Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Jean Chardin

Index Jean Chardin

Jean Chardin (16 November 1643 – 5 January 1713), born Jean-Baptiste Chardin, and also known as Sir John Chardin, was a French jeweller and traveller whose ten-volume book The Travels of Sir John Chardin is regarded as one of the finest works of early Western scholarship on Persia and the Near East in general. [1]

37 relations: Abbas II of Persia, Age of Enlightenment, Anthropology, Armenia, Black Sea, Cape of Good Hope, Chardin baronets, Charles II of England, Chiswick, Constantinople, East India Company, Edward Gibbon, Encyclopædia Iranica, Fellow of the Royal Society, Feodosia, France–Iran relations, Franco-Persian alliance, Georgia (country), HathiTrust, Iran, Isfahan, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Kempton Park, Surrey, Louis-Mathieu Langlès, Lyon, Mingrelians, Montesquieu, Musgrave baronets, Near East, Oriental studies, Safavid dynasty, Sunbury-on-Thames, Thomas Harmer, Voltaire, Westminster Abbey, Whitehall, William Jones (philologist).

Abbas II of Persia

Shah Abbas II (Shāh Abbās) (30 August 1632 – 26 October 1666), was the seventh Safavid king (shah) of Iran, ruling from 1642 to 1666.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Abbas II of Persia · See more »

Age of Enlightenment

The Enlightenment (also known as the Age of Enlightenment or the Age of Reason; in lit in Aufklärung, "Enlightenment", in L’Illuminismo, “Enlightenment” and in Spanish: La Ilustración, "Enlightenment") was an intellectual and philosophical movement that dominated the world of ideas in Europe during the 18th century, "The Century of Philosophy".

New!!: Jean Chardin and Age of Enlightenment · See more »

Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of humans and human behaviour and societies in the past and present.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Anthropology · See more »

Armenia

Armenia (translit), officially the Republic of Armenia (translit), is a country in the South Caucasus region of Eurasia.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Armenia · See more »

Black Sea

The Black Sea is a body of water and marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean between Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and Western Asia.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Black Sea · See more »

Cape of Good Hope

The Cape of Good Hope (Kaap die Goeie Hoop, Kaap de Goede Hoop, Cabo da Boa Esperança) is a rocky headland on the Atlantic coast of the Cape Peninsula, South Africa.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Cape of Good Hope · See more »

Chardin baronets

The Chardin Baronetcy, of the Inner Temple in London, was a title in the Baronetage of Great Britain.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Chardin baronets · See more »

Charles II of England

Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was king of England, Scotland and Ireland.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Charles II of England · See more »

Chiswick

Chiswick is a district of west London, England.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Chiswick · See more »

Constantinople

Constantinople (Κωνσταντινούπολις Konstantinoúpolis; Constantinopolis) was the capital city of the Roman/Byzantine Empire (330–1204 and 1261–1453), and also of the brief Latin (1204–1261), and the later Ottoman (1453–1923) empires.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Constantinople · See more »

East India Company

The East India Company (EIC), also known as the Honourable East India Company (HEIC) or the British East India Company and informally as John Company, was an English and later British joint-stock company, formed to trade with the East Indies (in present-day terms, Maritime Southeast Asia), but ended up trading mainly with Qing China and seizing control of large parts of the Indian subcontinent.

New!!: Jean Chardin and East India Company · See more »

Edward Gibbon

Edward Gibbon FRS (8 May 173716 January 1794) was an English historian, writer and Member of Parliament.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Edward Gibbon · See more »

Encyclopædia Iranica

Encyclopædia Iranica is a project whose goal is to create a comprehensive and authoritative English language encyclopedia about the history, culture, and civilization of Iranian peoples from prehistory to modern times.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Encyclopædia Iranica · See more »

Fellow of the Royal Society

Fellowship of the Royal Society (FRS, ForMemRS and HonFRS) is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society judges to have made a "substantial contribution to the improvement of natural knowledge, including mathematics, engineering science and medical science".

New!!: Jean Chardin and Fellow of the Royal Society · See more »

Feodosia

Feodosia (Феодо́сия, Feodosiya; Феодо́сія, Feodosiia; Crimean Tatar and Turkish: Kefe), also called Theodosia (from), is a port and resort, a town of regional significance in Crimea on the Black Sea coast.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Feodosia · See more »

France–Iran relations

French–Iranian relations are the international relations between France and Iran.

New!!: Jean Chardin and France–Iran relations · See more »

Franco-Persian alliance

A Franco-Persian alliance or Franco-Iranian alliance was formed for a short period between the French Empire of Napoleon I and Fath Ali Shah against Russia and Great Britain between 1807 and 1809.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Franco-Persian alliance · See more »

Georgia (country)

Georgia (tr) is a country in the Caucasus region of Eurasia.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Georgia (country) · See more »

HathiTrust

HathiTrust is a large-scale collaborative repository of digital content from research libraries including content digitized via the Google Books project and Internet Archive digitization initiatives, as well as content digitized locally by libraries.

New!!: Jean Chardin and HathiTrust · See more »

Iran

Iran (ایران), also known as Persia, officially the Islamic Republic of Iran (جمهوری اسلامی ایران), is a sovereign state in Western Asia. With over 81 million inhabitants, Iran is the world's 18th-most-populous country. Comprising a land area of, it is the second-largest country in the Middle East and the 17th-largest in the world. Iran is bordered to the northwest by Armenia and the Republic of Azerbaijan, to the north by the Caspian Sea, to the northeast by Turkmenistan, to the east by Afghanistan and Pakistan, to the south by the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman, and to the west by Turkey and Iraq. The country's central location in Eurasia and Western Asia, and its proximity to the Strait of Hormuz, give it geostrategic importance. Tehran is the country's capital and largest city, as well as its leading economic and cultural center. Iran is home to one of the world's oldest civilizations, beginning with the formation of the Elamite kingdoms in the fourth millennium BCE. It was first unified by the Iranian Medes in the seventh century BCE, reaching its greatest territorial size in the sixth century BCE, when Cyrus the Great founded the Achaemenid Empire, which stretched from Eastern Europe to the Indus Valley, becoming one of the largest empires in history. The Iranian realm fell to Alexander the Great in the fourth century BCE and was divided into several Hellenistic states. An Iranian rebellion culminated in the establishment of the Parthian Empire, which was succeeded in the third century CE by the Sasanian Empire, a leading world power for the next four centuries. Arab Muslims conquered the empire in the seventh century CE, displacing the indigenous faiths of Zoroastrianism and Manichaeism with Islam. Iran made major contributions to the Islamic Golden Age that followed, producing many influential figures in art and science. After two centuries, a period of various native Muslim dynasties began, which were later conquered by the Turks and the Mongols. The rise of the Safavids in the 15th century led to the reestablishment of a unified Iranian state and national identity, with the country's conversion to Shia Islam marking a turning point in Iranian and Muslim history. Under Nader Shah, Iran was one of the most powerful states in the 18th century, though by the 19th century, a series of conflicts with the Russian Empire led to significant territorial losses. Popular unrest led to the establishment of a constitutional monarchy and the country's first legislature. A 1953 coup instigated by the United Kingdom and the United States resulted in greater autocracy and growing anti-Western resentment. Subsequent unrest against foreign influence and political repression led to the 1979 Revolution and the establishment of an Islamic republic, a political system that includes elements of a parliamentary democracy vetted and supervised by a theocracy governed by an autocratic "Supreme Leader". During the 1980s, the country was engaged in a war with Iraq, which lasted for almost nine years and resulted in a high number of casualties and economic losses for both sides. According to international reports, Iran's human rights record is exceptionally poor. The regime in Iran is undemocratic, and has frequently persecuted and arrested critics of the government and its Supreme Leader. Women's rights in Iran are described as seriously inadequate, and children's rights have been severely violated, with more child offenders being executed in Iran than in any other country in the world. Since the 2000s, Iran's controversial nuclear program has raised concerns, which is part of the basis of the international sanctions against the country. The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, an agreement reached between Iran and the P5+1, was created on 14 July 2015, aimed to loosen the nuclear sanctions in exchange for Iran's restriction in producing enriched uranium. Iran is a founding member of the UN, ECO, NAM, OIC, and OPEC. It is a major regional and middle power, and its large reserves of fossil fuels – which include the world's largest natural gas supply and the fourth-largest proven oil reserves – exert considerable influence in international energy security and the world economy. The country's rich cultural legacy is reflected in part by its 22 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the third-largest number in Asia and eleventh-largest in the world. Iran is a multicultural country comprising numerous ethnic and linguistic groups, the largest being Persians (61%), Azeris (16%), Kurds (10%), and Lurs (6%).

New!!: Jean Chardin and Iran · See more »

Isfahan

Isfahan (Esfahān), historically also rendered in English as Ispahan, Sepahan, Esfahan or Hispahan, is the capital of Isfahan Province in Iran, located about south of Tehran.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Isfahan · See more »

Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Jean-Jacques Rousseau (28 June 1712 – 2 July 1778) was a Genevan philosopher, writer and composer.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Jean-Jacques Rousseau · See more »

Kempton Park, Surrey

Kempton Park formerly also a larger manor known as Kempton today refers to Kempton Park Racecourse in the Spelthorne district of Surrey which was in the Medieval period a private parkland, the remaining parkland of its royal manor.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Kempton Park, Surrey · See more »

Louis-Mathieu Langlès

Louis-Mathieu Langlès (23 August 1763 – 28 January 1824) was a French academic, philologist, linguist, translator, author, librarian and orientalist.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Louis-Mathieu Langlès · See more »

Lyon

Lyon (Liyon), is the third-largest city and second-largest urban area of France.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Lyon · See more »

Mingrelians

The Megrelians (Megrelian: მარგალი, margali; მეგრელები: megrelebi) or Mingrelians are an ethnic subgroup of Georgians that mostly live in Samegrelo region of Georgia.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Mingrelians · See more »

Montesquieu

Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de La Brède et de Montesquieu (18 January 1689 – 10 February 1755), generally referred to as simply Montesquieu, was a French judge, man of letters, and political philosopher.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Montesquieu · See more »

Musgrave baronets

There have been four baronetcies created for persons with the surname Musgrave, one in the Baronetage of England, one in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia, one in the Baronetage of Ireland and one in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Musgrave baronets · See more »

Near East

The Near East is a geographical term that roughly encompasses Western Asia.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Near East · See more »

Oriental studies

Oriental studies is the academic field of study that embraces Near Eastern and Far Eastern societies and cultures, languages, peoples, history and archaeology; in recent years the subject has often been turned into the newer terms of Asian studies and Middle Eastern studies.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Oriental studies · See more »

Safavid dynasty

The Safavid dynasty (دودمان صفوی Dudmān e Safavi) was one of the most significant ruling dynasties of Iran, often considered the beginning of modern Iranian history.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Safavid dynasty · See more »

Sunbury-on-Thames

Sunbury-on-Thames is a town and London suburb located in Surrey, England.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Sunbury-on-Thames · See more »

Thomas Harmer

Thomas Harmer (1715 – 27 November 1788) was a minister in Suffolk, England and the author of Observations on various Passages of Scripture.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Thomas Harmer · See more »

Voltaire

François-Marie Arouet (21 November 1694 – 30 May 1778), known by his nom de plume Voltaire, was a French Enlightenment writer, historian and philosopher famous for his wit, his attacks on Christianity as a whole, especially the established Catholic Church, and his advocacy of freedom of religion, freedom of speech and separation of church and state.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Voltaire · See more »

Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, England, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Westminster Abbey · See more »

Whitehall

Whitehall is a road in the City of Westminster, Central London, which forms the first part of the A3212 road from Trafalgar Square to Chelsea.

New!!: Jean Chardin and Whitehall · See more »

William Jones (philologist)

Sir William Jones FRS FRSE (28 September 1746 – 27 April 1794) was an Anglo-Welsh philologist, a puisne judge on the Supreme Court of Judicature at Fort William in Bengal, and a scholar of ancient India, particularly known for his proposition of the existence of a relationship among European and Indian languages, which would later be known as Indo-European languages.

New!!: Jean Chardin and William Jones (philologist) · See more »

Redirects here:

Johannes Chardin, John Chardin, Sir John Chardin.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Chardin

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »