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Gurukula

Index Gurukula

Gurukula (gurukula) was a type of residential schooling system in ancient India with shishya (students) living near or with the guru, in the same house. [1]

27 relations: Arya Samaj, Brahman, Buddhism, D.A.V. College Managing Committee, Dakshina, Dayananda Saraswati, Drona, Education in India, Gujarat, Gurgaon, Guru, Guru–shishya tradition, Gurukul Kangri Vishwavidyalaya, Gurukul Sanskrit Mahavidyalaya, Suryakund, Budaun, Hinduism, History of education in the Indian subcontinent, India, Jainism, Kaula, Rajkot, Sikhism, South Asia, Swami Shraddhanand, Swaminarayan Gurukul, Uchi-deshi, Upanayana, Upanishads.

Arya Samaj

Arya Samaj (Sanskrit: आर्य समाज "Noble Society" Hindi: आर्य समाज, Bengali: আর্য সমাজ, Punjabi: ਆਰੀਆ ਸਮਾਜ, Gujarati: આર્ય સમાજ) is an Indian Hindu reform movement that promotes values and practices based on the belief in the infallible authority of the Vedas.

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Brahman

In Hinduism, Brahman connotes the highest Universal Principle, the Ultimate Reality in the universe.P. T. Raju (2006), Idealistic Thought of India, Routledge,, page 426 and Conclusion chapter part XII In major schools of Hindu philosophy, it is the material, efficient, formal and final cause of all that exists.For dualism school of Hinduism, see: Francis X. Clooney (2010), Hindu God, Christian God: How Reason Helps Break Down the Boundaries between Religions, Oxford University Press,, pages 51–58, 111–115;For monist school of Hinduism, see: B. Martinez-Bedard (2006), Types of Causes in Aristotle and Sankara, Thesis – Department of Religious Studies (Advisors: Kathryn McClymond and Sandra Dwyer), Georgia State University, pages 18–35 It is the pervasive, genderless, infinite, eternal truth and bliss which does not change, yet is the cause of all changes. Brahman as a metaphysical concept is the single binding unity behind diversity in all that exists in the universe. Brahman is a Vedic Sanskrit word, and it is conceptualized in Hinduism, states Paul Deussen, as the "creative principle which lies realized in the whole world". Brahman is a key concept found in the Vedas, and it is extensively discussed in the early Upanishads.Stephen Philips (1998), Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Brahman to Derrida (Editor; Edward Craig), Routledge,, pages 1–4 The Vedas conceptualize Brahman as the Cosmic Principle. In the Upanishads, it has been variously described as Sat-cit-ānanda (truth-consciousness-bliss) and as the unchanging, permanent, highest reality. Brahman is discussed in Hindu texts with the concept of Atman (Soul, Self), personal, impersonal or Para Brahman, or in various combinations of these qualities depending on the philosophical school. In dualistic schools of Hinduism such as the theistic Dvaita Vedanta, Brahman is different from Atman (soul) in each being.Michael Myers (2000), Brahman: A Comparative Theology, Routledge,, pages 124–127 In non-dual schools such as the Advaita Vedanta, Brahman is identical to the Atman, is everywhere and inside each living being, and there is connected spiritual oneness in all existence.Arvind Sharma (2007), Advaita Vedānta: An Introduction, Motilal Banarsidass,, pages 19–40, 53–58, 79–86.

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Buddhism

Buddhism is the world's fourth-largest religion with over 520 million followers, or over 7% of the global population, known as Buddhists.

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D.A.V. College Managing Committee

The D.A.V. College Managing Committee, familiarly known as DAVCMC, is a non-governmental educational organisation in India and overseas with over 900+ schools, 75+ colleges and a university.

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Dakshina

Dakshinā,, or दक्षिणा), is a Sanskrit word found in Buddhist, Hindu and Jain literature where it may mean any donation, fees or honorarium given to a cause, monastery, temple, spiritual guide or after a ritual. It may be expected, or a tradition or voluntary form of daana. The term is found in this context in the Vedic literature. It may mean honorarium to a guru for education, training or guidance.

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Dayananda Saraswati

Dayanand Saraswati (12 February 1824 – 30 October 1883) was an Indian religious leader and founder of the Arya Samaj, a Hindu reform movement of the Vedic dharma.

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Drona

In the epic Mahabharata, Droṇa (द्रोण) or Droṇācārya or Guru Droṇa or Rajaguru Devadroṇa was the royal preceptor to the Kauravas and Pandavas; an avatar of Brihaspati.

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Education in India

Education in India is provided by the public sector as well as the private sector, with control and funding coming from three levels: central, state and local.

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Gujarat

Gujarat is a state in Western India and Northwest India with an area of, a coastline of – most of which lies on the Kathiawar peninsula – and a population in excess of 60 million.

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Gurgaon

Gurgaon, officially named Gurugram since 2016, is a satellite city of Delhi located in the Indian state of Haryana and is part of the National Capital Region of India.

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Guru

Guru (गुरु, IAST: guru) is a Sanskrit term that connotes someone who is a "teacher, guide, expert, or master" of certain knowledge or field.

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Guru–shishya tradition

The guru–shishya tradition, or parampara ("lineage"), denotes a succession of teachers and disciples in traditional Indian culture and religions such as Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism and Buddhism (Tibetan and Zen tradition).

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Gurukul Kangri Vishwavidyalaya

Gurukula Kangri University or Gurukul Kangri Vishwavidyalaya ('गुरुकुल कांगड़ी विश्वविद्यालय') is a university in the city of Haridwar in the Indian state of Uttarakhand.

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Gurukul Sanskrit Mahavidyalaya, Suryakund, Budaun

Gurukul Sanskrit Mahavidyalaya, Suryakund, Budaun (गुरुकुल संस्कृत महाविद्यालय, सूर्यकुंड, बदायूँ) is an ancient Gurukula school (a place of education) located on Dataganj road Budaun.

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Hinduism

Hinduism is an Indian religion and dharma, or a way of life, widely practised in the Indian subcontinent.

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History of education in the Indian subcontinent

The history of education began with teaching of traditional elements such as Indian religions, Indian mathematics, Indian logic at early Hindu and Buddhist centres of learning such as ancient Taxila (in modern-day Pakistan) and Nalanda (in India) before the common era.

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India

India (IAST), also called the Republic of India (IAST), is a country in South Asia.

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Jainism

Jainism, traditionally known as Jain Dharma, is an ancient Indian religion.

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Kaula

Kaula, also known as Kula, ("the Kula practice") and ("the Kaula conduct"), is a religious tradition in Shaktism and tantric Shaivism characterised by distinctive rituals and symbolism connected with the worship of Shakti.

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Rajkot

Rajkot (Rājkot) is the fourth-largest city in the state of Gujarat, India, after Ahmedabad, Surat and Vadodara.

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Sikhism

Sikhism (ਸਿੱਖੀ), or Sikhi,, from Sikh, meaning a "disciple", or a "learner"), is a monotheistic religion that originated in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent about the end of the 15th century. It is one of the youngest of the major world religions, and the fifth-largest. The fundamental beliefs of Sikhism, articulated in the sacred scripture Guru Granth Sahib, include faith and meditation on the name of the one creator, divine unity and equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, striving for social justice for the benefit and prosperity of all, and honest conduct and livelihood while living a householder's life. In the early 21st century there were nearly 25 million Sikhs worldwide, the great majority of them (20 million) living in Punjab, the Sikh homeland in northwest India, and about 2 million living in neighboring Indian states, formerly part of the Punjab. Sikhism is based on the spiritual teachings of Guru Nanak, the first Guru (1469–1539), and the nine Sikh gurus that succeeded him. The Tenth Guru, Guru Gobind Singh, named the Sikh scripture Guru Granth Sahib as his successor, terminating the line of human Gurus and making the scripture the eternal, religious spiritual guide for Sikhs.Louis Fenech and WH McLeod (2014),, 3rd Edition, Rowman & Littlefield,, pages 17, 84-85William James (2011), God's Plenty: Religious Diversity in Kingston, McGill Queens University Press,, pages 241–242 Sikhism rejects claims that any particular religious tradition has a monopoly on Absolute Truth. The Sikh scripture opens with Ik Onkar (ੴ), its Mul Mantar and fundamental prayer about One Supreme Being (God). Sikhism emphasizes simran (meditation on the words of the Guru Granth Sahib), that can be expressed musically through kirtan or internally through Nam Japo (repeat God's name) as a means to feel God's presence. It teaches followers to transform the "Five Thieves" (lust, rage, greed, attachment, and ego). Hand in hand, secular life is considered to be intertwined with the spiritual life., page.

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South Asia

South Asia or Southern Asia (also known as the Indian subcontinent) is a term used to represent the southern region of the Asian continent, which comprises the sub-Himalayan SAARC countries and, for some authorities, adjoining countries to the west and east.

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Swami Shraddhanand

Swami Shraddhanand (1856–1926), also known as Mahatma Munshi Ram Vij, was an Indian educationist and an Arya Samaj missionary who propagated the teachings of Dayananda Saraswati.

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Swaminarayan Gurukul

Shree Swaminarayan Gurukul is an educational organisation headquartered in Rajkot.

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Uchi-deshi

is a Japanese term for a live-in student/apprentice who trains under and assists a sensei on a full-time basis.

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Upanayana

Upanayana (उपनयन) is one of the traditional saṃskāras (rites of passage) that marked the acceptance of a student by a guru (teacher) and an individual's entrance to a school in Hinduism.

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Upanishads

The Upanishads (उपनिषद्), a part of the Vedas, are ancient Sanskrit texts that contain some of the central philosophical concepts and ideas of Hinduism, some of which are shared with religious traditions like Buddhism and Jainism.

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Redirects here:

Gurukul, Gurukulam, Gurukulas, Traditional Tamil teaching system.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gurukula

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