Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Install
Faster access than browser!
 

Hellenization

Index Hellenization

Hellenization or Hellenisation is the historical spread of ancient Greek culture, religion and, to a lesser extent, language, over foreign peoples conquered by Greeks or brought into their sphere of influence, particularly during the Hellenistic period following the campaigns of Alexander the Great in the fourth century BC. [1]

87 relations: Afghanistan, Alexander the Great, Anatolia, Ancient Greece, Ancient Greek, Armenians, Assyrian people, Bactria, Balkans, Black Sea, Bruttians, Byzantine Empire, Byzantine Greeks, Central Asia, Christianity and Hellenistic philosophy, Classical antiquity, Constantine the Great, Constantinople, Corfiot Italians, Corfu, Crete, Culture of Greece, Cyprus, Dardani, Dehellenization, Early Christianity, Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople, Egyptians, Elymians, Eteocretan language, Eteocypriot language, Getae, Greco-Bactrian Kingdom, Greece, Greek nationalism, Greek Orthodox Church, Hellenistic Judaism, Hellenistic period, Hellenistic religion, Heraclius, History of Greece, Illyrians, Indian subcontinent, Indo-Greek Kingdom, Ionian Islands, Italy, Jews, Jireček Line, Judaism, Koine Greek, ..., Language of the New Testament, Leleges, Lemnian language, Levant, Lucanians, Macedonian language, Magna Graecia, Martin Hengel, Meditations, Mediterranean Basin, Mediterranean Sea, Messapians, Middle East, Minoan civilization, Mixobarbaroi, Oenotrians, Ottoman Empire, Paeonia (kingdom), Pakistan, Parthia, Pelasgians, Penguin Books, Persis, Philhellenism, Rudolf Bultmann, Seleucid army, Seleucid Empire, Seneca the Younger, Sicani, Sicels, Sicily, Sphere of influence, Stoicism, Syria, Syriac language, Thracians, Turkification. Expand index (37 more) »

Afghanistan

Afghanistan (Pashto/Dari:, Pashto: Afġānistān, Dari: Afġānestān), officially the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, is a landlocked country located within South Asia and Central Asia.

New!!: Hellenization and Afghanistan · See more »

Alexander the Great

Alexander III of Macedon (20/21 July 356 BC – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander the Great (Aléxandros ho Mégas), was a king (basileus) of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon and a member of the Argead dynasty.

New!!: Hellenization and Alexander the Great · See more »

Anatolia

Anatolia (Modern Greek: Ανατολία Anatolía, from Ἀνατολή Anatolḗ,; "east" or "rise"), also known as Asia Minor (Medieval and Modern Greek: Μικρά Ἀσία Mikrá Asía, "small Asia"), Asian Turkey, the Anatolian peninsula, or the Anatolian plateau, is the westernmost protrusion of Asia, which makes up the majority of modern-day Turkey.

New!!: Hellenization and Anatolia · See more »

Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (AD 600).

New!!: Hellenization and Ancient Greece · See more »

Ancient Greek

The Ancient Greek language includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD.

New!!: Hellenization and Ancient Greek · See more »

Armenians

Armenians (հայեր, hayer) are an ethnic group native to the Armenian Highlands.

New!!: Hellenization and Armenians · See more »

Assyrian people

Assyrian people (ܐܫܘܪܝܐ), or Syriacs (see terms for Syriac Christians), are an ethnic group indigenous to the Middle East.

New!!: Hellenization and Assyrian people · See more »

Bactria

Bactria or Bactriana was the name of a historical region in Central Asia.

New!!: Hellenization and Bactria · See more »

Balkans

The Balkans, or the Balkan Peninsula, is a geographic area in southeastern Europe with various and disputed definitions.

New!!: Hellenization and Balkans · See more »

Black Sea

The Black Sea is a body of water and marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean between Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and Western Asia.

New!!: Hellenization and Black Sea · See more »

Bruttians

The Bruttians (Bréttioi, Bruttii) were an ancient Italic tribe of Lucanian descent.

New!!: Hellenization and Bruttians · See more »

Byzantine Empire

The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire and Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium).

New!!: Hellenization and Byzantine Empire · See more »

Byzantine Greeks

The Byzantine Greeks (or Byzantines) were the Greek or Hellenized people of the Byzantine Empire (or Eastern Roman Empire) during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages who spoke medieval Greek and were Orthodox Christians.

New!!: Hellenization and Byzantine Greeks · See more »

Central Asia

Central Asia stretches from the Caspian Sea in the west to China in the east and from Afghanistan in the south to Russia in the north.

New!!: Hellenization and Central Asia · See more »

Christianity and Hellenistic philosophy

Christianity and Hellenistic philosophies experienced complex interactions during the first to the fourth centuries.

New!!: Hellenization and Christianity and Hellenistic philosophy · See more »

Classical antiquity

Classical antiquity (also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the period of cultural history between the 8th century BC and the 5th or 6th century AD centered on the Mediterranean Sea, comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome, collectively known as the Greco-Roman world.

New!!: Hellenization and Classical antiquity · See more »

Constantine the Great

Constantine the Great (Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus; Κωνσταντῖνος ὁ Μέγας; 27 February 272 ADBirth dates vary but most modern historians use 272". Lenski, "Reign of Constantine" (CC), 59. – 22 May 337 AD), also known as Constantine I or Saint Constantine, was a Roman Emperor of Illyrian and Greek origin from 306 to 337 AD.

New!!: Hellenization and Constantine the Great · See more »

Constantinople

Constantinople (Κωνσταντινούπολις Konstantinoúpolis; Constantinopolis) was the capital city of the Roman/Byzantine Empire (330–1204 and 1261–1453), and also of the brief Latin (1204–1261), and the later Ottoman (1453–1923) empires.

New!!: Hellenization and Constantinople · See more »

Corfiot Italians

Corfiot Italians (or "Corfiote Italians") are a population from the Greek island of Corfu (Kerkyra) with ethnic and linguistic ties to the Republic of Venice.

New!!: Hellenization and Corfiot Italians · See more »

Corfu

Corfu or Kerkyra (translit,; translit,; Corcyra; Corfù) is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea.

New!!: Hellenization and Corfu · See more »

Crete

Crete (Κρήτη,; Ancient Greek: Κρήτη, Krḗtē) is the largest and most populous of the Greek islands, the 88th largest island in the world and the fifth largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, after Sicily, Sardinia, Cyprus, and Corsica.

New!!: Hellenization and Crete · See more »

Culture of Greece

The culture of Greece has evolved over thousands of years, beginning in Mycenaean Greece, continuing most notably into Classical Greece, through the influence of the Roman Empire and its successor the Byzantine Empire.

New!!: Hellenization and Culture of Greece · See more »

Cyprus

Cyprus (Κύπρος; Kıbrıs), officially the Republic of Cyprus (Κυπριακή Δημοκρατία; Kıbrıs Cumhuriyeti), is an island country in the Eastern Mediterranean and the third largest and third most populous island in the Mediterranean.

New!!: Hellenization and Cyprus · See more »

Dardani

The Dardani (Δαρδάνιοι, Δάρδανοι; Dardani), or Dardanians (Δαρδανίωνες) were a tribe which occupied the region that took its name from them of Dardania, at the Thraco-Illyrian contact zone; their identification as either an Illyrian or Thracian tribe is uncertain.

New!!: Hellenization and Dardani · See more »

Dehellenization

Dehellenization refers to a disillusionment with forms of Greek philosophy that emerged in the Hellenistic Period, and in particular to a rejection of the use of reason.

New!!: Hellenization and Dehellenization · See more »

Early Christianity

Early Christianity, defined as the period of Christianity preceding the First Council of Nicaea in 325, typically divides historically into the Apostolic Age and the Ante-Nicene Period (from the Apostolic Age until Nicea).

New!!: Hellenization and Early Christianity · See more »

Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople

The Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople (Οἰκουμενικόν Πατριαρχεῖον Κωνσταντινουπόλεως, Oikoumenikón Patriarkhíon Konstantinoupóleos,; Patriarchatus Oecumenicus Constantinopolitanus; Rum Ortodoks Patrikhanesi, "Roman Orthodox Patriarchate") is one of the fourteen autocephalous churches (or "jurisdictions") that together compose the Eastern Orthodox Church.

New!!: Hellenization and Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople · See more »

Egyptians

Egyptians (مَصريين;; مِصريّون; Ni/rem/en/kīmi) are an ethnic group native to Egypt and the citizens of that country sharing a common culture and a common dialect known as Egyptian Arabic.

New!!: Hellenization and Egyptians · See more »

Elymians

The Elymians (Greek: Ἔλυμοι; Latin: Elymi) were an ancient people who inhabited the western part of Sicily during the Bronze Age and Classical antiquity.

New!!: Hellenization and Elymians · See more »

Eteocretan language

Eteocretan (from Eteókrētes, lit. "true Cretans", itself composed from ἐτεός eteós "true" and Κρής Krḗs "Cretan") is the non-Greek language of a few alphabetic inscriptions of ancient Crete.

New!!: Hellenization and Eteocretan language · See more »

Eteocypriot language

Eteocypriot was a pre-Indo-European language spoken in Iron Age Cyprus.

New!!: Hellenization and Eteocypriot language · See more »

Getae

The Getae or or Gets (Γέται, singular Γέτης) were several Thracian tribes that once inhabited the regions to either side of the Lower Danube, in what is today northern Bulgaria and southern Romania.

New!!: Hellenization and Getae · See more »

Greco-Bactrian Kingdom

The Greco-Bactrian Kingdom was – along with the Indo-Greek Kingdom – the easternmost part of the Hellenistic world, covering Bactria and Sogdiana in Central Asia from 250 to 125 BC.

New!!: Hellenization and Greco-Bactrian Kingdom · See more »

Greece

No description.

New!!: Hellenization and Greece · See more »

Greek nationalism

Greek nationalism (or Hellenic nationalism) refers to the nationalism of Greeks and Greek culture.

New!!: Hellenization and Greek nationalism · See more »

Greek Orthodox Church

The name Greek Orthodox Church (Greek: Ἑλληνορθόδοξη Ἑκκλησία, Ellinorthódoxi Ekklisía), or Greek Orthodoxy, is a term referring to the body of several Churches within the larger communion of Eastern Orthodox Christianity, whose liturgy is or was traditionally conducted in Koine Greek, the original language of the Septuagint and New Testament, and whose history, traditions, and theology are rooted in the early Church Fathers and the culture of the Byzantine Empire.

New!!: Hellenization and Greek Orthodox Church · See more »

Hellenistic Judaism

Hellenistic Judaism was a form of Judaism in the ancient world that combined Jewish religious tradition with elements of Greek culture.

New!!: Hellenization and Hellenistic Judaism · See more »

Hellenistic period

The Hellenistic period covers the period of Mediterranean history between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the emergence of the Roman Empire as signified by the Battle of Actium in 31 BC and the subsequent conquest of Ptolemaic Egypt the following year.

New!!: Hellenization and Hellenistic period · See more »

Hellenistic religion

Hellenistic religion is any of the various systems of beliefs and practices of the people who lived under the influence of ancient Greek culture during the Hellenistic period and the Roman Empire (c. 300 BCE to 300 CE).

New!!: Hellenization and Hellenistic religion · See more »

Heraclius

Heraclius (Flavius Heracles Augustus; Flavios Iraklios; c. 575 – February 11, 641) was the Emperor of the Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Empire from 610 to 641.

New!!: Hellenization and Heraclius · See more »

History of Greece

The history of Greece encompasses the history of the territory of the modern nation state of Greece as well as that of the Greek people and the areas they inhabited and ruled historically.

New!!: Hellenization and History of Greece · See more »

Illyrians

The Illyrians (Ἰλλυριοί, Illyrioi; Illyrii or Illyri) were a group of Indo-European tribes in antiquity, who inhabited part of the western Balkans.

New!!: Hellenization and Illyrians · See more »

Indian subcontinent

The Indian subcontinent is a southern region and peninsula of Asia, mostly situated on the Indian Plate and projecting southwards into the Indian Ocean from the Himalayas.

New!!: Hellenization and Indian subcontinent · See more »

Indo-Greek Kingdom

The Indo-Greek Kingdom or Graeco-Indian Kingdom was an Hellenistic kingdom covering various parts of Afghanistan and the northwest regions of the Indian subcontinent (parts of modern Pakistan and northwestern India), during the last two centuries BC and was ruled by more than thirty kings, often conflicting with one another.

New!!: Hellenization and Indo-Greek Kingdom · See more »

Ionian Islands

The Ionian Islands (Modern Greek: Ιόνια νησιά, Ionia nisia; Ancient Greek, Katharevousa: Ἰόνιοι Νῆσοι, Ionioi Nēsoi; Isole Ionie) are a group of islands in Greece.

New!!: Hellenization and Ionian Islands · See more »

Italy

Italy (Italia), officially the Italian Republic (Repubblica Italiana), is a sovereign state in Europe.

New!!: Hellenization and Italy · See more »

Jews

Jews (יְהוּדִים ISO 259-3, Israeli pronunciation) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group and a nation, originating from the Israelites Israelite origins and kingdom: "The first act in the long drama of Jewish history is the age of the Israelites""The people of the Kingdom of Israel and the ethnic and religious group known as the Jewish people that descended from them have been subjected to a number of forced migrations in their history" and Hebrews of the Ancient Near East.

New!!: Hellenization and Jews · See more »

Jireček Line

The Jireček Line is a conceptual boundary through the ancient Balkans that divides the influence of the Latin (in the north) and Greek (in the south) languages in the Roman Empire from Antiquity until the 4th century.

New!!: Hellenization and Jireček Line · See more »

Judaism

Judaism (originally from Hebrew, Yehudah, "Judah"; via Latin and Greek) is the religion of the Jewish people.

New!!: Hellenization and Judaism · See more »

Koine Greek

Koine Greek,.

New!!: Hellenization and Koine Greek · See more »

Language of the New Testament

The New Testament was written in a form of Koine Greek, which was the common language of the Eastern Mediterranean from the Conquests of Alexander the Great (335–323 BC) until the evolution of Byzantine Greek (c. 600).

New!!: Hellenization and Language of the New Testament · See more »

Leleges

The Leleges (Λέλεγες) were one of the pre-hellenic aboriginal peoples of the Aegean littoral, distinct from the Pelasgians.

New!!: Hellenization and Leleges · See more »

Lemnian language

The Lemnian language was a language spoken on the island of Lemnos in the 6th century BC.

New!!: Hellenization and Lemnian language · See more »

Levant

The Levant is an approximate historical geographical term referring to a large area in the Eastern Mediterranean.

New!!: Hellenization and Levant · See more »

Lucanians

The Lucanians (Leukanoí; Lucani) were an Italic tribe living in Lucania, in what is now southern Italy, who spoke an Oscan language, a member of the Italic languages.

New!!: Hellenization and Lucanians · See more »

Macedonian language

Macedonian (македонски, tr. makedonski) is a South Slavic language spoken as a first language by around two million people, principally in the Republic of Macedonia and the Macedonian diaspora, with a smaller number of speakers throughout the transnational region of Macedonia.

New!!: Hellenization and Macedonian language · See more »

Magna Graecia

Magna Graecia (Latin meaning "Great Greece", Μεγάλη Ἑλλάς, Megálē Hellás, Magna Grecia) was the name given by the Romans to the coastal areas of Southern Italy in the present-day regions of Campania, Apulia, Basilicata, Calabria and Sicily that were extensively populated by Greek settlers; particularly the Achaean settlements of Croton, and Sybaris, and to the north, the settlements of Cumae and Neapolis.

New!!: Hellenization and Magna Graecia · See more »

Martin Hengel

Martin Hengel (14 December 1926 – 2 July 2009) was a German historian of religion, focusing on the "Second Temple Period" or "Hellenistic Period" of early Judaism and Christianity.

New!!: Hellenization and Martin Hengel · See more »

Meditations

Meditations (Ta eis heauton, literally "things to one's self") is a series of personal writings by Marcus Aurelius, Roman Emperor from 161 to 180 AD, recording his private notes to himself and ideas on Stoic philosophy.

New!!: Hellenization and Meditations · See more »

Mediterranean Basin

In biogeography, the Mediterranean Basin (also known as the Mediterranean region or sometimes Mediterranea) is the region of lands around the Mediterranean Sea that have a Mediterranean climate, with mild, rainy winters and hot, dry summers, which supports characteristic Mediterranean forests, woodlands, and scrub vegetation.

New!!: Hellenization and Mediterranean Basin · See more »

Mediterranean Sea

The Mediterranean Sea is a sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Southern Europe and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa and on the east by the Levant.

New!!: Hellenization and Mediterranean Sea · See more »

Messapians

The Messapians (Messápioi; Messapii) were an Iapygian tribe that inhabited southern Apulia in classical antiquity.

New!!: Hellenization and Messapians · See more »

Middle East

The Middle Easttranslit-std; translit; Orta Şərq; Central Kurdish: ڕۆژھەڵاتی ناوین, Rojhelatî Nawîn; Moyen-Orient; translit; translit; translit; Rojhilata Navîn; translit; Bariga Dhexe; Orta Doğu; translit is a transcontinental region centered on Western Asia, Turkey (both Asian and European), and Egypt (which is mostly in North Africa).

New!!: Hellenization and Middle East · See more »

Minoan civilization

The Minoan civilization was an Aegean Bronze Age civilization on the island of Crete and other Aegean Islands which flourished from about 2600 to 1600 BC, before a late period of decline, finally ending around 1100.

New!!: Hellenization and Minoan civilization · See more »

Mixobarbaroi

Mixobarbaroi (μιξοβάρβαροι, semibarbari, "semi-/mixed/half barbarians") was an ethnographical term first used in Classical Greece by authors to denote people who lived in the frontiers of the oikoumene, and had qualities of both the civilized peoples and the barbarians, as seen in the works of Euripides, Plato and Xenophon.

New!!: Hellenization and Mixobarbaroi · See more »

Oenotrians

The Oenotrians ("tribe led by Oenotrus" or "people from the land of vines - Οἰνωτρία") were an ancient people of uncertain origin who inhabited a territory from Paestum to southern Calabria in southern Italy.

New!!: Hellenization and Oenotrians · See more »

Ottoman Empire

The Ottoman Empire (دولت عليه عثمانیه,, literally The Exalted Ottoman State; Modern Turkish: Osmanlı İmparatorluğu or Osmanlı Devleti), also historically known in Western Europe as the Turkish Empire"The Ottoman Empire-also known in Europe as the Turkish Empire" or simply Turkey, was a state that controlled much of Southeast Europe, Western Asia and North Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries.

New!!: Hellenization and Ottoman Empire · See more »

Paeonia (kingdom)

In antiquity, Paeonia or Paionia (Παιονία) was the land and kingdom of the Paeonians (Παίονες).

New!!: Hellenization and Paeonia (kingdom) · See more »

Pakistan

Pakistan (پاکِستان), officially the Islamic Republic of Pakistan (اِسلامی جمہوریہ پاکِستان), is a country in South Asia.

New!!: Hellenization and Pakistan · See more »

Parthia

Parthia (𐎱𐎼𐎰𐎺 Parθava; 𐭐𐭓𐭕𐭅 Parθaw; 𐭯𐭫𐭮𐭥𐭡𐭥 Pahlaw) is a historical region located in north-eastern Iran.

New!!: Hellenization and Parthia · See more »

Pelasgians

The name Pelasgians (Πελασγοί, Pelasgoí, singular: Πελασγός, Pelasgós) was used by classical Greek writers to either refer to populations that were the ancestors or forerunners of the Greeks, or to signify all pre-classical indigenes of Greece.

New!!: Hellenization and Pelasgians · See more »

Penguin Books

Penguin Books is a British publishing house.

New!!: Hellenization and Penguin Books · See more »

Persis

Persis (Περσίς), better known as Persia (Parsa; پارس, Pars), or "Persia proper", was originally a name of a region near the Zagros mountains at Lake Urmia.

New!!: Hellenization and Persis · See more »

Philhellenism

Philhellenism ("the love of Greek culture") and philhellene ("the admirer of Greeks and everything Greek"), from the Greek φίλος philos "friend, lover" and ἑλληνισμός hellenism "Greek", was an intellectual fashion prominent mostly at the turn of the 19th century.

New!!: Hellenization and Philhellenism · See more »

Rudolf Bultmann

Rudolf Karl Bultmann (20 August 1884 – 30 July 1976) was a German Lutheran theologian and professor of New Testament at the University of Marburg.

New!!: Hellenization and Rudolf Bultmann · See more »

Seleucid army

The Seleucid army was the army of the Seleucid Empire, one of the numerous Hellenistic states that emerged after the death of Alexander the Great.

New!!: Hellenization and Seleucid army · See more »

Seleucid Empire

The Seleucid Empire (Βασιλεία τῶν Σελευκιδῶν, Basileía tōn Seleukidōn) was a Hellenistic state ruled by the Seleucid dynasty, which existed from 312 BC to 63 BC; Seleucus I Nicator founded it following the division of the Macedonian empire vastly expanded by Alexander the Great.

New!!: Hellenization and Seleucid Empire · See more »

Seneca the Younger

Seneca the Younger AD65), fully Lucius Annaeus Seneca and also known simply as Seneca, was a Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman, dramatist, and—in one work—satirist of the Silver Age of Latin literature.

New!!: Hellenization and Seneca the Younger · See more »

Sicani

The Sicani (Greek Σικανοί Sikanoi) or Sicanians were one of three ancient peoples of Sicily present at the time of Phoenician and Greek colonization.

New!!: Hellenization and Sicani · See more »

Sicels

The Sicels (Siculi; Σικελοί Sikeloi) were an Italic tribe who inhabited eastern Sicily during the Iron Age.

New!!: Hellenization and Sicels · See more »

Sicily

Sicily (Sicilia; Sicìlia) is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea.

New!!: Hellenization and Sicily · See more »

Sphere of influence

In the field of international relations, a sphere of influence (SOI) is a spatial region or concept division over which a state or organization has a level of cultural, economic, military, or political exclusivity, accommodating to the interests of powers outside the borders of the state that controls it.

New!!: Hellenization and Sphere of influence · See more »

Stoicism

Stoicism is a school of Hellenistic philosophy founded by Zeno of Citium in Athens in the early 3rd century BC.

New!!: Hellenization and Stoicism · See more »

Syria

Syria (سوريا), officially known as the Syrian Arab Republic (الجمهورية العربية السورية), is a country in Western Asia, bordering Lebanon and the Mediterranean Sea to the west, Turkey to the north, Iraq to the east, Jordan to the south, and Israel to the southwest.

New!!: Hellenization and Syria · See more »

Syriac language

Syriac (ܠܫܢܐ ܣܘܪܝܝܐ), also known as Syriac Aramaic or Classical Syriac, is a dialect of Middle Aramaic.

New!!: Hellenization and Syriac language · See more »

Thracians

The Thracians (Θρᾷκες Thrāikes; Thraci) were a group of Indo-European tribes inhabiting a large area in Eastern and Southeastern Europe.

New!!: Hellenization and Thracians · See more »

Turkification

Turkification, or Turkicization (Türkleştirme), is a cultural shift whereby populations or states adopted a historical Turkic culture, such as in the Ottoman Empire.

New!!: Hellenization and Turkification · See more »

Redirects here:

De-hellenisation, Hellenisation, Hellenise, Hellenised, Hellenize, Hellenized, Hellenizer, Re-hellenisation, Re-hellenization.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hellenization

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »