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Humanities

Index Humanities

Humanities are academic disciplines that study aspects of human society and culture. [1]

302 relations: Abraham, Abrahamic religions, Academy, Acrobatics, Acting, Actor, Adhesive, Aesthetics, Albert Einstein, Alexander the Great, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Analytic philosophy, Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome, Animal, Anselm Kiefer, Anthropological linguistics, Anthropology, Antihumanism, Archaeological record, Archaeology, Architecture, Aristotle, Arithmetic, Art, Artifact (archaeology), Astrology and astronomy, Ballet, Bertrand Russell, Biofact (archaeology), Biological anthropology, Body language, Book of Genesis, Brass band, Brush, Buddhism, Byzantine art, Canvas, Cement, Charcoal, China, Chinese opera, Choreography, Christianity, Classical antiquity, Classics, Cognitive science, Collage, College, Color theory, ..., Columbia University, Comedian, Comedy, Comparative method, Comparative research, Composition (visual arts), Concept, Confucianism, Conscience, Continental philosophy, Contract, Corporate law, Cosmetics, Costume, Crayon, Critical theory, Critical thinking, Cubism, Cultural anthropology, Cultural capital, Cultural landscape, Culture, Culture-historical archaeology, Curriculum, Dance, Deconstruction, Democracy, Digital humanities, Dilthey, Discipline (academia), Discourse, Divinity (academic discipline), Drama, Drawing, E. D. Hirsch, Ecological humanities, Edwin Edwards, Egalitarianism, Emotional expression, Empirical research, English language, Epistemology, Eric Wolf, Esperanto, Ethics, Ethnomusicology, Etymology, Experiment, Experimental philosophy, Fiction, Film, Fine art, Folk dance, Fordham University, Foreign language, Frankish language, G. E. Moore, Genre, Geography, Geometry, Globalization, Gothic art, Gottlob Frege, Grammar, Graphite, Great books, Great Books programs in Canada, Greater Nepal, Greek language, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Hatching, Helen Small, Hermeneutics, Hinduism, History, History of Japan, Holism, Human, Human biology, Human physical appearance, Human science, Humanism, Humanitas, Humanities Indicators, Image, Imagination, Immanuel Kant, India, Indian classical dance, Indoctrination, Indus Valley Civilisation, Information, Ink, Inside Higher Ed, Invention, Isaac Newton, Islam, Jainism, Jürgen Habermas, Jean Dubuffet, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Joseph Carroll (scholar), Judaism, Juggling, Kabuki, Labour law, Language, Language planning, Latin, Law, Leaf, Legalism (Chinese philosophy), Liberal arts college, Liberal arts education, Lifeway, Linguistics, Literature, Logic, Louis Menand, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Magic (illusion), Manifesto, Marching arts, Mark Bauerlein, Marker pen, Martha Nussbaum, Material culture, Mathematical logic, Mesoamerica, Mesopotamia, Metaphysics, Middle Ages, Mikhail Epstein, Mime artist, Mode of production, Modern dance, Moral, Mortimer J. Adler, Motion (physics), Mummers play, Music, Music history, Music theory, Musical notation, Musician, Musicology, Natural science, New Literary History, Non-fiction, Nonverbal communication, Novel, Old English, Old French, Old Testament, Opera, Oral literature, Ordinary language philosophy, Outline of academic disciplines, Outline of the humanities, Painting, Pantomime, Pantone, Paper, Past, Pastel, Patriarchs (Bible), Pen, Pencil, Performance, Performance art, Performing arts, Persian Empire, Philosophy, Physics, Pigment, Plato, Poetry, Politics, Post-structuralism, Postmodernism, Property law, Prophet, Prophets and messengers in Islam, Prose, Providence College, Public humanities, Public sphere, Quadrivium, Quran, Red, Religion, Renaissance, Renaissance humanism, Renaissance Latin, Rhetoric, Roland Barthes, Roman Empire, Romanticism, Saint Anselm College, Sand, Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, Scientific literacy, Secondary school, Secularity, Self-reflection, Semantics, Short story, Sigmund Freud, Sikhism, Singing, Sistine Chapel, Social environment, Social science, Society, Songwriter, Spirituality, St. John's College (Annapolis/Santa Fe), Stagecraft, Stanley Fish, Stefan Collini, Stippling, Straw, Street performance, Subsistence economy, Surrealism, Symbolism (arts), Tanakh, Taoism, Technical drawing, Technology, Texture (painting), The Commission on the Humanities and Social Sciences, The Death of the Author, The Two Cultures, Theatre, Theatrical property, Tinbergen's four questions, Tort, Trivium, University, University of Chicago, Virtuoso, Visual arts, Waggle dance, Wassily Kandinsky, Western culture, Wilhelm Dilthey, Wind, Wood, Work of art, Zeus, Zoroastrianism. Expand index (252 more) »

Abraham

Abraham (Arabic: إبراهيم Ibrahim), originally Abram, is the common patriarch of the three Abrahamic religions.

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Abrahamic religions

The Abrahamic religions, also referred to collectively as Abrahamism, are a group of Semitic-originated religious communities of faith that claim descent from the practices of the ancient Israelites and the worship of the God of Abraham.

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Academy

An academy (Attic Greek: Ἀκαδήμεια; Koine Greek Ἀκαδημία) is an institution of secondary education, higher learning, research, or honorary membership.

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Acrobatics

Acrobatics (from Greek ἀκροβατέω akrobateō, "walk on tiptoe, strut") is the performance of extraordinary human feats of balance, agility, and motor coordination.

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Acting

Acting is an activity in which a story is told by means of its enactment by an actor or actress who adopts a character—in theatre, television, film, radio, or any other medium that makes use of the mimetic mode.

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Actor

An actor (often actress for women; see terminology) is a person who portrays a character in a performance.

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Adhesive

An adhesive, also known as glue, cement, mucilage, or paste, is any substance applied to one surface, or both surfaces, of two separate items that binds them together and resists their separation.

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Aesthetics

Aesthetics (also spelled esthetics) is a branch of philosophy that explores the nature of art, beauty, and taste, with the creation and appreciation of beauty.

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Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein (14 March 1879 – 18 April 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics).

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Alexander the Great

Alexander III of Macedon (20/21 July 356 BC – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander the Great (Aléxandros ho Mégas), was a king (basileus) of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon and a member of the Argead dynasty.

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American Academy of Arts and Sciences

The American Academy of Arts and Sciences is one of the oldest learned societies in the United States of America.

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Analytic philosophy

Analytic philosophy (sometimes analytical philosophy) is a style of philosophy that became dominant in the Western world at the beginning of the 20th century.

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Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (AD 600).

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Ancient Rome

In historiography, ancient Rome is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic and Roman Empire until the fall of the western empire.

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Animal

Animals are multicellular eukaryotic organisms that form the biological kingdom Animalia.

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Anselm Kiefer

Anselm Kiefer (born 8 March 1945) is a German painter and sculptor.

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Anthropological linguistics

Anthropological linguistics is the subfield of linguistics and anthropology, which deals with the place of language in its wider social and cultural context, and its role in making and maintaining cultural practices and societal structures.

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Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of humans and human behaviour and societies in the past and present.

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Antihumanism

In social theory and philosophy, antihumanism (or anti-humanism) is a theory that is critical of traditional humanism and traditional ideas about humanity and the human condition.

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Archaeological record

The archaeological record is the body of physical (not written) evidence about the past.

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Archaeology

Archaeology, or archeology, is the study of humanactivity through the recovery and analysis of material culture.

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Architecture

Architecture is both the process and the product of planning, designing, and constructing buildings or any other structures.

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Aristotle

Aristotle (Ἀριστοτέλης Aristotélēs,; 384–322 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher and scientist born in the city of Stagira, Chalkidiki, in the north of Classical Greece.

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Arithmetic

Arithmetic (from the Greek ἀριθμός arithmos, "number") is a branch of mathematics that consists of the study of numbers, especially the properties of the traditional operations on them—addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.

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Art

Art is a diverse range of human activities in creating visual, auditory or performing artifacts (artworks), expressing the author's imaginative, conceptual idea, or technical skill, intended to be appreciated for their beauty or emotional power.

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Artifact (archaeology)

An artifact, or artefact (see American and British English spelling differences), is something made or given shape by humans, such as a tool or a work of art, especially an object of archaeological interest.

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Astrology and astronomy

Astrology and astronomy were archaically treated together (astrologia), and were only gradually separated in Western 17th century philosophy (the "Age of Reason") with the rejection of astrology.

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Ballet

Ballet is a type of performance dance that originated during the Italian Renaissance in the 15th century and later developed into a concert dance form in France and Russia.

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Bertrand Russell

Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970) was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, historian, writer, social critic, political activist, and Nobel laureate.

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Biofact (archaeology)

In archaeology, a biofact (or ecofact) is organic material found at an archaeological site that carries archaeological significance.

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Biological anthropology

Biological anthropology, also known as physical anthropology, is a scientific discipline concerned with the biological and behavioral aspects of human beings, their related non-human primates and their extinct hominin ancestors.

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Body language

Body language is a type of nonverbal communication in which physical behavior, as opposed to words, are used to express or convey information.

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Book of Genesis

The Book of Genesis (from the Latin Vulgate, in turn borrowed or transliterated from Greek "", meaning "Origin"; בְּרֵאשִׁית, "Bərēšīṯ", "In beginning") is the first book of the Hebrew Bible (the Tanakh) and the Old Testament.

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Brass band

A brass band is a musical ensemble generally consisting entirely of brass instruments, most often with a percussion section.

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Brush

A brush is a common tool with bristles, wire or other filaments.

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Buddhism

Buddhism is the world's fourth-largest religion with over 520 million followers, or over 7% of the global population, known as Buddhists.

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Byzantine art

Byzantine art is the name for the artistic products of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, as well as the nations and states that inherited culturally from the empire.

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Canvas

Canvas is an extremely durable plain-woven fabric used for making sails, tents, marquees, backpacks, and other items for which sturdiness is required.

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Cement

A cement is a binder, a substance used for construction that sets, hardens and adheres to other materials, binding them together.

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Charcoal

Charcoal is the lightweight black carbon and ash residue hydrocarbon produced by removing water and other volatile constituents from animal and vegetation substances.

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China

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a unitary one-party sovereign state in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around /1e9 round 3 billion.

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Chinese opera

Traditional Chinese opera, or Xiqu, is a popular form of drama and musical theatre in China with roots going back to the early periods in China.

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Choreography

Choreography is the art or practice of designing sequences of movements of physical bodies (or their depictions) in which motion, form, or both are specified.

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Christianity

ChristianityFrom Ancient Greek Χριστός Khristós (Latinized as Christus), translating Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ, Māšîăḥ, meaning "the anointed one", with the Latin suffixes -ian and -itas.

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Classical antiquity

Classical antiquity (also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the period of cultural history between the 8th century BC and the 5th or 6th century AD centered on the Mediterranean Sea, comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome, collectively known as the Greco-Roman world.

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Classics

Classics or classical studies is the study of classical antiquity.

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Cognitive science

Cognitive science is the interdisciplinary, scientific study of the mind and its processes.

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Collage

Collage (from the coller., "to glue") is a technique of an art production, primarily used in the visual arts, where the artwork is made from an assemblage of different forms, thus creating a new whole.

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College

A college (Latin: collegium) is an educational institution or a constituent part of one.

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Color theory

In the visual arts, color theory or colour theory is a body of practical guidance to color mixing and the visual effects of a specific color combination.

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Columbia University

Columbia University (Columbia; officially Columbia University in the City of New York), established in 1754, is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City.

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Comedian

A comedian or comic is a person who seeks to entertain an audience by making them laugh.

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Comedy

In a modern sense, comedy (from the κωμῳδία, kōmōidía) refers to any discourse or work generally intended to be humorous or amusing by inducing laughter, especially in theatre, television, film, stand-up comedy, or any other medium of entertainment.

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Comparative method

In linguistics, the comparative method is a technique for studying the development of languages by performing a feature-by-feature comparison of two or more languages with common descent from a shared ancestor, in order to extrapolate back to infer the properties of that ancestor.

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Comparative research

Comparative research is a research methodology in the social sciences that aims to make comparisons across different countries or cultures.

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Composition (visual arts)

In the visual arts, composition is the placement or arrangement of visual elements or 'ingredients' in a work of art, as distinct from the subject.

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Concept

Concepts are mental representations, abstract objects or abilities that make up the fundamental building blocks of thoughts and beliefs.

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Confucianism

Confucianism, also known as Ruism, is described as tradition, a philosophy, a religion, a humanistic or rationalistic religion, a way of governing, or simply a way of life.

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Conscience

Conscience is an aptitude, faculty, intuition or judgment that assists in distinguishing right from wrong.

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Continental philosophy

Continental philosophy is a set of 19th- and 20th-century philosophical traditions from mainland Europe.

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Contract

A contract is a promise or set of promises that are legally enforceable and, if violated, allow the injured party access to legal remedies.

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Corporate law

Corporate law (also known as business law or enterprise law or sometimes company law) is the body of law governing the rights, relations, and conduct of persons, companies, organizations and businesses.

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Cosmetics

Cosmetics are substances or products used to enhance or alter the appearance of the face or fragrance and texture of the body.

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Costume

Costume is the distinctive style of dress of an individual or group that reflects their class, gender, profession, ethnicity, nationality, activity or epoch.

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Crayon

A crayon (or wax pastel) is a stick of colored wax, charcoal, chalk or other material used for writing or drawing.

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Critical theory

Critical theory is a school of thought that stresses the reflective assessment and critique of society and culture by applying knowledge from the social sciences and the humanities.

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Critical thinking

Critical thinking is the objective analysis of facts to form a judgment.

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Cubism

Cubism is an early-20th-century art movement which brought European painting and sculpture historically forward toward 20th century Modern art.

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Cultural anthropology

Cultural anthropology is a branch of anthropology focused on the study of cultural variation among humans.

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Cultural capital

In sociology, cultural capital consists of the social assets of a person (education, intellect, style of speech and dress, etc.) that promote social mobility in a stratified society.

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Cultural landscape

A cultural landscape, as defined by the World Heritage Committee, is the "cultural properties represent the combined works of nature and of man.".

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Culture

Culture is the social behavior and norms found in human societies.

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Culture-historical archaeology

Culture-historical archaeology is an archaeological theory that emphasises defining historical societies into distinct ethnic and cultural groupings according to their material culture.

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Curriculum

In education, a curriculum (plural: curricula or curriculums) is broadly defined as the totality of student experiences that occur in the educational process.

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Dance

Dance is a performing art form consisting of purposefully selected sequences of human movement.

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Deconstruction

Deconstruction is a critique of the relationship between text and meaning originated by the philosopher Jacques Derrida.

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Democracy

Democracy (δημοκρατία dēmokraa thetía, literally "rule by people"), in modern usage, has three senses all for a system of government where the citizens exercise power by voting.

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Digital humanities

Digital humanities (DH) is an area of scholarly activity at the intersection of computing or digital technologies and the disciplines of the humanities.

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Dilthey

Dilthey is a surname.

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Discipline (academia)

An academic discipline or academic field is a branch of knowledge.

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Discourse

Discourse (from Latin discursus, "running to and from") denotes written and spoken communications.

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Divinity (academic discipline)

Divinity is the study of Christian and other theology and ministry at a school, divinity school, university, or seminary.

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Drama

Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance: a play performed in a theatre, or on radio or television.

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Drawing

Drawing is a form of visual art in which a person uses various drawing instruments to mark paper or another two-dimensional medium.

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E. D. Hirsch

Eric Donald Hirsch Jr. (born March 22, 1928), usually cited as E. D. Hirsch, is an American educator and academic literary critic.

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Ecological humanities

The ecological humanities (also environmental humanities) is an interdisciplinary area of research, drawing on the many environmental sub-disciplines that have emerged in the humanities over the past several decades (in particular environmental literature, environmental philosophy, environmental history and environmental anthropology).

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Edwin Edwards

Edwin Washington Edwards (born August 7, 1927) is an American politician and member of the Democratic Party who served as the U.S. Representative for from 1965 to 1972 and as the 50th Governor of Louisiana for four terms (1972–1980, 1984–1988 and 1992–1996), twice as many elected terms as any other Louisiana chief executive.

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Egalitarianism

Egalitarianism – or equalitarianism – is a school of thought that prioritizes equality for all people.

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Emotional expression

Emotional expressions in psychology are.

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Empirical research

Empirical research is research using empirical evidence.

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English language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca.

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Epistemology

Epistemology is the branch of philosophy concerned with the theory of knowledge.

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Eric Wolf

Eric Robert Wolf (February 1, 1923 – March 6, 1999) was an anthropologist, best known for his studies of peasants, Latin America, and his advocacy of Marxist perspectives within anthropology.

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Esperanto

Esperanto (or; Esperanto) is a constructed international auxiliary language.

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Ethics

Ethics or moral philosophy is a branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct.

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Ethnomusicology

Ethnomusicology is the study of music from the cultural and social aspects of the people who make it.

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Etymology

EtymologyThe New Oxford Dictionary of English (1998) – p. 633 "Etymology /ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒi/ the study of the class in words and the way their meanings have changed throughout time".

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Experiment

An experiment is a procedure carried out to support, refute, or validate a hypothesis.

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Experimental philosophy

Experimental philosophy is an emerging field of philosophical inquiryEdmonds, David and Warburton, Nigel.

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Fiction

Fiction is any story or setting that is derived from imagination—in other words, not based strictly on history or fact.

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Film

A film, also called a movie, motion picture, moving pícture, theatrical film, or photoplay, is a series of still images that, when shown on a screen, create the illusion of moving images.

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Fine art

In European academic traditions, fine art is art developed primarily for aesthetics or beauty, distinguishing it from applied art, which also has to serve some practical function, such as pottery or most metalwork.

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Folk dance

A folk dance is developed by people that reflect the life of the people of a certain country or region.

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Fordham University

Fordham University is a private research university in New York City.

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Foreign language

A foreign language is a language originally from another country.

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Frankish language

Frankish (reconstructed Frankish: *italic), Old Franconian or Old Frankish was the West Germanic language spoken by the Franks between the 4th and 8th century.

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G. E. Moore

George Edward Moore (4 November 1873 – 24 October 1958), usually cited as G. E. Moore, was an English philosopher.

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Genre

Genre is any form or type of communication in any mode (written, spoken, digital, artistic, etc.) with socially-agreed upon conventions developed over time.

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Geography

Geography (from Greek γεωγραφία, geographia, literally "earth description") is a field of science devoted to the study of the lands, the features, the inhabitants, and the phenomena of Earth.

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Geometry

Geometry (from the γεωμετρία; geo- "earth", -metron "measurement") is a branch of mathematics concerned with questions of shape, size, relative position of figures, and the properties of space.

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Globalization

Globalization or globalisation is the process of interaction and integration between people, companies, and governments worldwide.

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Gothic art

Gothic art was a style of medieval art that developed in Northern France out of Romanesque art in the 12th century AD, led by the concurrent development of Gothic architecture.

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Gottlob Frege

Friedrich Ludwig Gottlob Frege (8 November 1848 – 26 July 1925) was a German philosopher, logician, and mathematician.

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Grammar

In linguistics, grammar (from Greek: γραμματική) is the set of structural rules governing the composition of clauses, phrases, and words in any given natural language.

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Graphite

Graphite, archaically referred to as plumbago, is a crystalline allotrope of carbon, a semimetal, a native element mineral, and a form of coal.

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Great books

The great books are books that are thought to constitute an essential foundation in the literature of Western culture.

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Great Books programs in Canada

Great Books programs in Canada are university/college programs inspired by the Great Books movement begun in the United States in the 1920s.

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Greater Nepal

Greater Nepal (Nepali:विशाल नेपाल) or Akhand Nepal (अखण्ड नेपाल) are irredentist terms literally meaning "Undivided Nepal".

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Greek language

Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά, elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα, ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

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Hans-Georg Gadamer

Hans-Georg Gadamer (February 11, 1900 – March 13, 2002) was a German philosopher of the continental tradition, best known for his 1960 magnum opus Truth and Method (Wahrheit und Methode) on hermeneutics.

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Hatching

Hatching (hachure in French) is an artistic technique used to create tonal or shading effects by drawing (or painting or scribing) closely spaced parallel lines.

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Helen Small

Helen Small is a Professor of English Literature at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford.

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Hermeneutics

Hermeneutics is the theory and methodology of interpretation, especially the interpretation of biblical texts, wisdom literature, and philosophical texts.

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Hinduism

Hinduism is an Indian religion and dharma, or a way of life, widely practised in the Indian subcontinent.

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History

History (from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation") is the study of the past as it is described in written documents.

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History of Japan

The first human habitation in the Japanese archipelago has been traced to prehistoric times.

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Holism

Holism (from Greek ὅλος holos "all, whole, entire") is the idea that systems (physical, biological, chemical, social, economic, mental, linguistic) and their properties should be viewed as wholes, not just as a collection of parts.

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Human

Humans (taxonomically Homo sapiens) are the only extant members of the subtribe Hominina.

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Human biology

Human biology is an interdisciplinary area of study that examines humans through the influences and interplay of many diverse fields such as genetics, evolution, physiology, anatomy, epidemiology, anthropology, ecology, nutrition, population genetics and sociocultural influences.

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Human physical appearance

Human physical appearance is the outward phenotype or look of human beings.

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Human science

Human Science studies the philosophical, biological, social, and cultural aspects of human life.

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Humanism

Humanism is a philosophical and ethical stance that emphasizes the value and agency of human beings, individually and collectively, and generally prefers critical thinking and evidence (rationalism and empiricism) over acceptance of dogma or superstition.

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Humanitas

Humanitas is a Latin noun meaning human nature, civilization, and kindness.

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Humanities Indicators

The Humanities Indicators is a project of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences that equips researchers and policymakers, universities, foundations, museums, libraries, humanities councils and other public institutions with statistical tools for answering basic questions about primary and secondary humanities education, undergraduate and graduate education in the humanities, the humanities workforce, levels and sources of program funding, public understanding and impact of the humanities, and other areas of concern in the humanities community.

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Image

An image (from imago) is an artifact that depicts visual perception, for example, a photo or a two-dimensional picture, that has a similar appearance to some subject—usually a physical object or a person, thus providing a depiction of it.

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Imagination

Imagination is the capacity to produce images, ideas and sensations in the mind without any immediate input of the senses (such as seeing or hearing).

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Immanuel Kant

Immanuel Kant (22 April 1724 – 12 February 1804) was a German philosopher who is a central figure in modern philosophy.

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India

India (IAST), also called the Republic of India (IAST), is a country in South Asia.

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Indian classical dance

Indian classical dance, or Shastriya Nritya, is an umbrella term for various performance arts rooted in religious Hindu musical theatre styles,, Quote: All of the dances considered to be part of the Indian classical canon (Bharata Natyam, Chhau, Kathak, Kathakali, Manipuri, Mohiniattam, Odissi, Sattriya and Yakshagana) trace their roots to religious practices (...) the Indian diaspora has led to the translocation of Hindu dances to Europe, North America and the world." whose theory and practice can be traced to the Sanskrit text Natya Shastra.

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Indoctrination

Indoctrination is the process of inculcating a person with ideas, attitudes, cognitive strategies or professional methodologies (see doctrine).

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Indus Valley Civilisation

The Indus Valley Civilisation (IVC), or Harappan Civilisation, was a Bronze Age civilisation (5500–1300 BCE; mature period 2600–1900 BCE) mainly in the northwestern regions of South Asia, extending from what today is northeast Afghanistan to Pakistan and northwest India.

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Information

Information is any entity or form that provides the answer to a question of some kind or resolves uncertainty.

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Ink

Ink is a liquid or paste that contains pigments or dyes and is used to color a surface to produce an image, text, or design.

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Inside Higher Ed

Inside Higher Ed is a media company and online publication that provides news, opinion, resources, events and jobs focused on college and university topics.

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Invention

An invention is a unique or novel device, method, composition or process.

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Isaac Newton

Sir Isaac Newton (25 December 1642 – 20 March 1726/27) was an English mathematician, astronomer, theologian, author and physicist (described in his own day as a "natural philosopher") who is widely recognised as one of the most influential scientists of all time, and a key figure in the scientific revolution.

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Islam

IslamThere are ten pronunciations of Islam in English, differing in whether the first or second syllable has the stress, whether the s is or, and whether the a is pronounced, or (when the stress is on the first syllable) (Merriam Webster).

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Jainism

Jainism, traditionally known as Jain Dharma, is an ancient Indian religion.

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Jürgen Habermas

Jürgen Habermas (born 18 June 1929) is a German sociologist and philosopher in the tradition of critical theory and pragmatism.

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Jean Dubuffet

Jean Philippe Arthur Dubuffet (31 July 1901 – 12 May 1985) was a French painter and sculptor.

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Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German writer and statesman.

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Joseph Carroll (scholar)

Joseph Carroll (born 1949) is a scholar in the field of literature and evolution.

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Judaism

Judaism (originally from Hebrew, Yehudah, "Judah"; via Latin and Greek) is the religion of the Jewish people.

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Juggling

Juggling is a physical skill, performed by a juggler, involving the manipulation of objects for recreation, entertainment, art or sport.

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Kabuki

is a classical Japanese dance-drama.

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Labour law

Labour law (also known as labor law or employment law) mediates the relationship between workers, employing entities, trade unions and the government.

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Language

Language is a system that consists of the development, acquisition, maintenance and use of complex systems of communication, particularly the human ability to do so; and a language is any specific example of such a system.

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Language planning

Language planning is a deliberate effort to influence the function, structure, or acquisition of languages or language variety within a speech community.

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Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

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Law

Law is a system of rules that are created and enforced through social or governmental institutions to regulate behavior.

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Leaf

A leaf is an organ of a vascular plant and is the principal lateral appendage of the stem.

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Legalism (Chinese philosophy)

Fajia or Legalism is one of Sima Tan's six classical schools of thought in Chinese philosophy.

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Liberal arts college

A liberal arts college is a college with an emphasis on undergraduate study in the liberal arts and sciences.

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Liberal arts education

Liberal arts education (from Latin "free" and "art or principled practice") can claim to be the oldest programme of higher education in Western history.

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Lifeway

The expression lifeway is a fairly new technical term that is not yet in most general dictionaries and for which most textbooks instead still use "way of life".

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Linguistics

Linguistics is the scientific study of language, and involves an analysis of language form, language meaning, and language in context.

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Literature

Literature, most generically, is any body of written works.

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Logic

Logic (from the logikḗ), originally meaning "the word" or "what is spoken", but coming to mean "thought" or "reason", is a subject concerned with the most general laws of truth, and is now generally held to consist of the systematic study of the form of valid inference.

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Louis Menand

Louis Menand (born January 21, 1952) is an American critic and essayist, best known for his book The Metaphysical Club (2001), an intellectual and cultural history of late 19th and early 20th century America.

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Ludwig Wittgenstein

Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein (26 April 1889 – 29 April 1951) was an Austrian-British philosopher who worked primarily in logic, the philosophy of mathematics, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of language.

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Magic (illusion)

Magic, along with its subgenres of, and sometimes referred to as illusion, stage magic or street magic is a performing art in which audiences are entertained by staged tricks or illusions of seemingly impossible feats using natural means.

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Manifesto

A manifesto is a published verbal declaration of the intentions, motives, or views of the issuer, be it an individual, group, political party or government.

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Marching arts

The marching arts are a collection of fine arts related activities that are closely associated with wind music.

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Mark Bauerlein

Mark Weightman Bauerlein (born 1959) is an English professor at Emory University and senior editor of First Things journal.

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Marker pen

A marker pen, fineliner, marking pen, felt-tip marker, felt-tip pen, flow marker, texta (in Australia), sketch pen (in India) or koki (in South Africa), is a pen which has its own ink-source and a tip made of porous, pressed fibers such as felt.

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Martha Nussbaum

Martha Craven Nussbaum (born May 6, 1947) is an American philosopher and the current Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago, where she is jointly appointed in the Law School and the Philosophy department.

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Material culture

Material culture is the physical aspect of culture in the objects and architecture that surround people.

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Mathematical logic

Mathematical logic is a subfield of mathematics exploring the applications of formal logic to mathematics.

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Mesoamerica

Mesoamerica is an important historical region and cultural area in the Americas, extending from approximately central Mexico through Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and northern Costa Rica, and within which pre-Columbian societies flourished before the Spanish colonization of the Americas in the 15th and 16th centuries.

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Mesopotamia

Mesopotamia is a historical region in West Asia situated within the Tigris–Euphrates river system, in modern days roughly corresponding to most of Iraq, Kuwait, parts of Northern Saudi Arabia, the eastern parts of Syria, Southeastern Turkey, and regions along the Turkish–Syrian and Iran–Iraq borders.

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Metaphysics

Metaphysics is a branch of philosophy that explores the nature of being, existence, and reality.

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Middle Ages

In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages (or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century.

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Mikhail Epstein

Mikhail Naumovich Epstein (Михаи́л Нау́мович Эпште́йн; or Epshtein, born April 21, 1950) is a Russian-American literary theorist and critical thinker.

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Mime artist

A mime or mime artist (from Greek μῖμος, mimos, "imitator, actor") is a person who uses mime as a theatrical medium or as a performance art.

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Mode of production

In the writings of Karl Marx and the Marxist theory of historical materialism, a mode of production (in German: Produktionsweise, meaning 'the way of producing') is a specific combination of.

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Modern dance

Modern dance is a broad genre of western concert or theatrical dance, primarily arising out of Germany and the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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Moral

A moral (from Latin morālis) is a message that is conveyed or a lesson to be learned from a story or event.

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Mortimer J. Adler

Mortimer Jerome Adler (December 28, 1902 – June 28, 2001) was an American philosopher, educator, and popular author.

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Motion (physics)

In physics, motion is a change in position of an object over time.

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Mummers play

Mummers' Plays are folk plays performed by troupes of amateur actors, traditionally all male, known as mummers or guisers (also by local names such as rhymers, pace-eggers, soulers, tipteerers, wrenboys, and galoshins).

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Music

Music is an art form and cultural activity whose medium is sound organized in time.

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Music history

Music history, sometimes called historical musicology, is the highly diverse subfield of the broader discipline of musicology that studies music from a historical viewpoint.

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Music theory

Music theory is the study of the practices and possibilities of music.

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Musical notation

Music notation or musical notation is any system used to visually represent aurally perceived music played with instruments or sung by the human voice through the use of written, printed, or otherwise-produced symbols.

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Musician

A musician is a person who plays a musical instrument or is musically talented.

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Musicology

Musicology is the scholarly analysis and research-based study of music.

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Natural science

Natural science is a branch of science concerned with the description, prediction, and understanding of natural phenomena, based on empirical evidence from observation and experimentation.

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New Literary History

New Literary History: A Journal of Theory & Interpretation is a quarterly academic journal published by Johns Hopkins University Press.

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Non-fiction

Non-fiction or nonfiction is content (sometimes, in the form of a story) whose creator, in good faith, assumes responsibility for the truth or accuracy of the events, people, or information presented.

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Nonverbal communication

Nonverbal communication (NVC) between people is communication through sending and receiving wordless cues.

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Novel

A novel is a relatively long work of narrative fiction, normally in prose, which is typically published as a book.

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Old English

Old English (Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc), or Anglo-Saxon, is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland in the early Middle Ages.

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Old French

Old French (franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French: ancien français) was the language spoken in Northern France from the 8th century to the 14th century.

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Old Testament

The Old Testament (abbreviated OT) is the first part of Christian Bibles, based primarily upon the Hebrew Bible (or Tanakh), a collection of ancient religious writings by the Israelites believed by most Christians and religious Jews to be the sacred Word of God.

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Opera

Opera (English plural: operas; Italian plural: opere) is a form of theatre in which music has a leading role and the parts are taken by singers.

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Oral literature

Oral literature or folk literature corresponds in the sphere of the spoken (oral) word to literature as literature operates in the domain of the written word.

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Ordinary language philosophy

Ordinary language philosophy is a philosophical methodology that sees traditional philosophical problems as rooted in misunderstandings philosophers develop by distorting or forgetting what words actually mean in everyday use.

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Outline of academic disciplines

An academic discipline or field of study is a branch of knowledge that is taught and researched as part of higher education.

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Outline of the humanities

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to the humanities: Humanities – academic disciplines that study the human condition, using methods that are primarily analytical, critical, or speculative, as distinguished from the mainly empirical approaches of the natural sciences.

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Painting

Painting is the practice of applying paint, pigment, color or other medium to a solid surface (support base).

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Pantomime

Pantomime (informally panto) is a type of musical comedy stage production designed for family entertainment.

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Pantone

Pantone Inc. is a U.S. corporation headquartered in Carlstadt, New Jersey.

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Paper

Paper is a thin material produced by pressing together moist fibres of cellulose pulp derived from wood, rags or grasses, and drying them into flexible sheets.

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Past

The past is the set of all events that occurred before a given point in time.

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Pastel

A pastel is an art medium in the form of a stick, consisting of pure powdered pigment and a binder.

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Patriarchs (Bible)

The Patriarchs (אבות. Avot or Abot, singular אב. Ab or Aramaic: אבא Abba) of the Bible, when narrowly defined, are Abraham, his son Isaac, and Isaac's son Jacob, also named Israel, the ancestor of the Israelites.

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Pen

A pen is a common writing instrument used to apply ink to a surface, usually paper, for writing or drawing.

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Pencil

A pencil is a writing implement or art medium constructed of a narrow, solid pigment core inside a protective casing which prevents the core from being broken and/or from leaving marks on the user’s hand during use.

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Performance

Performance is completion of a task with application of knowledge, skills and abilities.

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Performance art

Performance art is a performance presented to an audience within a fine art context, traditionally interdisciplinary.

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Performing arts

Performing arts are a form of art in which artists use their voices or bodies, often in relation to other objects, to convey artistic expression.

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Persian Empire

The Persian Empire (شاهنشاهی ایران, translit., lit. 'Imperial Iran') refers to any of a series of imperial dynasties that were centred in Persia/Iran from the 6th-century-BC Achaemenid Empire era to the 20th century AD in the Qajar dynasty era.

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Philosophy

Philosophy (from Greek φιλοσοφία, philosophia, literally "love of wisdom") is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.

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Physics

Physics (from knowledge of nature, from φύσις phýsis "nature") is the natural science that studies matterAt the start of The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Richard Feynman offers the atomic hypothesis as the single most prolific scientific concept: "If, in some cataclysm, all scientific knowledge were to be destroyed one sentence what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words? I believe it is that all things are made up of atoms – little particles that move around in perpetual motion, attracting each other when they are a little distance apart, but repelling upon being squeezed into one another..." and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force."Physical science is that department of knowledge which relates to the order of nature, or, in other words, to the regular succession of events." Physics is one of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, and its main goal is to understand how the universe behaves."Physics is one of the most fundamental of the sciences. Scientists of all disciplines use the ideas of physics, including chemists who study the structure of molecules, paleontologists who try to reconstruct how dinosaurs walked, and climatologists who study how human activities affect the atmosphere and oceans. Physics is also the foundation of all engineering and technology. No engineer could design a flat-screen TV, an interplanetary spacecraft, or even a better mousetrap without first understanding the basic laws of physics. (...) You will come to see physics as a towering achievement of the human intellect in its quest to understand our world and ourselves."Physics is an experimental science. Physicists observe the phenomena of nature and try to find patterns that relate these phenomena.""Physics is the study of your world and the world and universe around you." Physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines and, through its inclusion of astronomy, perhaps the oldest. Over the last two millennia, physics, chemistry, biology, and certain branches of mathematics were a part of natural philosophy, but during the scientific revolution in the 17th century, these natural sciences emerged as unique research endeavors in their own right. Physics intersects with many interdisciplinary areas of research, such as biophysics and quantum chemistry, and the boundaries of physics are not rigidly defined. New ideas in physics often explain the fundamental mechanisms studied by other sciences and suggest new avenues of research in academic disciplines such as mathematics and philosophy. Advances in physics often enable advances in new technologies. For example, advances in the understanding of electromagnetism and nuclear physics led directly to the development of new products that have dramatically transformed modern-day society, such as television, computers, domestic appliances, and nuclear weapons; advances in thermodynamics led to the development of industrialization; and advances in mechanics inspired the development of calculus.

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Pigment

A pigment is a material that changes the color of reflected or transmitted light as the result of wavelength-selective absorption.

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Plato

Plato (Πλάτων Plátōn, in Classical Attic; 428/427 or 424/423 – 348/347 BC) was a philosopher in Classical Greece and the founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world.

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Poetry

Poetry (the term derives from a variant of the Greek term, poiesis, "making") is a form of literature that uses aesthetic and rhythmic qualities of language—such as phonaesthetics, sound symbolism, and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning.

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Politics

Politics (from Politiká, meaning "affairs of the cities") is the process of making decisions that apply to members of a group.

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Post-structuralism

Post-structuralism is associated with the works of a series of mid-20th-century French, continental philosophers and critical theorists who came to be known internationally in the 1960s and 1970s.

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Postmodernism

Postmodernism is a broad movement that developed in the mid- to late-20th century across philosophy, the arts, architecture, and criticism and that marked a departure from modernism.

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Property law

Property law is the area of law that governs the various forms of ownership and tenancy in real property (land as distinct from personal or movable possessions) and in personal property, within the common law legal system.

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Prophet

In religion, a prophet is an individual regarded as being in contact with a divine being and said to speak on that entity's behalf, serving as an intermediary with humanity by delivering messages or teachings from the supernatural source to other people.

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Prophets and messengers in Islam

Prophets in Islam (الأنبياء في الإسلام) include "messengers" (rasul, pl. rusul), bringers of a divine revelation via an angel (Arabic: ملائكة, malāʾikah);Shaatri, A. I. (2007).

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Prose

Prose is a form of language that exhibits a natural flow of speech and grammatical structure rather than a rhythmic structure as in traditional poetry, where the common unit of verse is based on meter or rhyme.

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Providence College

Providence College (also known as Providence or PC) is a private, coeducational, Roman Catholic university located about two miles west of downtown Providence, Rhode Island, United States, the state's capital city.

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Public humanities

Public humanities is the work of federal, state, nonprofit and community-based cultural organizations that engage publics in conversations, facilitate and present lectures, exhibitions, performances and other programs for the general public on topics such as history, philosophy, popular culture and the arts.

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Public sphere

The public sphere (German Öffentlichkeit) is an area in social life where individuals can come together to freely discuss and identify societal problems, and through that discussion influence political action.

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Quadrivium

The quadrivium (plural: quadrivia) is the four subjects, or arts, taught after teaching the trivium.

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Quran

The Quran (القرآن, literally meaning "the recitation"; also romanized Qur'an or Koran) is the central religious text of Islam, which Muslims believe to be a revelation from God (Allah).

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Red

Red is the color at the end of the visible spectrum of light, next to orange and opposite violet.

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Religion

Religion may be defined as a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, world views, texts, sanctified places, prophecies, ethics, or organizations, that relates humanity to supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual elements.

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Renaissance

The Renaissance is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries.

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Renaissance humanism

Renaissance humanism is the study of classical antiquity, at first in Italy and then spreading across Western Europe in the 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries.

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Renaissance Latin

Renaissance Latin is a name given to the distinctive form of Latin style developed during the European Renaissance of the fourteenth to fifteenth centuries, particularly by the Renaissance humanism movement.

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Rhetoric

Rhetoric is the art of discourse, wherein a writer or speaker strives to inform, persuade, or motivate particular audiences in specific situations.

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Roland Barthes

Roland Gérard Barthes (12 November 1915 – 26 March 1980) was a French literary theorist, philosopher, linguist, critic, and semiotician.

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Roman Empire

The Roman Empire (Imperium Rōmānum,; Koine and Medieval Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Ῥωμαίων, tr.) was the post-Roman Republic period of the ancient Roman civilization, characterized by government headed by emperors and large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean Sea in Europe, Africa and Asia.

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Romanticism

Romanticism (also known as the Romantic era) was an artistic, literary, musical and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century, and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850.

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Saint Anselm College

Saint Anselm College is a nationally ranked, Catholic, Benedictine, liberal arts college in Goffstown, New Hampshire, United States.

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Sand

Sand is a naturally occurring granular material composed of finely divided rock and mineral particles.

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Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), previously Science, Math, Engineering, and Technology (SMET), is a term used to group together these academic disciplines.

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Scientific literacy

Scientific literacy or Science literacy encompasses written, numerical, and digital literacy as they pertain to understanding science, its methodology, observations, and theories.

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Secondary school

A secondary school is both an organization that provides secondary education and the building where this takes place.

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Secularity

Secularity (adjective form secular, from Latin saeculum meaning "worldly", "of a generation", "temporal", or a span of about 100 years) is the state of being separate from religion, or of not being exclusively allied with or against any particular religion.

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Self-reflection

Human self-reflection is the capacity of humans to exercise introspection and the willingness to learn more about their fundamental nature, purpose and essence.

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Semantics

Semantics (from σημαντικός sēmantikós, "significant") is the linguistic and philosophical study of meaning, in language, programming languages, formal logics, and semiotics.

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Short story

A short story is a piece of prose fiction that typically can be read in one sitting and focuses on a self-contained incident or series of linked incidents, with the intent of evoking a "single effect" or mood, however there are many exceptions to this.

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Sigmund Freud

Sigmund Freud (born Sigismund Schlomo Freud; 6 May 1856 – 23 September 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst.

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Sikhism

Sikhism (ਸਿੱਖੀ), or Sikhi,, from Sikh, meaning a "disciple", or a "learner"), is a monotheistic religion that originated in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent about the end of the 15th century. It is one of the youngest of the major world religions, and the fifth-largest. The fundamental beliefs of Sikhism, articulated in the sacred scripture Guru Granth Sahib, include faith and meditation on the name of the one creator, divine unity and equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, striving for social justice for the benefit and prosperity of all, and honest conduct and livelihood while living a householder's life. In the early 21st century there were nearly 25 million Sikhs worldwide, the great majority of them (20 million) living in Punjab, the Sikh homeland in northwest India, and about 2 million living in neighboring Indian states, formerly part of the Punjab. Sikhism is based on the spiritual teachings of Guru Nanak, the first Guru (1469–1539), and the nine Sikh gurus that succeeded him. The Tenth Guru, Guru Gobind Singh, named the Sikh scripture Guru Granth Sahib as his successor, terminating the line of human Gurus and making the scripture the eternal, religious spiritual guide for Sikhs.Louis Fenech and WH McLeod (2014),, 3rd Edition, Rowman & Littlefield,, pages 17, 84-85William James (2011), God's Plenty: Religious Diversity in Kingston, McGill Queens University Press,, pages 241–242 Sikhism rejects claims that any particular religious tradition has a monopoly on Absolute Truth. The Sikh scripture opens with Ik Onkar (ੴ), its Mul Mantar and fundamental prayer about One Supreme Being (God). Sikhism emphasizes simran (meditation on the words of the Guru Granth Sahib), that can be expressed musically through kirtan or internally through Nam Japo (repeat God's name) as a means to feel God's presence. It teaches followers to transform the "Five Thieves" (lust, rage, greed, attachment, and ego). Hand in hand, secular life is considered to be intertwined with the spiritual life., page.

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Singing

Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice and augments regular speech by the use of sustained tonality, rhythm, and a variety of vocal techniques.

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Sistine Chapel

The Sistine Chapel (Sacellum Sixtinum; Cappella Sistina) is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, the official residence of the Pope, in Vatican City.

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Social environment

The social environment, social context, sociocultural context or milieu refers to the immediate physical and social setting in which people live or in which something happens or develops.

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Social science

Social science is a major category of academic disciplines, concerned with society and the relationships among individuals within a society.

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Society

A society is a group of individuals involved in persistent social interaction, or a large social group sharing the same geographical or social territory, typically subject to the same political authority and dominant cultural expectations.

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Songwriter

A songwriter is a professional who is paid to write lyrics for singers and melodies for songs, typically for a popular music genre such as rock or country music.

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Spirituality

Traditionally, spirituality refers to a religious process of re-formation which "aims to recover the original shape of man," oriented at "the image of God" as exemplified by the founders and sacred texts of the religions of the world.

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St. John's College (Annapolis/Santa Fe)

St.

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Stagecraft

Stagecraft is the technical aspect of theatrical, film, and video production.

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Stanley Fish

Stanley Eugene Fish (born April 19, 1938) is an American literary theorist, legal scholar, author and public intellectual.

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Stefan Collini

Stefan Collini (born 6 September 1947) is an English literary critic and academic who is Professor of English Literature and Intellectual History at the University of Cambridge and an Emeritus Fellow of Clare Hall.

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Stippling

Stippling is the creation of a pattern simulating varying degrees of solidity or shading by using small dots.

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Straw

Straw is an agricultural by-product, the dry stalks of cereal plants, after the grain and chaff have been removed.

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Street performance

Street performance or busking is the act of performing in public places for gratuities.

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Subsistence economy

A subsistence economy is a non-monetary economy which relies on natural resources to provide for basic needs, through hunting, gathering, and subsistence agriculture.

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Surrealism

Surrealism is a cultural movement that began in the early 1920s, and is best known for its visual artworks and writings.

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Symbolism (arts)

Symbolism was a late nineteenth-century art movement of French, Russian and Belgian origin in poetry and other arts.

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Tanakh

The Tanakh (or; also Tenakh, Tenak, Tanach), also called the Mikra or Hebrew Bible, is the canonical collection of Jewish texts, which is also a textual source for the Christian Old Testament.

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Taoism

Taoism, also known as Daoism, is a religious or philosophical tradition of Chinese origin which emphasizes living in harmony with the Tao (also romanized as ''Dao'').

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Technical drawing

Technical drawing, drafting or drawing, is the act and discipline of composing drawings that visually communicate how something functions or is constructed.

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Technology

Technology ("science of craft", from Greek τέχνη, techne, "art, skill, cunning of hand"; and -λογία, -logia) is first robustly defined by Jacob Bigelow in 1829 as: "...principles, processes, and nomenclatures of the more conspicuous arts, particularly those which involve applications of science, and which may be considered useful, by promoting the benefit of society, together with the emolument of those who pursue them".

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Texture (painting)

Texture in painting refers to the look and feel of the canvas.

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The Commission on the Humanities and Social Sciences

The Commission on the Humanities and Social Sciences was convened by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences at the request of Senators Lamar Alexander (R-Tennessee) and Mark Warner (R-Virginia) and Representatives Tom Petri (R-Wisconsin) and David Price (D-North Carolina).

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The Death of the Author

"The Death of the Author" (French: La mort de l'auteur) is a 1967 essay by the French literary critic and theorist Roland Barthes (1915–80).

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The Two Cultures

The Two Cultures is the first part of an influential 1959 Rede Lecture by British scientist and novelist C. P. Snow.

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Theatre

Theatre or theater is a collaborative form of fine art that uses live performers, typically actors or actresses, to present the experience of a real or imagined event before a live audience in a specific place, often a stage.

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Theatrical property

A prop, formally known as (theatrical) property, is an object used on stage or on screen by actors during a performance or screen production.

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Tinbergen's four questions

Tinbergen's four questions, named after Nikolaas Tinbergen and based on Aristotle's four causes, are complementary categories of explanations for behaviour.

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Tort

A tort, in common law jurisdictions, is a civil wrong that causes a claimant to suffer loss or harm resulting in legal liability for the person who commits the tortious act.

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Trivium

The trivium is the lower division of the seven liberal arts and comprises grammar, logic, and rhetoric (input, process, and output).

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University

A university (universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines.

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University of Chicago

The University of Chicago (UChicago, U of C, or Chicago) is a private, non-profit research university in Chicago, Illinois.

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Virtuoso

A virtuoso (from Italian virtuoso or, "virtuous", Late Latin virtuosus, Latin virtus, "virtue", "excellence", "skill", or "manliness") is an individual who possesses outstanding technical ability in a particular art or field such as fine arts, music, singing, playing a musical instrument, or composition.

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Visual arts

The visual arts are art forms such as ceramics, drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, design, crafts, photography, video, filmmaking, and architecture.

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Waggle dance

Waggle dance is a term used in beekeeping and ethology for a particular figure-eight dance of the honey bee.

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Wassily Kandinsky

Wassily Wassilyevich Kandinsky (Vasily Vasilyevich Kandinsky) (– 13 December 1944) was a Russian painter and art theorist.

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Western culture

Western culture, sometimes equated with Western civilization, Occidental culture, the Western world, Western society, European civilization,is a term used very broadly to refer to a heritage of social norms, ethical values, traditional customs, belief systems, political systems and specific artifacts and technologies that have some origin or association with Europe.

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Wilhelm Dilthey

Wilhelm Dilthey (19 November 1833 – 1 October 1911) was a German historian, psychologist, sociologist, and hermeneutic philosopher, who held G. W. F. Hegel's Chair in Philosophy at the University of Berlin.

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Wind

Wind is the flow of gases on a large scale.

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Wood

Wood is a porous and fibrous structural tissue found in the stems and roots of trees and other woody plants.

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Work of art

A work of art, artwork, art piece, piece of art or art object is an aesthetic physical item or artistic creation.

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Zeus

Zeus (Ζεύς, Zeús) is the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion, who rules as king of the gods of Mount Olympus.

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Zoroastrianism

Zoroastrianism, or more natively Mazdayasna, is one of the world's oldest extant religions, which is monotheistic in having a single creator god, has dualistic cosmology in its concept of good and evil, and has an eschatology which predicts the ultimate destruction of evil.

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History and Geography, Human studies, Humane letters, Humaniora, Humanistic studies, Humanity studies, Humanoira, Humanties, The humanities.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humanities

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