic Greek Renaissance scholar, philosopher and civil servant.

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George Hermonymus

George Hermonymus (Γεώργιος Ἑρμώνυμος) or Hermonymus of Sparta was a 15th-century Greek scribe, diplomat, scholar and lecturer.

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George of Trebizond

George of Trebizond (Γεώργιος Τραπεζούντιος; 1395–1486) was a Greek philosopher, scholar and humanist.

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Georgios Kalafatis (professor)

Georgios Kalafatis (Γεώργιος Καλαφάτης, Giorgio Calafatti, Georgius Calafattus; ca. 1652 – ca. 9 February 1720) was a Greek professor of theoretical and practical medicine who was largely active in Padua and Venice in the 17th-century Italian Renaissance.

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Gerasimos Vlachos

Gerasimos Vlachos (1607–1685) was a Greek scholar of the Renaissance.

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Giovanni Boccaccio

Giovanni Boccaccio (16 June 1313 – 21 December 1375) was an Italian writer, poet, correspondent of Petrarch, and an important Renaissance humanist.

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Giovanni Pontano

Giovanni Pontano (1426–1503), later known as Giovanni Gioviano or Ioannes Iovianus Pontanus, was a humanist and poet from the Duchy of Spoleto, in central Italy.

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Greek College, Oxford

The Greek College, established 1699, was a short-lived attempt to create a separate college for Greek Orthodox students at Oxford University in Oxford, England.

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Greek War of Independence

The Greek War of Independence, also known as the Greek Revolution (Ελληνική Επανάσταση, Elliniki Epanastasi, or also referred to by Greeks in the 19th century as the Αγώνας, Agonas, "Struggle"; Ottoman: يونان عصياني Yunan İsyanı, "Greek Uprising"), was a successful war of independence waged by Greek revolutionaries against the Ottoman Empire between 1821 and 1830.

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Greeks

The Greeks or Hellenes (Έλληνες, Éllines) are an ethnic group native to Greece, Cyprus, southern Albania, Italy, Turkey, Egypt and, to a lesser extent, other countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. They also form a significant diaspora, with Greek communities established around the world.. Greek colonies and communities have been historically established on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea and Black Sea, but the Greek people have always been centered on the Aegean and Ionian seas, where the Greek language has been spoken since the Bronze Age.. Until the early 20th century, Greeks were distributed between the Greek peninsula, the western coast of Asia Minor, the Black Sea coast, Cappadocia in central Anatolia, Egypt, the Balkans, Cyprus, and Constantinople. Many of these regions coincided to a large extent with the borders of the Byzantine Empire of the late 11th century and the Eastern Mediterranean areas of ancient Greek colonization. The cultural centers of the Greeks have included Athens, Thessalonica, Alexandria, Smyrna, and Constantinople at various periods. Most ethnic Greeks live nowadays within the borders of the modern Greek state and Cyprus. The Greek genocide and population exchange between Greece and Turkey nearly ended the three millennia-old Greek presence in Asia Minor. Other longstanding Greek populations can be found from southern Italy to the Caucasus and southern Russia and Ukraine and in the Greek diaspora communities in a number of other countries. Today, most Greeks are officially registered as members of the Greek Orthodox Church.CIA World Factbook on Greece: Greek Orthodox 98%, Greek Muslim 1.3%, other 0.7%. Greeks have greatly influenced and contributed to culture, arts, exploration, literature, philosophy, politics, architecture, music, mathematics, science and technology, business, cuisine, and sports, both historically and contemporarily.

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Gregory Tifernas

Gregory Tifernas was a Greek renaissance humanist from the Italian city of Città di Castello (Tifernum in Latin, whence his surname).

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Guillaume Budé

Guillaume Budé (Guilielmus Budaeus; 26 January 146723 August 1540) was a French scholar.

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Henry Aristippus

Henry Aristippus of Calabria (born in Santa Severina in 1105–10; died in Palermo in 1162), sometimes known as Enericus or Henricus Aristippus, was a religious scholar and the archdeacon of Catania (from c. 1155) and later chief familiaris (or chancellor) of the triumvirate of familiares who replaced the admiral Maio of Bari as chief functionaries of the kingdom of Sicily in 1161.

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History of science in the Renaissance

During the Renaissance, great advances occurred in geography, astronomy, chemistry, physics, mathematics, manufacturing, anatomy and engineering.

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Humanism

Humanism is a philosophical and ethical stance that emphasizes the value and agency of human beings, individually and collectively, and generally prefers critical thinking and evidence (rationalism and empiricism) over acceptance of dogma or superstition.

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Iakovos Trivolis

Iakovos Trivolis (died 1547) was a Greek Renaissance humanist and writer.

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Icon

An icon (from Greek εἰκών eikōn "image") is a religious work of art, most commonly a painting, from the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, and certain Eastern Catholic churches.

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Ioannis Kigalas

Ioannis Kigalas (Ιωάννης Κιγάλας), (Giovanni Cigala, Cicala), (Joannes Cigala; 1622 – c. 5 November 1687) was a Greek Cypriot scholar and professor of Philosophy and Logic who was largely active in Padova and Venice in the 17th-century Italian Renaissance.

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Ioannis Kottounios

Ioannis Kottounios, (Ἰωάννης Κωττούνιος, Joannes Cottunius de Verria; c. 1577 – 1658) was an eminent ethnic Greek scholar who studied Philosophy, Theology and Medicine, taught Greek from 1617 and Philosophy from 1630 in Bologna, Italy becoming professor of philosophy in 1632 he also founded a college for unwealthy Greeks at Padua in 1653.

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Isidore of Kiev

Isidore of Kiev, also known as Isidore of Thessalonica (Ἰσίδωρος τοῦ Κιέβου; Исидор; Ісидор; b. Peloponnesus, 1385 – d.Rome, 27 April 1463) was a Greek Metropolitan of Kiev, cardinal, humanist, and theologian.

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Italy

Italy (Italia), officially the Italian Republic (Repubblica Italiana), is a sovereign state in Europe.

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Jacques Lefèvre d'Étaples

Jacques Lefèvre d'Étaples or Jacobus Faber Stapulensis (c. 1455 – 1536) was a French theologian and humanist.

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Janus Lascaris

Janus Lascaris (Ianos Laskaris; born c. 1445, Constantinople – 7 December 1535, Rome), also called John Rhyndacenus (from Rhyndacus, a country town in Asia Minor), was a noted Greek scholar in the Renaissance.

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Janus Plousiadenos

Janus Plousiadenos (~1429-1500) was a 15th-century Greek Renaissance scholar, hymnographer and composer born in Crete.

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Johann Reuchlin

Johann Reuchlin (sometimes called Johannes; 29 January 1455 – 30 June 1522) was a German-born humanist and a scholar of Greek and Hebrew, whose work also took him to modern-day Austria, Switzerland, and Italy and France.

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Johannes Crastonis

Johannes Crastonis (Crastonus; Crastone) was an Italian renaissance humanist and scholar.

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John Argyropoulos

John Argyropoulos (Ἰωάννης Ἀργυρόπουλος Ioannis Argyropoulos; Giovanni Argiropulo; surname also spelt Argyropulus, or Argyropulos, or Argyropulo; c. 1415 – 26 June 1487) was a lecturer, philosopher and humanist, one of the émigré Greek scholars who pioneered the revival of Classical learning in 15th-century Italy.

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John Chrysoloras

John Chrysoloras was a relative of Manuel Chrysoloras, (variously described as his nephew, brother or son) who like him had studied and taught at Constantinople and then migrated to Italy.

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John Rhosos

John Rhosos or Rhosus (d. Feb. 1498) was a Greek Cretan scribe and calligraphist who lived and worked in 15th century Renaissance Italy.

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John Servopoulos

John Servopoulos (fl. 1484–1500) was a Greek scribe and scholar.

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Konstantinos Kallokratos

Konstantinos Kallokratos (Κωνσταντίνος Καλλοκράτος) was a teacher and a poet.

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Laonikos Chalkokondyles

Laonikos Chalkokondyles, Latinized as Laonicus Chalcondyles (Λαόνικος Χαλκοκονδύλης, from λαός "people", νικᾶν "to be victorious", an anagram of Nikolaos which bears the same meaning; c. 1430 – c. 1470), was a Byzantine Greek historian from Athens.

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Latin school

The Latin school was the grammar school of 14th to 19th-century Europe, though the latter term was much more common in England.

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Leo Allatius

Leo Allatius (c. 1586 – January 19, 1669) (Greek: Λέων Αλλάτιος, Leon Allatios, Λιωνής Αλάτζης, Lionis Allatzis; Italian: Leone Allacci, Allacio; Latin: Leo Allatius, Allacius) was a Greek scholar, theologian, and keeper of the Vatican library.

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Leonard of Chios

Leonard of Chios (Leonardo di Chio) was a Dominican scholar and Latin Archbishop of Mytilene, best known for his eye-witness account of the Fall of Constantinople in 1453, which is one of the main sources for the event.

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Leonardos Philaras

Leonardos Philaras (c. 1595 – 1673) (Greek: Λεονάρδος Φιλαρᾶς, Leonardos Filaras, French: Leonard Philara also known as Villeret, Villare) was a Greek Athenian scholar, politician, diplomat and advisor to the French court.

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Leontius Pilatus

Leontius Pilatus, or Leontius (Leonzio Pilato; died 1366) (Latin: Leontius Pilatus, Greek: Λεόντιος Πιλάτος, Leontios Pilatos, Italian: Leonzio Pilato), was a Calabrian scholar and was one of the earliest promoters of Greek studies in Western Europe.

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List of Byzantine scholars

This is a list of Byzantine scientists and other scholars.

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Lorenzo Valla

Lorenzo (or Laurentius) Valla (14071 August 1457) was an Italian humanist, rhetorician, educator and Catholic priest.

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Manuel Chrysoloras

Manuel (or Emmanuel) Chrysoloras (Μανουὴλ Χρυσολωρᾶς; c. 1355 – 15 April 1415) was a pioneer in the introduction of Greek literature to Western Europe during the late middle ages.

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Marco Basaiti

Marco Basaiti (c. 1470–1530) was a Renaissance painter who worked mainly in Venice and was a contemporary of Giovanni Bellini and Cima da Conegliano.

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Marcus Musurus

Marcus Musurus (Μάρκος Μουσοῦρος Markos Mousouros; Marco Musuro; c. 1470–1517) was a Greek scholar and philosopher born in Retimo, Castello, Venetian Crete (modern Rethymno, Crete).

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Mathew Devaris

Mathew Devaris was a Greek scholar during the Renaissance.

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Matthaios Kamariotis

Matthaios Kamariotis (Ματθαῖος Καμαριώτης; died 1490) was a Greek scholar of the Renaissance era, from Thessaloniki.

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Maximos Margunios

Maximos Margunios (b.1549 Candia, Crete - d. 1602, Venice) Bishop of Cerigo (Kythira), was a Greek Renaissance humanist.

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Maximus Planudes

Maximus Planudes (Μάξιμος Πλανούδης, Máximos Planoúdēs) was a Byzantine Greek monk, scholar, anthologist, translator, grammarian and theologian at Constantinople.

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Maximus the Greek

Maximus the Greek, also known as Maximos the Greek or Maksim Grek (Greek: Μάξιμος ὁ Γραικός, Russian: Максим Грек, c. 1475-1556), was a Greek monk, publicist, writer, scholar, and translator active in Russia.

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Melkite

The term "Melkite", also written "Melchite", refers to various Byzantine Rite Christian churches and their members originating in the Middle East.

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Michael Apostolius

Michael Apostolius (Μιχαὴλ Ἀποστόλιος or Μιχαὴλ Ἀποστόλης; c. 1420 in Constantinople – after 1474 or 1486, possibly in Venetian Crete) or Apostolius Paroemiographus, i.e. Apostolius the proverb-writer, was a Greek teacher, writer and copyist who lived in the fifteenth century.

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Michael Damaskinos

Michael Damaskenos or Michail Damaskenos (Μιχαήλ Δαμασκηνός, 1530/35–1592/93) was a leading post-Byzantine Cretan painter.

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Michael Tarchaniota Marullus

Michael Tarchaniota Marullus or Michael Marullus (Μιχαήλ Μάρουλλος Ταρχανειώτης, Michele Marullo Tarcaniota; c. 1458 – 10 April 1500) was a Greek Renaissance scholar, poet of Neolatin, humanist and soldier.

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Milos

Milos or Melos (Modern Greek: Μήλος; Μῆλος Melos) is a volcanic Greek island in the Aegean Sea, just north of the Sea of Crete.

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New Testament

The New Testament (Ἡ Καινὴ Διαθήκη, trans. Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē; Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, based on the Hebrew Bible.

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Nicholas Kalliakis

Nicholas Kalliakis (Νικόλαος Καλλιάκης, Nikolaos Kalliakis; Nicolaus Calliachius; Niccolò Calliachi; c. 1645 - May 8, 1707) was a Cretan scholar and philosopher who flourished in Italy in the 17th century.

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Nicholas Leonicus Thomaeus

Nicholas Leonicus Thomaeus (Niccolò Leonico Tomeo, Νικόλαος Λεόνικος Θωμεύς; 1456–1531) was a Venetian scholar and professor of philosophy at the University of Padua.

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Nikolaos Loukanis

Nikolaos Loukanis was a 16th-century Greek Renaissance humanist.

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Nikolaos Sophianos

Nikolaos Sophianos (Νικόλαος Σοφιανός; c. 1500 – after 1551) was a Greek Renaissance humanist and cartographer chiefly noted for his Totius Graeciae Descriptio map and his grammar of Greek.

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Otranto

Otranto (Salentino: Uṭṛàntu; Griko: Δερεντό, translit. Derentò; translit; Hydruntum) is a town and comune in the province of Lecce (Apulia, Italy), in a fertile region once famous for its breed of horses.

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Padua

Padua (Padova; Pàdova) is a city and comune in Veneto, northern Italy.

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Paolo Veronese

Paolo Caliari, known as Paolo Veronese (1528 – 19 April 1588), was an Italian Renaissance painter, based in Venice, known for large-format history paintings of religion and mythology, such as The Wedding at Cana (1563) and The Feast in the House of Levi (1573).

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Petrarch

Francesco Petrarca (July 20, 1304 – July 18/19, 1374), commonly anglicized as Petrarch, was a scholar and poet of Renaissance Italy who was one of the earliest humanists.

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Plato

Plato (Πλάτων Plátōn, in Classical Attic; 428/427 or 424/423 – 348/347 BC) was a philosopher in Classical Greece and the founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world.

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Pontifical Greek College of Saint Athanasius

The Pontifical Greek College of St.

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Pope Gregory XIII

Pope Gregory XIII (Gregorius XIII; 7 January 1502 – 10 April 1585), born Ugo Boncompagni, was Pope of the Catholic Church from 13 May 1572 to his death in 1585.

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Renaissance

The Renaissance is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries.

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Renaissance humanism

Renaissance humanism is the study of classical antiquity, at first in Italy and then spreading across Western Europe in the 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries.

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Robert Gaguin

Robert Gaguin (older spelling: Robert Guaguin, around the winter of 1433 – May 22, 1501) was a noted French Renaissance humanist and philosopher, he was minister general of the Trinitarian Order.

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Rome

Rome (Roma; Roma) is the capital city of Italy and a special comune (named Comune di Roma Capitale).

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Ruthenians

Ruthenians and Ruthenes are Latin exonyms which were used in Western Europe for the ancestors of modern East Slavic peoples, Rus' people with Ruthenian Greek Catholic religious background and Orthodox believers which lived outside the Rus'.

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Sack of Constantinople (1204)

The siege and sack of Constantinople occurred in April 1204 and marked the culmination of the Fourth Crusade.

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Simon Atumano

Simon Atumano was the Bishop of Gerace in Calabria from 23 June 1348 until 1366 and the Latin Archbishop of Thebes thereafter until 1380.

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Southern Italy

Southern Italy or Mezzogiorno (literally "midday") is a macroregion of Italy traditionally encompassing the territories of the former Kingdom of the two Sicilies (all the southern section of the Italian Peninsula and Sicily), with the frequent addition of the island of Sardinia.

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Spain

Spain (España), officially the Kingdom of Spain (Reino de España), is a sovereign state mostly located on the Iberian Peninsula in Europe.

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Syria (region)

The historic region of Syria (ash-Shām, Hieroglyphic Luwian: Sura/i; Συρία; in modern literature called Greater Syria, Syria-Palestine, or the Levant) is an area located east of the Mediterranean sea.

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Theodore Poulakis

Theodore Poulakis (Θεόδωρος Πουλάκης, 1622–1692) was a Greek Renaissance painter.

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Theodorus Gaza

Theodorus Gaza or Theodore Gazis (Θεόδωρος Γαζῆς, Theodoros Gazis; Teodoro Gaza; Theodorus Gazes), also called by the epithet Thessalonicensis (in Latin) and Thessalonikeus (in Greek) (c. 1398 – c. 1475), was a Greek humanist and translator of Aristotle, one of the Greek scholars who were the leaders of the revival of learning in the 15th century (the Palaeologan Renaissance).

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Thomas Flanginis

Thomas Flanginis (Θωμάς Φλαγγίνης, Italian: Tommaso Flangini; 1578–1648) was a wealthy Greek lawyer and merchant in Venice, who founded the Flanginian School, a Greek college where many teachers were trained.

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Totius Graeciae Descriptio

Totius Graeciae Descriptio refers to an early antiquarian map of Greece drawn by Renaissance humanist Nikolaos Sophianos that became a cartographical bestseller of the late 16th century.

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University of Messina

The University of Messina (Università degli Studi di Messina, UNIME) is a public university located in Messina, Italy.

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University of Paris

The University of Paris (Université de Paris), metonymically known as the Sorbonne (one of its buildings), was a university in Paris, France, from around 1150 to 1793, and from 1806 to 1970.

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Vatican Library

The Vatican Apostolic Library (Bibliotheca Apostolica Vaticana), more commonly called the Vatican Library or simply the Vat, is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City.

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Venice

Venice (Venezia,; Venesia) is a city in northeastern Italy and the capital of the Veneto region.

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Vulgate

The Vulgate is a late-4th-century Latin translation of the Bible that became the Catholic Church's officially promulgated Latin version of the Bible during the 16th century.

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Zacharias Calliergi

Zacharias Calliergi (Ζαχαρίας Καλλιέργης, Zakharias Kalliergēs) was a Greek Renaissance humanist and scholar.

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Redirects here:

Byzantine emigres, Byzantine scholars, Byzantine scholars in Renaissance, Byzantine scholars in the Renaissance, Byzantine-Greek scholars, Greek Renaissance.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_scholars_in_the_Renaissance

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