Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Install
Faster access than browser!
 

Hill sphere

+ Save concept

An astronomical body's Hill sphere is the region in which it dominates the attraction of satellites. [1]

45 relations: Active galactic nucleus, Apsis, Asteroid, Asteroid belt, Astronomer, Astronomical object, Astronomical unit, Édouard Roche, Ceres (dwarf planet), COROT-7b, Eccentricity (mathematics), Exoplanet, France, George William Hill, Geostationary orbit, Gravity, HD 209458 b, Hot Jupiter, Interplanetary Transport Network, Kepler orbit, Lagrangian point, Lead, List of Mercury-crossing minor planets, Low Earth orbit, N-body problem, Natural satellite, Nature (journal), Neptune, Orbit, Perturbation (astronomy), Planet, Radiation pressure, Retrograde and prograde motion, Roche limit, Roche lobe, Semi-major and semi-minor axes, Solar System, Space Shuttle, Sphere of influence (astrodynamics), Sphere of influence (black hole), Sun, Tonne, United States, Yarkovsky effect, Zero-velocity surface.

Active galactic nucleus

An active galactic nucleus (AGN) is a compact region at the center of a galaxy that has a much higher than normal luminosity over at least some portion—and possibly all—of the electromagnetic spectrum, with characteristics indicating that the excess luminosity is not produced by stars.

New!!: Hill sphere and Active galactic nucleus · See more »

Apsis

An apsis (ἁψίς; plural apsides, Greek: ἁψῖδες) is an extreme point in the orbit of an object.

New!!: Hill sphere and Apsis · See more »

Asteroid

Asteroids are minor planets, especially those of the inner Solar System.

New!!: Hill sphere and Asteroid · See more »

Asteroid belt

The asteroid belt is the circumstellar disc in the Solar System located roughly between the orbits of the planets Mars and Jupiter.

New!!: Hill sphere and Asteroid belt · See more »

Astronomer

An astronomer is a scientist in the field of astronomy who concentrates their studies on a specific question or field outside the scope of Earth.

New!!: Hill sphere and Astronomer · See more »

Astronomical object

An astronomical object or celestial object is a naturally occurring physical entity, association, or structure that exists in the observable universe.

New!!: Hill sphere and Astronomical object · See more »

Astronomical unit

The astronomical unit (symbol: au, ua, or AU) is a unit of length, roughly the distance from Earth to the Sun.

New!!: Hill sphere and Astronomical unit · See more »

Édouard Roche

Édouard Albert Roche (17 October 1820 – 27 April 1883) was a French astronomer and mathematician, who is best known for his work in the field of celestial mechanics.

New!!: Hill sphere and Édouard Roche · See more »

Ceres (dwarf planet)

Ceres (minor-planet designation: 1 Ceres) is the largest object in the asteroid belt that lies between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, slightly closer to Mars' orbit.

New!!: Hill sphere and Ceres (dwarf planet) · See more »

COROT-7b

COROT-7b (previously named COROT-Exo-7b) is an exoplanet orbiting around the star COROT-7, in the constellation Monoceros, at 489 light years from Earth.

New!!: Hill sphere and COROT-7b · See more »

Eccentricity (mathematics)

In mathematics, the eccentricity, denoted e or \varepsilon, is a parameter associated with every conic section.

New!!: Hill sphere and Eccentricity (mathematics) · See more »

Exoplanet

An exoplanet or extrasolar planet is a planet outside our solar system.

New!!: Hill sphere and Exoplanet · See more »

France

France, officially the French Republic (République française), is a sovereign state whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.

New!!: Hill sphere and France · See more »

George William Hill

George William Hill (March 3, 1838 – April 16, 1914), was an American astronomer and mathematician.

New!!: Hill sphere and George William Hill · See more »

Geostationary orbit

A geostationary orbit, often referred to as a geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO), is a circular geosynchronous orbit above Earth's equator and following the direction of Earth's rotation.

New!!: Hill sphere and Geostationary orbit · See more »

Gravity

Gravity, or gravitation, is a natural phenomenon by which all things with mass or energy—including planets, stars, galaxies, and even light—are brought toward (or gravitate toward) one another.

New!!: Hill sphere and Gravity · See more »

HD 209458 b

HD 209458 b, also given the nickname Osiris,http://exoplanets.co/exoplanets-tutorial/extrasolar-planet-hd-209458-b.html is an exoplanet that orbits the solar analog HD 209458 in the constellation Pegasus, some 159 light-years from the Solar System.

New!!: Hill sphere and HD 209458 b · See more »

Hot Jupiter

Hot Jupiters are a class of gas giant exoplanets that are inferred to be physically similar to Jupiter but that have very short orbital period (P The close proximity to their stars and high surface-atmosphere temperatures resulted in the moniker "hot Jupiters". Hot Jupiters are the easiest extrasolar planets to detect via the radial-velocity method, because the oscillations they induce in their parent stars' motion are relatively large and rapid compared to those of other known types of planets. One of the best-known hot Jupiters is 51 Pegasi b. Discovered in 1995, it was the first extrasolar planet found orbiting a Sun-like star. 51 Pegasi b has an orbital period of about 4 days.

New!!: Hill sphere and Hot Jupiter · See more »

Interplanetary Transport Network

The Interplanetary Transport Network (ITN) is a collection of gravitationally determined pathways through the Solar System that require very little energy for an object to follow.

New!!: Hill sphere and Interplanetary Transport Network · See more »

Kepler orbit

In celestial mechanics, a Kepler orbit (or Keplerian orbit) is the motion of one body relative to another, as an ellipse, parabola, or hyperbola, which forms a two-dimensional orbital plane in three-dimensional space.

New!!: Hill sphere and Kepler orbit · See more »

Lagrangian point

In celestial mechanics, the Lagrangian points (also Lagrange points, L-points, or libration points) are positions in an orbital configuration of two large bodies, wherein a small object, affected only by the gravitational forces from the two larger objects, will maintain its position relative to them.

New!!: Hill sphere and Lagrangian point · See more »

Lead

Lead is a chemical element with symbol Pb (from the Latin plumbum) and atomic number 82.

New!!: Hill sphere and Lead · See more »

List of Mercury-crossing minor planets

A Mercury crosser is an asteroid whose orbit crosses that of Mercury.

New!!: Hill sphere and List of Mercury-crossing minor planets · See more »

Low Earth orbit

A low Earth orbit (LEO) is an orbit around Earth with an altitude of or less, and with an orbital period of between about 84 and 127 minutes.

New!!: Hill sphere and Low Earth orbit · See more »

N-body problem

In physics, the -body problem is the problem of predicting the individual motions of a group of celestial objects interacting with each other gravitationally.

New!!: Hill sphere and N-body problem · See more »

Natural satellite

A natural satellite or moon is, in the most common usage, an astronomical body that orbits a planet or minor planet (or sometimes another small Solar System body).

New!!: Hill sphere and Natural satellite · See more »

Nature (journal)

Nature is a British multidisciplinary scientific journal, first published on 4 November 1869.

New!!: Hill sphere and Nature (journal) · See more »

Neptune

Neptune is the eighth and farthest known planet from the Sun in the Solar System.

New!!: Hill sphere and Neptune · See more »

Orbit

In physics, an orbit is the gravitationally curved trajectory of an object, such as the trajectory of a planet around a star or a natural satellite around a planet.

New!!: Hill sphere and Orbit · See more »

Perturbation (astronomy)

In astronomy, perturbation is the complex motion of a massive body subject to forces other than the gravitational attraction of a single other massive body.

New!!: Hill sphere and Perturbation (astronomy) · See more »

Planet

A planet is an astronomical body orbiting a star or stellar remnant that is massive enough to be rounded by its own gravity, is not massive enough to cause thermonuclear fusion, and has cleared its neighbouring region of planetesimals.

New!!: Hill sphere and Planet · See more »

Radiation pressure

Radiation pressure is the pressure exerted upon any surface due to the exchange of momentum between the object and the electromagnetic field.

New!!: Hill sphere and Radiation pressure · See more »

Retrograde and prograde motion

Retrograde motion in astronomy is, in general, orbital or rotational motion of an object in the direction opposite the rotation of its primary, that is the central object (right figure).

New!!: Hill sphere and Retrograde and prograde motion · See more »

Roche limit

In celestial mechanics, the Roche limit, also called Roche radius, is the distance in which a celestial body, held together only by its own gravity, will disintegrate due to a second celestial body's tidal forces exceeding the first body's gravitational self-attraction.

New!!: Hill sphere and Roche limit · See more »

Roche lobe

The Roche lobe (or Roche limit) is the region around a star in a binary system within which orbiting material is gravitationally bound to that star.

New!!: Hill sphere and Roche lobe · See more »

Semi-major and semi-minor axes

In geometry, the major axis of an ellipse is its longest diameter: a line segment that runs through the center and both foci, with ends at the widest points of the perimeter.

New!!: Hill sphere and Semi-major and semi-minor axes · See more »

Solar System

The Solar SystemCapitalization of the name varies.

New!!: Hill sphere and Solar System · See more »

Space Shuttle

The Space Shuttle was a partially reusable low Earth orbital spacecraft system operated by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), as part of the Space Shuttle program.

New!!: Hill sphere and Space Shuttle · See more »

Sphere of influence (astrodynamics)

A sphere of influence (SOI) in astrodynamics and astronomy is the oblate-spheroid-shaped region around a celestial body where the primary gravitational influence on an orbiting object is that body.

New!!: Hill sphere and Sphere of influence (astrodynamics) · See more »

Sphere of influence (black hole)

The sphere of influence is a region around a supermassive black hole in which the gravitational potential of the black hole dominates the gravitational potential of the host galaxy.

New!!: Hill sphere and Sphere of influence (black hole) · See more »

Sun

The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System.

New!!: Hill sphere and Sun · See more »

Tonne

The tonne (Non-SI unit, symbol: t), commonly referred to as the metric ton in the United States, is a non-SI metric unit of mass equal to 1,000 kilograms;.

New!!: Hill sphere and Tonne · See more »

United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

New!!: Hill sphere and United States · See more »

Yarkovsky effect

The Yarkovsky effect is a force acting on a rotating body in space caused by the anisotropic emission of thermal photons, which carry momentum.

New!!: Hill sphere and Yarkovsky effect · See more »

Zero-velocity surface

The zero-velocity surface is a concept that relates to the N-body problem of gravity.

New!!: Hill sphere and Zero-velocity surface · See more »

Redirects here:

Hill Sphere, Hill radius, Roche Sphere, Roche sphere.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hill_sphere

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »