Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Download
Faster access than browser!
 

Guru Hargobind

Index Guru Hargobind

Guru Hargobind (19 June 1595 - 3 March 1644), revered as the sixth Nanak, was the sixth of ten Gurus of the Sikh religion. [1]

41 relations: A & C Black, ABC-CLIO, Akal Takht, Amritsar, Asian Educational Services, Baba Buddha, Baba Gurditta, Battle of Amritsar (1634), Battle of Kartarpur, Battle of Lahira, Battle of Rohilla, Bhai Gurdas, Cobra, Gautama Buddha, Golden Temple, Governor, Guru Arjan, Guru Har Rai, Guru Tegh Bahadur, Gwalior Fort, Hem, India, Jahangir, Joseph Davey Cunningham, Kartarpur, India, Kiratpur Sahib, Lahore, Maya (religion), Miri piri, Mughal Empire, Muslim, Punjab, Rupnagar, Samarth Ramdas, Shah Jahan, Sikh, Sikh gurus, Sikhism, Sivalik Hills, Stepwell, Sutlej.

A & C Black

A & C Black is a British book publishing company, owned since 2002 by Bloomsbury Publishing.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and A & C Black · See more »

ABC-CLIO

ABC-CLIO, LLC is a publishing company for academic reference works and periodicals primarily on topics such as history and social sciences for educational and public library settings.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and ABC-CLIO · See more »

Akal Takht

The Akal Takht (ਅਕਾਲ ਤਖ਼ਤ), meaning throne of the timeless one, is one of five takhts (seats of power) of the Sikhs.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Akal Takht · See more »

Amritsar

Amritsar, historically also known as Rāmdāspur and colloquially as Ambarsar, is a city in north-western India which is the administrative headquarters of the Amritsar district - located in the Majha region of the Indian state of Punjab.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Amritsar · See more »

Asian Educational Services

Asian Educational Services (AES) is a New Delhi, India-based publishing house that specialises in antiquarian reprints of books that were originally published between the 17th and early 20th centuries.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Asian Educational Services · See more »

Baba Buddha

Baba Buddha ji (6 October 1506 – 8 September 1631) was a prime figure in early Sikhism.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Baba Buddha · See more »

Baba Gurditta

Baba Gurditta was the son of Guru Hargobind and the father of Guru Har Rai of Sikhism.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Baba Gurditta · See more »

Battle of Amritsar (1634)

The Battle of Amritsar was a campaign by Mukhlis Khan against Guru Hargobind and the Sikhs in 1634.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Battle of Amritsar (1634) · See more »

Battle of Kartarpur

The Battle of Kartarpur was a 1635 siege of Kartarpur by the Mughal Empire and was the last major battle of the Mughal-Sikh Wars of Guru Hargobind's period of Guruship.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Battle of Kartarpur · See more »

Battle of Lahira

The Battle of Lahira was fought between Mughals and Sikhs in 1634.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Battle of Lahira · See more »

Battle of Rohilla

The Battle of Rohilla was a 1621 campaign by the Mughal Empire against the growing influence of the Sikhs.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Battle of Rohilla · See more »

Bhai Gurdas

Bhai Gurdas (ਭਾਈ ਗੁਰਦਾਸ; 1551 – August 25, 1636) was an influential Sikh figure, writer, historian and preacher.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Bhai Gurdas · See more »

Cobra

Cobra is the common name of various elapid snakes, most of which belonging to the genus Naja.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Cobra · See more »

Gautama Buddha

Gautama Buddha (c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE), also known as Siddhārtha Gautama, Shakyamuni Buddha, or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was an ascetic (śramaṇa) and sage, on whose teachings Buddhism was founded.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Gautama Buddha · See more »

Golden Temple

Sri Harmandir Sahib ("The abode of God"), also known as Darbar Sahib,, informally referred to as the Golden Temple, is a Gurdwara located in the city of Amritsar, Punjab, India.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Golden Temple · See more »

Governor

A governor is, in most cases, a public official with the power to govern the executive branch of a non-sovereign or sub-national level of government, ranking under the head of state.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Governor · See more »

Guru Arjan

Guru Arjan (ਗੁਰੂ ਅਰਜੁਨ Guru Arjan) 15 April 1563 – 30 May 1606) was the first of the two Gurus martyred in the Sikh faith and the fifth of the ten total Sikh Gurus. He compiled the first official edition of the Sikh scripture called the Adi Granth, which later expanded into the Guru Granth Sahib. He was born in Goindval, in the Punjab, the youngest son of Bhai Jetha, who later became Guru Ram Das, and Mata Bhani, the daughter of Guru Amar Das. He was the first Guru in Sikhism to be born into a Sikh family. Guru Arjan led Sikhism for a quarter of a century. He completed the construction of Darbar Sahib at Amritsar, after the fourth Sikh Guru founded the town and built a pool. Guru Arjan compiled the hymns of previous Gurus and of other saints into Adi Granth, the first edition of the Sikh scripture, and installed it in the Harimandir Sahib. Guru Arjan reorganized the Masands system initiated by Guru Ram Das, by suggesting that the Sikhs donate, if possible, one tenth of their income, goods or service to the Sikh organization (dasvand). The Masand not only collected these funds but also taught tenets of Sikhism and settled civil disputes in their region. The dasvand financed the building of gurdwaras and langars (shared communal kitchens). Guru Arjan was arrested under the orders of the Mughal Emperor Jahangir and asked to convert to Islam. He refused, was tortured and executed in 1606 CE. Historical records and the Sikh tradition are unclear whether Guru Arjan was executed by drowning or died during torture. His martyrdom is considered a watershed event in the history of Sikhism. It is remembered as Shaheedi Divas of Guru Arjan in May or June according to the Nanakshahi calendar released by the Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee in 2003.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Guru Arjan · See more »

Guru Har Rai

Guru Har Rai (16 January 1630 – 6 October 1661) revered as the seventh Nanak, was the seventh of ten Gurus of the Sikh religion.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Guru Har Rai · See more »

Guru Tegh Bahadur

Guru Tegh Bahadur (1 April 1621 – 24 November 1675), revered as the ninth Nanak, was the ninth of ten Gurus of the Sikh religion.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Guru Tegh Bahadur · See more »

Gwalior Fort

Gwalior Fort (ग्वालियर क़िला Gwalior Qila) is a hill fort near Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh, central India.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Gwalior Fort · See more »

Hem

A hem in sewing is a garment finishing method, where the edge of a piece of cloth is folded narrowly and sewn to prevent unravelling of the fabric.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Hem · See more »

India

India (IAST), also called the Republic of India (IAST), is a country in South Asia.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and India · See more »

Jahangir

Mirza Nur-ud-din Beig Mohammad Khan Salim مرزا نور الدین محمد خان سلیم, known by his imperial name (جہانگیر) Jahangir (31 August 1569 – 28 October 1627), was the fourth Mughal Emperor who ruled from 1605 until his death in 1627.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Jahangir · See more »

Joseph Davey Cunningham

Joseph Davey Cunningham, (b. Scotland, 9 June 1812, died 28 February 1851) was the author of the book History of the Sikhs (1849) and an authority in Punjab historiography.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Joseph Davey Cunningham · See more »

Kartarpur, India

Kartarpur is a town near the city of Jalandhar and is located in the Doaba region of the state.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Kartarpur, India · See more »

Kiratpur Sahib

Kiratpur also known as Kiratpur Sahib is a town in Rupnagar district, Punjab, India.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Kiratpur Sahib · See more »

Lahore

Lahore (لاہور, لہور) is the capital city of the Pakistani province of Punjab, and is the country’s second-most populous city after Karachi.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Lahore · See more »

Maya (religion)

Maya (Devanagari: माया, IAST: māyā), literally "illusion" or "magic", has multiple meanings in Indian philosophies depending on the context.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Maya (religion) · See more »

Miri piri

"Miri-Piri" is a concept that has been practiced in Sikh religion since seventeenth century.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Miri piri · See more »

Mughal Empire

The Mughal Empire (گورکانیان, Gūrkāniyān)) or Mogul Empire was an empire in the Indian subcontinent, founded in 1526. It was established and ruled by a Muslim dynasty with Turco-Mongol Chagatai roots from Central Asia, but with significant Indian Rajput and Persian ancestry through marriage alliances; only the first two Mughal emperors were fully Central Asian, while successive emperors were of predominantly Rajput and Persian ancestry. The dynasty was Indo-Persian in culture, combining Persianate culture with local Indian cultural influences visible in its traits and customs. The Mughal Empire at its peak extended over nearly all of the Indian subcontinent and parts of Afghanistan. It was the second largest empire to have existed in the Indian subcontinent, spanning approximately four million square kilometres at its zenith, after only the Maurya Empire, which spanned approximately five million square kilometres. The Mughal Empire ushered in a period of proto-industrialization, and around the 17th century, Mughal India became the world's largest economic power, accounting for 24.4% of world GDP, and the world leader in manufacturing, producing 25% of global industrial output up until the 18th century. The Mughal Empire is considered "India's last golden age" and one of the three Islamic Gunpowder Empires (along with the Ottoman Empire and Safavid Persia). The beginning of the empire is conventionally dated to the victory by its founder Babur over Ibrahim Lodi, the last ruler of the Delhi Sultanate, in the First Battle of Panipat (1526). The Mughal emperors had roots in the Turco-Mongol Timurid dynasty of Central Asia, claiming direct descent from both Genghis Khan (founder of the Mongol Empire, through his son Chagatai Khan) and Timur (Turco-Mongol conqueror who founded the Timurid Empire). During the reign of Humayun, the successor of Babur, the empire was briefly interrupted by the Sur Empire. The "classic period" of the Mughal Empire started in 1556 with the ascension of Akbar the Great to the throne. Under the rule of Akbar and his son Jahangir, the region enjoyed economic progress as well as religious harmony, and the monarchs were interested in local religious and cultural traditions. Akbar was a successful warrior who also forged alliances with several Hindu Rajput kingdoms. Some Rajput kingdoms continued to pose a significant threat to the Mughal dominance of northwestern India, but most of them were subdued by Akbar. All Mughal emperors were Muslims; Akbar, however, propounded a syncretic religion in the latter part of his life called Dīn-i Ilāhī, as recorded in historical books like Ain-i-Akbari and Dabistān-i Mazāhib. The Mughal Empire did not try to intervene in the local societies during most of its existence, but rather balanced and pacified them through new administrative practices and diverse and inclusive ruling elites, leading to more systematic, centralised, and uniform rule. Traditional and newly coherent social groups in northern and western India, such as the Maratha Empire|Marathas, the Rajputs, the Pashtuns, the Hindu Jats and the Sikhs, gained military and governing ambitions during Mughal rule, which, through collaboration or adversity, gave them both recognition and military experience. The reign of Shah Jahan, the fifth emperor, between 1628 and 1658, was the zenith of Mughal architecture. He erected several large monuments, the best known of which is the Taj Mahal at Agra, as well as the Moti Masjid, Agra, the Red Fort, the Badshahi Mosque, the Jama Masjid, Delhi, and the Lahore Fort. The Mughal Empire reached the zenith of its territorial expanse during the reign of Aurangzeb and also started its terminal decline in his reign due to Maratha military resurgence under Category:History of Bengal Category:History of West Bengal Category:History of Bangladesh Category:History of Kolkata Category:Empires and kingdoms of Afghanistan Category:Medieval India Category:Historical Turkic states Category:Mongol states Category:1526 establishments in the Mughal Empire Category:1857 disestablishments in the Mughal Empire Category:History of Pakistan.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Mughal Empire · See more »

Muslim

A Muslim (مُسلِم) is someone who follows or practices Islam, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Muslim · See more »

Punjab

The Punjab, also spelled Panjab (land of "five rivers"; Punjabi: پنجاب (Shahmukhi); ਪੰਜਾਬ (Gurumukhi); Πενταποταμία, Pentapotamia) is a geographical and cultural region in the northern part of the Indian subcontinent, comprising areas of eastern Pakistan and northern India.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Punjab · See more »

Rupnagar

Rupnagar (formerly known as Ropar or Rupar), is a city and a municipal council in Rupnagar district in the Indian state of Punjab.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Rupnagar · See more »

Samarth Ramdas

Shree Samarth Ramdas (Marathi language: Rāmdās) was a noted 17th-century saint and spiritual poet of Maharashtra.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Samarth Ramdas · See more »

Shah Jahan

Mirza Shahab-ud-din Baig Muhammad Khan Khurram (5 January 1592 – 22 January 1666), better known by his regnal name Shah Jahan (شاہ جہاں), (Persian:شاه جهان "King of the World"), was the fifth Mughal emperor, who reigned from 1628 to 1658.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Shah Jahan · See more »

Sikh

A Sikh (ਸਿੱਖ) is a person associated with Sikhism, a monotheistic religion that originated in the 15th century based on the revelation of Guru Nanak.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Sikh · See more »

Sikh gurus

The Sikh gurus established Sikhism over the centuries, beginning in the year 1469.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Sikh gurus · See more »

Sikhism

Sikhism (ਸਿੱਖੀ), or Sikhi,, from Sikh, meaning a "disciple", or a "learner"), is a monotheistic religion that originated in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent about the end of the 15th century. It is one of the youngest of the major world religions, and the fifth-largest. The fundamental beliefs of Sikhism, articulated in the sacred scripture Guru Granth Sahib, include faith and meditation on the name of the one creator, divine unity and equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, striving for social justice for the benefit and prosperity of all, and honest conduct and livelihood while living a householder's life. In the early 21st century there were nearly 25 million Sikhs worldwide, the great majority of them (20 million) living in Punjab, the Sikh homeland in northwest India, and about 2 million living in neighboring Indian states, formerly part of the Punjab. Sikhism is based on the spiritual teachings of Guru Nanak, the first Guru (1469–1539), and the nine Sikh gurus that succeeded him. The Tenth Guru, Guru Gobind Singh, named the Sikh scripture Guru Granth Sahib as his successor, terminating the line of human Gurus and making the scripture the eternal, religious spiritual guide for Sikhs.Louis Fenech and WH McLeod (2014),, 3rd Edition, Rowman & Littlefield,, pages 17, 84-85William James (2011), God's Plenty: Religious Diversity in Kingston, McGill Queens University Press,, pages 241–242 Sikhism rejects claims that any particular religious tradition has a monopoly on Absolute Truth. The Sikh scripture opens with Ik Onkar (ੴ), its Mul Mantar and fundamental prayer about One Supreme Being (God). Sikhism emphasizes simran (meditation on the words of the Guru Granth Sahib), that can be expressed musically through kirtan or internally through Nam Japo (repeat God's name) as a means to feel God's presence. It teaches followers to transform the "Five Thieves" (lust, rage, greed, attachment, and ego). Hand in hand, secular life is considered to be intertwined with the spiritual life., page.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Sikhism · See more »

Sivalik Hills

The Sivalik Hills is a mountain range of the outer Himalayas.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Sivalik Hills · See more »

Stepwell

Stepwells are wells or ponds in which the water is reached by descending a set of steps.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Stepwell · See more »

Sutlej

The Sutlej River (alternatively spelled as Satluj River) (सतलुज, ਸਤਲੁਜ, शतद्रुम (shatadrum), is the longest of the five rivers that flow through the historic crossroads region of Punjab in northern India and Pakistan. The Sutlej River is also known as Satadree. It is the easternmost tributary of the Indus River. The waters of the Sutlej are allocated to India under the Indus Waters Treaty between India and Pakistan, and are mostly diverted to irrigation canals in India. There are several major hydroelectric projects on the Sutlej, including the 1,000 MW Bhakra Dam, the 1,000 MW Karcham Wangtoo Hydroelectric Plant, and the 1,530 MW Nathpa Jhakri Dam. The river basin area in India is located in Himachal Pradesh, Punjab, Jammu and Kashmir, Rajasthan and Haryana states.

New!!: Guru Hargobind and Sutlej · See more »

Redirects here:

Guru Har Gobind, Guru Hargobind Ji, Guru Hargobind Sahib, Guru Hargobind ji, Hargobind, List of places named after Guru Har Gobind, Sri Guru Hargobind, Sri Guru Hargobind Sahib, Sri Guru Hargobind Sahib Ji.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guru_Hargobind

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »