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IUPAC nomenclature of inorganic chemistry

Index IUPAC nomenclature of inorganic chemistry

In chemical nomenclature, the IUPAC nomenclature of inorganic chemistry is a systematic method of naming inorganic chemical compounds, as recommended by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). [1]

69 relations: Ambiguity, Ammonium, Arsenate, Bicarbonate, Bisulfite, Borate, Caffeine, Calcium carbonate, Calcium fluoride, Carbonate, Chemical compound, Chemical formula, Chemical nomenclature, Chlorate, Chloride, Chlorine, Chlorite, Chromate and dichromate, Common name, Compendium of Analytical Nomenclature, Conjugate acid, Coordination complex, Copper(II) nitrate, Cyanide, Deprecation, Dihydrogen monoxide hoax, Electric charge, Electronegativity, Hydrate, Hydride, Hydrogen, Hydronium, Hypochlorite, Inorganic compound, International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Ion, Ionic compound, IUPAC books, IUPAC nomenclature of chemistry, IUPAC nomenclature of inorganic chemistry, IUPAC nomenclature of inorganic chemistry 2005, IUPAC nomenclature of organic chemistry, IUPAC numerical multiplier, List of inorganic compounds, Nitrate, Nitrite, Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry, Oxalate, Oxidation state, Oxyanion, ..., Perchlorate, Permanganate, Phosphate, Phosphide, Phosphorus pentoxide, Polyatomic ion, Potassium oxide, Quantities, Units and Symbols in Physical Chemistry, Roman numerals, Sodium bicarbonate, Sodium chloride, Sulfate, Sulfide, Sulfite, Systematic name, Thiocyanate, Uranium, Water, Water of crystallization. Expand index (19 more) »

Ambiguity

Ambiguity is a type of meaning in which several interpretations are plausible.

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Ammonium

The ammonium cation is a positively charged polyatomic ion with the chemical formula.

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Arsenate

The arsenate ion is.

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Bicarbonate

In inorganic chemistry, bicarbonate (IUPAC-recommended nomenclature: hydrogencarbonate) is an intermediate form in the deprotonation of carbonic acid.

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Bisulfite

Bisulfite ion (IUPAC-recommended nomenclature: hydrogen sulfite) is the ion HSO3−.

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Borate

Borates are the name for a large number of boron-containing oxyanions.

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Caffeine

Caffeine is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant of the methylxanthine class.

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Calcium carbonate

Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3.

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Calcium fluoride

Calcium fluoride is the inorganic compound of the elements calcium and fluorine with the formula CaF2.

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Carbonate

In chemistry, a carbonate is a salt of carbonic acid (H2CO3), characterized by the presence of the carbonate ion, a polyatomic ion with the formula of.

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Chemical compound

A chemical compound is a chemical substance composed of many identical molecules (or molecular entities) composed of atoms from more than one element held together by chemical bonds.

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Chemical formula

A chemical formula is a way of presenting information about the chemical proportions of atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound or molecule, using chemical element symbols, numbers, and sometimes also other symbols, such as parentheses, dashes, brackets, commas and plus (+) and minus (−) signs.

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Chemical nomenclature

A chemical nomenclature is a set of rules to generate systematic names for chemical compounds.

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Chlorate

The chlorate anion has the formula.

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Chloride

The chloride ion is the anion (negatively charged ion) Cl−.

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Chlorine

Chlorine is a chemical element with symbol Cl and atomic number 17.

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Chlorite

The chlorite ion, or chlorine dioxide anion, is.

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Chromate and dichromate

Chromate salts contain the chromate anion,.

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Common name

In biology, a common name of a taxon or organism (also known as a vernacular name, English name, colloquial name, trivial name, trivial epithet, country name, popular name, or farmer's name) is a name that is based on the normal language of everyday life; this kind of name is often contrasted with the scientific name for the same organism, which is Latinized.

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Compendium of Analytical Nomenclature

The Compendium of Analytical Nomenclature is a book published by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) containing internationally accepted definitions for terms in analytical chemistry.

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Conjugate acid

A conjugate acid, within the Brønsted–Lowry acid–base theory, is a species formed by the reception of a proton (H+) by a base—in other words, it is a base with a hydrogen ion added to it.

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Coordination complex

In chemistry, a coordination complex consists of a central atom or ion, which is usually metallic and is called the coordination centre, and a surrounding array of bound molecules or ions, that are in turn known as ligands or complexing agents.

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Copper(II) nitrate

Copper(II) nitrate, Cu(NO3)2, is an inorganic compound that forms a blue crystalline solid.

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Cyanide

A cyanide is a chemical compound that contains the group C≡N.

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Deprecation

In several fields, deprecation is the discouragement of use of some terminology, feature, design, or practice, typically because it has been superseded or is no longer considered efficient or safe, without completely removing it or prohibiting its use.

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Dihydrogen monoxide hoax

The dihydrogen monoxide hoax involves calling water by the unfamiliar chemical name "dihydrogen monoxide" (DHMO), and listing some of water's effects in a particularly alarming manner, such as accelerating corrosion and causing suffocation.

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Electric charge

Electric charge is the physical property of matter that causes it to experience a force when placed in an electromagnetic field.

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Electronegativity

Electronegativity, symbol ''χ'', is a chemical property that describes the tendency of an atom to attract a shared pair of electrons (or electron density) towards itself.

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Hydrate

In chemistry, a hydrate is a substance that contains water or its constituent elements.

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Hydride

In chemistry, a hydride is the anion of hydrogen, H−, or, more commonly, it is a compound in which one or more hydrogen centres have nucleophilic, reducing, or basic properties.

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Hydrogen

Hydrogen is a chemical element with symbol H and atomic number 1.

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Hydronium

In chemistry, hydronium is the common name for the aqueous cation, the type of oxonium ion produced by protonation of water.

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Hypochlorite

In chemistry, hypochlorite is an ion with the chemical formula ClO−.

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Inorganic compound

An inorganic compound is typically a chemical compound that lacks C-H bonds, that is, a compound that is not an organic compound, but the distinction is not defined or even of particular interest.

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International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry

The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) is an international federation of National Adhering Organizations that represents chemists in individual countries.

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Ion

An ion is an atom or molecule that has a non-zero net electrical charge (its total number of electrons is not equal to its total number of protons).

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Ionic compound

In chemistry, an ionic compound is a chemical compound composed of ions held together by electrostatic forces termed ionic bonding.

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IUPAC books

The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry publishes many books, which contain its complete list of definitions.

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IUPAC nomenclature of chemistry

The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has published four sets of rules to standardize chemical nomenclature.

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IUPAC nomenclature of inorganic chemistry

In chemical nomenclature, the IUPAC nomenclature of inorganic chemistry is a systematic method of naming inorganic chemical compounds, as recommended by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC).

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IUPAC nomenclature of inorganic chemistry 2005

Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry, IUPAC Recommendations 2005 is the 2005 version of Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry (which is informally called the Red Book).

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IUPAC nomenclature of organic chemistry

In chemical nomenclature, the IUPAC nomenclature of organic chemistry is a systematic method of naming organic chemical compounds as recommended by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC).

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IUPAC numerical multiplier

The numerical multiplier (or multiplying affix) in IUPAC nomenclature indicates how many particular atoms or functional groups are attached at a particular point in a molecule.

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List of inorganic compounds

Although most compounds are referred to by their IUPAC systematic names (following IUPAC nomenclature), "traditional" names have also been kept where they are in wide use or of significant historical interests.

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Nitrate

Nitrate is a polyatomic ion with the molecular formula and a molecular mass of 62.0049 u.

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Nitrite

The nitrite ion, which has the chemical formula, is a symmetric anion with equal N–O bond lengths.

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Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry

Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry, commonly referred to by chemists as the Blue Book, is a collection of recommendations on organic chemical nomenclature published at irregular intervals by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC).

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Oxalate

Oxalate (IUPAC: ethanedioate) is the dianion with the formula, also written.

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Oxidation state

The oxidation state, sometimes referred to as oxidation number, describes degree of oxidation (loss of electrons) of an atom in a chemical compound.

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Oxyanion

An oxyanion, or oxoanion, is an ion with the generic formula (where A represents a chemical element and O represents an oxygen atom).

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Perchlorate

A perchlorate is the name for a chemical compound containing the perchlorate ion,.

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Permanganate

A permanganate is the general name for a chemical compound containing the manganate(VII) ion,.

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Phosphate

A phosphate is chemical derivative of phosphoric acid.

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Phosphide

In chemistry, a phosphide is a compound containing the P3− ion or its equivalent.

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Phosphorus pentoxide

Phosphorus pentoxide is a chemical compound with molecular formula P4O10 (with its common name derived from its empirical formula, P2O5).

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Polyatomic ion

A polyatomic ion, also known as a molecular ion, is a charged chemical species (ion) composed of two or more atoms covalently bonded or of a metal complex that can be considered to be acting as a single unit.

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Potassium oxide

Potassium oxide (2O) is an ionic compound of potassium and oxygen.

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Quantities, Units and Symbols in Physical Chemistry

Quantities, Units and Symbols in Physical Chemistry, also known as the Green Book, is a compilation of terms and symbols widely used in the field of physical chemistry.

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Roman numerals

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages.

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Sodium bicarbonate

Sodium bicarbonate (IUPAC name: sodium hydrogen carbonate), commonly known as baking soda, is a chemical compound with the formula NaHCO3.

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Sodium chloride

Sodium chloride, also known as salt, is an ionic compound with the chemical formula NaCl, representing a 1:1 ratio of sodium and chloride ions.

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Sulfate

The sulfate or sulphate (see spelling differences) ion is a polyatomic anion with the empirical formula.

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Sulfide

Sulfide (systematically named sulfanediide, and sulfide(2−)) (British English sulphide) is an inorganic anion of sulfur with the chemical formula S2− or a compound containing one or more S2− ions.

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Sulfite

Sulfites or sulphites are compounds that contain the sulfite ion (or the sulfate(IV) ion, from its correct systematic name),.

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Systematic name

A systematic name is a name given in a systematic way to one unique group, organism, object or chemical substance, out of a specific population or collection.

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Thiocyanate

Thiocyanate (also known as rhodanide) is the anion −. It is the conjugate base of thiocyanic acid.

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Uranium

Uranium is a chemical element with symbol U and atomic number 92.

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Water

Water is a transparent, tasteless, odorless, and nearly colorless chemical substance that is the main constituent of Earth's streams, lakes, and oceans, and the fluids of most living organisms.

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Water of crystallization

In chemistry, water of crystallization or water of hydration or crystallization water is water molecules that are present inside crystals.

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IUPAC Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry, IUPAC Red Book, IUPAC inorganic nomenclature, IUPAC nomenclature of inorganic compounds, Inorganic nomenclature, Naming ionic compounds, Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IUPAC_nomenclature_of_inorganic_chemistry

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