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Harlem is a large neighborhood in the northern section of the New York City borough of Manhattan. [1]

253 relations: A. Philip Randolph, Abyssinian Baptist Church, Adam Clayton Powell Jr., Adam Clayton Powell Jr. State Office Building, African American Day Parade, African Americans, African Methodist Episcopal Church, African-American businesses, All Saints Church (Manhattan), AM New York, American Civil War, American Mafia, American middle class, American Negro Theater, American Revolution, Angola, Apollo Theater, Arthur Mitchell (dancer), Astor Row, ATLAH World Missionary Church, Bangladesh, Baptists, Big L, Bill Robinson, Black Hebrew Israelites, Black Issues Book Review, Black mecca, Blockhouse No. 1 (Central Park), Boroughs of New York City, Boys Choir of Harlem, Brian Benjamin, Bribery, Burlesque, Business cycle, Cardiovascular disease, Catholic Church, Central Park, Charter school, Chicken Noodle Soup (song), Christian, City, City College of New York, Cockroach, College of New Rochelle, Commandment Keepers, Commuter rail, Congress of Racial Equality, Connie's Inn, Coogan's Bluff, Cotton Club, ..., Crack cocaine, Crack epidemic, Crime in Harlem, Croton Aqueduct, CUNY School of Public Health, Dance Theatre of Harlem, David Dinkins, Deindustrialization, Diaspora, Duke Ellington, Duke Ellington Circle, Dunbar Apartments, Dutch Schultz, East Harlem, East River, Education in Harlem, Eighth Avenue (Manhattan), El Museo del Barrio, Elevated railway, Episcopal Church (United States), Farmers' market, Father Divine, Fifth Avenue, Five Families, Fort Clinton (Central Park), Frederick Douglass Circle, Genovese crime family, Gentrification, George Wilson Becton, Graham Court, Great Depression, Great Migration (African American), Haarlem, Hamilton Grange National Memorial, Hamilton Heights, Manhattan, Harbor Conservatory for the Performing Arts, Harlem Children's Zone, Harlem Hospital Center, Harlem Renaissance, Harlem riot of 1935, Harlem riot of 1943, Harlem riot of 1964, Harlem River, Harlem River Houses, Harlem shake (dance), Harlem YMCA, Harlem Youth Opportunities Unlimited, Harlem–125th Street station, Heaven, Heroin, Hip hop, Hotel Theresa, Hudson River, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immortal Technique, IND Concourse Line, IND Eighth Avenue Line, Infant mortality, Interborough Rapid Transit Company, IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line, IRT Lenox Avenue Line, IRT Lexington Avenue Line, Jackie Robinson, James Bailey House, Jehovah's Witnesses, Jesse Gray, Jim Crow laws, Jumel Terrace Historic District, Juvenile delinquency, Kurtis Blow, La Marqueta, Lafayette Theatre (Harlem), Langston Hughes House, Lenape, Lenox Avenue, Lenox Lounge, Life expectancy, List of counties in New York, List of films shot in Harlem, List of Manhattan neighborhoods, List of numbered streets in Manhattan, List of people from Harlem, List of sovereign states, Look (American magazine), Lotteries in the United States, Lynching, Macbeth, Macombs Dam Bridge, Manhattan, Manhattan Avenue–West 120th–123rd Streets Historic District, Manhattanville, Manhattan, Marcus Garvey Park, Masjid Malcolm Shabazz, Matthew Henson, Median income, Methodism, Metro-North Railroad, Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Mexicans, Mink Building, Minton's Playhouse, Model Cities Program, Morningside Park (New York City), Morris–Jumel Mansion, Mount Morris Bank Building, Mount Morris Park Historic District, Mount Sinai Hospital (Manhattan), MTA Regional Bus Operations, Museum of the City of New York, Nation of Islam, National Black Theatre, National Register of Historic Places, Native Americans in the United States, Netherlands, New Negro, New York Amsterdam News, New York and Harlem Railroad, New York City, New York City Ballet, New York City Council, New York City Department of Education, New York City Fire Department, New York City Panel for Educational Policy, New York City Police Department, New York City Subway, New York College of Podiatric Medicine, New York Herald Tribune, New York Public Library, New York State Assembly, New York State Senate, New York's 13th congressional district, Numbers game, Nutter's Battery, Old Broadway Synagogue, Orson Welles, Pakistan, Paul Robeson, Polo Grounds, Poverty in the United States, Property crime, Puerto Ricans, Puerto Ricans in the United States, Queens, Randalls and Wards Islands, Rat, Rent strike, Rucker Park, Rudy Giuliani, Salsa music, Savoy Ballroom, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Second Avenue Subway, Section 8 (housing), Seventh Avenue (Manhattan), Sicilian Mafia, Single parent, Sit-in, Soul food, Southern Italy, Speakeasy, St. Nicholas Avenue, St. Nicholas Historic District, St. Nicholas Houses, St. Nicholas Park, Stephanie St. Clair, Storefront church, Stroke Belt, Studio Museum in Harlem, Swing (dance), Sylvia's Restaurant of Harlem, Telephone numbering plan, The Bronx, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The Harlem School of the Arts, The New England Journal of Medicine, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, Triborough Bridge, Tuberculosis, U.S. state, Unemployment, United States Census, Upper Manhattan, W. E. B. Du Bois, Wards Island Bridge, Washington Heights, Manhattan, West 147th–149th Streets Historic District, Westchester County, New York, White flight, William Appleton Potter, World War I, World War II, ZIP Code, 110th Street (Manhattan), 125th Street (IRT Lexington Avenue Line), 125th Street (Manhattan), 133rd Street (Manhattan), 155th Street (IND Concourse Line), 155th Street (Manhattan), 1972 Harlem mosque incident, 369th Infantry Regiment (United States), 96th Street (Manhattan). Expand index (203 more) »

A. Philip Randolph

Asa Philip Randolph (April 15, 1889 – May 16, 1979) was a leader in the Civil Rights Movement, the American labor movement, and socialist political parties.

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Abyssinian Baptist Church

The Abyssinian Baptist Church, located at 132 West 138th Street between Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard and Lenox Avenue in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, was built in 1922–23 and was designed by Charles W. Bolton & Son in Gothic Revival and Tudor Revival styles – it has also been described as "Collegiate Gothic".

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Adam Clayton Powell Jr.

Adam Clayton Powell Jr. (November 29, 1908 – April 4, 1972) was a Baptist pastor and an American politician, who represented Harlem, New York City, in the United States House of Representatives (1945–71).

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Adam Clayton Powell Jr. State Office Building

The Adam Clayton Powell Jr.

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African American Day Parade

The African American Day Parade in Harlem is held every September, typically with participants from at least 12 states.

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African Americans

African Americans (also referred to as Black Americans or Afro-Americans) are an ethnic group of Americans with total or partial ancestry from any of the black racial groups of Africa.

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African Methodist Episcopal Church

The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the A.M.E. Church or AME, is a predominantly African-American Methodist denomination based in the United States.

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African-American businesses

African-American businesses, also known as black-owned businesses or black businesses, originated in the days of slavery before 1865.

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All Saints Church (Manhattan)

The Church of All Saints is a historic Roman Catholic parish church in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at 47 East 129th Street, at the corner of Madison Avenue, in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.

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AM New York

amNewYork is a morning free daily newspaper that is published in New York City by Newsday.

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American Civil War

The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865.

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American Mafia

The American Mafia (commonly referred to as the Mafia or the Mob, though "the Mob" can refer to other organized crime groups) or Italian-American Mafia, is the highly organized Italian-American criminal society.

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American middle class

The American middle class is a social class in the United States.

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American Negro Theater

The American Negro Theater (ANT) was formed in Harlem on June 5, 1940, by writer Abram Hill and actor Frederick O'Neal.

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American Revolution

The American Revolution was a colonial revolt that took place between 1765 and 1783.

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Angola

Angola, officially the Republic of Angola (República de Angola; Kikongo, Kimbundu and Repubilika ya Ngola), is a country in Southern Africa.

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Apollo Theater

The Apollo Theater at 253 West 125th Street between Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard (formerly Seventh Avenue) and Frederick Douglass Boulevard (formerly Eighth Avenue) in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, pp.528-29 is a music hall which is a noted venue for African-American performers.

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Arthur Mitchell (dancer)

Arthur Mitchell (born March 27, 1934) is an African-American dancer and choreographer who created a training school and the first African-American classical ballet company, Dance Theatre of Harlem (DTH).

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Astor Row

__notoc__ Astor Row is the name given to 28 row houses on the south side of West 130th Street, between Fifth and Lenox Avenues in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, which were among the first speculative townhouses built in the area.

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ATLAH World Missionary Church

ATLAH World Missionary Church (formerly Bethelite Missionary Baptist Church) is a Christian church and ministry located in Harlem, New York.

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Bangladesh

Bangladesh (বাংলাদেশ, lit. "The country of Bengal"), officially the People's Republic of Bangladesh (গণপ্রজাতন্ত্রী বাংলাদেশ), is a country in South Asia.

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Baptists

Baptists are Christians distinguished by baptizing professing believers only (believer's baptism, as opposed to infant baptism), and doing so by complete immersion (as opposed to affusion or sprinkling).

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Big L

Lamont Coleman (May 30, 1974 – February 15, 1999), better known by his stage name Big L, was an American rapper.

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Bill Robinson

Bill "Bojangles" Robinson (May 25, 1878 – November 25, 1949) was an American tap dancer and actor, the best known and most highly paid African-American entertainer in the first half of the twentieth century.

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Black Hebrew Israelites

Black Hebrew Israelites (also called Black Hebrews, African Hebrew Israelites, and Hebrew Israelites) are groups of Black Americans who believe that they are descendants of the ancient Israelites.

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Black Issues Book Review

Black Issues Book Review was a bimonthly magazine published in New York City, U.S., in which books of interest to African-American readers were reviewed.

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Black mecca

A black mecca, in the United States, is a city to which African Americans, particularly professionals, are drawn to live, due to some or all of the following factors.

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Blockhouse No. 1 (Central Park)

Blockhouse No.

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Boroughs of New York City

New York City encompasses five county-level administrative divisions called boroughs: Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, The Bronx, and Staten Island.

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Boys Choir of Harlem

The Boys Choir of Harlem (also known as the Harlem Boys Choir) was a choir located in Harlem, New York City, United States.

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Brian Benjamin

Brian A. Benjamin is the Senator for the 30th District of the New York Senate.

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Bribery

Bribery is the act of giving or receiving something of value in exchange for some kind of influence or action in return, that the recipient would otherwise not alter.

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Burlesque

A burlesque is a literary, dramatic or musical work intended to cause laughter by caricaturing the manner or spirit of serious works, or by ludicrous treatment of their subjects.

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Business cycle

The business cycle, also known as the economic cycle or trade cycle, is the downward and upward movement of gross domestic product (GDP) around its long-term growth trend.

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Cardiovascular disease

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a class of diseases that involve the heart or blood vessels.

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Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.299 billion members worldwide.

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Central Park

Central Park is an urban park in Manhattan, New York City.

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Charter school

A charter school is a school that receives government funding but operates independently of the established state school system in which it is located.

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Chicken Noodle Soup (song)

"Chicken Noodle Soup" is a song by producer Da Drizzle from Webstar's album Webstar Presents: Caught in the Web (2006).

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Christian

A Christian is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus Christ.

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City

A city is a large human settlement.

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City College of New York

The City College of the City University of New York (more commonly referred to as the City College of New York, or simply City College, CCNY, or City) is a public senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY) in New York City.

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Cockroach

Cockroaches are insects of the order Blattodea, which also includes termites. About 30 cockroach species out of 4,600 are associated with human habitats. About four species are well known as pests. The cockroaches are an ancient group, dating back at least as far as the Carboniferous period, some 320 million years ago. Those early ancestors however lacked the internal ovipositors of modern roaches. Cockroaches are somewhat generalized insects without special adaptations like the sucking mouthparts of aphids and other true bugs; they have chewing mouthparts and are likely among the most primitive of living neopteran insects. They are common and hardy insects, and can tolerate a wide range of environments from Arctic cold to tropical heat. Tropical cockroaches are often much bigger than temperate species, and, contrary to popular belief, extinct cockroach relatives and 'roachoids' such as the Carboniferous Archimylacris and the Permian Apthoroblattina were not as large as the biggest modern species. Some species, such as the gregarious German cockroach, have an elaborate social structure involving common shelter, social dependence, information transfer and kin recognition. Cockroaches have appeared in human culture since classical antiquity. They are popularly depicted as dirty pests, though the great majority of species are inoffensive and live in a wide range of habitats around the world.

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College of New Rochelle

The College of New Rochelle (CNR) is a private Catholic college with its main campus located in New Rochelle, New York.

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Commandment Keepers

The Commandment Keepers Ethiopian Hebrew Congregation of the Living God Pillar & Ground of Truth, Inc. are a sect of Black Hebrews, who believe that people of Ethiopian descent represent one of the lost tribes of Israel.

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Commuter rail

Commuter rail, also called suburban rail, is a passenger rail transport service that primarily operates between a city centre and middle to outer suburbs beyond 15 km (10 miles) and commuter towns or other locations that draw large numbers of commuters—people who travel on a daily basis.

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Congress of Racial Equality

The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) is an African-American civil rights organization in the United States that played a pivotal role for African Americans in the Civil Rights Movement.

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Connie's Inn

Connie's Inn was a Harlem, New York City nightclub established in 1923 by Connie Immerman (né Conrad Immerman; 1893–1967) in partnership with two of his brothers, George (1884–1944) and Louie Immerman (1882–1955).

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Coogan's Bluff

Coogan's Bluff is a promontory near the western shore of the Harlem River in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Upper Manhattan in New York City.

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Cotton Club

The Cotton Club was a New York City nightclub located in Harlem on 142nd Street and Lenox Avenue from 1923 to 1935, then briefly in the midtown Theater District from 1936 to 1940.

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Crack cocaine

Crack cocaine, also known simply as crack, is a free base form of cocaine that can be smoked.

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Crack epidemic

The American crack epidemic was a surge of crack cocaine use in major cities across the United States between the early 1980s and the early 1990s.

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Crime in Harlem

Harlem, a large neighborhood within the northern section of the New York City borough of Manhattan, is known as one of the worst areas for poverty and crime in New York City and the United States.

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Croton Aqueduct

The Croton Aqueduct or Old Croton Aqueduct was a large and complex water distribution system constructed for New York City between 1837 and 1842.

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CUNY School of Public Health

The CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (commonly known as the CUNY School of Public Health, or CUNY SPH) is a public American research and professional college within the CUNY system based in New York City.

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Dance Theatre of Harlem

Dance Theatre of Harlem (DTH) is an American professional ballet company and school based in Harlem, New York City.

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David Dinkins

David Norman Dinkins (born July 10, 1927) is an American politician, lawyer, and author who served as the 106th Mayor of New York City, from 1990 to 1993.

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Deindustrialization

Deindustrialization or deindustrialisation is a process of social and economic change caused by the removal or reduction of industrial capacity or activity in a country or region, especially heavy industry or manufacturing industry.

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Diaspora

A diaspora (/daɪˈæspərə/) is a scattered population whose origin lies in a separate geographic locale.

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Duke Ellington

Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington (April 29, 1899 – May 24, 1974) was an American composer, pianist, and bandleader of a jazz orchestra, which he led from 1923 until his death in a career spanning over fifty years.

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Duke Ellington Circle

Duke Ellington Circle is a traffic circle located at the Northeast corner of Central Park at the foot of Fifth Avenue and of 110th Street in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

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Dunbar Apartments

The Dunbar Apartments is a complex of buildings located on West 149th and West 150th Streets between Frederick Douglass Boulevard/Macombs Place and Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.

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Dutch Schultz

Dutch Schultz (born Arthur Simon Flegenheimer; August 6, 1901October 24, 1935) was a New York City-area Jewish-American mobster of the 1920s and 1930s who made his fortune in organized crime-related activities, including bootlegging and the numbers racket.

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East Harlem

East Harlem, also known as Spanish Harlem or El Barrio, is a neighborhood of Upper Manhattan, New York City roughly encompassing the area north of the Upper East Side and East 96th Street up to about the 140s, east of Fifth Avenue to the East and Harlem Rivers.

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East River

The East River is a salt water tidal estuary in New York City.

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Education in Harlem

Education in the New York City neighborhood of Harlem, in Manhattan, is provided in schools and institutions of higher education, both public and private.

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Eighth Avenue (Manhattan)

Eighth Avenue is a major north-south avenue on the west side of Manhattan in New York City, carrying northbound traffic below 59th Street.

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El Museo del Barrio

El Museo del Barrio, often known simply as El Museo (the museum) is a museum located towards the northern end in the neighborhood of Museum Mile, immediately north of the Museum of the City of New York and south of the future Museum for African Art.

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Elevated railway

An elevated railway (also known as an El rail, El train or simply an El for short, and, in Europe, as an overhead railway) is a rapid transit railway with the tracks above street level on a viaduct or other elevated structure (usually constructed of steel, concrete, or brick).

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Episcopal Church (United States)

The Episcopal Church is the United States-based member church of the worldwide Anglican Communion.

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Farmers' market

A farmers' market is a physical retail marketplace intended to sell foods directly by farmers to consumers.

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Father Divine

Father Divine (c. 1876September 10, 1965), also known as Reverend M. J. Divine, was an African American spiritual leader from about 1907 until his death.

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Fifth Avenue

Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, United States.

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Five Families

The Five Families are the five major New York City organized crime families of the Italian American Mafia.

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Fort Clinton (Central Park)

Fort Clinton in New York City's Central Park was an 1814 stone-and-earthworks fortification on a rocky escarpment near the present line of 107th Street, slightly west of Fifth Avenue.

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Frederick Douglass Circle

Frederick Douglass Circle is a traffic circle located at the northwest corner of Central Park at the intersection of Eighth Avenue (Frederick Douglass Boulevard and Central Park West) and 110th Street (Cathedral Parkway and Central Park North) in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

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Genovese crime family

The Genovese crime family (pronounced) is one of the "Five Families" that dominate organized crime activities in New York City and New Jersey as part of the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). Often nicknamed the "Ivy League" and "Rolls Royce" of organized crime, the Genovese crime family are rivaled in size only by the Gambino crime family, and are unmatched in terms of power. They have generally maintained a varying degree of influence over many of the smaller mob families outside New York, including ties with the Philadelphia, Patriarca, and Buffalo crime families. The current "family" was founded by Charles "Lucky" Luciano, and was known as the "Luciano crime family" from 1931 to 1957, when it was renamed after boss Vito Genovese. Originally in control of the waterfront on the West Side of Manhattan and the Fulton Fish Market, the family was run for years by "the Oddfather", Vincent "the Chin" Gigante, who feigned insanity by shuffling unshaven through New York's Greenwich Village wearing a tattered bath robe and muttering to himself incoherently to avoid prosecution. The Genovese family is the oldest and the largest of the "Five Families". Finding new ways to make money in the 21st century, the family took advantage of lax due diligence by banks during the housing bubble with a wave of mortgage frauds. Prosecutors say loan shark victims obtained home equity loans to pay off debts to their mob bankers. The family found ways to use new technology to improve on illegal gambling, with customers placing bets through offshore sites via the Internet. Although the leadership of the Genovese family seemed to have been in limbo after the death of Gigante in 2005, they appear to be the most organized family and remain powerful. - the wiretap network - wmob.com Unique in today's Mafia, the family has benefited greatly from members following the code of Omertà. While many mobsters from across the country have testified against their crime families since the 1980s, the Genovese family has only had 8 members turn state's evidence in its history.

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Gentrification

Gentrification is a process of renovation of deteriorated urban neighborhoods by means of the influx of more affluent residents.

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George Wilson Becton

George Wilson Becton was the "first of the colorful cult leaders in Harlem." He began charismatic preaching in about 1930, after the decline of Marcus Garvey, and continued until he was mysteriously murdered in 1933.

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Graham Court

Graham Court is a historic Harlem apartment building.

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Great Depression

The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States.

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Great Migration (African American)

The Great Migration was the movement of 6 million African-Americans out of the rural Southern United States to the urban Northeast, Midwest, and West that occurred between 1916 and 1970.

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Haarlem

Haarlem (predecessor of Harlem in the English language) is a city and municipality in the Netherlands.

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Hamilton Grange National Memorial

Hamilton Grange National Memorial, also known as The Grange or the Hamilton Grange Mansion, is a National Park Service site in St. Nicholas Park, Manhattan, New York City, that preserves the relocated home of U.S. Founding Father Alexander Hamilton.

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Hamilton Heights, Manhattan

Hamilton Heights is a neighborhood in the northern part of Manhattan, which is a borough of New York City.

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Harbor Conservatory for the Performing Arts

The Harbor Conservatory for the Performing Arts is a performing arts center in Spanish Harlem, New York, New York.

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Harlem Children's Zone

The Harlem Children's Zone (HCZ) is a non-profit organization for poverty-stricken children and families living in Harlem, providing free support in the form of parenting workshops, a pre-school program, three charter schools, and child-oriented health programs for thousands of children and families.

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Harlem Hospital Center

Harlem Hospital Center, branded as NYC Health + Hospitals/Harlem, is a 272-bed, public teaching hospital affiliated with Columbia University.

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Harlem Renaissance

The Harlem Renaissance was an intellectual, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem, New York, spanning the 1920s.

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Harlem riot of 1935

The Harlem riot of 1935 took place on March 19 during the Great Depression, in New York City, New York, in the United States.

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Harlem riot of 1943

A race riot took place in Harlem, New York City, on August 1 and 2 of 1943, after a white police officer, James Collins, shot and wounded Robert Bandy, an African-American soldier; and rumors circulated that the soldier had been killed.

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Harlem riot of 1964

The Harlem riot of 1964, or Harlem riots of 1964 occurred between July 16 and 22, 1964.

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Harlem River

The Harlem River is an tidal strait flowing between the Hudson River and the East River and separating the island of Manhattan from the Bronx on the New York mainland.

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Harlem River Houses

The Harlem River Houses is a New York City Housing Authority public housing complex located between West 151st and West 153rd Streets and between Macombs Place and the Harlem River Drive in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.

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Harlem shake (dance)

The Harlem shake is a style of hip-hop dance and is characterised by jerky arm and shoulder movements in time to the music.

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Harlem YMCA

The Harlem YMCA is located at 180 West 135th Street between Lenox Avenue and Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.

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Harlem Youth Opportunities Unlimited

Harlem Youth Opportunities Unlimited, more commonly called HARYOU, was an American social activism organization founded by psychologists Kenneth Clark and Mamie Phipps Clark in 1962.

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Harlem–125th Street station

Harlem–125th Street is a Metro-North Railroad commuter rail hub station in New York City.

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Heaven

Heaven, or the heavens, is a common religious, cosmological, or transcendent place where beings such as gods, angels, spirits, saints, or venerated ancestors are said to originate, be enthroned, or live.

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Heroin

Heroin, also known as diamorphine among other names, is an opioid most commonly used as a recreational drug for its euphoric effects.

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Hip hop

Hip hop, or hip-hop, is a subculture and art movement developed in the Bronx in New York City during the late 1970s.

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Hotel Theresa

The Hotel Theresa, located at 2082-96 Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard between West 124th and 125th Streets in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, was, in the mid-20th century, a vibrant center of African American life in the area and the city.

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Hudson River

The Hudson River is a river that flows from north to south primarily through eastern New York in the United States.

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Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS), formerly Mount Sinai School of Medicine, is a medical school in New York City, New York.

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Immortal Technique

Felipe Andres Coronel (born February 19, 1978), better known by the stage name Immortal Technique, is a Peruvian-American hip hop recording artist and activist.

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IND Concourse Line

The Concourse Line is an IND rapid transit line of the New York City Subway system.

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IND Eighth Avenue Line

The IND Eighth Avenue Line is a rapid transit line in New York City, United States, and is part of the B Division of the New York City Subway.

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Infant mortality

Infant mortality refers to deaths of young children, typically those less than one year of age.

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Interborough Rapid Transit Company

The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the private operator of the original underground New York City Subway line that opened in 1904, as well as earlier elevated railways and additional rapid transit lines in New York City. The IRT was purchased by the city in June 1940. The former IRT lines (the numbered routes in the current subway system) are now the A Division or IRT Division of the Subway.

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IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

The IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line (also known as the IRT Seventh Avenue Line or the IRT West Side Line) is a New York City Subway line.

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IRT Lenox Avenue Line

The Lenox Avenue Line is one of the IRT lines in the New York City Subway, mostly built as part of the first subway line.

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IRT Lexington Avenue Line

The IRT Lexington Avenue Line (also known as the IRT East Side Line and the IRT Lexington–Fourth Avenue Line) is one of the lines of the A Division of the New York City Subway, stretching from Lower Manhattan north to 125th Street in East Harlem.

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Jackie Robinson

Jack Roosevelt Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) was an American professional baseball player who became the first African American to play in Major League Baseball (MLB) in the modern era.

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James Bailey House

The James A. and Ruth M. Bailey House, p.198 is a large freestanding limestone mansion located at 10 St Nicholas Place at West 150th Street in the Sugar Hill area of the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.

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Jehovah's Witnesses

Jehovah's Witnesses is a millenarian restorationist Christian denomination with nontrinitarian beliefs distinct from mainstream Christianity.

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Jesse Gray

Jesse Gray (May 14, 1923 – January 2, 1988) was an American civil rights leader and politician from New York.

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Jim Crow laws

Jim Crow laws were state and local laws that enforced racial segregation in the Southern United States.

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Jumel Terrace Historic District

The Jumel Terrace Historic District is a small New York City and national historic district located in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.

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Juvenile delinquency

Juvenile delinquency, also known as "juvenile offending", is participation in illegal behavior by minors (juveniles, i.e. individuals younger than the statutory age of majority).

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Kurtis Blow

Kurtis Walker (born August 9, 1959), professionally known by his stage name Kurtis Blow, is an American rapper, singer, songwriter, record/film producer, Bboy, DJ, public speaker and minister.

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La Marqueta

La Marqueta is a marketplace under the elevated Metro North railway tracks between 111th Street and 116th Street on Park Avenue in East Harlem in Manhattan, New York City.

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Lafayette Theatre (Harlem)

The Lafayette Theatre was an entertainment venue located at 132nd Street and 7th Avenue in Harlem, New York that operated from 1912 to 1951.

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Langston Hughes House

Langston Hughes House is a historic home located in Harlem, Manhattan, New York City.

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Lenape

The Lenape, also called the Leni Lenape, Lenni Lenape and Delaware people, are an indigenous people of the Northeastern Woodlands, who live in Canada and the United States.

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Lenox Avenue

Lenox Avenue – also named Malcolm X Boulevard; both names are officially recognized – is the primary north–south route through Harlem in the upper portion of the New York City borough of Manhattan.

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Lenox Lounge

Lenox Lounge was a long-standing bar in Harlem, New York City.

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Life expectancy

Life expectancy is a statistical measure of the average time an organism is expected to live, based on the year of its birth, its current age and other demographic factors including gender.

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List of counties in New York

There are 62 counties in the state of New York.

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List of films shot in Harlem

This is a list of films shot in Harlem, in New York City.

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List of Manhattan neighborhoods

This is a list of neighborhoods in the New York City borough of Manhattan arranged geographically from the north of the island to the south.

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List of numbered streets in Manhattan

The New York City borough of Manhattan contains 214 numbered east–west streets numbered from 1st to 228th, the majority of them created by the Commissioners' Plan of 1811.

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List of people from Harlem

This is a list of people from Harlem in New York City.

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List of sovereign states

This list of sovereign states provides an overview of sovereign states around the world, with information on their status and recognition of their sovereignty.

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Look (American magazine)

Look was a bi-weekly, general-interest magazine published in Des Moines, Iowa, from 1937 to 1971, with more of an emphasis on photographs than articles.

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Lotteries in the United States

In the United States, lotteries are run by 47 jurisdictions: 44 states plus the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

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Lynching

Lynching is a premeditated extrajudicial killing by a group.

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Macbeth

Macbeth (full title The Tragedy of Macbeth) is a tragedy by William Shakespeare; it is thought to have been first performed in 1606.

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Macombs Dam Bridge

The Macombs Dam Bridge spans the Harlem River in New York City, connecting the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx near Yankee Stadium.

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Manhattan

Manhattan is the most densely populated borough of New York City, its economic and administrative center, and its historical birthplace.

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Manhattan Avenue–West 120th–123rd Streets Historic District

Manhattan Avenue–West 120th–123rd Streets Historic District is a national historic district in Harlem in New York City.

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Manhattanville, Manhattan

Manhattanville (also known as West Harlem or West Central Harlem) is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan bordered on the north and south by West 134th Street and West 122nd Street, respectively; on the west by Morningside Park and on the east by Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard.

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Marcus Garvey Park

Marcus Garvey Park (formerly and also named Mount Morris Park) is located in Harlem, and East Harlem neighborhoods in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

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Masjid Malcolm Shabazz

Masjid Malcolm Shabazz, formerly known as Mosque No.

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Matthew Henson

Matthew Alexander Henson (August 8, 1866March 9, 1955) was the first African-American Arctic explorer, an associate of Robert Peary on seven voyages over a period of nearly 23 years. They made six voyages and spent a total of 18 years in expeditions., Globe Pequot, 2009, pp. 3–6 Henson served as a navigator and craftsman, traded with Inuit and learned their language, and was known as Peary's "first man" for these arduous travels. During their 1909 expedition to Greenland, Henson accompanied Peary in the small party, including four Inuit men, that has been recognized as the first to reach the Geographic North Pole (although this has also been subject to dispute). Henson was invited in 1937 as a member of The Explorers Club due to his achievement and was the first African American to be accepted. In 1948 he was made an honorary member, a distinction for 20 people annually. Based on research into Peary's diary and astronomical observations, Wally Herbert, a later Arctic explorer who reached the North Pole in 1969, concluded in 1989 that Peary's team had not reached the pole. This has been widely accepted, but some dispute this conclusion. Henson published his memoir, A Negro Explorer at the North Pole (1912), which included a foreword and praise by Peary. Since the late 20th century, Henson's contributions have received more recognition. By presidential order, in 1988, the remains of Henson and his wife were re-interred with a monument at Arlington National Cemetery, near that for Peary and his wife. Henson has received numerous posthumous honors since then. In the late 20th century, Henson's and Peary's elderly sons by their Inuit "country wives" were tracked down, and their descendants invited to the United States to meet other family members, as well as to attend the 1988 ceremonies.

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Median income

Median income is the amount that divides the income distribution into two equal groups, half having income above that amount, and half having income below that amount.

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Methodism

Methodism or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity which derive their inspiration from the life and teachings of John Wesley, an Anglican minister in England.

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Metro-North Railroad

The Metro-North Commuter Railroad, trading as MTA Metro-North Railroad or simply Metro-North, is a suburban commuter rail service run by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), a public authority of the U.S. state of New York.

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Metropolitan Transportation Authority

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) is a public benefit corporation responsible for public transportation in the U.S. state of New York, serving 12 counties in Downstate New York, along with two counties in southwestern Connecticut under contract to the Connecticut Department of Transportation, carrying over 11 million passengers on an average weekday systemwide, and over 850,000 vehicles on its seven toll bridges and two tunnels per weekday.

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Mexicans

Mexicans (mexicanos) are the people of the United Mexican States, a multiethnic country in North America.

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Mink Building

The Mink Building is a five-story German-American style red brick structure at 1361-1369 Amsterdam Avenue between 126th and 128th Streets, in the West Harlem/Manhattanville neighborhood of New York City, originally part of a large brewery complex, inclusive of 1361 Amsterdam Avenue, 461 West 126 Street, 423 West 127 Street, 439-449 West 128 Street, 454 West 128 Street, and 460 West 128 Street.

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Minton's Playhouse

Minton's Playhouse is a jazz club and bar located on the first floor of the Cecil Hotel at 210 West 118th Street in Harlem and is a registered trademark of Housing and Services, Inc. a New York City nonprofit provider of supportive housing.

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Model Cities Program

The Model Cities Program was an element of U.S. President Lyndon Johnson's Great Society and War on Poverty.

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Morningside Park (New York City)

Morningside Park is a New York City public park primarily located in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.

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Morris–Jumel Mansion

The Morris–Jumel Mansion, also known as the Roger and Mary Philipse Morris House, "Mount Morris", p.210 and other similar names, located at 65 Jumel Terrace in Roger Morris Park in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, is the oldest house in the borough.

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Mount Morris Bank Building

The Mount Morris Bank Building, also referred to as the Corn Exchange Bank (Mount Morris Branch) and Corn Exchange Building, is an historic building in the East Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, located at 81-85 East 125th Street on the northwest corner of Park Avenue.

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Mount Morris Park Historic District

Mount Morris Park Historic District was designated a historic district by New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1971, and is part of the larger Mount Morris Park neighborhood.

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Mount Sinai Hospital (Manhattan)

Mount Sinai Hospital, founded in 1852, is one of the oldest and largest teaching hospitals in the United States.

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MTA Regional Bus Operations

MTA Regional Bus Operations (RBO) is the surface transit division of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA).

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Museum of the City of New York

The Museum of the City of New York (MCNY) is a history and art museum in New York City, New York.

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Nation of Islam

The Nation of Islam, abbreviated as NOI, is an African American political and religious movement, founded in Detroit, Michigan, United States, by Wallace D. Fard Muhammad on July 4, 1930.

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National Black Theatre

The National Black Theatre is a non-profit cultural and educational corporation, and community-based theatre company located on 5th Avenue in Harlem, New York.

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National Register of Historic Places

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance.

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Native Americans in the United States

Native Americans, also known as American Indians, Indians, Indigenous Americans and other terms, are the indigenous peoples of the United States.

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Netherlands

The Netherlands (Nederland), often referred to as Holland, is a country located mostly in Western Europe with a population of seventeen million.

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New Negro

"New Negro" is a term popularized during the Harlem Renaissance implying a more outspoken advocacy of dignity and a refusal to submit quietly to the practices and laws of Jim Crow racial segregation.

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New York Amsterdam News

The New York Amsterdam News is an American weekly newspaper geared to the African-American community of New York City, New York.

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New York and Harlem Railroad

The New York and Harlem Railroad (now the Metro-North Railroad's Harlem Line) was one of the first railroads in the United States, and was the world's first street railway.

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New York City

The City of New York, often called New York City (NYC) or simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States.

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New York City Ballet

New York City Ballet (NYCB) is a ballet company founded in 1948 by choreographer George Balanchine and Lincoln Kirstein.

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New York City Council

The New York City Council is the lawmaking body of the City of New York.

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New York City Department of Education

The New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) is the department of the government of New York City that manages the city's public school system.

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New York City Fire Department

The New York City Fire Department, officially the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY), is a department of the government of New York City that provides fire protection, technical rescue, primary response to biological, chemical, and radioactive hazards, and emergency medical services to the five boroughs of New York City.

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New York City Panel for Educational Policy

The Panel for Educational Policy of the Department of Education of the City School District of the City of New York, abbreviated as the Panel for Educational Policy and also known as the New York City Board of Education, is the governing body of the New York City Department of Education.

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New York City Police Department

The City of New York Police Department, commonly known as the NYPD, is the primary law enforcement and investigation agency within the five boroughs of New York City.

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New York City Subway

The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system owned by the City of New York and leased to the New York City Transit Authority, a subsidiary agency of the state-run Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA).

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New York College of Podiatric Medicine

The New York College of Podiatric Medicine (NYCPM) is a private specialized college located at 53 East 124th Street, Harlem, in New York City.

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New York Herald Tribune

The New York Herald Tribune was a newspaper published between 1924 and 1966.

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New York Public Library

The New York Public Library (NYPL) is a public library system in New York City.

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New York State Assembly

The New York State Assembly is the lower house of the New York State Legislature, the New York State Senate being the upper house.

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New York State Senate

The New York State Senate is the upper house of the New York State Legislature, the New York State Assembly being the lower house.

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New York's 13th congressional district

New York's 13th Congressional District is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives located in New York City, represented by Adriano Espaillat.

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Numbers game

The numbers game, also known as the numbers racket, the policy racket, the Italian lottery, the policy game, or the daily number, is a form of illegal gambling or illegal lottery played mostly in poor and working class neighborhoods in the United States, wherein a bettor attempts to pick three digits to match those that will be randomly drawn the following day.

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Nutter's Battery

Nutter's Battery was an 1814 earth-and-wood fortification near Harlem Meer in present-day Central Park in New York City.

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Old Broadway Synagogue

Old Broadway Synagogue is an Orthodox Jewish synagogue in the Manhattanville neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City incorporated in 1911 under the name Chevra Talmud Torah Anshei Marovi, by an immigrant named Morris Schiff.

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Orson Welles

George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an American actor, director, writer, and producer who worked in theatre, radio, and film.

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Pakistan

Pakistan (پاکِستان), officially the Islamic Republic of Pakistan (اِسلامی جمہوریہ پاکِستان), is a country in South Asia.

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Paul Robeson

Paul Leroy Robeson (April 9, 1898 – January 23, 1976) was an American bass baritone concert artist and stage and film actor who became famous both for his cultural accomplishments and for his political activism.

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Polo Grounds

The Polo Grounds was the name of three stadiums in Upper Manhattan, New York City, used mainly for professional baseball and American football from 1880 until 1963.

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Poverty in the United States

Poverty is a state of deprivation, lacking the usual or socially acceptable amount of money or material possessions.

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Property crime

Property crime is a category of crime that includes, among other crimes, burglary, larceny, theft, motor vehicle theft, arson, shoplifting, and vandalism.

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Puerto Ricans

Puerto Ricans (Puertorriqueños; or boricuas) are people from Puerto Rico, the inhabitants and citizens of Puerto Rico, and their descendants.

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Puerto Ricans in the United States

A Stateside Puerto Rican, also ambiguously Puerto Rican American (puertorriqueño-americano, puertorriqueño-estadounidense) is a term for residents in the United States who were born in or trace family ancestry to Puerto Rico.

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Queens

Queens is the easternmost and largest in area of the five boroughs of New York City.

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Randalls and Wards Islands

Randalls Island (also called Randall's Island) and Wards Island are conjoined islands, collectively called Randalls and Wards Islands, in the New York City borough of Manhattan, "Purchased in 1772 by British Captain James Montresor; sold in 1784 to Johnathan Randel; acquired by City of New York in 1835." separated from Manhattan by the Harlem River, from Queens by the East River and Hell Gate, and from the Bronx by the Bronx Kill.

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Rat

Rats are various medium-sized, long-tailed rodents in the superfamily Muroidea.

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Rent strike

A rent strike is a method of protest commonly employed against large landlords.

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Rucker Park

Rucker Park is a basketball court in Harlem, Manhattan, New York City, at 155th Street and Frederick Douglass Boulevard across the street from the former Polo Grounds site; it is geographically at the base of a large cliff named Coogan's Bluff.

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Rudy Giuliani

Rudolph William Louis Giuliani (born May 28, 1944) is an American politician, attorney, businessman, public speaker, former mayor of New York City, and attorney to President Donald Trump.

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Salsa music

Salsa music is a popular dance music that initially arose in New York City during the 1960s.

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Savoy Ballroom

The Savoy Ballroom was a large ballroom for music and public dancing located at 596 Lenox Avenue, between 140th and 141st Streets in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.

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Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture is a research library of the New York Public Library (NYPL) and an archive repository for information on people of African descent worldwide.

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Second Avenue Subway

The Second Avenue Subway (internally referred to as the IND Second Avenue Line by the MTA and abbreviated to SAS) is a New York City Subway line that runs under Second Avenue on the East Side of Manhattan.

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Section 8 (housing)

Section 8 of the Housing Act of 1937, often called Section 8, as repeatedly amended, authorizes the payment of rental housing assistance to private landlords on behalf of approximately 4.8 million low-income households, as of 2008, in the United States.

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Seventh Avenue (Manhattan)

Seventh Avenue – known as Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard north of Central Park – is a thoroughfare on the West Side of the borough of Manhattan in New York City.

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Sicilian Mafia

The Sicilian Mafia, also known as simply the Mafia and frequently referred to by members as Cosa Nostra (this thing of ours), is a criminal syndicate in Sicily, Italy.

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Single parent

A single parent is a parent that parents alone without the other parent's support, meaning this particular parent is the only parent to the child, responsible for all financial, material, and emotional needs.

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Sit-in

A sit-in or sit-down is a form of direct action that involves one or more people occupying an area for a protest, often to promote political, social, or economic change.

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Soul food

Soul food is a variety of cuisine originating in the Southeastern United States.

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Southern Italy

Southern Italy or Mezzogiorno (literally "midday") is a macroregion of Italy traditionally encompassing the territories of the former Kingdom of the two Sicilies (all the southern section of the Italian Peninsula and Sicily), with the frequent addition of the island of Sardinia.

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Speakeasy

A speakeasy, also called a blind pig or blind tiger, is an illicit establishment that sells alcoholic beverages.

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St. Nicholas Avenue

St.

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St. Nicholas Historic District

The St.

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St. Nicholas Houses

St.

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St. Nicholas Park

Saint Nicholas Park is a New York City public park located in Harlem at the intersection of Manhattan neighborhoods Hamilton Heights and Manhattanville.

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Stephanie St. Clair

Stephanie Saint-Clair (December 24, 1886 – December 1969) was an American mob boss who ran numerous criminal enterprises in Harlem, New York in the early part of the 20th century.

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Storefront church

A storefront church is a church housed in a commercial storefront building.

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Stroke Belt

Stroke Belt or Stroke Alley is a name given to a region in the southeastern United States that has been recognized by public health authorities for having an unusually high incidence of stroke and other forms of cardiovascular disease.

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Studio Museum in Harlem

The Studio Museum in Harlem is an American art museum devoted to the work of artists of African descent.

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Swing (dance)

Swing dance is a group of dances that developed with the swing style of jazz music in the 1920s–1940s, with the origins of each dance predating the popular "swing era".

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Sylvia's Restaurant of Harlem

Sylvia's Restaurant of Harlem (often called "Sylvia's Soul Food" or just "Sylvia's") is a soul food restaurant located at 328 Lenox Avenue, between 126th and 127th Streets, in Harlem, Manhattan, New York City.

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Telephone numbering plan

A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunication to assign telephone numbers to subscriber telephones or other telephony endpoints.

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The Bronx

The Bronx is the northernmost of the five boroughs of New York City, in the U.S. state of New York.

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The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), often informally known as the Mormon Church, is a nontrinitarian, Christian restorationist church that is considered by its members to be the restoration of the original church founded by Jesus Christ.

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The Harlem School of the Arts

Harlem School of the Arts (HSA) in Harlem, New York was founded in 1964 by soprano Dorothy Maynor, and offers its programs to students of all ages.

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The New England Journal of Medicine

The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) is a weekly medical journal published by the Massachusetts Medical Society.

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The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

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The Washington Post

The Washington Post is a major American daily newspaper founded on December 6, 1877.

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Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine

The Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (TouroCOM) is a private, non-profit, American osteopathic medical school with a main campus in the neighborhood of Central Harlem in New York City, New York and an additional campus located in Middletown, New York, 60 miles from New York City in the Hudson Valley.

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Triborough Bridge

The Triborough Bridge, known officially as the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge since 2008, and sometimes referred to as the RFK Triborough Bridge or RFK Bridge, is a complex of three separate bridges and their connecting viaducts or elevated expressways in New York City.

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Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease usually caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB).

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U.S. state

A state is a constituent political entity of the United States.

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Unemployment

Unemployment is the situation of actively looking for employment but not being currently employed.

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United States Census

The United States Census is a decennial census mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the United States Constitution, which states: "Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States...

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Upper Manhattan

Upper Manhattan denotes the most northern region of the New York City Borough of Manhattan.

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W. E. B. Du Bois

William Edward Burghardt "W.

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Wards Island Bridge

The Wards Island Bridge, also known as the 103rd Street Footbridge, is a pedestrian bridge crossing the Harlem River between Manhattan Island and Wards Island in New York City.

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Washington Heights, Manhattan

Washington Heights is a neighborhood in the northern portion of the New York City borough of Manhattan.

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West 147th–149th Streets Historic District

West 147th–149th Streets Historic District is a national historic district in Harlem, New York, New York.

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Westchester County, New York

Westchester County is a county in the U.S. state of New York.

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White flight

White flight is a term that originated in the United States, starting in the 1950s and 1960s, and applied to the large-scale migration of people of various European ancestries from racially mixed urban regions to more racially homogeneous suburban or exurban regions.

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William Appleton Potter

William Appleton Potter (December 10, 1842 – February 19, 1909) was an American architect who designed numerous buildings for Princeton University, as well as municipal offices and churches.

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World War I

World War I (often abbreviated as WWI or WW1), also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.

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World War II

World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier.

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ZIP Code

ZIP Codes are a system of postal codes used by the United States Postal Service (USPS) since 1963.

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110th Street (Manhattan)

110th Street is a street in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

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125th Street (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)

125th Street is an express station that has four tracks and two island platforms.

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125th Street (Manhattan)

125th Street is a two-way street that runs east–west in the New York City borough of Manhattan, from First Avenue on the east to Marginal Street, a service road for the Henry Hudson Parkway along the Hudson River in the west.

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133rd Street (Manhattan)

133rd Street is a street in Manhattan and the Bronx, New York City.

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155th Street (IND Concourse Line)

155th Street (155th Street–Eighth Avenue on some signage) is a local station on the IND Concourse Line of the New York City Subway.

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155th Street (Manhattan)

155th Street are two crosstown streets in the Harlem and Washington Heights neighborhood, in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

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1972 Harlem mosque incident

The 1972 Harlem mosque incident occurred on April 14, 1972, when a New York City Police Department (NYPD) officer was shot and fatally wounded at the Nation of Islam Mosque No. 7 in Harlem, Manhattan, New York City.

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369th Infantry Regiment (United States)

The 369th Infantry Regiment, formerly known as the 15th New York National Guard Regiment, was an infantry regiment of the New York Army National Guard during World War I and World War II.

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96th Street (Manhattan)

96th Street is a major two-way street on the Upper East Side and Upper West Side sections of the New York City borough of Manhattan, running from the East River at the FDR Drive to the Henry Hudson Parkway at the Hudson River.

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Redirects here:

Black Harlem, Central Harlem, Demographics of Harlem, Harelm, Harlem (Manhattan), Harlem (New York City), Harlem (New York), Harlem (New York, N.Y.), Harlem, Manhattan, Harlem, NY, Harlem, New York, Harlem, New York City, Harlem, New York County, New York, New Harlem, Social issues in Harlem, Vinegar Hill, Manhattan.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlem

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