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Jnana yoga

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Jñāna yoga, also known as Jnanamarga, is one of the several spiritual paths in Hinduism that emphasizes the "path of knowledge", also known as the "path of self-realization". [1]

50 relations: Adi Shankara, Advaita Vedanta, Āgama (Hinduism), Ātman (Hinduism), Bhagavad Gita, Bhakti, Bhakti yoga, Brahman, Brihadaranyaka Upanishad, Devi-Bhagavata Purana, Dhyana in Hinduism, Diamond Sutra, Faith in Hinduism, Gnosis, Guru, H. W. L. Poonja, Hindu, Hinduism, Impermanence, Jivanmukta, Jnana, Karma yoga, Kevala Jnana, Knowledge, Krishna, Moksha, Mukhya Upanishads, Para Brahman, Ramana Maharshi, Ramanuja, Rāja yoga, Saguna brahman, Samadhana, Sanskrit, Shaivism, Sita Upanishad, Swami Vivekananda, Temperance (virtue), Three Yogas, Titiksha, Upanishads, Uparati, Vaishnavism, Vedanta, Videha mukti, Vishishtadvaita, Vivekachudamani, Yoga, Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, Yoga Vasistha.

Adi Shankara

Adi Shankara (pronounced) or Shankara, was an early 8th century Indian philosopher and theologian who consolidated the doctrine of Advaita Vedanta.

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Advaita Vedanta

Advaita Vedanta (अद्वैत वेदान्त, IAST:, literally, "not-two"), originally known as Puruṣavāda, is a school of Hindu philosophy and religious practice, and one of the classic Indian paths to spiritual realization.

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Christmas

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ,Martindale, Cyril Charles.

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Christmas and holiday season

The Christmas season, also called the festive season, or the holiday season (mainly in the U.S. and Canada; often simply called the holidays),, is an annually recurring period recognized in many Western and Western-influenced countries that is generally considered to run from late November to early January.

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Christmas Eve

Christmas Eve is the evening or entire day before Christmas Day, the festival commemorating the birth of Jesus.

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Christmas traditions

Christmas traditions vary from country to country.

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New Year

New Year is the time or day at which a new calendar year begins and the calendar's year count increments by one.

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New Year's Day

New Year's Day, also called simply New Year's or New Year, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar.

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New Year's Eve

In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December which is the seventh day of Christmastide.

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Āgama (Hinduism)

The Agamas (Devanagari: आगम, IAST) are a collection of scriptures of several Hindu devotional schools.

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Ātman (Hinduism)

Ātma is a Sanskrit word that means inner self or soul.

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Bhagavad Gita

The Bhagavad Gita (भगवद्गीता, in IAST,, lit. "The Song of God"), often referred to as the Gita, is a 700 verse Hindu scripture in Sanskrit that is part of the Hindu epic Mahabharata (chapters 23–40 of the 6th book of Mahabharata).

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Bhakti

Bhakti (भक्ति) literally means "attachment, participation, fondness for, homage, faith, love, devotion, worship, purity".

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Bhakti yoga

Bhakti yoga, also called Bhakti marga (literally the path of Bhakti), is a spiritual path or spiritual practice within Hinduism focused on loving devotion towards a personal god.

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Brahman

In Hinduism, Brahman connotes the highest Universal Principle, the Ultimate Reality in the universe.P. T. Raju (2006), Idealistic Thought of India, Routledge,, page 426 and Conclusion chapter part XII In major schools of Hindu philosophy, it is the material, efficient, formal and final cause of all that exists.For dualism school of Hinduism, see: Francis X. Clooney (2010), Hindu God, Christian God: How Reason Helps Break Down the Boundaries between Religions, Oxford University Press,, pages 51–58, 111–115;For monist school of Hinduism, see: B. Martinez-Bedard (2006), Types of Causes in Aristotle and Sankara, Thesis – Department of Religious Studies (Advisors: Kathryn McClymond and Sandra Dwyer), Georgia State University, pages 18–35 It is the pervasive, genderless, infinite, eternal truth and bliss which does not change, yet is the cause of all changes. Brahman as a metaphysical concept is the single binding unity behind diversity in all that exists in the universe. Brahman is a Vedic Sanskrit word, and it is conceptualized in Hinduism, states Paul Deussen, as the "creative principle which lies realized in the whole world". Brahman is a key concept found in the Vedas, and it is extensively discussed in the early Upanishads.Stephen Philips (1998), Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Brahman to Derrida (Editor; Edward Craig), Routledge,, pages 1–4 The Vedas conceptualize Brahman as the Cosmic Principle. In the Upanishads, it has been variously described as Sat-cit-ānanda (truth-consciousness-bliss) and as the unchanging, permanent, highest reality. Brahman is discussed in Hindu texts with the concept of Atman (Soul, Self), personal, impersonal or Para Brahman, or in various combinations of these qualities depending on the philosophical school. In dualistic schools of Hinduism such as the theistic Dvaita Vedanta, Brahman is different from Atman (soul) in each being.Michael Myers (2000), Brahman: A Comparative Theology, Routledge,, pages 124–127 In non-dual schools such as the Advaita Vedanta, Brahman is identical to the Atman, is everywhere and inside each living being, and there is connected spiritual oneness in all existence.Arvind Sharma (2007), Advaita Vedānta: An Introduction, Motilal Banarsidass,, pages 19–40, 53–58, 79–86.

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Brihadaranyaka Upanishad

The Brihadaranyaka Upanishad (बृहदारण्यक उपनिषद्) is one of the Principal Upanishads and one of the oldest Upanishadic scriptures of Hinduism.

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Devi-Bhagavata Purana

The Devi Bhagavata Purana (Sanskrit: देवी भागवतपुराण), also known as the Shrimad Devi Bhagvatam and the Devi Bhagavatam, is a Sanskrit text that belongs to the Purana-genre of Hindu literature.

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Dhyana in Hinduism

Dhyana (IAST: Dhyāna) in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism means contemplation and meditation, though their technical context is different.

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Diamond Sutra

The Diamond Sūtra (Sanskrit:Vajracchedikā Prajñāpāramitā Sūtra) is a Mahāyāna (Buddhist) sūtra from the Prajñāpāramitā sutras or 'Perfection of Wisdom' genre.

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Faith in Hinduism

Śraddhā (श्रद्धा) is loosely translated as "faith".

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Gnosis

Gnosis is the common Greek noun for knowledge (γνῶσις, gnôsis, f.). The term is used in various Hellenistic religions and philosophies.

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Guru

Guru (गुरु, IAST: guru) is a Sanskrit term that connotes someone who is a "teacher, guide, expert, or master" of certain knowledge or field.

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H. W. L. Poonja

Sri H. W. L. Poonja (born Hariwansh Lal Poonja; 13 October 1910 (or later) in Punjab, British India – 6 September 1997 in Lucknow, India), known as "Poonjaji" or "Papaji", was a teacher of Self-enquiry as advocated by Ramana Maharshi.

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Hindu

Hindu refers to any person who regards themselves as culturally, ethnically, or religiously adhering to aspects of Hinduism.

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Hinduism

Hinduism is an Indian religion and dharma, or a way of life, widely practised in the Indian subcontinent.

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Impermanence

Impermanence, also called Anicca or Anitya, is one of the essential doctrines and a part of three marks of existence in Buddhism.

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Jivanmukta

A jivan mukta or mukta is someone who, in the Advaita Vedanta philosophy of Hinduism, has gained and assimilated self-knowledge, thus is liberated with an inner sense of freedom while living.

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Jnana

In Indian philosophy and religion, jñāna (Pali: ñāṇa) or gyan/gian (Hindi: jñān) is "knowledge".

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Karma yoga

Karma yoga, also called Karma marga, is one of the several spiritual paths in Hinduism, one based on the "yoga of action".

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Kevala Jnana

Kevala jñāna means omniscience in Jainism and is roughly translated as absolute knowledge or supreme knowledge.

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Knowledge

Knowledge is a familiarity, awareness, or understanding of someone or something, such as facts, information, descriptions, or skills, which is acquired through experience or education by perceiving, discovering, or learning.

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Krishna

Krishna (Kṛṣṇa) is a major deity in Hinduism.

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Moksha

Moksha (मोक्ष), also called vimoksha, vimukti and mukti, is a term in Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism which refers to various forms of emancipation, liberation, and release. In its soteriological and eschatological senses, it refers to freedom from saṃsāra, the cycle of death and rebirth. In its epistemological and psychological senses, moksha refers to freedom from ignorance: self-realization and self-knowledge. In Hindu traditions, moksha is a central concept and the utmost aim to be attained through three paths during human life; these three paths are dharma (virtuous, proper, moral life), artha (material prosperity, income security, means of life), and kama (pleasure, sensuality, emotional fulfillment). Together, these four concepts are called Puruṣārtha in Hinduism. In some schools of Indian religions, moksha is considered equivalent to and used interchangeably with other terms such as vimoksha, vimukti, kaivalya, apavarga, mukti, nihsreyasa and nirvana. However, terms such as moksha and nirvana differ and mean different states between various schools of Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.See.

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Mukhya Upanishads

Mukhya Upanishads, also known as Principal Upanishads, are the most ancient, widely studied Upanishads of Hinduism.

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Para Brahman

Para Brahman (Sanskrit:परब्रह्मन्) (IAST) is the "Highest Brahman" that which is beyond all descriptions and conceptualisations.

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Ramana Maharshi

Ramana Maharshi (30 December 1879 – 14 April 1950) was a Hindu sage and jivanmukta.

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Ramanuja

Ramanuja (traditionally, 1017–1137 CE) was a Hindu theologian, philosopher, and one of the most important exponents of the Sri Vaishnavism tradition within Hinduism.

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Rāja yoga

In Sanskrit texts, Rāja yoga refers to the goal of yoga (which is usually samadhi) and not a method of attaining it.

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Saguna brahman

Saguna Brahman (lit. "The Absolute with qualities") came from the Sanskrit (सगुण) "with qualities, gunas" and Brahman (ब्रह्मन्) "The Absolute", close to the concept of immanence, the manifested divine presence.

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Samadhana

Samādhāna or samādhānam (Sanskrit:समाधानम्) is a Sanskrit noun derived from the word, samādhā (समाधा), and variously means – putting together, uniting, fixing the mind in abstract contemplation on the true nature of the soul, contemplate oneness, concentrated or formless meditation, commitment, intentness, steadiness, composure, peace of mind, clearing up a doubt or replying to the pūrvapaksha, agreeing or promising, a leading incident, justification of a statement, proof, reconciliation or eagerness.

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Sanskrit

Sanskrit is the primary liturgical language of Hinduism; a philosophical language of Hinduism, Sikhism, Buddhism and Jainism; and a former literary language and lingua franca for the educated of ancient and medieval India.

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Shaivism

Shaivism (Śaivam) (Devanagari: शैव संप्रदाय) (Bengali: শৈব) (Tamil: சைவம்) (Telugu: శైవ సాంప్రదాయం) (Kannada:ಶೈವ ಸಂಪ್ರದಾಯ) is one of the major traditions within Hinduism that reveres Shiva as the Supreme Being.

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Sita Upanishad

The Sita Upanishad (सीता उपनिषत्) is a medieval era Sanskrit text and a minor Upanishad of Hinduism.

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Swami Vivekananda

Swami Vivekananda (12 January 1863 – 4 July 1902), born Narendranath Datta, was an Indian Hindu monk, a chief disciple of the 19th-century Indian mystic Ramakrishna.

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Temperance (virtue)

Temperance is defined as moderation or voluntary self-restraint.

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Three Yogas

The Three Yog are three soteriological paths mentioned in Bhagavad Gita for the liberation of human spirit.

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Titiksha

Titiksha or titikșā (Sanskrit: तितिक्षा) (literally the desire to leave) in Vedanta philosophy is the bearing with indifference all opposites such as pleasure and pain, heat and cold etc.

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Upanishads

The Upanishads (उपनिषद्), a part of the Vedas, are ancient Sanskrit texts that contain some of the central philosophical concepts and ideas of Hinduism, some of which are shared with religious traditions like Buddhism and Jainism.

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Uparati

Uparati, is a Sanskrit word and it literally means "cessation, quietism, stopping worldly action".

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Vaishnavism

Vaishnavism (Vaishnava dharma) is one of the major traditions within Hinduism along with Shaivism, Shaktism, and Smartism.

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Vedanta

Vedanta (Sanskrit: वेदान्त, IAST) or Uttara Mīmāṃsā is one of the six orthodox (''āstika'') schools of Hindu philosophy.

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Videha mukti

Videha mukti (Sanskrit, "liberation after death") refers to the moksha, or "liberation attained by a person after death".

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Vishishtadvaita

Vishishtadvaita (IAST; विशिष्टाद्वैत) is one of the most popular schools of the Vedanta school of Hindu philosophy.

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Vivekachudamani

The Vivekachudamani (Sanskrit: विवेकचूडामणि) is an introductory treatise to Advaita Vedanta tradition of Hinduism.

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Yoga

Yoga (Sanskrit, योगः) is a group of physical, mental, and spiritual practices or disciplines which originated in ancient India.

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Yoga Sutras of Patanjali

The Yoga Sūtras of Patañjali are a collection of 196 Indian sutras (aphorisms) on the theory and practice of yoga.

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Yoga Vasistha

Yoga Vasistha (योग-वासिष्ठ, IAST) is a philosophical text attributed to Valmiki, but the real author is unknown.

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2018

2018 has been designated as the third International Year of the Reef by the International Coral Reef Initiative.

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2019

2019 (MMXIX) will be a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2019th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 19th year of the 3rd millennium, the 19th year of the 21st century, and the 10th and last year of the 2010s decade.

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Dnyana yoga, Gnana yoga, Gyan Yoga, Gyan yoga, Jnana Yoga, Jnana marga, Jnanamarga, Jnanayoga, Jnani, Jñāna Yoga, Jñānayoga.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jnana_yoga

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