Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Hippolytus of Rome

+ Save concept

Hippolytus of Rome (170 – 235 AD) was one of the most important 3rd-century theologians in the Christian Church in Rome, where he was probably born. [1]

100 relations: Afterfeast, Ambrose, Ancient Church Orders, Ancient Greek, Anglican Communion, Antichrist, Antioch, Apologetics, Apostolic Tradition, Bibbiena, Bibliotheca (Photius), Breviary, Calendar of saints, Canon law, Canons of Hippolytus, Catholic Church, Catholic Encyclopedia, Christian Charles Josias von Bunsen, Christian Church, Christian martyrs, Chronography of 354, Chronology, Church History (Eusebius), Congregation for the Causes of Saints, Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria, Daniel (biblical figure), De Viris Illustribus (Jerome), Discourse to the Greeks concerning Hades, Eastern Orthodox Church, Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica, Ekphrasis, Epistle to Diognetus, Epitome, Ethiopia, Eusebius, Exegesis, Fetha Nagast, Florilegium, Foxe's Book of Martyrs, General Roman Calendar, Genesis creation narrative, Great feasts in the Eastern Orthodox Church, Hertfordshire, Hippolytus (son of Theseus), Homiletics, Icon, Ignaz von Döllinger, Irenaeus, Italy, Jerome, ..., Jesus, John Foxe, Joseph Lightfoot, Justin Martyr, Justin the Confessor, Karl Johannes Neumann, Liberian Catalogue, Liturgy, Mary, mother of Jesus, Maximinus Thrax, Menaion, Middle Ages, Modalistic Monarchianism, Mount Athos, Mysterii Paschalis, Novatianism, Oriental Orthodoxy, Origen, Papal selection before 1059, Paschal cycle, Passover, Patron saint, Photios I of Constantinople, Polemic, Polycarp, Pope, Pope Callixtus I, Pope Damasus I, Pope Fabian, Pope Paul VI, Pope Pius IV, Pope Pontian, Pope Urban I, Pope Zephyrinus, Portus, Presbyter, Prudentius, Refutation of All Heresies, Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults, Roman Martyrology, Saint Lawrence, Sardinia, Seventy disciples, Severus Alexander, Song of Songs, St Ippolyts, Symphorian and Timotheus, Synaxarium, Transfiguration of Jesus, Via Tiburtina. Expand index (50 more) »

Afterfeast

An Afterfeast is a period of celebration attached to one of the Great Feasts celebrated by the Orthodox Christian and Eastern Catholic Churches (somewhat analogous to what in the West would be called an Octave).

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Afterfeast · See more »

Ambrose

Aurelius Ambrosius (– 397), better known in English as Ambrose, was a bishop of Milan who became one of the most influential ecclesiastical figures of the 4th century.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Ambrose · See more »

Ancient Church Orders

Ancient Church Orders is a genre of early Christian literature, ranging from 1st to 5th century, which has the purpose of offering authoritative "apostolic" prescriptions on matters of moral conduct, liturgy and Church organization.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Ancient Church Orders · See more »

Ancient Greek

The Ancient Greek language includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Ancient Greek · See more »

Anglican Communion

The Anglican Communion is the third largest Christian communion with 85 million members, founded in 1867 in London, England.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Anglican Communion · See more »

Antichrist

In Christianity, antichrist is a term found solely in the First Epistle of John and Second Epistle of John, and often lowercased in Bible translations, in accordance with its introductory appearance: "Children, it is the last hour! As you heard that antichrist is coming, so now many antichrists have come".

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Antichrist · See more »

Antioch

Antioch on the Orontes (Antiókheia je epi Oróntou; also Syrian Antioch)Ἀντιόχεια ἡ ἐπὶ Ὀρόντου; or Ἀντιόχεια ἡ ἐπὶ Δάφνῃ, "Antioch on Daphne"; or Ἀντιόχεια ἡ Μεγάλη, "Antioch the Great"; Antiochia ad Orontem; Անտիոք Antiok; ܐܢܛܝܘܟܝܐ Anṭiokya; Hebrew: אנטיוכיה, Antiyokhya; Arabic: انطاكية, Anṭākiya; انطاکیه; Antakya.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Antioch · See more »

Apologetics

Apologetics (from Greek ἀπολογία, "speaking in defense") is the religious discipline of defending religious doctrines through systematic argumentation and discourse.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Apologetics · See more »

Apostolic Tradition

The Apostolic Tradition (or Egyptian Church Order) is an early Christian treatise which belongs to genre of the Church Orders.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Apostolic Tradition · See more »

Bibbiena

Bibbiena is a town and comune in the province of Arezzo, Tuscany (Italy), the largest town in the valley of Casentino.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Bibbiena · See more »

Bibliotheca (Photius)

The Bibliotheca (Βιβλιοθήκη) or Myriobiblos (Μυριόβιβλος, "Ten Thousand Books") was a ninth-century work of Byzantine Patriarch of Constantinople Photius, dedicated to his brother and composed of 279 reviews of books which he had read.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Bibliotheca (Photius) · See more »

Breviary

The Breviary (Latin: breviarium) is a book in many Western Christian denominations that "contains all the liturgical texts for the Office, whether said in choir or in private." Historically, different breviaries were used in the various parts of Christendom, such as Aberdeen Breviary, Belleville Breviary, Stowe Breviary and Isabella Breviary, although eventually the Roman Breviary became the standard within the Roman Catholic Church.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Breviary · See more »

Calendar of saints

The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the feast day or feast of said saint.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Calendar of saints · See more »

Canon law

Canon law (from Greek kanon, a 'straight measuring rod, ruler') is a set of ordinances and regulations made by ecclesiastical authority (Church leadership), for the government of a Christian organization or church and its members.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Canon law · See more »

Canons of Hippolytus

The Canons of Hippolytus is a Christian text composed of 38 decrees ("canons") of the genre of the Church Orders.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Canons of Hippolytus · See more »

Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.299 billion members worldwide.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Catholic Church · See more »

Catholic Encyclopedia

The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the Constitution, Doctrine, Discipline, and History of the Catholic Church, also referred to as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia and the Original Catholic Encyclopedia, is an English-language encyclopedia published in the United States and designed to serve the Roman Catholic Church.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Catholic Encyclopedia · See more »

Christian Charles Josias von Bunsen

Christian Charles or Karl Josias von Bunsen (25 August 1791 – 28 November 1860), also known as, was a German diplomat and scholar.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Christian Charles Josias von Bunsen · See more »

Christian Church

"Christian Church" is an ecclesiological term generally used by Protestants to refer to the whole group of people belonging to Christianity throughout the history of Christianity.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Christian Church · See more »

Christian martyrs

A Christian martyr is a person who is killed because of their testimony for Jesus.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Christian martyrs · See more »

Chronography of 354

The Chronography of 354, also known as the Calendar of 354, was a 4th-century illuminated manuscript, which was produced in 354 AD for a wealthy Roman Christian named Valentinus by the calligrapher and illuminator Furius Dionysius Filocalus.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Chronography of 354 · See more »

Chronology

Chronology (from Latin chronologia, from Ancient Greek χρόνος, chrónos, "time"; and -λογία, -logia) is the science of arranging events in their order of occurrence in time.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Chronology · See more »

Church History (Eusebius)

The Church History (Ἐκκλησιαστικὴ ἱστορία; Historia Ecclesiastica or Historia Ecclesiae) of Eusebius, the bishop of Caesarea was a 4th-century pioneer work giving a chronological account of the development of Early Christianity from the 1st century to the 4th century.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Church History (Eusebius) · See more »

Congregation for the Causes of Saints

The Congregation for the Causes of Saints is the congregation of the Roman Curia that oversees the complex process that leads to the canonization of saints, passing through the steps of a declaration of "heroic virtues" and beatification.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Congregation for the Causes of Saints · See more »

Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria

The Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria (Coptic: Ϯⲉⲕ̀ⲕⲗⲏⲥⲓⲁ ̀ⲛⲣⲉⲙ̀ⲛⲭⲏⲙⲓ ⲛⲟⲣⲑⲟⲇⲟⲝⲟⲥ, ti.eklyseya en.remenkimi en.orthodoxos, literally: the Egyptian Orthodox Church) is an Oriental Orthodox Christian church based in Egypt, Northeast Africa and the Middle East.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria · See more »

Daniel (biblical figure)

Daniel is the hero of the biblical Book of Daniel.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Daniel (biblical figure) · See more »

De Viris Illustribus (Jerome)

De Viris Illustribus (On Illustrious Men) is a collection of short biographies of 135 authors, written in Latin, by the 4th-century Latin Church Father Jerome.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and De Viris Illustribus (Jerome) · See more »

Discourse to the Greeks concerning Hades

Discourse to the Greeks concerning Hades is a short treatise believed to be the work of Hippolytus of Rome.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Discourse to the Greeks concerning Hades · See more »

Eastern Orthodox Church

The Eastern Orthodox Church, also known as the Orthodox Church, or officially as the Orthodox Catholic Church, is the second-largest Christian Church, with over 250 million members.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Eastern Orthodox Church · See more »

Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica

Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica (E.G.C.), or the Gnostic Catholic Church, is a Gnostic church organization.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica · See more »

Ekphrasis

Ekphrasis or ecphrasis, comes from the Greek for the description of a work of art produced as a rhetorical exercise, often used in the adjectival form ekphrastic, is a vivid, often dramatic, verbal description of a visual work of art, either real or imagined.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Ekphrasis · See more »

Epistle to Diognetus

The Epistle of Mathetes to Diognetus (Πρὸς Διόγνητον Ἐπιστολή) is an example of Christian apologetics, writings defending Christianity from its accusers.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Epistle to Diognetus · See more »

Epitome

An epitome (ἐπιτομή, from ἐπιτέμνειν epitemnein meaning "to cut short") is a summary or miniature form, or an instance that represents a larger reality, also used as a synonym for embodiments.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Epitome · See more »

Ethiopia

Ethiopia (ኢትዮጵያ), officially the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia (የኢትዮጵያ ፌዴራላዊ ዲሞክራሲያዊ ሪፐብሊክ, yeʾĪtiyoṗṗya Fēdēralawī Dēmokirasīyawī Rīpebilīk), is a country located in the Horn of Africa.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Ethiopia · See more »

Eusebius

Eusebius of Caesarea (Εὐσέβιος τῆς Καισαρείας, Eusébios tés Kaisareías; 260/265 – 339/340), also known as Eusebius Pamphili (from the Εὐσέβιος τοῦ Παμϕίλου), was a historian of Christianity, exegete, and Christian polemicist. He became the bishop of Caesarea Maritima about 314 AD. Together with Pamphilus, he was a scholar of the Biblical canon and is regarded as an extremely learned Christian of his time. He wrote Demonstrations of the Gospel, Preparations for the Gospel, and On Discrepancies between the Gospels, studies of the Biblical text. As "Father of Church History" (not to be confused with the title of Church Father), he produced the Ecclesiastical History, On the Life of Pamphilus, the Chronicle and On the Martyrs. During the Council of Antiochia (325) he was excommunicated for subscribing to the heresy of Arius, and thus withdrawn during the First Council of Nicaea where he accepted that the Homoousion referred to the Logos. Never recognized as a Saint, he became counselor of Constantine the Great, and with the bishop of Nicomedia he continued to polemicize against Saint Athanasius of Alexandria, Church Fathers, since he was condemned in the First Council of Tyre in 335.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Eusebius · See more »

Exegesis

Exegesis (from the Greek ἐξήγησις from ἐξηγεῖσθαι, "to lead out") is a critical explanation or interpretation of a text, particularly a religious text.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Exegesis · See more »

Fetha Nagast

The Fetha Nagast (Ge'ez: ፍትሐ ነገሥት fətḥa nägäśt, "Law of the Kings") is a legal code compiled around 1240 by the Coptic Egyptian Christian writer, 'Abul Fada'il Ibn al-'Assal, in Arabic that was later translated into Ge'ez in Ethiopia and expanded upon with numerous local laws.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Fetha Nagast · See more »

Florilegium

In medieval Latin a (plural) was a compilation of excerpts from other writings.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Florilegium · See more »

Foxe's Book of Martyrs

The Actes and Monuments, popularly known as Foxe's Book of Martyrs, is a work of Protestant history and martyrology by John Foxe, first published in English in 1563 by John Day.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Foxe's Book of Martyrs · See more »

General Roman Calendar

The General Roman Calendar is the liturgical calendar that indicates the dates of celebrations of saints and mysteries of the Lord (Jesus Christ) in the Roman Rite, wherever this liturgical rite is in use.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and General Roman Calendar · See more »

Genesis creation narrative

The Genesis creation narrative is the creation myth of both Judaism and Christianity.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Genesis creation narrative · See more »

Great feasts in the Eastern Orthodox Church

In the Eastern Orthodox Church, the feast of the Resurrection of Jesus, called Pascha (Easter), is the greatest of all holy days and as such it is called the "feast of feasts".

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Great feasts in the Eastern Orthodox Church · See more »

Hertfordshire

Hertfordshire (often abbreviated Herts) is a county in southern England, bordered by Bedfordshire to the north, Cambridgeshire to the north-east, Essex to the east, Buckinghamshire to the west and Greater London to the south.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Hertfordshire · See more »

Hippolytus (son of Theseus)

''The Death of Hippolytus'', by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836–1912). In Greek mythology, Hippolytus (Ἱππόλυτος Hippolytos; "unleasher of horses") was a son of Theseus and either Antiope or Hippolyte.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Hippolytus (son of Theseus) · See more »

Homiletics

Homiletics (ὁμιλητικός homilētikós, from homilos, "assembled crowd, throng"), in religion, is the application of the general principles of rhetoric to the specific art of public preaching.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Homiletics · See more »

Icon

An icon (from Greek εἰκών eikōn "image") is a religious work of art, most commonly a painting, from the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, and certain Eastern Catholic churches.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Icon · See more »

Ignaz von Döllinger

Johann Joseph Ignaz von Döllinger (28 February 179914 January 1890), also Doellinger in English, was a German theologian, Catholic priest and church historian who rejected the dogma of papal infallibility.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Ignaz von Döllinger · See more »

Irenaeus

Irenaeus (Ειρηναίος Eirēnaíos) (died about 202) was a Greek cleric noted for his role in guiding and expanding Christian communities in what is now the south of France and, more widely, for the development of Christian theology by combatting heresy and defining orthodoxy.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Irenaeus · See more »

Italy

Italy (Italia), officially the Italian Republic (Repubblica Italiana), is a sovereign state in Europe.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Italy · See more »

Jerome

Jerome (Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus; Εὐσέβιος Σωφρόνιος Ἱερώνυμος; c. 27 March 347 – 30 September 420) was a priest, confessor, theologian, and historian.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Jerome · See more »

Jesus

Jesus, also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth and Jesus Christ, was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Jesus · See more »

John Foxe

John Foxe (1516/17 – 18 April 1587) was an English historian and martyrologist, the author of Actes and Monuments (popularly known as Foxe's Book of Martyrs), an account of Christian martyrs throughout Western history, but emphasizing the sufferings of English Protestants and proto-Protestants from the 14th century through the reign of Mary I. Widely owned and read by English Puritans, the book helped to mould British popular opinion about the Catholic Church for several centuries.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and John Foxe · See more »

Joseph Lightfoot

Joseph Barber Lightfoot (13 April 1828 – 21 December 1889), also known as J. B. Lightfoot, was an English theologian and Bishop of Durham.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Joseph Lightfoot · See more »

Justin Martyr

Justin Martyr (Latin: Iustinus Martyr) was an early Christian apologist, and is regarded as the foremost interpreter of the theory of the Logos in the 2nd century.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Justin Martyr · See more »

Justin the Confessor

Justin the Confessor (died 269 in Rome) was a Christian martyr in the Roman Empire.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Justin the Confessor · See more »

Karl Johannes Neumann

Karl Johannes Neumann (9 September 1857 in Glogau near Krotoschin – 12 October 1917 in Munich) was a German classical historian.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Karl Johannes Neumann · See more »

Liberian Catalogue

In compiling the history of the Early Christian Church, the Liberian Catalogue (Catalogus Liberianus), which was part of the illuminated manuscript known as the Chronography of 354, is an essential document, for it consists of a list of the popes, designated bishops of Rome, ending with Pope Liberius (died 366), hence its name and approximate date.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Liberian Catalogue · See more »

Liturgy

Liturgy is the customary public worship performed by a religious group, according to its beliefs, customs and traditions.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Liturgy · See more »

Mary, mother of Jesus

Mary was a 1st-century BC Galilean Jewish woman of Nazareth, and the mother of Jesus, according to the New Testament and the Quran.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Mary, mother of Jesus · See more »

Maximinus Thrax

Maximinus Thrax (Gaius Julius Verus Maximinus Augustus; c. 173 – May 238), also known as Maximinus I, was Roman Emperor from 235 to 238.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Maximinus Thrax · See more »

Menaion

The Menaion (Μηναῖον; Slavonic: Минеѧ, Minéya, "of the month") is the liturgical book used by the Eastern Orthodox Churchand those Eastern Catholic Churches which follow the Byzantine Rite containing the propers for fixed dates of the calendar year, i.e. entities not dependent of the date of Easter.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Menaion · See more »

Middle Ages

In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages (or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Middle Ages · See more »

Modalistic Monarchianism

Modalistic Monarchianism (also known as Oneness Christology) is a Christian theology that upholds the oneness of God as well as the deity of Jesus Christ.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Modalistic Monarchianism · See more »

Mount Athos

Mount Athos (Άθως, Áthos) is a mountain and peninsula in northeastern Greece and an important centre of Eastern Orthodox monasticism.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Mount Athos · See more »

Mysterii Paschalis

Mysterii Paschalis is the incipit of an apostolic letter issued motu proprio (that is, "of his own accord") by Pope Paul VI on 14 February 1969.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Mysterii Paschalis · See more »

Novatianism

Novatianism was an Early Christian sect devoted to Novatian.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Novatianism · See more »

Oriental Orthodoxy

Oriental Orthodoxy is the fourth largest communion of Christian churches, with about 76 million members worldwide.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Oriental Orthodoxy · See more »

Origen

Origen of Alexandria (184 – 253), also known as Origen Adamantius, was a Hellenistic scholar, ascetic, and early Christian theologian who was born and spent the first half of his career in Alexandria.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Origen · See more »

Papal selection before 1059

There was no fixed process for papal selection before 1059.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Papal selection before 1059 · See more »

Paschal cycle

The Paschal cycle, in the Eastern Orthodox Church, is the cycle of the moveable feasts built around Pascha (Easter).

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Paschal cycle · See more »

Passover

Passover or Pesach (from Hebrew Pesah, Pesakh) is a major, biblically derived Jewish holiday.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Passover · See more »

Patron saint

A patron saint, patroness saint, patron hallow or heavenly protector is a saint who in Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism, Eastern Orthodoxy, or particular branches of Islam, is regarded as the heavenly advocate of a nation, place, craft, activity, class, clan, family or person.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Patron saint · See more »

Photios I of Constantinople

Photios I (Φώτιος Phōtios), (c. 810/820 – 6 February 893), also spelled PhotiusFr.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Photios I of Constantinople · See more »

Polemic

A polemic is contentious rhetoric that is intended to support a specific position by aggressive claims and undermining of the opposing position.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Polemic · See more »

Polycarp

Polycarp (Πολύκαρπος, Polýkarpos; Polycarpus; AD 69 155) was a 2nd-century Christian bishop of Smyrna.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Polycarp · See more »

Pope

The pope (papa from πάππας pappas, a child's word for "father"), also known as the supreme pontiff (from Latin pontifex maximus "greatest priest"), is the Bishop of Rome and therefore ex officio the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Pope · See more »

Pope Callixtus I

Pope Callixtus I (died 222), also called Callistus I, was the Bishop of Rome (according to Sextus Julius Africanus) from c. 218 to his death c. 222 or 223.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Pope Callixtus I · See more »

Pope Damasus I

Pope Damasus I (c. 305 – 11 December 384) was Pope of the Catholic Church, from October 366 to his death in 384.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Pope Damasus I · See more »

Pope Fabian

Fabian (Fabianus; c. 200 – 20 January 250) was the Bishop of Rome from 10 January 236 to his death in 250,Meier, Gabriel (1909).

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Pope Fabian · See more »

Pope Paul VI

Pope Paul VI (Paulus VI; Paolo VI; born Giovanni Battista Enrico Antonio Maria Montini; 26 September 1897 – 6 August 1978) reigned from 21 June 1963 to his death in 1978.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Pope Paul VI · See more »

Pope Pius IV

Pope Pius IV (31 March 1499 – 9 December 1565), born Giovanni Angelo Medici, was Pope from 25 December 1559 to his death in 1565.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Pope Pius IV · See more »

Pope Pontian

Pope Pontian (Pontianus; died October 235) was the Bishop of Rome from 21 July 230 to 28 September 235.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Pope Pontian · See more »

Pope Urban I

Pope Urban I (Urbanus I) was Bishop of Rome or Pope from 222 to 23 May 230.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Pope Urban I · See more »

Pope Zephyrinus

Pope Zephyrinus (died 20 December 217) was Bishop of Rome or Pope from 199 to his death in 217.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Pope Zephyrinus · See more »

Portus

Portus was a large artificial harbour of Ancient Rome.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Portus · See more »

Presbyter

In the New Testament, a presbyter (Greek πρεσβύτερος: "elder") is a leader of a local Christian congregation.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Presbyter · See more »

Prudentius

Aurelius Prudentius Clemens was a Roman Christian poet, born in the Roman province of Tarraconensis (now Northern Spain) in 348.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Prudentius · See more »

Refutation of All Heresies

The Refutation of All Heresies (Φιλοσοφούμενα ή κατὰ πασῶν αἱρέσεων ἔλεγχος, Refutatio Omnium Haeresium), also called the Elenchus or Philosophumena, is a compendious Christian polemical work of the early third century, now generally attributed to Hippolytus of Rome.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Refutation of All Heresies · See more »

Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults

The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA), or Ordo Initiationis Christianae Adultorum (OICA) is a process developed by the Catholic Church for prospective converts to Catholicism who are above the age of infant baptism.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults · See more »

Roman Martyrology

The Roman Martyrology (Martyrologium Romanum) is the official martyrology of the Catholic Church.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Roman Martyrology · See more »

Saint Lawrence

Saint Lawrence or Laurence (Laurentius, lit. "laurelled"; 31 December AD 225Citing St. Donato as the original source. Janice Bennett. St. Laurence and the Holy Grail: The Story of the Holy Chalice of Valencia. Littleton, Colorado: Libri de Hispania, 2002. Page 61. – 10 August 258) was one of the seven deacons of the city of Rome, Italy, under Pope Sixtus II who were martyred in the persecution of the Christians that the Roman Emperor Valerian ordered in 258.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Saint Lawrence · See more »

Sardinia

| conventional_long_name.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Sardinia · See more »

Seventy disciples

The seventy disciples or seventy-two disciples (known in the Eastern Christian traditions as the Seventy Apostles) were early emissaries of Jesus mentioned in the Gospel of Luke.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Seventy disciples · See more »

Severus Alexander

Severus Alexander (Marcus Aurelius Severus Alexander Augustus; c.207 - 19 March 235) was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 and the last emperor of the Severan dynasty.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Severus Alexander · See more »

Song of Songs

The Song of Songs, also Song of Solomon or Canticles (Hebrew:, Šîr HašŠîrîm, Greek: ᾎσμα ᾎσμάτων, asma asmaton, both meaning Song of Songs), is one of the megillot (scrolls) found in the last section of the Tanakh, known as the Ketuvim (or "Writings"), and a book of the Old Testament.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Song of Songs · See more »

St Ippolyts

St Ippolyts (or St Ippollitts) is a small village and civil parish on the southern edge of Hitchin in Hertfordshire, England.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and St Ippolyts · See more »

Symphorian and Timotheus

Symphorian (Symphorianus, Symphorien), Timotheus (Timothy), and Hippolytus of Rome are three Christian martyrs who though they were unrelated and were killed in different places and at different times, shared a common feast day in the General Roman Calendar from at least the 1568 Tridentine Calendar to the Mysterii Paschalis.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Symphorian and Timotheus · See more »

Synaxarium

Synaxarion or Synexarion (plurals Synaxaria, Synexaria; Συναξάριον, from συνάγειν, synagein, "to bring together"; cf. etymology of synaxis and synagogue; Latin: Synaxarium, Synexarium; ⲥϫⲛⲁⲝⲁⲣⲓⲟⲛ) is the name given in the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches to a compilation of hagiographies corresponding roughly to the martyrology of the Roman Church.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Synaxarium · See more »

Transfiguration of Jesus

The Transfiguration of Jesus is an event reported in the New Testament when Jesus is transfigured and becomes radiant in glory upon a mountain.

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Transfiguration of Jesus · See more »

Via Tiburtina

Via Tiburtina is an ancient road in Italy leading east-northeast from Rome to Tivoli (Latin, Tibur) and then on to Pescara (Latin, Aternum).

New!!: Hippolytus of Rome and Via Tiburtina · See more »

Redirects here:

Antipope Hippolytus, Antipope Hippolytus I, Hippolyte of Antioch, Hippolytus (writer), Hippolytus Romanus, Hippolytus the soldier, Hypolitus, Pseudo-Hippolytus, Saint Hippolytus, Saint Hippolytus (disambiguation), Saint Hippolytus of Rome, St Hippolytus, St. Hippolytus, St. Hippolytus of Rome.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippolytus_of_Rome

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »