Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Download
Faster access than browser!
 

Hegemony

Index Hegemony

Hegemony (or) is the political, economic, or military predominance or control of one state over others. [1]

149 relations: Abbasid Caliphate, Africa, Alexander the Great, Ancient Greece, Angolan Civil War, Antonio Gramsci, Arab–Israeli conflict, Arms race, Articulation (sociology), Asia, Athens, Augustus, Authoritarianism, Baghdad Pact, Balance of power (international relations), Banana Wars, British Empire, Bureaucracy, Burgundy, Byzantine Empire, Capitalism, Caribbean Sea, Central American crisis, Chantal Mouffe, Charlemagne, City-state, Classical antiquity, Cold War, Colonialism, Communism, Congress of Vienna, Continental Europe, Counter-hegemonic globalization, Cultural hegemony, Cultural imperialism, David Harvey, Delian League, Discourse, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, Dominance hierarchy, Dominant ideology, Dutch Golden Age, Dutch Republic, Early modern Britain, East Asia, Economic history of the Netherlands (1500–1815), Edward Luttwak, Edward Soja, Emperor of the French, Empire of Japan, ..., Ephorus, Ernesto Laclau, European colonialism, Feudalism, Five Hegemons, French Consulate, German Empire, Global governance, Glorious Revolution, Great power, Greco-Roman world, Habsburg Spain, Harsha, Hegemonic masculinity, Hegemony and Socialist Strategy, History of Portugal (1415–1578), Hubert Védrine, Hyperpower, Iberian Union, Ideology, Imperialism, Imperialism, the Highest Stage of Capitalism, Imperium, Indian Ocean, Indian subcontinent, Information, International relations, International relations theory, Italian Wars, John Mearsheimer, Joseph Nye, Korean War, Language, Laotian Civil War, League of Corinth, Lingua franca, Louis XIV of France, Marxism, Marxist philosophy, Mercantilism, Monetary hegemony, Mores, Napoleon, Napoleonic Wars, NATO, Nazi Germany, Noam Chomsky, Oxford English Dictionary, Pacific Ocean, Pax Romana, Peloponnesian League, Philip II of Macedon, Philip IV of Spain, Political science, Portuguese discoveries, Posthegemony, Power (social and political), Praxis (process), Proxy war, Prussia, Queen Victoria, Regional hegemony, Reich, Ruling class, Social class, Social constructionism, Social norm, Social structure, Socialist Party (France), Society, Soft power, Southeast Asia Treaty Organization, Spanish Empire, Sparta, Sphere of influence, Spring and Autumn period, State (polity), State collapse, Status quo, Stock market, Supremacism, Umayyad Caliphate, Unification of Germany, Union of Utrecht, United Nations, United Nations Security Council, United States Department of Defense, Value (ethics), Vietnam War, War in Afghanistan (1978–present), Warsaw Pact, Washington, D.C., Western world, World view, World War I, World War II, Xenophon, Zhou dynasty, 1954 Guatemalan coup d'état. Expand index (99 more) »

Abbasid Caliphate

The Abbasid Caliphate (or ٱلْخِلافَةُ ٱلْعَبَّاسِيَّة) was the third of the Islamic caliphates to succeed the Islamic prophet Muhammad.

New!!: Hegemony and Abbasid Caliphate · See more »

Africa

Africa is the world's second largest and second most-populous continent (behind Asia in both categories).

New!!: Hegemony and Africa · See more »

Alexander the Great

Alexander III of Macedon (20/21 July 356 BC – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander the Great (Aléxandros ho Mégas), was a king (basileus) of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon and a member of the Argead dynasty.

New!!: Hegemony and Alexander the Great · See more »

Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (AD 600).

New!!: Hegemony and Ancient Greece · See more »

Angolan Civil War

The Angolan Civil War (Guerra civil angolana) was a major civil conflict in Angola, beginning in 1975 and continuing, with some interludes, until 2002.

New!!: Hegemony and Angolan Civil War · See more »

Antonio Gramsci

Antonio Francesco Gramsci (22 January 1891 – 27 April 1937) was an Italian Marxist philosopher and politician.

New!!: Hegemony and Antonio Gramsci · See more »

Arab–Israeli conflict

The Arab–Israeli conflict refers to the political tension, military conflicts and disputes between a number of Arab countries and Israel.

New!!: Hegemony and Arab–Israeli conflict · See more »

Arms race

An arms race, in its original usage, is a competition between two or more states to have the best armed forces.

New!!: Hegemony and Arms race · See more »

Articulation (sociology)

In sociology, articulation labels the process by which particular classes appropriate cultural forms and practices for their own use.

New!!: Hegemony and Articulation (sociology) · See more »

Asia

Asia is Earth's largest and most populous continent, located primarily in the Eastern and Northern Hemispheres.

New!!: Hegemony and Asia · See more »

Athens

Athens (Αθήνα, Athína; Ἀθῆναι, Athênai) is the capital and largest city of Greece.

New!!: Hegemony and Athens · See more »

Augustus

Augustus (Augustus; 23 September 63 BC – 19 August 14 AD) was a Roman statesman and military leader who was the first Emperor of the Roman Empire, controlling Imperial Rome from 27 BC until his death in AD 14.

New!!: Hegemony and Augustus · See more »

Authoritarianism

Authoritarianism is a form of government characterized by strong central power and limited political freedoms.

New!!: Hegemony and Authoritarianism · See more »

Baghdad Pact

The Central Treaty Organization (CENTO), originally known as the Baghdad Pact or the Middle East Treaty Organization (METO), was formed in 1955 by Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, Turkey and the United Kingdom.

New!!: Hegemony and Baghdad Pact · See more »

Balance of power (international relations)

The balance of power theory in international relations suggests that national security is enhanced when military capability is distributed so that no one state is strong enough to dominate all others.

New!!: Hegemony and Balance of power (international relations) · See more »

Banana Wars

The Banana Wars were the occupations, police actions, and interventions on the part of the United States in Central America and the Caribbean between the end of the Spanish–American War in 1898 and the inception of the Good Neighbor Policy in 1934.

New!!: Hegemony and Banana Wars · See more »

British Empire

The British Empire comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states.

New!!: Hegemony and British Empire · See more »

Bureaucracy

Bureaucracy refers to both a body of non-elective government officials and an administrative policy-making group.

New!!: Hegemony and Bureaucracy · See more »

Burgundy

Burgundy (Bourgogne) is a historical territory and a former administrative region of France.

New!!: Hegemony and Burgundy · See more »

Byzantine Empire

The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire and Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium).

New!!: Hegemony and Byzantine Empire · See more »

Capitalism

Capitalism is an economic system based upon private ownership of the means of production and their operation for profit.

New!!: Hegemony and Capitalism · See more »

Caribbean Sea

The Caribbean Sea (Mar Caribe; Mer des Caraïbes; Caraïbische Zee) is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean in the tropics of the Western Hemisphere.

New!!: Hegemony and Caribbean Sea · See more »

Central American crisis

The Central American crisis began in the late 1970s, when major civil wars and communist revolutions erupted in various countries in Central America, resulting in it becoming the number one region among US's foreign policy hot spots in the 1980s.

New!!: Hegemony and Central American crisis · See more »

Chantal Mouffe

Chantal Mouffe (born 17 June 1943) is a Belgian political theorist, currently teaching at University of Westminster.

New!!: Hegemony and Chantal Mouffe · See more »

Charlemagne

Charlemagne or Charles the Great (Karl der Große, Carlo Magno; 2 April 742 – 28 January 814), numbered Charles I, was King of the Franks from 768, King of the Lombards from 774, and Holy Roman Emperor from 800.

New!!: Hegemony and Charlemagne · See more »

City-state

A city-state is a sovereign state, also described as a type of small independent country, that usually consists of a single city and its dependent territories.

New!!: Hegemony and City-state · See more »

Classical antiquity

Classical antiquity (also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the period of cultural history between the 8th century BC and the 5th or 6th century AD centered on the Mediterranean Sea, comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome, collectively known as the Greco-Roman world.

New!!: Hegemony and Classical antiquity · See more »

Cold War

The Cold War was a state of geopolitical tension after World War II between powers in the Eastern Bloc (the Soviet Union and its satellite states) and powers in the Western Bloc (the United States, its NATO allies and others).

New!!: Hegemony and Cold War · See more »

Colonialism

Colonialism is the policy of a polity seeking to extend or retain its authority over other people or territories, generally with the aim of developing or exploiting them to the benefit of the colonizing country and of helping the colonies modernize in terms defined by the colonizers, especially in economics, religion and health.

New!!: Hegemony and Colonialism · See more »

Communism

In political and social sciences, communism (from Latin communis, "common, universal") is the philosophical, social, political, and economic ideology and movement whose ultimate goal is the establishment of the communist society, which is a socioeconomic order structured upon the common ownership of the means of production and the absence of social classes, money and the state.

New!!: Hegemony and Communism · See more »

Congress of Vienna

The Congress of Vienna (Wiener Kongress) also called Vienna Congress, was a meeting of ambassadors of European states chaired by Austrian statesman Klemens von Metternich, and held in Vienna from November 1814 to June 1815, though the delegates had arrived and were already negotiating by late September 1814.

New!!: Hegemony and Congress of Vienna · See more »

Continental Europe

Continental or mainland Europe is the continuous continent of Europe excluding its surrounding islands.

New!!: Hegemony and Continental Europe · See more »

Counter-hegemonic globalization

Counter-hegemonic globalization is a social movement based in a perspective of globalization that challenges the contemporary view of globalization; neoliberal globalization.

New!!: Hegemony and Counter-hegemonic globalization · See more »

Cultural hegemony

In Marxist philosophy, cultural hegemony is the domination of a culturally diverse society by the ruling class who manipulate the culture of that society—the beliefs, explanations, perceptions, values, and mores—so that their imposed, ruling-class worldview becomes the accepted cultural norm; the universally valid dominant ideology, which justifies the social, political, and economic status quo as natural and inevitable, perpetual and beneficial for everyone, rather than as artificial social constructs that benefit only the ruling class.

New!!: Hegemony and Cultural hegemony · See more »

Cultural imperialism

Cultural imperialism comprises the cultural aspects of imperialism.

New!!: Hegemony and Cultural imperialism · See more »

David Harvey

David W. Harvey (born 31 October 1935) is the Distinguished Professor of anthropology and geography at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY).

New!!: Hegemony and David Harvey · See more »

Delian League

The Delian League, founded in 478 BC, was an association of Greek city-states, with the amount of members numbering between 150 to 330under the leadership of Athens, whose purpose was to continue fighting the Persian Empire after the Greek victory in the Battle of Plataea at the end of the Second Persian invasion of Greece.

New!!: Hegemony and Delian League · See more »

Discourse

Discourse (from Latin discursus, "running to and from") denotes written and spoken communications.

New!!: Hegemony and Discourse · See more »

Dissolution of the Soviet Union

The dissolution of the Soviet Union occurred on December 26, 1991, officially granting self-governing independence to the Republics of the Soviet Union.

New!!: Hegemony and Dissolution of the Soviet Union · See more »

Dominance hierarchy

Dominance hierarchy is a type of social hierarchy that arises when members of a social group interact, often aggressively, to create a ranking system.

New!!: Hegemony and Dominance hierarchy · See more »

Dominant ideology

In Marxist philosophy, the term dominant ideology denotes the attitudes, beliefs, values, and morals shared by the majority of the people in a given society.

New!!: Hegemony and Dominant ideology · See more »

Dutch Golden Age

The Dutch Golden Age (Gouden Eeuw) was a period in the history of the Netherlands, roughly spanning the 17th century, in which Dutch trade, science, military, and art were among the most acclaimed in the world.

New!!: Hegemony and Dutch Golden Age · See more »

Dutch Republic

The Dutch Republic was a republic that existed from the formal creation of a confederacy in 1581 by several Dutch provinces (which earlier seceded from the Spanish rule) until the Batavian Revolution in 1795.

New!!: Hegemony and Dutch Republic · See more »

Early modern Britain

Early modern Britain is the history of the island of Great Britain roughly corresponding to the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries.

New!!: Hegemony and Early modern Britain · See more »

East Asia

East Asia is the eastern subregion of the Asian continent, which can be defined in either geographical or ethno-cultural "The East Asian cultural sphere evolves when Japan, Korea, and what is today Vietnam all share adapted elements of Chinese civilization of this period (that of the Tang dynasty), in particular Buddhism, Confucian social and political values, and literary Chinese and its writing system." terms.

New!!: Hegemony and East Asia · See more »

Economic history of the Netherlands (1500–1815)

The economic history of the Netherlands (1500–1815) is the history of an economy that scholar Jan de Vries calls the first "modern" economy.

New!!: Hegemony and Economic history of the Netherlands (1500–1815) · See more »

Edward Luttwak

Edward Nicolae Luttwak (born 4 November 1942) is a political scientist known for his works on grand strategy, military history, and international relations.

New!!: Hegemony and Edward Luttwak · See more »

Edward Soja

Edward William Soja (1940–2015) was a self-described "urbanist," a noted postmodern political geographer and urban theorist on the planning faculty at UCLA, where he was Distinguished Professor of Urban Planning, and the London School of Economics.

New!!: Hegemony and Edward Soja · See more »

Emperor of the French

Emperor of the French (French: Empereur des Français) was the title used by the House of Bonaparte starting when Napoleon Bonaparte was given the title of Emperor on 18 May 1804 by the French Senate and was crowned emperor of the French on 2 December 1804 at the cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris, in Paris, with the Crown of Napoleon.

New!!: Hegemony and Emperor of the French · See more »

Empire of Japan

The was the historical nation-state and great power that existed from the Meiji Restoration in 1868 to the enactment of the 1947 constitution of modern Japan.

New!!: Hegemony and Empire of Japan · See more »

Ephorus

Ephorus of Cyme (Ἔφορος ὁ Κυμαῖος, Ephoros ho Kymaios; c. 400 – 330 BC), often named in conjunction with his birthplace Cyme, Aeolia, was an ancient Greek historian.

New!!: Hegemony and Ephorus · See more »

Ernesto Laclau

Ernesto Laclau (6 October 1935 – 13 April 2014) was an Argentine political theorist.

New!!: Hegemony and Ernesto Laclau · See more »

European colonialism

European colonialism refers to the worldwide colonial expansion of European countries, which began in the early modern period, c. 1500.

New!!: Hegemony and European colonialism · See more »

Feudalism

Feudalism was a combination of legal and military customs in medieval Europe that flourished between the 9th and 15th centuries.

New!!: Hegemony and Feudalism · See more »

Five Hegemons

The Five Hegemons refers to several especially powerful rulers of Chinese states of the Spring and Autumn period of Chinese history (770 to 476 BCE), sometimes alternatively referred to as the "Age of Hegemons".

New!!: Hegemony and Five Hegemons · See more »

French Consulate

The Consulate (French: Le Consulat) was the government of France from the fall of the Directory in the coup of Brumaire in November 1799 until the start of the Napoleonic Empire in May 1804.

New!!: Hegemony and French Consulate · See more »

German Empire

The German Empire (Deutsches Kaiserreich, officially Deutsches Reich),Herbert Tuttle wrote in September 1881 that the term "Reich" does not literally connote an empire as has been commonly assumed by English-speaking people.

New!!: Hegemony and German Empire · See more »

Global governance

Global governance or world governance is a movement towards political cooperation among transnational actors, aimed at negotiating responses to problems that affect more than one state or region.

New!!: Hegemony and Global governance · See more »

Glorious Revolution

The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange, who was James's nephew and son-in-law.

New!!: Hegemony and Glorious Revolution · See more »

Great power

A great power is a sovereign state that is recognized as having the ability and expertise to exert its influence on a global scale.

New!!: Hegemony and Great power · See more »

Greco-Roman world

The Greco-Roman world, Greco-Roman culture, or the term Greco-Roman; spelled Graeco-Roman in the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth), when used as an adjective, as understood by modern scholars and writers, refers to those geographical regions and countries that culturally (and so historically) were directly, long-term, and intimately influenced by the language, culture, government and religion of the ancient Greeks and Romans. It is also better known as the Classical Civilisation. In exact terms the area refers to the "Mediterranean world", the extensive tracts of land centered on the Mediterranean and Black Sea basins, the "swimming-pool and spa" of the Greeks and Romans, i.e. one wherein the cultural perceptions, ideas and sensitivities of these peoples were dominant. This process was aided by the universal adoption of Greek as the language of intellectual culture and commerce in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, and of Latin as the tongue for public management and forensic advocacy, especially in the Western Mediterranean. Though the Greek and the Latin never became the native idioms of the rural peasants who composed the great majority of the empire's population, they were the languages of the urbanites and cosmopolitan elites, and the lingua franca, even if only as corrupt or multifarious dialects to those who lived within the large territories and populations outside the Macedonian settlements and the Roman colonies. All Roman citizens of note and accomplishment regardless of their ethnic extractions, spoke and wrote in Greek and/or Latin, such as the Roman jurist and Imperial chancellor Ulpian who was of Phoenician origin, the mathematician and geographer Claudius Ptolemy who was of Greco-Egyptian origin and the famous post-Constantinian thinkers John Chrysostom and Augustine who were of Syrian and Berber origins, respectively, and the historian Josephus Flavius who was of Jewish origin and spoke and wrote in Greek.

New!!: Hegemony and Greco-Roman world · See more »

Habsburg Spain

Habsburg Spain refers to the history of Spain over the 16th and 17th centuries (1516–1700), when it was ruled by kings from the House of Habsburg (also associated with its role in the history of Central Europe).

New!!: Hegemony and Habsburg Spain · See more »

Harsha

Harsha (c. 590–647 CE), also known as Harshavardhana, was an Indian emperor who ruled North India from 606 to 647 CE.

New!!: Hegemony and Harsha · See more »

Hegemonic masculinity

In gender studies, hegemonic masculinity is part of R.W. Connell's gender order theory, which recognizes multiple masculinities that vary across time, culture and the individual.

New!!: Hegemony and Hegemonic masculinity · See more »

Hegemony and Socialist Strategy

Hegemony and Socialist Strategy is a 1985 work of political theory in the post-Marxist tradition by Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe.

New!!: Hegemony and Hegemony and Socialist Strategy · See more »

History of Portugal (1415–1578)

The Kingdom of Portugal in the 15th century was the first European power to begin building a colonial empire.

New!!: Hegemony and History of Portugal (1415–1578) · See more »

Hubert Védrine

Hubert Védrine (born 31 July 1947 in Saint-Silvain-Bellegarde, Creuse) is a French Socialist politician.

New!!: Hegemony and Hubert Védrine · See more »

Hyperpower

A hyperpower is a state that dominates all other states in every domain (i.e. military, culture, economy) and is considered to be a step higher than a superpower.

New!!: Hegemony and Hyperpower · See more »

Iberian Union

The Iberian Union was the dynastic union of the Crown of Portugal and the Spanish Crown between 1580 and 1640, bringing the entire Iberian Peninsula, as well as Spanish and Portuguese overseas possessions, under the Spanish Habsburg kings Philip II, Philip III and Philip IV of Spain.

New!!: Hegemony and Iberian Union · See more »

Ideology

An Ideology is a collection of normative beliefs and values that an individual or group holds for other than purely epistemic reasons.

New!!: Hegemony and Ideology · See more »

Imperialism

Imperialism is a policy that involves a nation extending its power by the acquisition of lands by purchase, diplomacy or military force.

New!!: Hegemony and Imperialism · See more »

Imperialism, the Highest Stage of Capitalism

Imperialism, the Highest Stage of Capitalism (1917), by Vladimir Lenin, describes the function of financial capital in generating profits from imperialist colonialism as the final stage of capitalist development to ensure greater profits.

New!!: Hegemony and Imperialism, the Highest Stage of Capitalism · See more »

Imperium

Imperium is a Latin word that, in a broad sense, translates roughly as 'power to command'.

New!!: Hegemony and Imperium · See more »

Indian Ocean

The Indian Ocean is the third largest of the world's oceanic divisions, covering (approximately 20% of the water on the Earth's surface).

New!!: Hegemony and Indian Ocean · See more »

Indian subcontinent

The Indian subcontinent is a southern region and peninsula of Asia, mostly situated on the Indian Plate and projecting southwards into the Indian Ocean from the Himalayas.

New!!: Hegemony and Indian subcontinent · See more »

Information

Information is any entity or form that provides the answer to a question of some kind or resolves uncertainty.

New!!: Hegemony and Information · See more »

International relations

International relations (IR) or international affairs (IA) — commonly also referred to as international studies (IS) or global studies (GS) — is the study of interconnectedness of politics, economics and law on a global level.

New!!: Hegemony and International relations · See more »

International relations theory

International relations theory is the study of international relations (IR) from a theoretical perspective.

New!!: Hegemony and International relations theory · See more »

Italian Wars

The Italian Wars, often referred to as the Great Italian Wars or the Great Wars of Italy and sometimes as the Habsburg–Valois Wars or the Renaissance Wars, were a series of conflicts from 1494 to 1559 that involved, at various times, most of the city-states of Italy, the Papal States, the Republic of Venice, most of the major states of Western Europe (France, Spain, the Holy Roman Empire, England, and Scotland) as well as the Ottoman Empire.

New!!: Hegemony and Italian Wars · See more »

John Mearsheimer

John Joseph Mearsheimer (born December 14, 1947) is an American political scientist.

New!!: Hegemony and John Mearsheimer · See more »

Joseph Nye

Joseph Samuel Nye Jr. (born January 19, 1937) is an American political scientist.

New!!: Hegemony and Joseph Nye · See more »

Korean War

The Korean War (in South Korean, "Korean War"; in North Korean, "Fatherland: Liberation War"; 25 June 1950 – 27 July 1953) was a war between North Korea (with the support of China and the Soviet Union) and South Korea (with the principal support of the United States).

New!!: Hegemony and Korean War · See more »

Language

Language is a system that consists of the development, acquisition, maintenance and use of complex systems of communication, particularly the human ability to do so; and a language is any specific example of such a system.

New!!: Hegemony and Language · See more »

Laotian Civil War

The Laotian Civil War (1959–75) was fought between the Communist Pathet Lao (including many North Vietnamese of Lao ancestry) and the Royal Lao Government, with both sides receiving heavy external support in a proxy war between the global Cold War superpowers.

New!!: Hegemony and Laotian Civil War · See more »

League of Corinth

The League of Corinth, also referred to as the Hellenic League (from Greek Ἑλληνικός Hellenikos, "pertaining to Greece and Greeks"), was a federation of Greek states created by Philip II during the winter of 338 BC/337 BC after the battle of Chaeronea and succeeded by Alexander the Great at 336 BC, to facilitate the use of military forces in the war of Greece against Persia.

New!!: Hegemony and League of Corinth · See more »

Lingua franca

A lingua franca, also known as a bridge language, common language, trade language, auxiliary language, vernacular language, or link language is a language or dialect systematically used to make communication possible between people who do not share a native language or dialect, particularly when it is a third language that is distinct from both native languages.

New!!: Hegemony and Lingua franca · See more »

Louis XIV of France

Louis XIV (Louis Dieudonné; 5 September 16381 September 1715), known as Louis the Great (Louis le Grand) or the Sun King (Roi Soleil), was a monarch of the House of Bourbon who reigned as King of France from 1643 until his death in 1715.

New!!: Hegemony and Louis XIV of France · See more »

Marxism

Marxism is a method of socioeconomic analysis that views class relations and social conflict using a materialist interpretation of historical development and takes a dialectical view of social transformation.

New!!: Hegemony and Marxism · See more »

Marxist philosophy

Marxist philosophy or Marxist theory are works in philosophy that are strongly influenced by Karl Marx's materialist approach to theory, or works written by Marxists.

New!!: Hegemony and Marxist philosophy · See more »

Mercantilism

Mercantilism is a national economic policy designed to maximize the trade of a nation and, historically, to maximize the accumulation of gold and silver (as well as crops).

New!!: Hegemony and Mercantilism · See more »

Monetary hegemony

Monetary hegemony is an economic and political concept in which a single state has decisive influence over the functions of the international monetary system.

New!!: Hegemony and Monetary hegemony · See more »

Mores

Mores (sometimes; from Latin mōrēs,, plural form of singular mōs, meaning "manner", "custom", "usage", "habit") was introduced from English into American English by William Graham Sumner (1840–1910), an early U.S. sociologist, to refer to social norms that are widely observed and are considered to have greater moral significance than others.

New!!: Hegemony and Mores · See more »

Napoleon

Napoléon Bonaparte (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a French statesman and military leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution and led several successful campaigns during the French Revolutionary Wars.

New!!: Hegemony and Napoleon · See more »

Napoleonic Wars

The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, financed and usually led by the United Kingdom.

New!!: Hegemony and Napoleonic Wars · See more »

NATO

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO; Organisation du Traité de l'Atlantique Nord; OTAN), also called the North Atlantic Alliance, is an intergovernmental military alliance between 29 North American and European countries.

New!!: Hegemony and NATO · See more »

Nazi Germany

Nazi Germany is the common English name for the period in German history from 1933 to 1945, when Germany was under the dictatorship of Adolf Hitler through the Nazi Party (NSDAP).

New!!: Hegemony and Nazi Germany · See more »

Noam Chomsky

Avram Noam Chomsky (born December 7, 1928) is an American linguist, philosopher, cognitive scientist, historian, social critic and political activist.

New!!: Hegemony and Noam Chomsky · See more »

Oxford English Dictionary

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is the main historical dictionary of the English language, published by the Oxford University Press.

New!!: Hegemony and Oxford English Dictionary · See more »

Pacific Ocean

The Pacific Ocean is the largest and deepest of Earth's oceanic divisions.

New!!: Hegemony and Pacific Ocean · See more »

Pax Romana

The Pax Romana (Latin for "Roman Peace") was a long period of relative peace and stability experienced by the Roman Empire between the accession of Caesar Augustus, founder of the Roman principate, and the death of Marcus Aurelius, last of the "good emperors".

New!!: Hegemony and Pax Romana · See more »

Peloponnesian League

The Peloponnesian League was an alliance in the Peloponnesus from the 6th to the 4th centuries BC, dominated by Sparta.

New!!: Hegemony and Peloponnesian League · See more »

Philip II of Macedon

Philip II of Macedon (Φίλιππος Β΄ ὁ Μακεδών; 382–336 BC) was the king (basileus) of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon from until his assassination in.

New!!: Hegemony and Philip II of Macedon · See more »

Philip IV of Spain

Philip IV of Spain (Felipe IV; 8 April 1605 – 17 September 1665) was King of Spain (as Philip IV in Castille and Philip III in Aragon) and Portugal as Philip III (Filipe III).

New!!: Hegemony and Philip IV of Spain · See more »

Political science

Political science is a social science which deals with systems of governance, and the analysis of political activities, political thoughts, and political behavior.

New!!: Hegemony and Political science · See more »

Portuguese discoveries

Portuguese discoveries (Portuguese: Descobrimentos portugueses) are the numerous territories and maritime routes discovered by the Portuguese as a result of their intensive maritime exploration during the 15th and 16th centuries.

New!!: Hegemony and Portuguese discoveries · See more »

Posthegemony

Posthegemony or post-hegemony is a period or a situation in which hegemony is no longer said to function as the organizing principle of a national or post-national social order, or of the relationships between and amongst nation states within the global order.

New!!: Hegemony and Posthegemony · See more »

Power (social and political)

In social science and politics, power is the ability to influence or outright control the behaviour of people.

New!!: Hegemony and Power (social and political) · See more »

Praxis (process)

Praxis (from translit) is the process by which a theory, lesson, or skill is enacted, embodied, or realized.

New!!: Hegemony and Praxis (process) · See more »

Proxy war

A proxy war is an armed conflict between two states or non-state actors which act on the instigation or on behalf of other parties that are not directly involved in the hostilities.

New!!: Hegemony and Proxy war · See more »

Prussia

Prussia (Preußen) was a historically prominent German state that originated in 1525 with a duchy centred on the region of Prussia.

New!!: Hegemony and Prussia · See more »

Queen Victoria

Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death.

New!!: Hegemony and Queen Victoria · See more »

Regional hegemony

In international relations, regional hegemony is the influence exercised over neighboring countries by an independently powerful nation, the regional hegemon.

New!!: Hegemony and Regional hegemony · See more »

Reich

Reich is a German word literally meaning "realm".

New!!: Hegemony and Reich · See more »

Ruling class

The ruling class is the social class of a given society that decides upon and sets that society's political agenda.

New!!: Hegemony and Ruling class · See more »

Social class

A social class is a set of subjectively defined concepts in the social sciences and political theory centered on models of social stratification in which people are grouped into a set of hierarchical social categories, the most common being the upper, middle and lower classes.

New!!: Hegemony and Social class · See more »

Social constructionism

Social constructionism or the social construction of reality (also social concept) is a theory of knowledge in sociology and communication theory that examines the development of jointly constructed understandings of the world that form the basis for shared assumptions about reality.

New!!: Hegemony and Social constructionism · See more »

Social norm

From a sociological perspective, social norms are informal understandings that govern the behavior of members of a society.

New!!: Hegemony and Social norm · See more »

Social structure

In the social sciences, social structure is the patterned social arrangements in society that are both emergent from and determinant of the actions of the individuals.

New!!: Hegemony and Social structure · See more »

Socialist Party (France)

The Socialist Party (Parti socialiste, PS) is a social-democratic political party in France, and the largest party of the French centre-left.

New!!: Hegemony and Socialist Party (France) · See more »

Society

A society is a group of individuals involved in persistent social interaction, or a large social group sharing the same geographical or social territory, typically subject to the same political authority and dominant cultural expectations.

New!!: Hegemony and Society · See more »

Soft power

Soft power is the ability to attract and co-opt, rather than by coercion (hard power), which is using force or giving money as a means of persuasion.

New!!: Hegemony and Soft power · See more »

Southeast Asia Treaty Organization

The Southeast Asia Treaty Organization (SEATO) was an international organization for collective defense in Southeast Asia created by the Southeast Asia Collective Defense Treaty, or Manila Pact, signed in September 1954 in Manila, Philippines.

New!!: Hegemony and Southeast Asia Treaty Organization · See more »

Spanish Empire

The Spanish Empire (Imperio Español; Imperium Hispanicum), historically known as the Hispanic Monarchy (Monarquía Hispánica) and as the Catholic Monarchy (Monarquía Católica) was one of the largest empires in history.

New!!: Hegemony and Spanish Empire · See more »

Sparta

Sparta (Doric Greek: Σπάρτα, Spártā; Attic Greek: Σπάρτη, Spártē) was a prominent city-state in ancient Greece.

New!!: Hegemony and Sparta · See more »

Sphere of influence

In the field of international relations, a sphere of influence (SOI) is a spatial region or concept division over which a state or organization has a level of cultural, economic, military, or political exclusivity, accommodating to the interests of powers outside the borders of the state that controls it.

New!!: Hegemony and Sphere of influence · See more »

Spring and Autumn period

The Spring and Autumn period was a period in Chinese history from approximately 771 to 476 BC (or according to some authorities until 403 BC) which corresponds roughly to the first half of the Eastern Zhou Period.

New!!: Hegemony and Spring and Autumn period · See more »

State (polity)

A state is a compulsory political organization with a centralized government that maintains a monopoly of the legitimate use of force within a certain geographical territory.

New!!: Hegemony and State (polity) · See more »

State collapse

State collapse, breakdown, or downfall is the complete failure of a mode of government within a sovereign state.

New!!: Hegemony and State collapse · See more »

Status quo

Status quo is a Latin phrase meaning the existing state of affairs, particularly with regard to social or political issues.

New!!: Hegemony and Status quo · See more »

Stock market

A stock market, equity market or share market is the aggregation of buyers and sellers (a loose network of economic transactions, not a physical facility or discrete entity) of stocks (also called shares), which represent ownership claims on businesses; these may include securities listed on a public stock exchange as well as those only traded privately.

New!!: Hegemony and Stock market · See more »

Supremacism

Supremacism is an ideology of domination and superiority: it states that a particular class of people is superior to others, and that it should dominate, control, and subjugate others, or is entitled to do it.

New!!: Hegemony and Supremacism · See more »

Umayyad Caliphate

The Umayyad Caliphate (ٱلْخِلافَةُ ٱلأُمَوِيَّة, trans. Al-Khilāfatu al-ʾUmawiyyah), also spelt, was the second of the four major caliphates established after the death of Muhammad.

New!!: Hegemony and Umayyad Caliphate · See more »

Unification of Germany

The unification of Germany into a politically and administratively integrated nation state officially occurred on 18 January 1871, in the Hall of Mirrors at the Palace of Versailles in France.

New!!: Hegemony and Unification of Germany · See more »

Union of Utrecht

The Union of Utrecht (Unie van Utrecht) was a treaty signed on 23 January 1579 in Utrecht, the Netherlands, unifying the northern provinces of the Netherlands, until then under the control of Habsburg Spain.

New!!: Hegemony and Union of Utrecht · See more »

United Nations

The United Nations (UN) is an intergovernmental organization tasked to promote international cooperation and to create and maintain international order.

New!!: Hegemony and United Nations · See more »

United Nations Security Council

The United Nations Security Council (UNSC) is one of the six principal organs of the United Nations, charged with the maintenance of international peace and security as well as accepting new members to the United Nations and approving any changes to its United Nations Charter.

New!!: Hegemony and United Nations Security Council · See more »

United States Department of Defense

The Department of Defense (DoD, USDOD, or DOD) is an executive branch department of the federal government of the United States charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government concerned directly with national security and the United States Armed Forces.

New!!: Hegemony and United States Department of Defense · See more »

Value (ethics)

In ethics, value denotes the degree of importance of some thing or action, with the aim of determining what actions are best to do or what way is best to live (normative ethics), or to describe the significance of different actions.

New!!: Hegemony and Value (ethics) · See more »

Vietnam War

The Vietnam War (Chiến tranh Việt Nam), also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America (Kháng chiến chống Mỹ) or simply the American War, was a conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975.

New!!: Hegemony and Vietnam War · See more »

War in Afghanistan (1978–present)

This article covers the history of Afghanistan since the communist military coup on 27 April 1978, known as the Saur Revolution, when the People's Democratic Party of Afghanistan (PDPA) took power.

New!!: Hegemony and War in Afghanistan (1978–present) · See more »

Warsaw Pact

The Warsaw Pact, formally known as the Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance, was a collective defence treaty signed in Warsaw, Poland among the Soviet Union and seven Soviet satellite states of Central and Eastern Europe during the Cold War.

New!!: Hegemony and Warsaw Pact · See more »

Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.

New!!: Hegemony and Washington, D.C. · See more »

Western world

The Western world refers to various nations depending on the context, most often including at least part of Europe and the Americas.

New!!: Hegemony and Western world · See more »

World view

A world view or worldview is the fundamental cognitive orientation of an individual or society encompassing the whole of the individual's or society's knowledge and point of view.

New!!: Hegemony and World view · See more »

World War I

World War I (often abbreviated as WWI or WW1), also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.

New!!: Hegemony and World War I · See more »

World War II

World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier.

New!!: Hegemony and World War II · See more »

Xenophon

Xenophon of Athens (Ξενοφῶν,, Xenophōn; – 354 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher, historian, soldier, mercenary, and student of Socrates.

New!!: Hegemony and Xenophon · See more »

Zhou dynasty

The Zhou dynasty or the Zhou Kingdom was a Chinese dynasty that followed the Shang dynasty and preceded the Qin dynasty.

New!!: Hegemony and Zhou dynasty · See more »

1954 Guatemalan coup d'état

The 1954 Guatemalan coup d'état was a covert operation carried out by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) that deposed the democratically elected Guatemalan President Jacobo Árbenz and ended the Guatemalan Revolution of 1944–1954.

New!!: Hegemony and 1954 Guatemalan coup d'état · See more »

Redirects here:

American hegemony, Dominance over the Earth, Hedgemon, Hedgemony, Hegemnity, Hegemon, Hegemonial, Hegemonic, Hegemonics, Hegemonies, Hegemonism, Hegemonist, Hegemons, Hēgemonía, Ἡγεμονία.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hegemony

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »