Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Install
Faster access than browser!
 

John Cassian

Index John Cassian

John Cassian (–), John the Ascetic, or John Cassian the Roman (Ioannes Eremita Cassianus, Ioannus Cassianus, or Ioannes Massiliensis), was a Christian monk and theologian celebrated in both the Western and Eastern Churches for his mystical writings. [1]

120 relations: Abbey of St Victor, Marseille, Acedia, Alphonsus Liguori, Anger, Anglican Communion, Antioch, Asceticism, Augustine of Hippo, B. B. Warfield, Benedict of Nursia, Bethlehem, Boasting, Boston College, Bulgaria, Calendar of saints, Calendar of saints (Episcopal Church), Calvinism, Canonical hours, Castor of Apt, Catharsis, Catholic Church, Cenobitic monasticism, Charles Earle Funk, Christian Classics Ethereal Library, Christian contemplation, Christian monasticism, Church Fathers, Cicero, Cistercians, Congregation for the Causes of Saints, Constantinople, Council of Orange (529), Deacon, Desert Fathers, Divine grace, Dobruja, Early Middle Ages, Eastern Catholic Churches, Eastern Orthodox Church, Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, Egypt (Roman province), Envy, Evagrius Ponticus, Exile, France, Francis de Sales, Fréjus, Free will, Free will in theology, Gaul, ..., General Roman Calendar, Georges Florovsky, Gluttony, Greed, Greek language, Hermitage (religious retreat), Holy Spirit, Honoratus, Hubris, Icon, Ignatius of Loyola, Invitatory, Irresistible grace, John Anthony McGuckin, John Chrysostom, John Climacus, John Henry Newman, John of Damascus, Latin, Latin Church, Lérins Abbey, Leap year, Libertarianism (metaphysics), Liturgy of the Hours, Lust, Marseille, Martin of Tours, Memorial, Michel Foucault, Monastery, Monasticism, Nestorius, New Advent, Order of Saint Benedict, Origen, Original sin, Owen Chadwick, Palestine (region), Pelagianism, Persius, Philip Neri, Philokalia, Pope Gregory I, Pope Innocent I, Pope Leo I, Pope Theophilus of Alexandria, Pope Urban V, Relic, Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Marseille, Roman Martyrology, Romania, Rule of Saint Benedict, Sabine Baring-Gould, Saint, Saint Dominic, Salvation, Scythia Minor, Semipelagianism, Sermon on the Mount, Song of Songs, Soteriology, State (theology), Synaxarium, The Lives of the Saints (Baring-Gould), Theology, Theosis (Eastern Christian theology), Trappists, Versicle, Vice, Wadi El Natrun. Expand index (70 more) »

Abbey of St Victor, Marseille

The Abbey of Saint Victor is a late Roman former monastic foundation in Marseille in the south of France, named after the local soldier saint and martyr, Victor of Marseilles.

New!!: John Cassian and Abbey of St Victor, Marseille · See more »

Acedia

Acedia (also accidie or accedie, from Latin acedĭa, and this from Greek ἀκηδία, "negligence", ἀ- "lack of" -κηδία "care") is a state of listlessness or torpor, of not caring or not being concerned with one's position or condition in the world.

New!!: John Cassian and Acedia · See more »

Alphonsus Liguori

Saint Alphonsus Liguori (1696–1787), sometimes called Alphonsus Maria Liguori, was an Italian Catholic bishop, spiritual writer, composer, musician, artist, poet, lawyer, scholastic philosopher, and theologian.

New!!: John Cassian and Alphonsus Liguori · See more »

Anger

Anger or wrath is an intense negative emotion.

New!!: John Cassian and Anger · See more »

Anglican Communion

The Anglican Communion is the third largest Christian communion with 85 million members, founded in 1867 in London, England.

New!!: John Cassian and Anglican Communion · See more »

Antioch

Antioch on the Orontes (Antiókheia je epi Oróntou; also Syrian Antioch)Ἀντιόχεια ἡ ἐπὶ Ὀρόντου; or Ἀντιόχεια ἡ ἐπὶ Δάφνῃ, "Antioch on Daphne"; or Ἀντιόχεια ἡ Μεγάλη, "Antioch the Great"; Antiochia ad Orontem; Անտիոք Antiok; ܐܢܛܝܘܟܝܐ Anṭiokya; Hebrew: אנטיוכיה, Antiyokhya; Arabic: انطاكية, Anṭākiya; انطاکیه; Antakya.

New!!: John Cassian and Antioch · See more »

Asceticism

Asceticism (from the ἄσκησις áskesis, "exercise, training") is a lifestyle characterized by abstinence from sensual pleasures, often for the purpose of pursuing spiritual goals.

New!!: John Cassian and Asceticism · See more »

Augustine of Hippo

Saint Augustine of Hippo (13 November 354 – 28 August 430) was a Roman African, early Christian theologian and philosopher from Numidia whose writings influenced the development of Western Christianity and Western philosophy.

New!!: John Cassian and Augustine of Hippo · See more »

B. B. Warfield

Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield (November 5, 1851 – February 16, 1921) was professor of theology at Princeton Seminary from 1887 to 1921.

New!!: John Cassian and B. B. Warfield · See more »

Benedict of Nursia

Benedict of Nursia (Benedictus Nursiae; Benedetto da Norcia; Vulgar Latin: *Benedecto; Benedikt; 2 March 480 – 543 or 547 AD) is a Christian saint, who is venerated in the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches, the Oriental Orthodox Churches, the Anglican Communion and Old Catholic Churches.

New!!: John Cassian and Benedict of Nursia · See more »

Bethlehem

Bethlehem (بيت لحم, "House of Meat"; בֵּית לֶחֶם,, "House of Bread";; Bethleem; initially named after Canaanite fertility god Lehem) is a Palestinian city located in the central West Bank, Palestine, about south of Jerusalem.

New!!: John Cassian and Bethlehem · See more »

Boasting

Boasting is to speak with excessive pride and self-satisfaction about one’s achievements, possessions, or abilities.

New!!: John Cassian and Boasting · See more »

Boston College

Boston College (also referred to as BC) is a private Jesuit Catholic research university located in the affluent village of Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, United States, west of downtown Boston.

New!!: John Cassian and Boston College · See more »

Bulgaria

Bulgaria (България, tr.), officially the Republic of Bulgaria (Република България, tr.), is a country in southeastern Europe.

New!!: John Cassian and Bulgaria · See more »

Calendar of saints

The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the feast day or feast of said saint.

New!!: John Cassian and Calendar of saints · See more »

Calendar of saints (Episcopal Church)

The veneration of saints in the Episcopal Church is a continuation of an ancient tradition from the early Church which honors important and influential people of the Christian faith.

New!!: John Cassian and Calendar of saints (Episcopal Church) · See more »

Calvinism

Calvinism (also called the Reformed tradition, Reformed Christianity, Reformed Protestantism, or the Reformed faith) is a major branch of Protestantism that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice of John Calvin and other Reformation-era theologians.

New!!: John Cassian and Calvinism · See more »

Canonical hours

In the practice of Christianity, canonical hours mark the divisions of the day in terms of periods of fixed prayer at regular intervals.

New!!: John Cassian and Canonical hours · See more »

Castor of Apt

Saint Castor of Apt (died ca. 420) was a bishop of Apt, in Gaul.

New!!: John Cassian and Castor of Apt · See more »

Catharsis

Catharsis (from Greek κάθαρσις meaning "purification" or "cleansing") is the purification and purgation of emotions—particularly pity and fear—through art or any extreme change in emotion that results in renewal and restoration.

New!!: John Cassian and Catharsis · See more »

Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.299 billion members worldwide.

New!!: John Cassian and Catholic Church · See more »

Cenobitic monasticism

Cenobitic (or coenobitic) monasticism is a monastic tradition that stresses community life.

New!!: John Cassian and Cenobitic monasticism · See more »

Charles Earle Funk

Charles Earle Funk (1881–1957) was an American lexicographer.

New!!: John Cassian and Charles Earle Funk · See more »

Christian Classics Ethereal Library

The Christian Classics Ethereal Library (CCEL) is a digital library that provides free electronic copies of Christian scripture and literature texts.

New!!: John Cassian and Christian Classics Ethereal Library · See more »

Christian contemplation

Christian contemplation, from contemplatio (Latin; Greek θεωρία, Theoria), refers to several Christian practices which aim at "looking at", "gazing at", "being aware of" God or the Divine.

New!!: John Cassian and Christian contemplation · See more »

Christian monasticism

Christian monasticism is the devotional practice of individuals who live ascetic and typically cloistered lives that are dedicated to Christian worship.

New!!: John Cassian and Christian monasticism · See more »

Church Fathers

The Church Fathers, Early Church Fathers, Christian Fathers, or Fathers of the Church are ancient and influential Christian theologians and writers.

New!!: John Cassian and Church Fathers · See more »

Cicero

Marcus Tullius Cicero (3 January 106 BC – 7 December 43 BC) was a Roman statesman, orator, lawyer and philosopher, who served as consul in the year 63 BC.

New!!: John Cassian and Cicero · See more »

Cistercians

A Cistercian is a member of the Cistercian Order (abbreviated as OCist, SOCist ((Sacer) Ordo Cisterciensis), or ‘’’OCSO’’’ (Ordo Cisterciensis Strictioris Observantiae), which are religious orders of monks and nuns. They are also known as “Trappists”; as Bernardines, after the highly influential St. Bernard of Clairvaux (though that term is also used of the Franciscan Order in Poland and Lithuania); or as White Monks, in reference to the colour of the "cuccula" or white choir robe worn by the Cistercians over their habits, as opposed to the black cuccula worn by Benedictine monks. The original emphasis of Cistercian life was on manual labour and self-sufficiency, and many abbeys have traditionally supported themselves through activities such as agriculture and brewing ales. Over the centuries, however, education and academic pursuits came to dominate the life of many monasteries. A reform movement seeking to restore the simpler lifestyle of the original Cistercians began in 17th-century France at La Trappe Abbey, leading eventually to the Holy See’s reorganization in 1892 of reformed houses into a single order Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance (OCSO), commonly called the Trappists. Cistercians who did not observe these reforms became known as the Cistercians of the Original Observance. The term Cistercian (French Cistercien), derives from Cistercium, the Latin name for the village of Cîteaux, near Dijon in eastern France. It was in this village that a group of Benedictine monks from the monastery of Molesme founded Cîteaux Abbey in 1098, with the goal of following more closely the Rule of Saint Benedict. The best known of them were Robert of Molesme, Alberic of Cîteaux and the English monk Stephen Harding, who were the first three abbots. Bernard of Clairvaux entered the monastery in the early 1110s with 30 companions and helped the rapid proliferation of the order. By the end of the 12th century, the order had spread throughout France and into England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, Spain, Portugal, Italy, and Eastern Europe. The keynote of Cistercian life was a return to literal observance of the Rule of St Benedict. Rejecting the developments the Benedictines had undergone, the monks tried to replicate monastic life exactly as it had been in Saint Benedict's time; indeed in various points they went beyond it in austerity. The most striking feature in the reform was the return to manual labour, especially agricultural work in the fields, a special characteristic of Cistercian life. Cistercian architecture is considered one of the most beautiful styles of medieval architecture. Additionally, in relation to fields such as agriculture, hydraulic engineering and metallurgy, the Cistercians became the main force of technological diffusion in medieval Europe. The Cistercians were adversely affected in England by the Protestant Reformation, the Dissolution of the Monasteries under King Henry VIII, the French Revolution in continental Europe, and the revolutions of the 18th century, but some survived and the order recovered in the 19th century.

New!!: John Cassian and Cistercians · See more »

Congregation for the Causes of Saints

The Congregation for the Causes of Saints is the congregation of the Roman Curia that oversees the complex process that leads to the canonization of saints, passing through the steps of a declaration of "heroic virtues" and beatification.

New!!: John Cassian and Congregation for the Causes of Saints · See more »

Constantinople

Constantinople (Κωνσταντινούπολις Konstantinoúpolis; Constantinopolis) was the capital city of the Roman/Byzantine Empire (330–1204 and 1261–1453), and also of the brief Latin (1204–1261), and the later Ottoman (1453–1923) empires.

New!!: John Cassian and Constantinople · See more »

Council of Orange (529)

The Second Council of Orange (or Second Synod of Orange) was held in 529 at Orange, which was then part of the Ostrogothic Kingdom.

New!!: John Cassian and Council of Orange (529) · See more »

Deacon

A deacon is a member of the diaconate, an office in Christian churches that is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions.

New!!: John Cassian and Deacon · See more »

Desert Fathers

The Desert Fathers (along with Desert Mothers) were early Christian hermits, ascetics, and monks who lived mainly in the Scetes desert of Egypt beginning around the third century AD.

New!!: John Cassian and Desert Fathers · See more »

Divine grace

Divine grace is a theological term present in many religions.

New!!: John Cassian and Divine grace · See more »

Dobruja

Dobruja or Dobrudja (Добруджа, transliterated: Dobrudzha or Dobrudža; Dobrogea or; Dobruca) is a historical region in Eastern Europe that has been divided since the 19th century between the territories of Bulgaria and Romania.

New!!: John Cassian and Dobruja · See more »

Early Middle Ages

The Early Middle Ages or Early Medieval Period, typically regarded as lasting from the 5th or 6th century to the 10th century CE, marked the start of the Middle Ages of European history.

New!!: John Cassian and Early Middle Ages · See more »

Eastern Catholic Churches

The Eastern Catholic Churches or Oriental Catholic Churches, also called the Eastern-rite Catholic Churches, and in some historical cases Uniate Churches, are twenty-three Eastern Christian particular churches sui iuris in full communion with the Pope in Rome, as part of the worldwide Catholic Church.

New!!: John Cassian and Eastern Catholic Churches · See more »

Eastern Orthodox Church

The Eastern Orthodox Church, also known as the Orthodox Church, or officially as the Orthodox Catholic Church, is the second-largest Christian Church, with over 250 million members.

New!!: John Cassian and Eastern Orthodox Church · See more »

Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople

The Ecumenical Patriarch (Η Αυτού Θειοτάτη Παναγιότης, ο Αρχιεπίσκοπος Κωνσταντινουπόλεως, Νέας Ρώμης και Οικουμενικός Πατριάρχης, "His Most Divine All-Holiness the Archbishop of Constantinople, New Rome, and Ecumenical Patriarch") is the Archbishop of Constantinople–New Rome and ranks as primus inter pares (first among equals) among the heads of the several autocephalous churches that make up the Eastern Orthodox Church.

New!!: John Cassian and Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople · See more »

Egypt (Roman province)

The Roman province of Egypt (Aigyptos) was established in 30 BC after Octavian (the future emperor Augustus) defeated his rival Mark Antony, deposed Queen Cleopatra VII, and annexed the Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt to the Roman Empire.

New!!: John Cassian and Egypt (Roman province) · See more »

Envy

Envy (from Latin invidia) is an emotion which "occurs when a person lacks another's superior quality, achievement, or possession and either desires it or wishes that the other lacked it".

New!!: John Cassian and Envy · See more »

Evagrius Ponticus

Evagrius Ponticus (Εὐάγριος ὁ Ποντικός, "Evagrius of Pontus"), also called Evagrius the Solitary (345–399 AD), was a Christian monk and ascetic.

New!!: John Cassian and Evagrius Ponticus · See more »

Exile

To be in exile means to be away from one's home (i.e. city, state, or country), while either being explicitly refused permission to return or being threatened with imprisonment or death upon return.

New!!: John Cassian and Exile · See more »

France

France, officially the French Republic (République française), is a sovereign state whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.

New!!: John Cassian and France · See more »

Francis de Sales

Francis de Sales (François de Sales; Francesco di Sales); 21 August 156728 December 1622) was a Bishop of Geneva and is honored as a saint in the Catholic Church. He became noted for his deep faith and his gentle approach to the religious divisions in his land resulting from the Protestant Reformation. He is known also for his writings on the topic of spiritual direction and spiritual formation, particularly the Introduction to the Devout Life and the Treatise on the Love of God.

New!!: John Cassian and Francis de Sales · See more »

Fréjus

Fréjus is a commune in the Var department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region in southeastern France.

New!!: John Cassian and Fréjus · See more »

Free will

Free will is the ability to choose between different possible courses of action unimpeded.

New!!: John Cassian and Free will · See more »

Free will in theology

Free will in theology is an important part of the debate on free will in general.

New!!: John Cassian and Free will in theology · See more »

Gaul

Gaul (Latin: Gallia) was a region of Western Europe during the Iron Age that was inhabited by Celtic tribes, encompassing present day France, Luxembourg, Belgium, most of Switzerland, Northern Italy, as well as the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine.

New!!: John Cassian and Gaul · See more »

General Roman Calendar

The General Roman Calendar is the liturgical calendar that indicates the dates of celebrations of saints and mysteries of the Lord (Jesus Christ) in the Roman Rite, wherever this liturgical rite is in use.

New!!: John Cassian and General Roman Calendar · See more »

Georges Florovsky

Georges Vasilievich Florovsky (Russian: Гео́ргий Васи́льевич Флоро́вский; September 9, 1893 – August 11, 1979) was an Orthodox Christian priest, theologian, historian and ecumenist.

New!!: John Cassian and Georges Florovsky · See more »

Gluttony

Gluttony (gula, derived from the Latin gluttire meaning "to gulp down or swallow") means over-indulgence and over-consumption of food, drink, or wealth items.

New!!: John Cassian and Gluttony · See more »

Greed

Greed, or avarice, is an inordinate or insatiable longing for unneeded excess, especially for excess wealth, status, power, or food.

New!!: John Cassian and Greed · See more »

Greek language

Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά, elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα, ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

New!!: John Cassian and Greek language · See more »

Hermitage (religious retreat)

Although today's meaning is usually a place where a hermit lives in seclusion from the world, hermitage was more commonly used to mean a settlement where a person or a group of people lived religiously, in seclusion.

New!!: John Cassian and Hermitage (religious retreat) · See more »

Holy Spirit

Holy Spirit (also called Holy Ghost) is a term found in English translations of the Bible that is understood differently among the Abrahamic religions.

New!!: John Cassian and Holy Spirit · See more »

Honoratus

Honoratus (Saint Honorat or Saint Honoré; c. 350 – January 6, 429) was an early Archbishop of Arles, who was also the Abbot of Lérins Abbey.

New!!: John Cassian and Honoratus · See more »

Hubris

Hubris (from ancient Greek ὕβρις) describes a personality quality of extreme or foolish pride or dangerous overconfidence, often in combination with (or synonymous with) arrogance.

New!!: John Cassian and Hubris · See more »

Icon

An icon (from Greek εἰκών eikōn "image") is a religious work of art, most commonly a painting, from the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, and certain Eastern Catholic churches.

New!!: John Cassian and Icon · See more »

Ignatius of Loyola

Saint Ignatius of Loyola (Ignazio Loiolakoa, Ignacio de Loyola; – 31 July 1556) was a Spanish Basque priest and theologian, who founded the religious order called the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) and became its first Superior General.

New!!: John Cassian and Ignatius of Loyola · See more »

Invitatory

The Invitatory is the psalm used to start Nocturns in the Liturgy of the Hours, the Catholic Church's Divine Office.

New!!: John Cassian and Invitatory · See more »

Irresistible grace

Irresistible grace (or efficacious grace) is a doctrine in Christian theology particularly associated with Calvinism, which teaches that the saving grace of God is effectually applied to those whom he has determined to save (the elect) and, in God's timing, overcomes their resistance to obeying the call of the gospel, bringing them to faith in Christ.

New!!: John Cassian and Irresistible grace · See more »

John Anthony McGuckin

John Anthony McGuckin (born 1952) is a theologian, church historian, Orthodox Christian priest and poet.

New!!: John Cassian and John Anthony McGuckin · See more »

John Chrysostom

John Chrysostom (Ἰωάννης ὁ Χρυσόστομος; c. 349 – 14 September 407), Archbishop of Constantinople, was an important Early Church Father.

New!!: John Cassian and John Chrysostom · See more »

John Climacus

Saint John Climacus (Ἰωάννης τῆς Κλίμακος; Ioannes Climacus), also known as John of the Ladder, John Scholasticus and John Sinaites, was a 6th-7th-century Christian monk at the monastery on Mount Sinai.

New!!: John Cassian and John Climacus · See more »

John Henry Newman

John Henry Newman, (21 February 1801 – 11 August 1890) was a poet and theologian, first an Anglican priest and later a Catholic priest and cardinal, who was an important and controversial figure in the religious history of England in the 19th century.

New!!: John Cassian and John Henry Newman · See more »

John of Damascus

Saint John of Damascus (Medieval Greek Ἰωάννης ὁ Δαμασκηνός, Ioánnis o Damaskinós, Byzantine; Ioannes Damascenus, يوحنا الدمشقي, ALA-LC: Yūḥannā ad-Dimashqī); also known as John Damascene and as Χρυσορρόας / Chrysorrhoas (literally "streaming with gold"—i.e., "the golden speaker"; c. 675 or 676 – 4 December 749) was a Syrian monk and priest.

New!!: John Cassian and John of Damascus · See more »

Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

New!!: John Cassian and Latin · See more »

Latin Church

The Latin Church, sometimes called the Western Church, is the largest particular church sui iuris in full communion with the Pope and the rest of the Catholic Church, tracing its history to the earliest days of Christianity.

New!!: John Cassian and Latin Church · See more »

Lérins Abbey

Lérins Abbey is a Cistercian monastery on the island of Saint-Honorat, one of the Lérins Islands, on the French Riviera, with an active monastic community.

New!!: John Cassian and Lérins Abbey · See more »

Leap year

A leap year (also known as an intercalary year or bissextile year) is a calendar year containing one additional day (or, in the case of lunisolar calendars, a month) added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year.

New!!: John Cassian and Leap year · See more »

Libertarianism (metaphysics)

Libertarianism is one of the main philosophical positions related to the problems of free will and determinism, which are part of the larger domain of metaphysics.

New!!: John Cassian and Libertarianism (metaphysics) · See more »

Liturgy of the Hours

The Liturgy of the Hours (Latin: Liturgia Horarum) or Divine Office (Latin: Officium Divinum) or Work of God (Latin: Opus Dei) or canonical hours, often referred to as the Breviary, is the official set of prayers "marking the hours of each day and sanctifying the day with prayer".

New!!: John Cassian and Liturgy of the Hours · See more »

Lust

Lust is a craving, it can take any form such as the lust for sexuality, lust for money or the lust for power.

New!!: John Cassian and Lust · See more »

Marseille

Marseille (Provençal: Marselha), is the second-largest city of France and the largest city of the Provence historical region.

New!!: John Cassian and Marseille · See more »

Martin of Tours

Saint Martin of Tours (Sanctus Martinus Turonensis; 316 or 336 – 8 November 397) was Bishop of Tours, whose shrine in France became a famous stopping-point for pilgrims on the road to Santiago de Compostela in Spain.

New!!: John Cassian and Martin of Tours · See more »

Memorial

A memorial is an object which serves as a focus for memory of something, usually a person (who has died) or an event.

New!!: John Cassian and Memorial · See more »

Michel Foucault

Paul-Michel Foucault (15 October 1926 – 25 June 1984), generally known as Michel Foucault, was a French philosopher, historian of ideas, social theorist, and literary critic.

New!!: John Cassian and Michel Foucault · See more »

Monastery

A monastery is a building or complex of buildings comprising the domestic quarters and workplaces of monastics, monks or nuns, whether living in communities or alone (hermits).

New!!: John Cassian and Monastery · See more »

Monasticism

Monasticism (from Greek μοναχός, monachos, derived from μόνος, monos, "alone") or monkhood is a religious way of life in which one renounces worldly pursuits to devote oneself fully to spiritual work.

New!!: John Cassian and Monasticism · See more »

Nestorius

Nestorius (in Νεστόριος; 386 – 450) was Archbishop of Constantinople (now Istanbul) from 10 April 428 to August 431, when Emperor Theodosius II confirmed his condemnation by the Council of Ephesus on 22 June.

New!!: John Cassian and Nestorius · See more »

New Advent

New Advent is a website that provides online versions of various works connected with the Catholic Church.

New!!: John Cassian and New Advent · See more »

Order of Saint Benedict

The Order of Saint Benedict (OSB; Latin: Ordo Sancti Benedicti), also known as the Black Monksin reference to the colour of its members' habitsis a Catholic religious order of independent monastic communities that observe the Rule of Saint Benedict.

New!!: John Cassian and Order of Saint Benedict · See more »

Origen

Origen of Alexandria (184 – 253), also known as Origen Adamantius, was a Hellenistic scholar, ascetic, and early Christian theologian who was born and spent the first half of his career in Alexandria.

New!!: John Cassian and Origen · See more »

Original sin

Original sin, also called "ancestral sin", is a Christian belief of the state of sin in which humanity exists since the fall of man, stemming from Adam and Eve's rebellion in Eden, namely the sin of disobedience in consuming the forbidden fruit from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.

New!!: John Cassian and Original sin · See more »

Owen Chadwick

William Owen Chadwick (20 May 1916 – 17 July 2015) was a British Anglican priest, academic, writer and prominent historian of Christianity.

New!!: John Cassian and Owen Chadwick · See more »

Palestine (region)

Palestine (فلسطين,,; Παλαιστίνη, Palaistinē; Palaestina; פלשתינה. Palestina) is a geographic region in Western Asia.

New!!: John Cassian and Palestine (region) · See more »

Pelagianism

Pelagianism is the belief that original sin did not taint human nature and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil without special divine aid.

New!!: John Cassian and Pelagianism · See more »

Persius

Persius, in full Aulus Persius Flaccus (4 December 34, in Volterra24 November 62), was a Roman poet and satirist of Etruscan origin.

New!!: John Cassian and Persius · See more »

Philip Neri

Philip Romolo Neri (Italian: Filippo Romolo Neri; 21 July 151525 May 1595), known as the Third Apostle of Rome, after Saints Peter and Paul, was an Italian priest noted for founding a society of secular clergy called the Congregation of the Oratory.

New!!: John Cassian and Philip Neri · See more »

Philokalia

The Philokalia (φιλοκαλία "love of the beautiful, the good", from φιλία philia "love" and κάλλος kallos "beauty") is "a collection of texts written between the 4th and 15th centuries by spiritual masters" of the Eastern Orthodox Church mystical hesychast tradition.

New!!: John Cassian and Philokalia · See more »

Pope Gregory I

Pope Saint Gregory I (Gregorius I; – 12 March 604), commonly known as Saint Gregory the Great, Gregory had come to be known as 'the Great' by the late ninth century, a title which is still applied to him.

New!!: John Cassian and Pope Gregory I · See more »

Pope Innocent I

Pope Innocent I (Innocentius I; d. 12 March 417) served as the Pope of the Catholic Church from 401 to his death in 417. From the beginning of his papacy, he was seen as the general arbitrator of ecclesiastical disputes in both the East and the West. He confirmed the prerogatives of the Archbishop of Thessalonica, and issued a decretal on disciplinary matters referred to him by the Bishop of Rouen. He defended the exiled John Chrysostom and consulted with the bishops of Africa concerning the Pelagian controversy, confirming the decisions of the African synods. The Catholic priest-scholar, Johann Peter Kirsch, described Innocent as a very energetic and highly gifted individual, "...who fulfilled admirably the duties of his office".

New!!: John Cassian and Pope Innocent I · See more »

Pope Leo I

Pope Saint Leo I (400 – 10 November 461), also known as Saint Leo the Great, was Pope from 29 September 440 and died in 461.

New!!: John Cassian and Pope Leo I · See more »

Pope Theophilus of Alexandria

Theophilus was the 23rd Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of the See of St.

New!!: John Cassian and Pope Theophilus of Alexandria · See more »

Pope Urban V

Pope Urban V (Urbanus V; 1310 – 19 December 1370), born Guillaume de Grimoard, was Pope from 28 September 1362 to his death in 1370 and was also a member of the Order of Saint Benedict.

New!!: John Cassian and Pope Urban V · See more »

Relic

In religion, a relic usually consists of the physical remains of a saint or the personal effects of the saint or venerated person preserved for purposes of veneration as a tangible memorial.

New!!: John Cassian and Relic · See more »

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Marseille

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Marseille (Latin: Archidioecesis Massiliensis; French: Archidiocèse de Marseille) is a metropolitan archdiocese of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church in France.

New!!: John Cassian and Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Marseille · See more »

Roman Martyrology

The Roman Martyrology (Martyrologium Romanum) is the official martyrology of the Catholic Church.

New!!: John Cassian and Roman Martyrology · See more »

Romania

Romania (România) is a sovereign state located at the crossroads of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe.

New!!: John Cassian and Romania · See more »

Rule of Saint Benedict

The Rule of Saint Benedict (Regula Benedicti) is a book of precepts written by Benedict of Nursia (AD 480–550) for monks living communally under the authority of an abbot.

New!!: John Cassian and Rule of Saint Benedict · See more »

Sabine Baring-Gould

The Reverend Sabine Baring-Gould (28 January 1834 – 2 January 1924) of Lew Trenchard in Devon, England, was an Anglican priest, hagiographer, antiquarian, novelist, folk song collector and eclectic scholar.

New!!: John Cassian and Sabine Baring-Gould · See more »

Saint

A saint (also historically known as a hallow) is a person who is recognized as having an exceptional degree of holiness or likeness or closeness to God.

New!!: John Cassian and Saint · See more »

Saint Dominic

Saint Dominic (Santo Domingo), also known as Dominic of Osma and Dominic of Caleruega, often called Dominic de Guzmán and Domingo Félix de Guzmán (8 August 1170 – 6 August 1221), was a Castilian priest and founder of the Dominican Order.

New!!: John Cassian and Saint Dominic · See more »

Salvation

Salvation (salvatio; sōtēría; yāšaʕ; al-ḵalaṣ) is being saved or protected from harm or being saved or delivered from a dire situation.

New!!: John Cassian and Salvation · See more »

Scythia Minor

Scythia Minor or Lesser Scythia (Mikrá Skythia) was in ancient times the region surrounded by the Danube at the north and west and the Black Sea at the east, roughly corresponding to today's Dobrogea, with a part in Romania, a part in Bulgaria.

New!!: John Cassian and Scythia Minor · See more »

Semipelagianism

Semipelagianism (Semipelagianismus) is a Christian theological and soteriological school of thought on salvation; that is, the means by which humanity and God are restored to a right relationship.

New!!: John Cassian and Semipelagianism · See more »

Sermon on the Mount

The Sermon on the Mount (anglicized from the Matthean Vulgate Latin section title: Sermo in monte) is a collection of sayings and teachings of Jesus, which emphasizes his moral teaching found in the Gospel of Matthew (chapters 5, 6, and 7).

New!!: John Cassian and Sermon on the Mount · See more »

Song of Songs

The Song of Songs, also Song of Solomon or Canticles (Hebrew:, Šîr HašŠîrîm, Greek: ᾎσμα ᾎσμάτων, asma asmaton, both meaning Song of Songs), is one of the megillot (scrolls) found in the last section of the Tanakh, known as the Ketuvim (or "Writings"), and a book of the Old Testament.

New!!: John Cassian and Song of Songs · See more »

Soteriology

Soteriology (σωτηρία "salvation" from σωτήρ "savior, preserver" and λόγος "study" or "word") is the study of religious doctrines of salvation.

New!!: John Cassian and Soteriology · See more »

State (theology)

In Christianity, the term state is used in various senses by theologians and spiritual writers.

New!!: John Cassian and State (theology) · See more »

Synaxarium

Synaxarion or Synexarion (plurals Synaxaria, Synexaria; Συναξάριον, from συνάγειν, synagein, "to bring together"; cf. etymology of synaxis and synagogue; Latin: Synaxarium, Synexarium; ⲥϫⲛⲁⲝⲁⲣⲓⲟⲛ) is the name given in the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches to a compilation of hagiographies corresponding roughly to the martyrology of the Roman Church.

New!!: John Cassian and Synaxarium · See more »

The Lives of the Saints (Baring-Gould)

The Lives of the Saints is a sixteen-volume collection of lives of the saints by Sabine Baring-Gould, first published between 1872 and 1877 by John Hodges, of London, and later republished in Edinburgh in 1914.

New!!: John Cassian and The Lives of the Saints (Baring-Gould) · See more »

Theology

Theology is the critical study of the nature of the divine.

New!!: John Cassian and Theology · See more »

Theosis (Eastern Christian theology)

Theosis, or deification, is a transformative process whose aim is likeness to or union with God, as taught by the Eastern Orthodox Church and Eastern Catholic Churches.

New!!: John Cassian and Theosis (Eastern Christian theology) · See more »

Trappists

The Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance (OCSO: Ordo Cisterciensis Strictioris Observantiae) is a Catholic religious order of cloistered contemplative monastics who follow the Rule of St. Benedict.

New!!: John Cassian and Trappists · See more »

Versicle

A versicle is the first half of a preces, said or sung by an officiant or cantor, and answered with a said or sung response by the Congregation/People or choir.

New!!: John Cassian and Versicle · See more »

Vice

Vice is a practice, behaviour, or habit generally considered immoral, sinful, criminal, rude, taboo, depraved, or degrading in the associated society.

New!!: John Cassian and Vice · See more »

Wadi El Natrun

Wadi El Natrun (Arabic for "Natron Valley"; Ϣⲓϩⲏⲧ Šihēt "Measure of the Hearts", Σκῆτις or Σκήτη) is a valley located in Beheira Governorate, Egypt, including a town with the same name.

New!!: John Cassian and Wadi El Natrun · See more »

Redirects here:

Cassian the Ascetic, Cassian the ascetic, Cassian, John, Cassianus, Joannes Eremita Cassianus, Joannes Massiliensis, Joannus Cassianus, Johannes Cassianus, Johannes Eremita Cassianus, Juan Casiano, Saint John Cassian.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cassian

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »