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Haloperidol

Index Haloperidol

Haloperidol, marketed under the trade name Haldol among others, is a typical antipsychotic medication. [1]

159 relations: Activated carbon, Acute liver failure, Adrenaline, Adverse event, Aggression, Agranulocytosis, Akathisia, Alcohol withdrawal syndrome, Alpha-1A adrenergic receptor, Alpha-2A adrenergic receptor, Alpha-2B adrenergic receptor, Alpha-2C adrenergic receptor, American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Amiodarone, Amphetamine, Anaphylaxis, Anemia, Animal testing, Anticholinergic, Antipsychotic, Aripiprazole, Asenapine, Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Australian Approved Name, Belgium, Bile duct, Biological half-life, Bipolar disorder, Borderline personality disorder, Boxed warning, British Approved Name, Bromocriptine, Buspirone, Butyrophenone, Carbamazepine, Chemotherapy, Chlorpromazine, Cholestasis, Choosing Wisely, Chorea, Cmax (pharmacology), Coma, Complete blood count, Cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis, CYP3A4, Decanoic acid, Delirium, Dementia, Dementia with Lewy bodies, Dopamine receptor D1, ..., Dopamine receptor D2, Dopamine receptor D3, Dopamine receptor D4, Dopamine receptor D5, Drug-induced QT prolongation, Dystonia, Encephalopathy, Ester, Extrapyramidal symptoms, Feather-plucking, Fluoxetine, Food and Drug Administration, Gastric lavage, Guanethidine, Gynecomastia, Hallucination, Headache, Health system, Hiccup, Histamine H1 receptor, Hives, Hypertension, Hypokalemia, Hyponatremia, Hypotension, IC50, Ifenprodil, Ileus, Injection (medicine), International nonproprietary name, Intramuscular injection, Intravenous therapy, Janssen Pharmaceutica, L-DOPA, Laryngospasm, Leukopenia, Ligand (biochemistry), Lithium (medication), Liver, Long QT syndrome, Mania, McNeil Consumer Healthcare, Methyldopa, Methylphenidate, Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M1, Narcolepsy, Neuroleptic malignant syndrome, Neutropenia, NMDA receptor, Non-epileptic seizure, Oncology, Orthostatic hypotension, Paliperidone, Palliative care, Pancytopenia, Parkinson's disease, Parkinsonism, Patient satisfaction, Paul Janssen, Personality disorder, Perspiration, Pethidine, Pharmacodynamics, Pharmacology, Phenobarbital, Phenothiazine, Placebo, Preferred IUPAC name, Premature ventricular contraction, Priapism, Psychosis, QT interval, Quetiapine, Quinidine, Radiation therapy, Relative risk, Retinopathy, Rifampicin, Ropinirole, Schizophrenia, Sclerosis (medicine), Sedation, Shortness of breath, Sigma-1 receptor, Sigma-2 receptor, Somnolence, Systematic review, Tardive dyskinesia, Teratology, The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach, Thrombocytopenia, Tic disorder, Topical medication, Torsades de pointes, Tourette syndrome, Trade name, Tricyclic antidepressant, Typical antipsychotic, United States Adopted Name, Ventricular fibrillation, Ventricular tachycardia, Vomiting, WHO Model List of Essential Medicines, Ziprasidone, 5-HT1A receptor, 5-HT2A receptor, 5-HT2C receptor, 5-HT6 receptor, 5-HT7 receptor. Expand index (109 more) »

Activated carbon

Activated carbon, also called activated charcoal, is a form of carbon processed to have small, low-volume pores that increase the surface area available for adsorption or chemical reactions.

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Acute liver failure

Acute liver failure is the appearance of severe complications rapidly after the first signs of liver disease (such as jaundice), and indicates that the liver has sustained severe damage (loss of function of 80–90% of liver cells).

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Adrenaline

Adrenaline, also known as adrenalin or epinephrine, is a hormone, neurotransmitter, and medication.

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Adverse event

An adverse event (AE) is any untoward medical occurrence in a patient or clinical investigation subject administered a pharmaceutical product and which does not necessarily have a causal relationship with this treatment.

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Aggression

Aggression is overt, often harmful, social interaction with the intention of inflicting damage or other unpleasantness upon another individual.

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Agranulocytosis

Agranulocytosis, also known as agranulosis or granulopenia, is an acute condition involving a severe and dangerous leukopenia (lowered white blood cell count), most commonly of neutrophils causing a neutropenia in the circulating blood.

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Akathisia

Akathisia is a movement disorder characterized by a feeling of inner restlessness and inability to stay still.

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Alcohol withdrawal syndrome

Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is a set of symptoms that can occur following a reduction in alcohol use after a period of excessive use.

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Alpha-1A adrenergic receptor

The alpha-1A adrenergic receptor (α1A adrenoreceptor), also known as ADRA1A, formerly known also as the alpha-1C adrenergic receptor, is an alpha-1 adrenergic receptor, and also denotes the human gene encoding it.

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Alpha-2A adrenergic receptor

The alpha-2A adrenergic receptor (α2A adrenoceptor), also known as ADRA2A, is an α2 adrenergic receptor, and also denotes the human gene encoding it.

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Alpha-2B adrenergic receptor

The alpha-2B adrenergic receptor (α2B adrenoceptor), is a G-protein coupled receptor.

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Alpha-2C adrenergic receptor

The alpha-2C adrenergic receptor (α2C adrenoceptor), also known as ADRA2C, is an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor, and also denotes the human gene encoding it.

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American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine

The American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (AAHPM) is a professional organization for physicians specializing in Hospice and Palliative Medicine, headquartered in Chicago, Illinois.

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Amiodarone

Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic medication used to treat and prevent a number of types of irregular heartbeats.

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Amphetamine

Amphetamine (contracted from) is a potent central nervous system (CNS) stimulant that is used in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), narcolepsy, and obesity.

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Anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis is a serious allergic reaction that is rapid in onset and may cause death.

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Anemia

Anemia is a decrease in the total amount of red blood cells (RBCs) or hemoglobin in the blood, or a lowered ability of the blood to carry oxygen.

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Animal testing

Animal testing, also known as animal experimentation, animal research and in vivo testing, is the use of non-human animals in experiments that seek to control the variables that affect the behavior or biological system under study.

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Anticholinergic

An anticholinergic agent is a substance that blocks the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the central and the peripheral nervous system.

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Antipsychotic

Antipsychotics, also known as neuroleptics or major tranquilizers, are a class of medication primarily used to manage psychosis (including delusions, hallucinations, paranoia or disordered thought), principally in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

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Aripiprazole

Aripiprazole, sold under the brand name Abilify among others, is an atypical antipsychotic. It is recommended and primarily used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Other uses include as an add-on treatment in major depressive disorder, tic disorders, and irritability associated with autism. According to a Cochrane review, evidence for the oral form in schizophrenia is not sufficient to determine effects on general functioning. Additionally, because many people dropped out of the medication trials before they were completed, the overall strength of the conclusions is low. Side effects include neuroleptic malignant syndrome, a movement disorder known as tardive dyskinesia, and high blood sugar in those with diabetes. In the elderly there is an increased risk of death. It is thus not recommended for use in those with psychosis due to dementia. It is pregnancy category C in the United States and category C in Australia, meaning there is possible evidence of harm to the fetus. It is not recommended for women who are breastfeeding. It is unclear whether it is safe or effective in people less than 18 years old. It is a partial dopamine agonist. Aripiprazole was developed by Otsuka in Japan. In the United States, Otsuka America markets it jointly with Bristol-Myers Squibb. From April 2013 to March 2014, sales of Abilify amounted to almost $6.9 billion.

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Asenapine

Asenapine, sold under the trade names Saphris and Sycrest among others, is an atypical antipsychotic medication used to treat schizophrenia and acute mania associated with bipolar disorder.

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Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a mental disorder of the neurodevelopmental type.

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Australian Approved Name

An Australian Approved Name (AAN) is a generic drug name set by the TGA for use in Australia.

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Belgium

Belgium, officially the Kingdom of Belgium, is a country in Western Europe bordered by France, the Netherlands, Germany and Luxembourg.

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Bile duct

A bile duct is any of a number of long tube-like structures that carry bile, and is present in most vertebrates.

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Biological half-life

The biological half-life of a biological substance is the time it takes for half to be removed by biological processes when the rate of removal is roughly exponential.

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Bipolar disorder

Bipolar disorder, previously known as manic depression, is a mental disorder that causes periods of depression and periods of abnormally elevated mood.

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Borderline personality disorder

Borderline personality disorder (BPD), also known as emotionally unstable personality disorder (EUPD), is a long-term pattern of abnormal behavior characterized by unstable relationships with other people, unstable sense of self, and unstable emotions.

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Boxed warning

In the United States, a boxed warning (sometimes "black box warning", colloquially) is a type of warning that appears on the package insert for certain prescription drugs, so called because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration specifies that it is formatted with a 'box' or border around the text.

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British Approved Name

A British Approved Name (BAN) is the official non-proprietary or generic name given to a pharmaceutical substance, as defined in the British Pharmacopoeia (BP).

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Bromocriptine

Bromocriptine (originally marketed as Parlodel, subsequently under many names) is an ergoline derivative, is a dopamine agonist that is used in the treatment of pituitary tumors, Parkinson's disease (PD), hyperprolactinaemia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and type 2 diabetes.

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Buspirone

Buspirone, sold under the brand name Buspar, is an anxiolytic drug that is primarily used to treat generalized anxiety disorder (GAD).

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Butyrophenone

Butyrophenone is a chemical compound; some of its derivatives (called commonly butyrophenones) are used to treat various psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, as well as acting as antiemetics.

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Carbamazepine

Carbamazepine (CBZ), sold under the tradename Tegretol, among others, is a medication used primarily in the treatment of epilepsy and neuropathic pain.

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Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy (often abbreviated to chemo and sometimes CTX or CTx) is a type of cancer treatment that uses one or more anti-cancer drugs (chemotherapeutic agents) as part of a standardized chemotherapy regimen.

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Chlorpromazine

Chlorpromazine (CPZ), marketed under the trade names Thorazine and Largactil among others, is an antipsychotic medication.

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Cholestasis

Cholestasis is a condition where bile cannot flow from the liver to the duodenum.

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Choosing Wisely

Choosing Wisely is a United States-based health educational campaign, led by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM).

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Chorea

Chorea (or choreia, occasionally) is an abnormal involuntary movement disorder, one of a group of neurological disorders called dyskinesias.

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Cmax (pharmacology)

Cmax is the maximum (or peak) serum concentration that a drug achieves in a specified compartment or test area of the body after the drug has been administrated and before the administration of a second dose.

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Coma

Coma is a state of unconsciousness in which a person cannot be awaken; fails to respond normally to painful stimuli, light, or sound; lacks a normal wake-sleep cycle; and does not initiate voluntary actions.

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Complete blood count

A complete blood count (CBC), also known as a complete blood cell count, full blood count (FBC), or full blood exam (FBE), is a blood panel requested by a doctor or other medical professional that gives information about the cells in a patient's blood, such as the cell count for each cell type and the concentrations of various proteins and minerals.

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Cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis

Cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis, also known as hypersensitivity vasculitis, cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis, hypersensitivity angiitis, cutaneous leukocytoclastic angiitis, cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis and cutaneous necrotizing venulitis, is inflammation of small blood vessels (usually post-capillary venules in the dermis), characterized by palpable purpura.

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CYP3A4

Cytochrome P450 3A4 (abbreviated CYP3A4) is an important enzyme in the body, mainly found in the liver and in the intestine.

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Decanoic acid

Decanoic acid (capric acid) is a saturated fatty acid.

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Delirium

Delirium, also known as acute confusional state, is an organically caused decline from a previously baseline level of mental function.

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Dementia

Dementia is a broad category of brain diseases that cause a long-term and often gradual decrease in the ability to think and remember that is great enough to affect a person's daily functioning.

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Dementia with Lewy bodies

Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is a type of dementia accompanied by changes in behavior, cognition and movement.

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Dopamine receptor D1

Dopamine receptor D1, also known as DRD1, is a protein that in humans is encoded by the DRD1 gene.

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Dopamine receptor D2

Dopamine receptor D2, also known as D2R, is a protein that, in humans, is encoded by the DRD2 gene.

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Dopamine receptor D3

Dopamine receptor D3 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the DRD3 gene.

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Dopamine receptor D4

The dopamine receptor D4 is a dopamine D2-like G protein-coupled receptor encoded by the gene on chromosome 11 at 11p15.5.

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Dopamine receptor D5

Dopamine receptor D5, also known as D1BR, is a protein that in humans is encoded by the DRD5 gene.

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Drug-induced QT prolongation

Drug-induced QT prolongation is seen with a QT interval above 0.45 ms on the ECG and is usually a result of treatment by anti-arrhythmic drugs, such as amiodarone and sotalol, or a number of other drugs that have been reported to cause this problem (e.g., cisapride).

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Dystonia

Dystonia is a neurological movement disorder syndrome in which sustained or repetitive muscle contractions result in twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal fixed postures.

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Encephalopathy

Encephalopathy (from ἐγκέφαλος "brain" + πάθος "suffering") means any disorder or disease of the brain, especially chronic degenerative conditions.

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Ester

In chemistry, an ester is a chemical compound derived from an acid (organic or inorganic) in which at least one –OH (hydroxyl) group is replaced by an –O–alkyl (alkoxy) group.

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Extrapyramidal symptoms

Extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), also known as extrapyramidal side effects (EPSE), are drug-induced movement disorders that include acute and tardive symptoms.

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Feather-plucking

Feather-plucking, sometimes termed feather-picking, feather damaging behaviour or pterotillomania, is a maladaptive, behavioural disorder commonly seen in captive birds which chew, bite or pluck their own feathers with their beak, resulting in damage to the feathers and occasionally the skin.

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Fluoxetine

Fluoxetine, also known by trade names Prozac and Sarafem, among others, is an antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class.

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Food and Drug Administration

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or USFDA) is a federal agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, one of the United States federal executive departments.

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Gastric lavage

Gastric lavage, also commonly called stomach pumping or gastric irrigation, is the process of cleaning out the contents of the stomach.

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Guanethidine

Guanethidine is an antihypertensive drug that reduces the release of catecholamines, such as norepinephrine.

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Gynecomastia

Gynecomastia is an endocrine system disorder in which a noncancerous increase in the size of male breast tissue occurs.

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Hallucination

A hallucination is a perception in the absence of external stimulus that has qualities of real perception.

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Headache

Headache is the symptom of pain anywhere in the region of the head or neck.

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Health system

A health system, also sometimes referred to as health care system or as healthcare system, is the organization of people, institutions, and resources that deliver health care services to meet the health needs of target populations.

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Hiccup

A hiccup (also spelled hiccough) is an involuntary contraction (myoclonic jerk) of the diaphragm that may repeat several times per minute.

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Histamine H1 receptor

The H1 receptor is a histamine receptor belonging to the family of rhodopsin-like G-protein-coupled receptors.

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Hives

Hives, also known as urticaria, is a kind of skin rash with red, raised, itchy bumps.

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Hypertension

Hypertension (HTN or HT), also known as high blood pressure (HBP), is a long-term medical condition in which the blood pressure in the arteries is persistently elevated.

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Hypokalemia

Hypokalemia, also spelled hypokalaemia, is a low level of potassium (K+) in the blood serum.

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Hyponatremia

Hyponatremia is a low sodium level in the blood.

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Hypotension

Hypotension is low blood pressure, especially in the arteries of the systemic circulation.

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IC50

The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) is a measure of the potency of a substance in inhibiting a specific biological or biochemical function.

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Ifenprodil

Ifenprodil is an inhibitor of the NMDA receptor, specifically of GluN1 (glycine-binding NMDA receptor subunit 1) and GluN2B (glutamate-binding NMDA receptor subunit 2) subunits.

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Ileus

Ileus is a disruption of the normal propulsive ability of the gastrointestinal tract.

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Injection (medicine)

Injection (often referred to as a "shot" in US English, or a "jab" in UK English) is the act of putting a liquid, especially a drug, into a person's body using a needle (usually a hypodermic needle) and a syringe.

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International nonproprietary name

The International Nonproprietary Name (INN) is an official generic and non-proprietary name given to a pharmaceutical drug or an active ingredient.

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Intramuscular injection

Intramuscular (also IM or im) injection is the injection of a substance directly into muscle.

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Intravenous therapy

Intravenous therapy (IV) is a therapy that delivers liquid substances directly into a vein (intra- + ven- + -ous).

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Janssen Pharmaceutica

Janssen Pharmaceutica is a pharmaceutical company headquartered in Beerse, Belgium.

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L-DOPA

L-DOPA, also known as levodopa or L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine is an amino acid that is made and used as part of the normal biology of humans, as well as some animals and plants.

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Laryngospasm

In medicine, laryngospasm is an uncontrolled/involuntary muscular contraction (spasm) of the vocal folds.

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Leukopenia

Leukopenia is a decrease in the number of white blood cells (leukocytes) found in the blood, which places individuals at increased risk of infection.

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Ligand (biochemistry)

In biochemistry and pharmacology, a ligand is a substance that forms a complex with a biomolecule to serve a biological purpose.

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Lithium (medication)

Lithium compounds, also known as lithium salts, are primarily used as a psychiatric medication.

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Liver

The liver, an organ only found in vertebrates, detoxifies various metabolites, synthesizes proteins, and produces biochemicals necessary for digestion.

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Long QT syndrome

Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a condition which affects repolarization of the heart after a heartbeat.

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Mania

Mania, also known as manic syndrome, is a state of abnormally elevated arousal, affect, and energy level, or "a state of heightened overall activation with enhanced affective expression together with lability of affect." Although mania is often conceived as a "mirror image" to depression, the heightened mood can be either euphoric or irritable; indeed, as the mania intensifies, irritability can be more pronounced and result in violence, or anxiety.

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McNeil Consumer Healthcare

McNeil Consumer Healthcare is an American medicals products company belonging to the Johnson & Johnson healthcare products group.

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Methyldopa

Methyldopa, sold under the brand name Aldomet among others, is a medication used for high blood pressure.

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Methylphenidate

Methylphenidate, sold under various trade names, Ritalin being one of the most commonly known, is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant of the phenethylamine and piperidine classes that is used in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy.

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Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M1

The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M1, also known as the cholinergic receptor, muscarinic 1, is a muscarinic receptor that in humans is encoded by the CHRM1 gene.

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Narcolepsy

Narcolepsy is a long-term neurological disorder that involves a decreased ability to regulate sleep-wake cycles.

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Neuroleptic malignant syndrome

Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a life-threatening reaction that occasionally occurs in response to neuroleptic or antipsychotic medication.

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Neutropenia

Neutropenia or neutropaenia is an abnormally low concentration of neutrophils (a type of white blood cell) in the blood.

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NMDA receptor

The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (also known as the NMDA receptor or NMDAR), is a glutamate receptor and ion channel protein found in nerve cells.

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Non-epileptic seizure

Non-epileptic seizures are paroxysmal events that mimic an epileptic seizure but do not involve abnormal, rhythmic discharges of cortical neurons.

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Oncology

Oncology is a branch of medicine that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer.

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Orthostatic hypotension

Orthostatic hypotension, also known as postural hypotension, occurs when a person's blood pressure falls when suddenly standing up from a lying or sitting position.

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Paliperidone

Paliperidone, sold under the trade name Invega among others, is a dopamine antagonist and 5-HT2A antagonist of the atypical antipsychotic class of medications.

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Palliative care

Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to specialized medical and nursing care for people with life-limiting illnesses.

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Pancytopenia

Pancytopenia is a medical condition in which there is a reduction in the number of red and white blood cells, as well as platelets.

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Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a long-term degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that mainly affects the motor system.

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Parkinsonism

Parkinsonism is a clinical syndrome characterized by tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural instability.

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Patient satisfaction

Patient satisfaction is a measure of the extent to which a patient is content with the health care which they received from their health care provider.

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Paul Janssen

Paul Adriaan Jan, Baron Janssen (12 September 1926, Turnhout – 11 November 2003, Rome) was a Belgian physician.

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Personality disorder

Personality disorders (PD) are a class of mental disorders characterized by enduring maladaptive patterns of behavior, cognition, and inner experience, exhibited across many contexts and deviating from those accepted by the individual's culture.

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Perspiration

Perspiration, also known as sweating, is the production of fluids secreted by the sweat glands in the skin of mammals.

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Pethidine

Pethidine, also known as meperidine and sold under the brand name Demerol among others, is a synthetic opioid pain medication of the phenylpiperidine class.

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Pharmacodynamics

Pharmacodynamics is the study of the biochemical and physiologic effects of drugs (especially pharmaceutical drugs).

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Pharmacology

Pharmacology is the branch of biology concerned with the study of drug action, where a drug can be broadly defined as any man-made, natural, or endogenous (from within body) molecule which exerts a biochemical or physiological effect on the cell, tissue, organ, or organism (sometimes the word pharmacon is used as a term to encompass these endogenous and exogenous bioactive species).

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Phenobarbital

Phenobarbital, also known as phenobarbitone or phenobarb, is a medication recommended by the World Health Organization for the treatment of certain types of epilepsy in developing countries.

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Phenothiazine

Phenothiazine, abbreviated PTZ, is an organic compound that has the formula S(C6H4)2NH and is related to the thiazine-class of heterocyclic compounds.

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Placebo

A placebo is a substance or treatment of no intended therapeutic value.

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Preferred IUPAC name

In chemical nomenclature, a preferred IUPAC name (PIN) is a unique name, assigned to a chemical substance and preferred among the possible names generated by IUPAC nomenclature.

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Premature ventricular contraction

A premature ventricular contraction (PVC)—also known as a premature ventricular complex, ventricular premature contraction (or complex or complexes) (VPC), ventricular premature beat (VPB), or ventricular extrasystole (VES)—is a relatively common event where the heartbeat is initiated by Purkinje fibers in the ventricles rather than by the sinoatrial node, the normal heartbeat initiator.

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Priapism

Priapism is a condition in which a penis remains erect for hours in the absence of stimulation or after stimulation has ended.

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Psychosis

Psychosis is an abnormal condition of the mind that results in difficulties telling what is real and what is not.

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QT interval

In cardiology, the QT interval is a measure of the time between the start of the Q wave and the end of the T wave in the heart's electrical cycle.

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Quetiapine

Quetiapine, marketed as Seroquel among other names, is an atypical antipsychotic used for the treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder.

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Quinidine

Quinidine is a pharmaceutical agent that acts as a class I antiarrhythmic agent (Ia) in the heart.

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Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy or radiotherapy, often abbreviated RT, RTx, or XRT, is therapy using ionizing radiation, generally as part of cancer treatment to control or kill malignant cells and normally delivered by a linear accelerator.

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Relative risk

In statistics and epidemiology, relative risk or risk ratio (RR) is the ratio of the probability of an event occurring (for example, developing a disease, being injured) in an exposed group to the probability of the event occurring in a comparison, non-exposed group.

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Retinopathy

Retinopathy is any damage to the retina of the eyes, which may cause vision impairment.

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Rifampicin

Rifampicin, also known as rifampin, is an antibiotic used to treat several types of bacterial infections, including tuberculosis, leprosy, and Legionnaire's disease.

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Ropinirole

Ropinirole (INN; trade names Requip, Repreve, Ronirol, Adartrel) is a dopamine agonist of the non-ergoline class of medications.

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Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a mental disorder characterized by abnormal social behavior and failure to understand reality.

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Sclerosis (medicine)

In medicine, sclerosis (also spelled sclerosus in the names of a few disorders; from Greek σκληρός "hard") is the stiffening of a structure, usually caused by a replacement of the normal organ-specific tissue with connective tissue.

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Sedation

Sedation is the reduction of irritability or agitation by administration of sedative drugs, generally to facilitate a medical procedure or diagnostic procedure.

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Shortness of breath

Shortness of breath, also known as dyspnea, is the feeling that one cannot breathe well enough.

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Sigma-1 receptor

The sigma-1 receptor (σ1R), one of two sigma receptor subtypes, is a chaperone protein at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that modulates calcium signaling through the IP3 receptor.

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Sigma-2 receptor

The sigma-2 receptor (σ2R) is a sigma receptor subtype that has been found highly expressed in malignant cancer cells, and is currently under investigation for its potential diagnostic and therapeutic uses.

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Somnolence

Somnolence (alternatively "sleepiness" or "drowsiness") is a state of strong desire for sleep, or sleeping for unusually long periods (compare hypersomnia).

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Systematic review

Systematic reviews are a type of literature review that uses systematic methods to collect secondary data, critically appraise research studies, and synthesize studies.

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Tardive dyskinesia

Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a disorder that results in involuntary, repetitive body movements.

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Teratology

Teratology is the study of abnormalities of physiological development.

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The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach

The GRADE approach (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) is a method of assessing the certainty in evidence (also known as quality of evidence or confidence in effect estimates) and the strength of recommendations in health care.

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Thrombocytopenia

Thrombocytopenia is a condition characterized by abnormally low levels of thrombocytes, also known as platelets, in the blood.

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Tic disorder

Tic disorders is defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) based on type (motor or phonic) and duration of tics (sudden, rapid, nonrhythmic movements).

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Topical medication

A topical medication is a medication that is applied to a particular place on or in the body.

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Torsades de pointes

Torsades de pointes or torsade depointes (TdP or simply torsade(s)) (translated as "twisting of the points"), is a specific type of abnormal heart rhythm that can lead to sudden cardiac death.

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Tourette syndrome

Tourette syndrome (TS or simply Tourette's) is a common neuropsychiatric disorder with onset in childhood, characterized by multiple motor tics and at least one vocal (phonic) tic.

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Trade name

A trade name, trading name, or business name is a pseudonym frequently used by companies to operate under a name different from their registered, legal name.

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Tricyclic antidepressant

Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are a class of medications that are used primarily as antidepressants.

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Typical antipsychotic

Typical antipsychotics are a class of antipsychotic drugs first developed in the 1950s and used to treat psychosis (in particular, schizophrenia).

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United States Adopted Name

United States Adopted Names are unique nonproprietary names assigned to pharmaceuticals marketed in the United States.

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Ventricular fibrillation

Ventricular fibrillation (V-fib or VF) is when the heart quivers instead of pumping due to disorganized electrical activity in the ventricles.

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Ventricular tachycardia

Ventricular tachycardia (V-tach or VT) is a type of regular and fast heart rate that arises from improper electrical activity in the ventricles of the heart.

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Vomiting

Vomiting, also known as emesis, puking, barfing, throwing up, among other terms, is the involuntary, forceful expulsion of the contents of one's stomach through the mouth and sometimes the nose.

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WHO Model List of Essential Medicines

The WHO Model List of Essential Medicines (EML), published by the World Health Organization (WHO), contains the medications considered to be most effective and safe to meet the most important needs in a health system.

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Ziprasidone

Ziprasidone, sold under the brand name Geodon among others, is an atypical antipsychotic which is used for the treatment of schizophrenia as well as acute mania and mixed states associated with bipolar disorder.

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5-HT1A receptor

The serotonin 1A receptor (or 5-HT1A receptor) is a subtype of serotonin receptor (5-HT receptor) that binds the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT).

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5-HT2A receptor

The mammalian 5-HT2A receptor is a subtype of the 5-HT2 receptor that belongs to the serotonin receptor family and is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR).

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5-HT2C receptor

The 5-HT2C receptor is a subtype of 5-HT receptor that binds the endogenous neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT).

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5-HT6 receptor

The 5HT6 receptor is a subtype of 5HT receptor that binds the endogenous neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT).

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5-HT7 receptor

The 5-HT7 receptor is a member of the GPCR superfamily of cell surface receptors and is activated by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) The 5-HT7 receptor is coupled to Gs (stimulates the production of the intracellular signaling molecule cAMP) and is expressed in a variety of human tissues, particularly in the brain, the gastrointestinal tract, and in various blood vessels.

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References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haloperidol

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