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John Henry Newman

Index John Henry Newman

John Henry Newman, (21 February 1801 – 11 August 1890) was a poet and theologian, first an Anglican priest and later a Catholic priest and cardinal, who was an important and controversial figure in the religious history of England in the 19th century. [1]

342 relations: Adam and Eve, Alan Bray, Alasdair MacIntyre, Albany James Christie, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Allegory of the Cave, Alvin Plantinga, Ambrose St. John, Anglican-German Bishopric in Jerusalem, Anglicanism, Anglo-Catholicism, Anti-Catholicism in the United Kingdom, Antichrist, Apollonius of Tyana, Apologia Pro Vita Sua, Apostolic succession, Archibald Campbell Tait, Arianism, Aristotelianism, Aristotle, Arthur Hallam, Arthur Philip Perceval, Arthur Wollaston Hutton, Athanasius of Alexandria, Augustine of Hippo, Avery Dulles, Bampton Lectures, Banbury, Basil of Caesarea, Beatification, Benefice, Bernard Lonergan, Bible society, Birmingham, Birmingham Oratory, Bishop of Oxford, Bloomsbury, Book of Common Prayer, Boston, British Critic, Burns & Oates, C. S. Lewis, Callista (novel), Calvinism, Cambridge, Canonization, Cardinal (Catholic Church), Catholic Church, Catholic Church in England and Wales, Catholic Encyclopedia, ..., Catholic University of Ireland, Catholic University School, Channel 4, Charles Kingsley, Charles Pourtales Golightly, Cheadle, Staffordshire, Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford, Christian apologetics, Christian Church, Christopher Butler, Church Fathers, Church Mission Society, Church of England, Church of Ireland, Church of St Mary and St Nicholas, Littlemore, Cicero, City of London, Clapham Sect, Clement of Alexandria, Clerical celibacy, Cofton Park, Congregation for the Causes of Saints, Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples, Cotton College, Cyril Bibby, Daily Mail, Dante Alighieri, David Hume, Dean of St Paul's, Development of doctrine, Divine grace, Doctor of Divinity, Doctor of the Church, Dogma, Dominic Barberi, Dominican Order, Donatism, Dublin, Dublin Review (Catholic periodical), Duke of Norfolk, Eamon Duffy, Edgbaston, Edmund Burke, Edward Badeley, Edward Bellasis (officer of arms), Edward Bouverie Pusey, Edward Copleston, Edward Elgar, Edward Hawkins, Eminent Victorians, Empiricism, Encyclopædia Britannica, Encyclopædia Metropolitana, English law, English Reformation, Eton College, Evangelical Alliance, Evangelicalism, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Faith and rationality, Fellow, First Vatican Council, Francis Aidan Gasquet, Francis de Sales, Francis William Newman, Frederick Oakeley, Frederick William Faber, G. K. Chesterton, Gender role, Geoffrey Faber, George W. E. Russell, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Giacinto Achilli, Giacomo Filippo Fransoni, Gibraltar, Gospel of John, Graham Kings, Grammar of Assent, Great Ealing School, Hadleigh, Suffolk, Hagiography, Ham, London, Harriet Shaw Weaver, Henry Edward Manning, Henry Fitzalan-Howard, 15th Duke of Norfolk, Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston, Henry Wilberforce, Heresy, High church, Hilaire Belloc, Historical theology, Holy See, Homiletics, Homosociality, Hugh James Rose, Huguenots, Hurrell Froude, Idolatry, In Memoriam A.H.H., Individualism, Inquisition, Intercession of saints, Ionian Islands, Isaac Williams, J. R. R. Tolkien, James Anthony Froude, James Burns (publisher), James Joyce, Jaroslav Pelikan, Jerusalem, Jesus, John Brande Morris, John Campbell Shairp, John Cornwell (writer), John Dobree Dalgairns, John Everett Millais, John Keats, John Keble, John Locke, John Rouse Bloxam, John Russell, 1st Earl Russell, John Taylor Coleridge, John the Apostle, John the Evangelist, Joseph Blanco White, Joseph Butler, Joseph Milner, Judeo-Christian, Julius Caesar, King James Version, L'Osservatore Romano, Latin, Lead, Kindly Light, Leonforte, Letter to the Duke of Norfolk, Liberal education, Lickey Hills, Lincoln's Inn, Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski, Literary and Historical Society (University College Dublin), Littlemore, Lombard Street, London, London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, London Oratory, Loss and Gain, Low church, Lytton Strachey, Maria Monk, Mark Vernon, Martyr, Maryvale Institute, Massachusetts, Matthew Arnold, Meriol Trevor, Merton College, Oxford, Miracle, Monophysitism, Moral authority, Mortal sin, Muscular Christianity, Names for the number 0 in English, Naples, National Apostasy, National University of Ireland, Natural religion, Newman Centers, Newman College (University of Melbourne), Newman College, Thodupuzha, Newman Studies Journal, Newman Theological College, Newman University, Birmingham, Newman University, Wichita, Nicholas Wiseman, Nonconformist, Old Oscott, Oratory of Saint Philip Neri, Oriel College, Oxford, Oriel Noetics, Origen, Oscar Wilde, Owen Chadwick, Oxford, Oxford Movement, Oxford University Newman Society, Oxford University Press, Papal infallibility, Paralysis, Passionists, Paul Cullen (cardinal), Paul Fourdrinier, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham, Personalism, Peter Tatchell, Philosophy of education, Piers Brendon, Plato, Pneumonia, Polytheism, Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas, Pope Benedict XVI, Pope Benedict XVI's visit to the United Kingdom, Pope Francis, Pope Leo XIII, Pope Pius IX, Profession (religious), Protodeacon, Provost (religion), Punch (magazine), Queer theory, Rednal, Regius Professor of Divinity, Regius Professor of Hebrew (Oxford), Relic, Religious epistemology, Renn Hampden, Revelation, Richard Bagot (bishop), Richard Holt Hutton, Richard Whately, Richard William Church, Robert Peel, Robert Southey, Romantic friendship, Romanticism, Ronald Knox, Saint, San Giorgio in Velabro, Sicily, Sidney Lee, Skepticism, Slavery, Socrates, Sola fide, St Anne's Church, Birmingham, St Clement's Church, Oxford, St Mary's College, Oscott, St Patrick's College, Maynooth, Stiff upper lip, Strait of Bonifacio, Subjectivism, Sublimation (psychology), TAN Books, Tertullian, The American Spectator, The Catholic Herald, The Dream of Gerontius, The Dream of Gerontius (poem), The Dublin Review, The Oratory School, The Rambler (Catholic periodical), The Tablet, The Times, The Venerable, Thirty-nine Articles, Thomas Aquinas, Thomas Carlyle, Thomas Henry Huxley, Thomas More, Thomas Mozley, Thomas Newton, Thomas Paine, Thomas Scott (commentator), Thomas Vowler Short, Thomas William Allies, Tommaso Martinelli, Tract (literature), Tract 90, Tracts for the Times, Trinity College, Oxford, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Universalis Ecclesiae, University Church of St Mary the Virgin, University College Dublin, University of Oxford, Via media, Voltaire, Walter Scott, Western philosophy, Whitehall, Wilfrid Philip Ward, William Bernard Ullathorne, William Beveridge (bishop), William Ewart Gladstone, William John Copeland, William Law, William Lockhart (priest), William Palmer (theologian), Worton (civil parish), Oxfordshire, Zenit News Agency, 19th-century philosophy. 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Adam and Eve

Adam and Eve, according to the creation myth of the Abrahamic religions, were the first man and woman.

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Alan Bray

Alan Bray (13 October 1948 – 25 November 2001) was a British historian and gay rights activist.

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Alasdair MacIntyre

Alasdair Chalmers MacIntyre (born 12 January 1929) is a Scottish philosopher, primarily known for his contribution to moral and political philosophy, but also known for his work in history of philosophy and theology.

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Albany James Christie

Albany James Christie (18 December 1817 – 2 May 1891) was an English academic and Jesuit priest.

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Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (6 August 1809 – 6 October 1892) was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Queen Victoria's reign and remains one of the most popular British poets.

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Allegory of the Cave

The Allegory of the Cave, or Plato's Cave, was presented by the Greek philosopher Plato in his work Republic (514a–520a) to compare "the effect of education (παιδεία) and the lack of it on our nature".

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Alvin Plantinga

Alvin Carl Plantinga (born November 15, 1932) is a prominent American analytic philosopher who works primarily in the fields of logic, justification, philosophy of religion, and epistemology.

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Ambrose St. John

Ambrose St.

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Anglican-German Bishopric in Jerusalem

The Anglican-German Bishopric in Jerusalem was an episcopal see founded in Jerusalem in the nineteenth century by joint agreement of the Anglican Church of England and the united Evangelical Church in Prussia.

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Anglicanism

Anglicanism is a Western Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England following the Protestant Reformation.

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Anglo-Catholicism

The terms Anglo-Catholicism, Anglican Catholicism, and Catholic Anglicanism refer to people, beliefs and practices within Anglicanism that emphasise the Catholic heritage and identity of the various Anglican churches.

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Anti-Catholicism in the United Kingdom

Institutional Anti-Catholicism in the United Kingdom has its origins in the English and Irish Reformations under King Henry VIII and the Scottish Reformation led by John Knox.

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Antichrist

In Christianity, antichrist is a term found solely in the First Epistle of John and Second Epistle of John, and often lowercased in Bible translations, in accordance with its introductory appearance: "Children, it is the last hour! As you heard that antichrist is coming, so now many antichrists have come".

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Apollonius of Tyana

Apollonius of Tyana (Ἀπολλώνιος ὁ Τυανεύς; c. 15 – c. 100 AD), sometimes also called Apollonios of Tyana, was a Greek Neopythagorean philosopher from the town of Tyana in the Roman province of Cappadocia in Anatolia.

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Apologia Pro Vita Sua

Apologia Pro Vita Sua (Latin: A defence of one's own life) is John Henry Newman's defence of his religious opinions, published in 1864 in response to Charles Kingsley of the Church of England after Newman quit his position as the Anglican vicar of St.

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Apostolic succession

Apostolic succession is the method whereby the ministry of the Christian Church is held to be derived from the apostles by a continuous succession, which has usually been associated with a claim that the succession is through a series of bishops.

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Archibald Campbell Tait

Archibald Campbell Tait (21 December 18113 December 1882) was an Archbishop of Canterbury in the Church of England.

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Arianism

Arianism is a nontrinitarian Christological doctrine which asserts the belief that Jesus Christ is the Son of God who was begotten by God the Father at a point in time, a creature distinct from the Father and is therefore subordinate to him, but the Son is also God (i.e. God the Son).

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Aristotelianism

Aristotelianism is a tradition of philosophy that takes its defining inspiration from the work of Aristotle.

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Aristotle

Aristotle (Ἀριστοτέλης Aristotélēs,; 384–322 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher and scientist born in the city of Stagira, Chalkidiki, in the north of Classical Greece.

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Arthur Hallam

Arthur Henry Hallam (1 February 1811 – 15 September 1833) was an English poet, best known as the subject of a major work, "In Memoriam" by his close friend and fellow poet, Alfred Tennyson.

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Arthur Philip Perceval

Arthur Philip Perceval (1799–1853) was an English High Church clergyman, royal chaplain and theological writer.

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Arthur Wollaston Hutton

Arthur Wollaston Hutton (September 5, 1848 Spridlington, Lincolnshire – March 25, 1912 Blackheath) was an English clergyman and author.

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Athanasius of Alexandria

Athanasius of Alexandria (Ἀθανάσιος Ἀλεξανδρείας; ⲡⲓⲁⲅⲓⲟⲥ ⲁⲑⲁⲛⲁⲥⲓⲟⲩ ⲡⲓⲁⲡⲟⲥⲧⲟⲗⲓⲕⲟⲥ or Ⲡⲁⲡⲁ ⲁⲑⲁⲛⲁⲥⲓⲟⲩ ⲁ̅; c. 296–298 – 2 May 373), also called Athanasius the Great, Athanasius the Confessor or, primarily in the Coptic Orthodox Church, Athanasius the Apostolic, was the 20th bishop of Alexandria (as Athanasius I).

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Augustine of Hippo

Saint Augustine of Hippo (13 November 354 – 28 August 430) was a Roman African, early Christian theologian and philosopher from Numidia whose writings influenced the development of Western Christianity and Western philosophy.

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Avery Dulles

Avery Robert Dulles, S.J. (August 24, 1918 – December 12, 2008) was a Jesuit priest, theologian, and Cardinal of the Catholic Church.

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Bampton Lectures

The Bampton Lectures at the University of Oxford, England, were founded by a bequest of John Bampton.

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Banbury

Banbury is a historic market town on the River Cherwell in Oxfordshire, England.

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Basil of Caesarea

Basil of Caesarea, also called Saint Basil the Great (Ἅγιος Βασίλειος ὁ Μέγας, Ágios Basíleios o Mégas, Ⲡⲓⲁⲅⲓⲟⲥ Ⲃⲁⲥⲓⲗⲓⲟⲥ; 329 or 330 – January 1 or 2, 379), was the bishop of Caesarea Mazaca in Cappadocia, Asia Minor (modern-day Turkey).

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Beatification

Beatification (from Latin beatus, "blessed" and facere, "to make") is a recognition accorded by the Catholic Church of a dead person's entrance into Heaven and capacity to intercede on behalf of individuals who pray in his or her name.

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Benefice

A benefice or living is a reward received in exchange for services rendered and as a retainer for future services.

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Bernard Lonergan

Bernard Joseph Francis Lonergan (17 December 1904 – 26 November 1984) was a Canadian Jesuit priest, philosopher, and theologian, regarded by many as one of the most important thinkers of the 20th century.

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Bible society

A Bible Society is a non-profit organization, usually ecumenical in makeup, devoted to translating, publishing, and distributing the Bible at affordable costs.

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Birmingham

Birmingham is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands, England, with an estimated population of 1,101,360, making it the second most populous city of England and the United Kingdom.

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Birmingham Oratory

The Birmingham Oratory is an English Catholic religious community of the Congregation of the Oratory of St.

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Bishop of Oxford

The Bishop of Oxford is the diocesan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Oxford in the Province of Canterbury; his seat is at Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford.

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Bloomsbury

Bloomsbury is an area of the London Borough of Camden, between Euston Road and Holborn.

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Book of Common Prayer

The Book of Common Prayer (BCP) is the short title of a number of related prayer books used in the Anglican Communion, as well as by the Continuing Anglican, Anglican realignment and other Anglican Christian churches.

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Boston

Boston is the capital city and most populous municipality of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States.

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British Critic

The British Critic: A New Review was a quarterly publication, established in 1793 as a conservative and high church review journal riding the tide of British reaction against the French Revolution.

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Burns & Oates

Burns & Oates was a British Roman Catholic publishing house which most recently existed as an imprint of Continuum.

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C. S. Lewis

Clive Staples Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963) was a British novelist, poet, academic, medievalist, literary critic, essayist, lay theologian, broadcaster, lecturer, and Christian apologist.

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Callista (novel)

Callista is a novel by the English Catholic theologian, priest and writer John Henry Newman.

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Calvinism

Calvinism (also called the Reformed tradition, Reformed Christianity, Reformed Protestantism, or the Reformed faith) is a major branch of Protestantism that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice of John Calvin and other Reformation-era theologians.

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Cambridge

Cambridge is a university city and the county town of Cambridgeshire, England, on the River Cam approximately north of London.

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Canonization

Canonization is the act by which a Christian church declares that a person who has died was a saint, upon which declaration the person is included in the "canon", or list, of recognized saints.

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Cardinal (Catholic Church)

A cardinal (Sanctae Romanae Ecclesiae cardinalis, literally Cardinal of the Holy Roman Church) is a senior ecclesiastical leader, considered a Prince of the Church, and usually an ordained bishop of the Roman Catholic Church.

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Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.299 billion members worldwide.

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Catholic Church in England and Wales

The Catholic Church in England and Wales is part of the worldwide Catholic Church in full communion with the Pope.

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Catholic Encyclopedia

The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the Constitution, Doctrine, Discipline, and History of the Catholic Church, also referred to as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia and the Original Catholic Encyclopedia, is an English-language encyclopedia published in the United States and designed to serve the Roman Catholic Church.

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Catholic University of Ireland

The Catholic University of Ireland (Ollscoil Chaitliceach na hÉireann) was a Catholic university in Dublin, Ireland and was founded in 1851 following the Synod of Thurles in 1850, and in response to the Queen's University of Ireland and its associated colleges which were nondenominational.

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Catholic University School

Catholic University School (C.U.S.) is a private school for boys in Dublin, Ireland.

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Channel 4

Channel 4 is a British public-service television broadcaster that began transmission on 2 November 1982.

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Charles Kingsley

Charles Kingsley (12 June 1819 – 23 January 1875) was a broad church priest of the Church of England, a university professor, social reformer, historian and novelist.

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Charles Pourtales Golightly

Charles Pourtales Golightly (1807–1885) was an Anglican clergyman and religious writer.

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Cheadle, Staffordshire

Cheadle is a small market town near Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England, with a population of 12,165.

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Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford

Christ Church Cathedral is the cathedral of the diocese of Oxford, which consists of the counties of Oxford, Buckinghamshire and Berkshire.

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Christian apologetics

Christian apologetics (ἀπολογία, "verbal defence, speech in defence") is a branch of Christian theology that attempts to defend Christianity against objections.

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Christian Church

"Christian Church" is an ecclesiological term generally used by Protestants to refer to the whole group of people belonging to Christianity throughout the history of Christianity.

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Christopher Butler

Basil Christopher Butler (7 May 1902 – 20 September 1986) was a convert from the Church of England to the Roman Catholic Church.

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Church Fathers

The Church Fathers, Early Church Fathers, Christian Fathers, or Fathers of the Church are ancient and influential Christian theologians and writers.

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Church Mission Society

The Church Mission Society (CMS), formerly in Britain and currently in Australia and New Zealand known as the Church Missionary Society, is a mission society working with the Anglican Communion and Protestant Christians around the world.

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Church of England

The Church of England (C of E) is the state church of England.

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Church of Ireland

The Church of Ireland (Eaglais na hÉireann; Ulster-Scots: Kirk o Airlann) is a Christian church in Ireland and an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion.

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Church of St Mary and St Nicholas, Littlemore

The Church of St Mary and St Nicholas is a Church of England parish church in Littlemore, Oxford, Oxfordshire.

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Cicero

Marcus Tullius Cicero (3 January 106 BC – 7 December 43 BC) was a Roman statesman, orator, lawyer and philosopher, who served as consul in the year 63 BC.

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City of London

The City of London is a city and county that contains the historic centre and the primary central business district (CBD) of London.

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Clapham Sect

The Clapham Sect or Clapham Saints were a group of Church of England social reformers based in Clapham, London, at the beginning of the 19th century (active 1780s–1840s).

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Clement of Alexandria

Titus Flavius Clemens, also known as Clement of Alexandria (Κλήμης ὁ Ἀλεξανδρεύς; c. 150 – c. 215), was a Christian theologian who taught at the Catechetical School of Alexandria.

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Clerical celibacy

Clerical celibacy is the requirement in certain religions that some or all members of the clergy be unmarried.

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Cofton Park

Cofton Park is a park located in south Birmingham, England.

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Congregation for the Causes of Saints

The Congregation for the Causes of Saints is the congregation of the Roman Curia that oversees the complex process that leads to the canonization of saints, passing through the steps of a declaration of "heroic virtues" and beatification.

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Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples

The Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples in Rome is the congregation of the Roman Curia responsible for missionary work and related activities.

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Cotton College

Cotton College was a Roman Catholic boarding school in Cotton, Staffordshire, United Kingdom.

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Cyril Bibby

Cyril Bibby (b. Liverpool, 1 May 1914 as Harold Cyril Bibby; d. Edinburgh 20 June 1987) was a biologist and educator.

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Daily Mail

The Daily Mail is a British daily middle-marketPeter Wilby, New Statesman, 19 December 2013 (online version: 2 January 2014) tabloid newspaper owned by the Daily Mail and General Trust and published in London.

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Dante Alighieri

Durante degli Alighieri, commonly known as Dante Alighieri or simply Dante (c. 1265 – 1321), was a major Italian poet of the Late Middle Ages.

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David Hume

David Hume (born David Home; 7 May 1711 NS (26 April 1711 OS) – 25 August 1776) was a Scottish philosopher, historian, economist, and essayist, who is best known today for his highly influential system of philosophical empiricism, skepticism, and naturalism.

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Dean of St Paul's

The Dean of St Paul's is a member of, and chairman of the Chapter of St Paul's Cathedral in London in the Church of England.

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Development of doctrine

Development of doctrine is a term used by John Henry Newman and other theologians influenced by him to describe the way Catholic teaching has become more detailed and explicit over the centuries, while later statements of doctrine remain consistent with earlier statements.

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Divine grace

Divine grace is a theological term present in many religions.

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Doctor of Divinity

Doctor of Divinity (DD or DDiv; Doctor Divinitatis) is an advanced or honorary academic degree in divinity.

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Doctor of the Church

Doctor of the Church (Latin doctor "teacher") is a title given by the Catholic Church to saints whom they recognize as having been of particular importance, particularly regarding their contribution to theology or doctrine.

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Dogma

The term dogma is used in pejorative and non-pejorative senses.

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Dominic Barberi

Dominic Barberi (22 June 1792 - 27 August 1849) was an Italian theologian and a member of the Passionist Congregation.

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Dominican Order

The Order of Preachers (Ordo Praedicatorum, postnominal abbreviation OP), also known as the Dominican Order, is a mendicant Catholic religious order founded by the Spanish priest Dominic of Caleruega in France, approved by Pope Honorius III via the Papal bull Religiosam vitam on 22 December 1216.

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Donatism

Donatism (Donatismus, Δονατισμός Donatismós) was a schism in the Church of Carthage from the fourth to the sixth centuries AD.

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Dublin

Dublin is the capital of and largest city in Ireland.

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Dublin Review (Catholic periodical)

The Dublin Review was a Catholic periodical founded in 1836 by Michael Joseph Quin, Cardinal Wiseman and Daniel O'Connell.

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Duke of Norfolk

The Duke of Norfolk is the premier duke in the peerage of England, and also, as Earl of Arundel, the premier earl.

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Eamon Duffy

Eamon Duffy (born 9 February 1947) is an Irish historian and academic.

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Edgbaston

Edgbaston is an affluent suburban area of central Birmingham, England, curved around the southwest of the city centre.

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Edmund Burke

Edmund Burke (12 January 17309 July 1797) was an Anglo-Irish statesman born in Dublin, as well as an author, orator, political theorist and philosopher, who after moving to London in 1750 served as a member of parliament (MP) between 1766 and 1794 in the House of Commons with the Whig Party.

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Edward Badeley

Edward Lowth Badeley (1803 or 1804 – 1868) was an English ecclesiastical lawyer and member of the Oxford Movement who was involved in some of the most notorious cases of the 19th century.

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Edward Bellasis (officer of arms)

Edward Bellasis (1852–1922) was a long-serving officer of arms at the College of Arms in London.

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Edward Bouverie Pusey

Edward Bouverie Pusey (22 August 1800 – 16 September 1882) was an English churchman, for more than fifty years Regius Professor of Hebrew at Christ Church, Oxford.

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Edward Copleston

Edward Copleston (2 February 1776 – 14 August 1849) was an English churchman and academic, Provost of Oriel College, Oxford from 1814 til 1828 and Bishop of Llandaff from 1827.

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Edward Elgar

Sir Edward William Elgar, 1st Baronet (2 June 1857 – 23 February 1934) was an English composer, many of whose works have entered the British and international classical concert repertoire.

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Edward Hawkins

Edward Hawkins (27 February 1789 – 18 November 1882) was an English churchman and academic, a long-serving Provost of Oriel College, Oxford known as a committed opponent of the Oxford Movement from its beginnings in his college.

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Eminent Victorians

Eminent Victorians is a book by Lytton Strachey (one of the older members of the Bloomsbury Group), first published in 1918 and consisting of biographies of four leading figures from the Victorian era.

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Empiricism

In philosophy, empiricism is a theory that states that knowledge comes only or primarily from sensory experience.

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Encyclopædia Britannica

The Encyclopædia Britannica (Latin for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., is a general knowledge English-language encyclopaedia.

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Encyclopædia Metropolitana

The Encyclopædia Metropolitana was an encyclopedic work published in London, from 1817 to 1845, by part publication.

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English law

English law is the common law legal system of England and Wales, comprising mainly criminal law and civil law, each branch having its own courts and procedures.

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English Reformation

The English Reformation was a series of events in 16th century England by which the Church of England broke away from the authority of the Pope and the Roman Catholic Church.

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Eton College

Eton College is an English independent boarding school for boys in Eton, Berkshire, near Windsor.

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Evangelical Alliance

The Evangelical Alliance (EA) seeks to represent evangelical Christians in the UK.

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Evangelicalism

Evangelicalism, evangelical Christianity, or evangelical Protestantism, is a worldwide, crossdenominational movement within Protestant Christianity which maintains the belief that the essence of the Gospel consists of the doctrine of salvation by grace through faith in Jesus Christ's atonement.

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Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick (May 2, 1950 – April 12, 2009) was an American academic scholar in the fields of gender studies, queer theory (queer studies), and critical theory.

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Faith and rationality

Faith and rationality are two ideologies that exist in varying degrees of conflict or compatibility.

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Fellow

A fellow is a member of a group (or fellowship) that work together in pursuing mutual knowledge or practice.

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First Vatican Council

The First Vatican Council (Concilium Vaticanum Primum) was convoked by Pope Pius IX on 29 June 1868, after a period of planning and preparation that began on 6 December 1864.

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Francis Aidan Gasquet

Francis Aidan Gasquet, O.S.B. (born Francis Neil Gasquet, 5 October 1846 – 5 April 1929) was an English Benedictine monk and historical scholar.

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Francis de Sales

Francis de Sales (François de Sales; Francesco di Sales); 21 August 156728 December 1622) was a Bishop of Geneva and is honored as a saint in the Catholic Church. He became noted for his deep faith and his gentle approach to the religious divisions in his land resulting from the Protestant Reformation. He is known also for his writings on the topic of spiritual direction and spiritual formation, particularly the Introduction to the Devout Life and the Treatise on the Love of God.

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Francis William Newman

Francis William Newman (27 June 1805 – 4 October 1897), the younger brother of Cardinal Newman, was an English scholar and miscellaneous writer.

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Frederick Oakeley

Frederick Oakeley (5 September 1802 – 30 January 1880) was an English Roman Catholic convert, priest, and author.

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Frederick William Faber

Frederick William Faber C.O. (28 June 1814 – 26 September 1863) was a noted English hymn writer and theologian, who converted from Anglicanism to the Catholic priesthood.

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G. K. Chesterton

Gilbert Keith Chesterton, KC*SG (29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936), was an English writer, poet, philosopher, dramatist, journalist, orator, lay theologian, biographer, and literary and art critic.

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Gender role

A gender role, also known as a sex role, is a social role encompassing a range of behaviors and attitudes that are generally considered acceptable, appropriate, or desirable for people based on their actual or perceived sex or sexuality.

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Geoffrey Faber

Sir Geoffrey Cust Faber (23 August 1889, Great Malvern – 31 March 1961) was a British academic, publisher, and poet.

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George W. E. Russell

George William Erskine Russell PC (3 February 1853 – 17 March 1919), known as George W. E. Russell, was a British biographer, memoirist and Liberal politician.

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Gerard Manley Hopkins

Gerard Manley Hopkins (28 July 1844 – 8 June 1889) was an English poet and Jesuit priest, whose posthumous fame established him among the leading Victorian poets.

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Giacinto Achilli

Giovanni Giacinto Achilli (c. 1803 – c. 1860) was an Italian Roman Catholic who was discharged from the priesthood for sexual misconduct and subsequently became a fervent advocate of the Protestant evangelical cause.

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Giacomo Filippo Fransoni

Giacomo Filippo Fransoni (10 December 1775 – 20 April 1856) was an Italian prelate and Cardinal who served from 1834 to 1856 as Prefect of the Sacred Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith.

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Gibraltar

Gibraltar is a British Overseas Territory located at the southern tip of the Iberian Peninsula.

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Gospel of John

The Gospel According to John is the fourth of the canonical gospels.

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Graham Kings

Graham Kings (born 10 October 1953) is a British Anglican bishop.

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Grammar of Assent

An Essay in Aid of a Grammar of Assent (commonly abbreviated to the last three words) is John Henry Newman's book on the philosophy of faith, his seminal work.

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Great Ealing School

Great Ealing School was situated on St Mary's Road, Ealing W5 London and was founded in 1698.

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Hadleigh, Suffolk

Hadleigh (pronounced) is an ancient market town and civil parish in South Suffolk, East Anglia, situated, next to the River Brett, between the larger towns of Sudbury and Ipswich.

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Hagiography

A hagiography is a biography of a saint or an ecclesiastical leader.

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Ham, London

Ham is a suburban district in south-west London which has meadows adjoining the River Thames where the Thames Path National Trail also runs.

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Harriet Shaw Weaver

Harriet Shaw Weaver (1 September 1876 – 14 October 1961) was a political activist and a magazine editor.

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Henry Edward Manning

Henry Edward Manning (15 July 1808 – 14 January 1892) was an English Cardinal of the Roman Catholic church, and the second Archbishop of Westminster from 1865 until his death in 1892.

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Henry Fitzalan-Howard, 15th Duke of Norfolk

Henry Fitzalan-Howard, 15th Duke of Norfolk, (27 December 1847 – 11 February 1917), styled Baron Maltravers until 1856 and Earl of Arundel and Surrey between 1856 and 1860, was a British Unionist politician and philanthropist.

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Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston

Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston, (20 October 1784 – 18 October 1865) was a British statesman who served twice as Prime Minister in the mid-19th century.

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Henry Wilberforce

Henry William Wilberforce (22 September 1807 – 23 April 1873), was a Church of England clergyman, a Tractarian, a convert to the Roman Catholic Church, and thereafter a newspaper proprietor, editor and journalist.

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Heresy

Heresy is any belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs or customs, in particular the accepted beliefs of a church or religious organization.

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High church

The term "high church" refers to beliefs and practices of ecclesiology, liturgy, and theology, generally with an emphasis on formality and resistance to "modernisation." Although used in connection with various Christian traditions, the term originated in and has been principally associated with the Anglican/Episcopal tradition, where it describes Anglican churches using a number of ritual practices associated in the popular mind with Roman Catholicism.

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Hilaire Belloc

Joseph Hilaire Pierre René Belloc (27 July 187016 July 1953) was an Anglo-French writer and historian.

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Historical theology

Historical theology as a branch of theology investigates the socio-historical and cultural mechanisms that give rise to theological ideas, statements, and systems.

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Holy See

The Holy See (Santa Sede; Sancta Sedes), also called the See of Rome, is the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the Catholic Church in Rome, the episcopal see of the Pope, and an independent sovereign entity.

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Homiletics

Homiletics (ὁμιλητικός homilētikós, from homilos, "assembled crowd, throng"), in religion, is the application of the general principles of rhetoric to the specific art of public preaching.

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Homosociality

In sociology, homosociality means same-sex relationships that are not of a romantic or sexual nature, such as friendship, mentorship, or others.

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Hugh James Rose

Hugh James Rose (9 June 1795 – 22 December 1838) was an English churchman and theologian who served as the second Principal of King's College London.

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Huguenots

Huguenots (Les huguenots) are an ethnoreligious group of French Protestants who follow the Reformed tradition.

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Hurrell Froude

Richard Hurrell Froude (25 March 1803 – 28 February 1836) was an Anglican priest and an early leader of the Oxford Movement.

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Idolatry

Idolatry literally means the worship of an "idol", also known as a cult image, in the form of a physical image, such as a statue or icon.

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In Memoriam A.H.H.

"In Memoriam A.H.H." or simply "In Memoriam" is a poem by the British poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson, completed in 1849.

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Individualism

Individualism is the moral stance, political philosophy, ideology, or social outlook that emphasizes the moral worth of the individual.

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Inquisition

The Inquisition was a group of institutions within the government system of the Catholic Church whose aim was to combat public heresy committed by baptized Christians.

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Intercession of saints

Intercession of the saints is a doctrine held by the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Roman Catholic Churches.

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Ionian Islands

The Ionian Islands (Modern Greek: Ιόνια νησιά, Ionia nisia; Ancient Greek, Katharevousa: Ἰόνιοι Νῆσοι, Ionioi Nēsoi; Isole Ionie) are a group of islands in Greece.

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Isaac Williams

The Reverend Isaac Williams (1802–1865) was a prominent member of the Oxford Movement (or "Tractarians"), a student and disciple of John Keble and, like the other members of the movement, associated with Oxford University.

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J. R. R. Tolkien

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, (Tolkien pronounced his surname, see his phonetic transcription published on the illustration in The Return of the Shadow: The History of The Lord of the Rings, Part One. Christopher Tolkien. London: Unwin Hyman, 1988. (The History of Middle-earth; 6). In General American the surname is also pronounced. This pronunciation no doubt arose by analogy with such words as toll and polka, or because speakers of General American realise as, while often hearing British as; thus or General American become the closest possible approximation to the Received Pronunciation for many American speakers. Wells, John. 1990. Longman pronunciation dictionary. Harlow: Longman, 3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor who is best known as the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion.

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James Anthony Froude

James Anthony Froude (23 April 1818 – 20 October 1894) was an English historian, novelist, biographer, and editor of Fraser's Magazine.

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James Burns (publisher)

James Burns (1808 – 11 April 1871) was a Scottish publisher and author.

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James Joyce

James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist, short story writer, and poet.

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Jaroslav Pelikan

Jaroslav Jan Pelikan (December 17, 1923 – May 13, 2006) was a scholar of the history of Christianity, Christian theology and medieval intellectual history at Yale.

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Jerusalem

Jerusalem (יְרוּשָׁלַיִם; القُدس) is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea.

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Jesus

Jesus, also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth and Jesus Christ, was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.

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John Brande Morris

John Brande Morris, known to friends as Jack Morris (born at Brentford, Middlesex, 4 September 1812; died at Hammersmith, London, 9 April 1880) was an English Anglican theologian, later a Roman Catholic priest.

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John Campbell Shairp

John Campbell Shairp (30 July 1819 – 18 September 1885) was a Scottish critic and man of letters.

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John Cornwell (writer)

John Cornwell (born 1940) is a British journalist, author, and academic.

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John Dobree Dalgairns

John Dobree Dalgairns (21 October 18186 April 1876), English Roman Catholic priest, was born in Guernsey.

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John Everett Millais

Sir John Everett Millais, 1st Baronet, PRA (8 June 1829 – 13 August 1896) was an English painter and illustrator who was one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.

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John Keats

John Keats (31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821) was an English Romantic poet.

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John Keble

John Keble (25 April 1792 – 29 March 1866) was an English churchman and poet, one of the leaders of the Oxford Movement.

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John Locke

John Locke (29 August 1632 – 28 October 1704) was an English philosopher and physician, widely regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers and commonly known as the "Father of Liberalism".

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John Rouse Bloxam

John Rouse Bloxam (1807–1891) was an English academic and clergyman, the historian of Magdalen College, Oxford.

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John Russell, 1st Earl Russell

John Russell, 1st Earl Russell, (18 August 1792 – 28 May 1878), known by his courtesy title Lord John Russell before 1861, was a leading Whig and Liberal politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom on two occasions during the early Victorian era.

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John Taylor Coleridge

Sir John Taylor Coleridge (9 July 1790 – 11 February 1876) was an English judge, the second son of Captain James Coleridge and nephew of the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

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John the Apostle

John the Apostle (ܝܘܚܢܢ ܫܠܝܚܐ; יוחנן בן זבדי; Koine Greek: Ιωάννης; ⲓⲱⲁⲛⲛⲏⲥ or ⲓⲱ̅ⲁ; Latin: Ioannes) was one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus according to the New Testament, which refers to him as Ἰωάννης.

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John the Evangelist

John the Evangelist (Εὐαγγελιστής Ἰωάννης, ⲓⲱⲁⲛⲛⲏⲥ or ⲓⲱ̅ⲁ) is the name traditionally given to the author of the Gospel of John.

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Joseph Blanco White

Joseph Blanco White, born José María Blanco y Crespo (11 July 1775 – 20 May 1841), was a Spanish theologian and poet.

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Joseph Butler

Joseph Butler (18 May 1692 – 16 June 1752) was an English bishop, theologian, apologist, and philosopher.

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Joseph Milner

Joseph Milner (1744–1797) was an English evangelical divine.

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Judeo-Christian

Judeo-Christian is a term that groups Judaism and Christianity, either in reference to Christianity's derivation from Judaism, both religions common use of the Torah, or due to perceived parallels or commonalities shared values between those two religions, which has contained as part of Western culture.

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Julius Caesar

Gaius Julius Caesar (12 or 13 July 100 BC – 15 March 44 BC), known by his cognomen Julius Caesar, was a Roman politician and military general who played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire.

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King James Version

The King James Version (KJV), also known as the King James Bible (KJB) or simply the Version (AV), is an English translation of the Christian Bible for the Church of England, begun in 1604 and completed in 1611.

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L'Osservatore Romano

L'Osservatore Romano (Italian for "The Roman Observer") is the daily newspaper of Vatican City State which carries the Pope’s discourses and reports on the activities of the Holy See, reports on events taking place in the Church and the world, and many cultural articles.

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Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

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Lead, Kindly Light

Lead, Kindly Light is a hymn with words written in 1833 by John Henry Newman as a poem titled "the Pillar and the Cloud".

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Leonforte

Leonforte (Liunforti in sicilian) is an Italian comune with a population of 14,046 in the Province of Enna, Sicily.

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Letter to the Duke of Norfolk

Letter to the Duke of Norfolk is a book written in 1875 by the blessed John Henry Cardinal Newman.

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Liberal education

A liberal education is a system or course of education suitable for the cultivation of a free (Latin: liber) human being.

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Lickey Hills

The Lickey Hills (known locally as simply The Lickeys) are a range of hills in Worcestershire, England, to the south-west of the centre of Birmingham near the villages of Lickey, Cofton Hackett and Barnt Green.

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Lincoln's Inn

The Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn is one of the four Inns of Court in London to which barristers of England and Wales belong and where they are called to the Bar.

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Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski

Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski (born 1946) is an American philosopher.

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Literary and Historical Society (University College Dublin)

The Literary and Historical Society (L&H) is the oldest debating society in University College, Dublin (UCD), which according to its constitution is the 'College Debating Union'.

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Littlemore

Littlemore is a district and civil parish in Oxford, England.

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Lombard Street, London

Lombard Street, London, is a street notable for its connections with the City of London's merchant, banking and insurance industries, stretching back to medieval times.

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London Borough of Richmond upon Thames

The London Borough of Richmond upon Thames in southwest London, England, forms part of Outer London and is the only London borough on both sides of the River Thames.

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London Oratory

The London Oratory is a Catholic community of priests living under the rule of life established by its founder, Saint Philip Neri (1515-1595).

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Loss and Gain

Loss and Gain is a philosophical novel by John Henry Newman published in 1848.

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Low church

The term "low church" refers to churches which give relatively little emphasis to ritual, sacraments and the authority of clergy.

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Lytton Strachey

Giles Lytton Strachey (1 March 1880 – 21 January 1932) was an English writer and critic.

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Maria Monk

Maria Monk (June 27, 1816 – summer of 1849) was a Canadian woman whose book Awful Disclosures of Maria Monk, or, The Hidden Secrets of a Nun’s Life in a Convent Exposed (1836) claimed to expose systematic sexual abuse of nuns and infanticide of the resulting children by Catholic priests in her convent in Montreal.

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Mark Vernon

Mark Vernon is a writer, broadcaster and journalist.

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Martyr

A martyr (Greek: μάρτυς, mártys, "witness"; stem μάρτυρ-, mártyr-) is someone who suffers persecution and death for advocating, renouncing, refusing to renounce, or refusing to advocate a belief or cause as demanded by an external party.

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Maryvale Institute

Maryvale Institute is a college of further and higher education, an International Catholic Distance-Learning College for Catechesis, Theology, Philosophy and Religious Education in Old Oscott, Great Barr, Birmingham, England.

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Massachusetts

Massachusetts, officially known as the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

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Matthew Arnold

Matthew Arnold (24 December 1822 – 15 April 1888) was an English poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector of schools.

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Meriol Trevor

Meriol Trevor (15 April 1919 – 12 January 2000) was one of the most prolific Roman Catholic women writers of the twentieth century.

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Merton College, Oxford

Merton College (in full: The House or College of Scholars of Merton in the University of Oxford) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England.

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Miracle

A miracle is an event not explicable by natural or scientific laws.

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Monophysitism

Monophysitism (or; Greek: μονοφυσιτισμός; Late Koine Greek from μόνος monos, "only, single" and φύσις physis, "nature") is the Christological position that, after the union of the divine and the human in the historical incarnation, Jesus Christ, as the incarnation of the eternal Son or Word (Logos) of God, had only a single "nature" which was either divine or a synthesis of divine and human.

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Moral authority

Moral authority is authority premised on principles, or fundamental truths, which are independent of written, or positive, laws.

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Mortal sin

A mortal sin (peccatum mortale), in Catholic theology, is a gravely sinful act, which can lead to damnation if a person does not repent of the sin before death.

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Muscular Christianity

Muscular Christianity was a philosophical movement that originated in England in the mid-19th century, characterised by a belief in patriotic duty, manliness, the moral and physical beauty of athleticism, teamwork, discipline, self-sacrifice, and "the expulsion of all that is effeminate, un-English, and excessively intellectual." The movement came into vogue during the Victorian era as a method of building character in students at English public schools, and is most often associated with English author Thomas Hughes and his 1857 novel Tom Brown's School Days, as well as writers Charles Kingsley and Ralph Connor.

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Names for the number 0 in English

There are names for the number 0 in English and related concepts, and there are concomitant names for the decades whose tens column contains the number 0.

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Naples

Naples (Napoli, Napule or; Neapolis; lit) is the regional capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy after Rome and Milan.

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National Apostasy

National Apostasy was a sermon preached by John Keble on 14 July 1833.

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National University of Ireland

The National University of Ireland (NUI) (Ollscoil na hÉireann) is a federal university system of constituent universities (previously called constituent colleges) and recognised colleges set up under the Irish Universities Act, 1908, and significantly amended by the Universities Act, 1997.

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Natural religion

Natural religion most frequently means the "religion of nature", in which God, the soul, spirits, and all objects of the supernatural are considered as part of nature and not separate from it.

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Newman Centers

Newman Centers, Newman Houses, Newman Clubs, or Newman Communities are Catholic ministry centers at non-Catholic universities found throughout the world.

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Newman College (University of Melbourne)

Newman College is a Roman Catholic co-educational residential college affiliated with the University of Melbourne.

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Newman College, Thodupuzha

Newman College is a Catholic institution of higher education in Thodupuzha, Kerala, India, administered by the Diocese of Kothamangalam.

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Newman Studies Journal

Newman Studies Journal is a peer-reviewed academic journal that examines the intellectual legacy of Blessed John Henry Newman from a Catholic perspective.

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Newman Theological College

Newman Theological College (NTC) is a Roman Catholic school of theology founded in 1969 by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Edmonton, Alberta.

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Newman University, Birmingham

Newman University is a public university based in the suburb of Bartley Green in Birmingham, England.

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Newman University, Wichita

Newman University is a coeducational Catholic liberal arts university named for John Henry Cardinal Newman and founded by the Adorers of the Blood of Christ in Wichita, Kansas, United States.

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Nicholas Wiseman

Nicholas Wiseman (2 August 1802 – 15 February 1865) was an Irish Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church who became the first Archbishop of Westminster upon the re-establishment of the Catholic hierarchy in England and Wales in 1850.

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Nonconformist

In English church history, a nonconformist was a Protestant who did not "conform" to the governance and usages of the established Church of England.

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Old Oscott

Old Oscott (originally Oscott) is an area of Great Barr, Birmingham, England (previously in the parish of Handsworth, Staffordshire).

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Oratory of Saint Philip Neri

The Congregation of the Oratory of Saint Philip Neri is a pontifical society of apostolic life of Catholic priests and lay-brothers who live together in a community bound together by no formal vows but only with the bond of charity.

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Oriel College, Oxford

Oriel CollegeOxford University Calendar 2005–2006 (2005) p.323 has the corporate designation as "The Provost and Scholars of the House of the Blessed Mary the Virgin in Oxford, commonly called Oriel College, of the Foundation of Edward the Second of famous memory, sometime King of England", p324 has people — Oxford University Press.

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Oriel Noetics

The Oriel Noetics is a term now applied to a group of early 19th-century dons of the University of Oxford closely associated with Oriel College.

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Origen

Origen of Alexandria (184 – 253), also known as Origen Adamantius, was a Hellenistic scholar, ascetic, and early Christian theologian who was born and spent the first half of his career in Alexandria.

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Oscar Wilde

Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde (16 October 185430 November 1900) was an Irish poet and playwright.

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Owen Chadwick

William Owen Chadwick (20 May 1916 – 17 July 2015) was a British Anglican priest, academic, writer and prominent historian of Christianity.

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Oxford

Oxford is a city in the South East region of England and the county town of Oxfordshire.

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Oxford Movement

The Oxford Movement was a movement of High Church members of the Church of England which eventually developed into Anglo-Catholicism.

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Oxford University Newman Society

The Newman Society: Oxford University Catholic Society (est. 1878; current form 2012) is Oxford University's oldest Roman Catholic organisation, a student society named as a tribute to Cardinal Newman, who agreed to lend his name to a group formed seventeen years before the English hierarchy formally permitted Catholics to attend the university.

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Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press.

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Papal infallibility

Papal infallibility is a dogma of the Catholic Church that states that, in virtue of the promise of Jesus to Peter, the Pope is preserved from the possibility of error "when, in the exercise of his office as shepherd and teacher of all Christians, in virtue of his supreme apostolic authority, he defines a doctrine concerning faith or morals to be held by the whole Church." This doctrine was defined dogmatically at the First Ecumenical Council of the Vatican of 1869–1870 in the document Pastor aeternus, but had been defended before that, existing already in medieval theology and being the majority opinion at the time of the Counter-Reformation.

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Paralysis

Paralysis is a loss of muscle function for one or more muscles.

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Passionists

The Passionists (Latin: Congregatio Passionis Iesu Christi) are a Roman Catholic religious institute founded by Saint Paul of the Cross with a special emphasis on the Passion of Jesus Christ.

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Paul Cullen (cardinal)

Paul Cullen (29 April 1803 – 24 October 1878) was Roman Catholic Archbishop of Dublin and previously of Armagh, and the first Irish cardinal.

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Paul Fourdrinier

Paul Fourdrinier (20 December 1698 – 18 February 1758), sometimes referred to as Peter or Pierre Fourdrinier,Chatterton 1967, p.85 was an 18th-century engraver in England.

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Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley (4 August 17928 July 1822) was one of the major English Romantic poets, and is regarded by some as among the finest lyric and philosophical poets in the English language, and one of the most influential.

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Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham

The Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham in England and Wales is a personal ordinariate of the Roman Catholic Church immediately subject to the Holy See within the territory of the Catholic Bishops' Conference of England and Wales, of which its ordinary is a member, and encompassing Scotland also.

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Personalism

Personalism is a philosophical school of thought searching to describe the uniqueness of 1) God as Supreme Person or 2) a human person in the world of nature, specifically in relation to animals. One of the main points of interest of personalism is human subjectivity or self-consciousness, experienced in a person's own acts and inner happenings—in "everything in the human being that is internal, whereby each human being is an eyewitness of its own self". Other principles.

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Peter Tatchell

Peter Gary Tatchell (born 25 January 1952) is a British human rights campaigner, originally from Australia, best known for his work with LGBT social movements.

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Philosophy of education

Philosophy of education can refer either to the application of philosophy to the problem of education, examining definitions, goals and chains of meaning used in education by teachers, administrators or policymakers.

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Piers Brendon

Piers Brendon (born 21 December 1940, Stratton, Cornwall) is a British writer, known for historical and biographical works.

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Plato

Plato (Πλάτων Plátōn, in Classical Attic; 428/427 or 424/423 – 348/347 BC) was a philosopher in Classical Greece and the founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world.

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Pneumonia

Pneumonia is an inflammatory condition of the lung affecting primarily the small air sacs known as alveoli.

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Polytheism

Polytheism (from Greek πολυθεϊσμός, polytheismos) is the worship of or belief in multiple deities, which are usually assembled into a pantheon of gods and goddesses, along with their own religions and rituals.

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Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas

The Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas (PUST), also known as the Angelicum in honor of its patron the Doctor Angelicus Thomas Aquinas, is located in the historic center of Rome, Italy.

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Pope Benedict XVI

Pope Benedict XVI (Benedictus XVI; Benedetto XVI; Benedikt XVI; born Joseph Aloisius Ratzinger;; 16 April 1927) served as Pope and sovereign of the Vatican City State from 2005 until his resignation in 2013.

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Pope Benedict XVI's visit to the United Kingdom

Pope Benedict XVI's visit to the United Kingdom from 16 to 19 September 2010 was the first state visit by a pope to the United Kingdom (Pope John Paul II made a pastoral, rather than state, visit to Great Britain in 1982).

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Pope Francis

Pope Francis (Franciscus; Francesco; Francisco; born Jorge Mario Bergoglio; 17 December 1936) is the 266th and current Pope and sovereign of the Vatican City State.

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Pope Leo XIII

Pope Leo XIII (Leone; born Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci; 2 March 1810 – 20 July 1903) was head of the Catholic Church from 20 February 1878 to his death.

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Pope Pius IX

Pope Pius IX (Pio; 13 May 1792 – 7 February 1878), born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, was head of the Catholic Church from 16 June 1846 to his death on 7 February 1878.

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Profession (religious)

The term religious profession is used in many western-rite Christian denominations (including those of Roman Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran, and other traditions) to refer to the solemn admission of men or women into a religious order by means of public vows.

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Protodeacon

Protodeacon derives from the Greek proto- meaning 'first' and diakonos, which is a standard ancient Greek word meaning "assistant", "servant", or "waiting-man".

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Provost (religion)

A provost is a senior official in a number of Christian churches.

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Punch (magazine)

Punch; or, The London Charivari was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire established in 1841 by Henry Mayhew and engraver Ebenezer Landells.

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Queer theory

Queer theory is a field of critical theory that emerged in the early 1990s out of the fields of queer studies and women's studies.

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Rednal

Rednal is a residential suburb on the south western edge of metropolitan Birmingham, West Midlands, England, 9 miles (14.2 kilometres) south west of Birmingham city centre and forming part of Longbridge parish and electoral ward.

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Regius Professor of Divinity

The Regius Professorships of Divinity are amongst the oldest professorships at the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge.

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Regius Professor of Hebrew (Oxford)

The Regius Professorship of Hebrew in the University of Oxford is a professorship at the University of Oxford, founded by Henry VIII in 1546.

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Relic

In religion, a relic usually consists of the physical remains of a saint or the personal effects of the saint or venerated person preserved for purposes of veneration as a tangible memorial.

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Religious epistemology

Religious epistemology as a broad label covers any approach to epistemological questions from a religious perspective, or attempts to understand the epistemological issues that come from religious belief.

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Renn Hampden

Renn Dickson Hampden (1793 – 23 April 1868) was an English Anglican clergyman.

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Revelation

In religion and theology, revelation is the revealing or disclosing of some form of truth or knowledge through communication with a deity or other supernatural entity or entities.

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Richard Bagot (bishop)

Richard Bagot (22 November 1782 – 15 May 1854) was an English bishop.

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Richard Holt Hutton

Richard Holt Hutton (2 June 1826 – 9 September 1897) was an English journalist of literature and religion.

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Richard Whately

Richard Whately (1 February 1787 – 8 October 1863) was an English rhetorician, logician, economist, academic and theologian who also served as a reforming Church of Ireland Archbishop of Dublin.

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Richard William Church

Richard William Church (25 April 1815 – 6 December 1890) was an English churchman and writer, known latterly as Dean Church.

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Robert Peel

Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet, (5 February 17882 July 1850) was a British statesman of the Conservative Party who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1834–35 and 1841–46) and twice as Home Secretary (1822–27 and 1828–30).

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Robert Southey

Robert Southey (or 12 August 1774 – 21 March 1843) was an English poet of the Romantic school, one of the "Lake Poets" along with William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and England's Poet Laureate for 30 years from 1813 until his death in 1843.

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Romantic friendship

A romantic friendship or passionate friendship is a very close but typically non-sexual relationship between friends, often involving a degree of physical closeness beyond that which is common in the contemporary Western societies.

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Romanticism

Romanticism (also known as the Romantic era) was an artistic, literary, musical and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century, and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850.

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Ronald Knox

Ronald Arbuthnott Knox (17 February 1888 – 24 August 1957) was an English Catholic priest, theologian and author of detective stories.

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Saint

A saint (also historically known as a hallow) is a person who is recognized as having an exceptional degree of holiness or likeness or closeness to God.

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San Giorgio in Velabro

San Giorgio in Velabro is a church in Rome, Italy, devoted to St. George.

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Sicily

Sicily (Sicilia; Sicìlia) is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea.

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Sidney Lee

Sir Sidney Lee (5 December 1859 – 3 March 1926) was an English biographer, writer and critic.

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Skepticism

Skepticism (American English) or scepticism (British English, Australian English) is generally any questioning attitude or doubt towards one or more items of putative knowledge or belief.

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Slavery

Slavery is any system in which principles of property law are applied to people, allowing individuals to own, buy and sell other individuals, as a de jure form of property.

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Socrates

Socrates (Sōkrátēs,; – 399 BC) was a classical Greek (Athenian) philosopher credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy, and as being the first moral philosopher, of the Western ethical tradition of thought.

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Sola fide

Sola fide (Latin: by faith alone), also known as justification by faith alone, is a Christian theological doctrine commonly held to distinguish many Protestant churches from the Catholic Church, as well as the Eastern Orthodox Churches and Oriental Orthodox Churches.

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St Anne's Church, Birmingham

St Anne's Church is a Roman Catholic Parish church on Alcester Street in Digbeth, part of the city centre of Birmingham.

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St Clement's Church, Oxford

St Clement's Church is an evangelical Church of England parish church east of central Oxford, England.

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St Mary's College, Oscott

St Mary's College in New Oscott, Birmingham, often called Oscott College, is the Roman Catholic seminary of the Archdiocese of Birmingham in England and one of the three seminaries of the Catholic Church in England and Wales;.

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St Patrick's College, Maynooth

St Patrick's College, Maynooth (Coláiste Naoimh Phádraig, Maigh Nuad), is the "National Seminary for Ireland" (a Roman Catholic college), and a Pontifical University, located in the village of Maynooth, from Dublin, Ireland.

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Stiff upper lip

One who has a stiff upper lip displays fortitude in the face of adversity, or exercises great self-restraint in the expression of emotion.

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Strait of Bonifacio

The Strait of Bonifacio (Fretum Gallicum, Bouches de Bonifacio, Bocche di Bonifacio, Bucchi di Bunifaziu, Gallurese: Bocchi di Bunifaciu, Buccas de Bonifatziu, Bocche de Bunifazziu) is the strait between Corsica and Sardinia, named after the Corsican town Bonifacio.

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Subjectivism

Subjectivism is the doctrine that "our own mental activity is the only unquestionable fact of our experience.", instead of shared or communal, and that there is no external or objective truth.

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Sublimation (psychology)

In psychology, sublimation is a mature type of defense mechanism, in which socially unacceptable impulses or idealizations are unconsciously transformed into socially acceptable actions or behavior, possibly resulting in a long-term conversion of the initial impulse.

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TAN Books

TAN Books is a traditional Catholic American book distributor and publisher based in Charlotte, North Carolina.

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Tertullian

Tertullian, full name Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus, c. 155 – c. 240 AD, was a prolific early Christian author from Carthage in the Roman province of Africa.

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The American Spectator

The American Spectator is a conservative U.S. monthly magazine covering news and politics, edited by R. Emmett Tyrrell, Jr. and published by the non-profit American Spectator Foundation.

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The Catholic Herald

The Catholic Herald is a London-based Roman Catholic magazine, published in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland.

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The Dream of Gerontius

The Dream of Gerontius, Op.

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The Dream of Gerontius (poem)

The Dream of Gerontius is a poem written by John Henry Newman consisting of the prayer of a dying man, and angelic and demonic responses.

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The Dublin Review

The Dublin Review is a quarterly magazine that publishes essays, reportage, autobiography, travel writing, criticism and fiction.

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The Oratory School

The Oratory School is a boys' independent Roman Catholic day and boarding school in Woodcote, north-west of Reading.

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The Rambler (Catholic periodical)

The Rambler was a Catholic periodical founded by liberal converts to Catholicism and closely associated with the names of Lord Acton, Richard Simpson and, for a brief period, John Henry Newman.

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The Tablet

The Tablet is a self-described progressive Catholic international weekly review published in London.

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The Times

The Times is a British daily (Monday to Saturday) national newspaper based in London, England.

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The Venerable

The Venerable is used as a style or epithet in several Christian churches.

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Thirty-nine Articles

The Thirty-nine Articles of Religion (commonly abbreviated as the Thirty-nine Articles or the XXXIX Articles) are the historically defining statements of doctrines and practices of the Church of England with respect to the controversies of the English Reformation.

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Thomas Aquinas

Saint Thomas Aquinas (1225 – 7 March 1274) was an Italian Dominican friar, Catholic priest, and Doctor of the Church.

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Thomas Carlyle

Thomas Carlyle (4 December 17955 February 1881) was a Scottish philosopher, satirical writer, essayist, translator, historian, mathematician, and teacher.

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Thomas Henry Huxley

Thomas Henry Huxley (4 May 1825 – 29 June 1895) was an English biologist specialising in comparative anatomy.

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Thomas More

Sir Thomas More (7 February 14786 July 1535), venerated in the Catholic Church as Saint Thomas More, was an English lawyer, social philosopher, author, statesman, and noted Renaissance humanist.

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Thomas Mozley

Thomas Mozley (1806 – June 17, 1893), was an English clergyman and writer associated with the Oxford Movement.

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Thomas Newton

Thomas Newton (1 January 1704 – 14 February 1782) was an English cleric, biblical scholar and author.

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Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine (born Thomas Pain; – In the contemporary record as noted by Conway, Paine's birth date is given as January 29, 1736–37. Common practice was to use a dash or a slash to separate the old-style year from the new-style year. In the old calendar, the new year began on March 25, not January 1. Paine's birth date, therefore, would have been before New Year, 1737. In the new style, his birth date advances by eleven days and his year increases by one to February 9, 1737. The O.S. link gives more detail if needed. – June 8, 1809) was an English-born American political activist, philosopher, political theorist and revolutionary.

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Thomas Scott (commentator)

Thomas Scott (1747–1821) was an influential preacher and author who is principally known for his best-selling work A Commentary On The Whole Bible and The Force of Truth, and as one of the founders of the Church Missionary Society.

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Thomas Vowler Short

Thomas Vowler Short (16 September 1790 – 13 April 1872) was an English academic and clergyman, successively Bishop of Sodor and Man and Bishop of St Asaph.

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Thomas William Allies

Thomas William Allies (12 February 1813 – 17 June 1903) was an English historical writer specializing in religious subjects.

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Tommaso Martinelli

Tommaso Maria Martinelli (4 February 1827 - 30 March 1888) was a Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church who served as Prefect of the Congregation of Rites.

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Tract (literature)

A tract is a literary work, and in current usage, usually religious in nature.

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Tract 90

Remarks on Certain Passages in the Thirty-Nine Articles, better known as Tract 90, was a theological pamphlet written by the English theologian and churchman John Henry Newman and published in 1841.

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Tracts for the Times

The Tracts for the Times were a series of 90 theological publications, varying in length from a few pages to book-length, produced by members of the English Oxford Movement, an Anglo-Catholic revival group, from 1833 to 1841.

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Trinity College, Oxford

Trinity College (full name: The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity in the University of Oxford, of the foundation of Sir Thomas Pope (Knight)) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England.

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United Kingdom

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed with some organisations, including the and preferring to use Britain as shorthand for Great Britain is a sovereign country in western Europe.

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland.

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Universalis Ecclesiae

Universalis Ecclesiae is the incipit of the papal bull of 29 September 1850 by which Pope Pius IX recreated the Roman Catholic diocesan hierarchy in England, which had been extinguished with the death of the last Marian bishop in the reign of Elizabeth I. New names were given to the dioceses, as the old ones were in use by the Church of England.

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University Church of St Mary the Virgin

The University Church of St Mary the Virgin (St Mary's or SMV for short) is an Oxford church situated on the north side of the High Street.

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University College Dublin

University College, Dublin (commonly referred to as UCD; An Coláiste Ollscoile, Baile Átha Cliath) is a research university in Dublin, Ireland.

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University of Oxford

The University of Oxford (formally The Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of Oxford) is a collegiate research university located in Oxford, England.

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Via media

Via media is a Latin phrase meaning "the middle road" and is a philosophical maxim for life which advocates moderation in all thoughts and actions.

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Voltaire

François-Marie Arouet (21 November 1694 – 30 May 1778), known by his nom de plume Voltaire, was a French Enlightenment writer, historian and philosopher famous for his wit, his attacks on Christianity as a whole, especially the established Catholic Church, and his advocacy of freedom of religion, freedom of speech and separation of church and state.

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Walter Scott

Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet (15 August 1771 – 21 September 1832) was a Scottish historical novelist, playwright, poet and historian.

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Western philosophy

Western philosophy is the philosophical thought and work of the Western world.

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Whitehall

Whitehall is a road in the City of Westminster, Central London, which forms the first part of the A3212 road from Trafalgar Square to Chelsea.

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Wilfrid Philip Ward

Wilfrid Philip Ward (1856-1916) was an English essayist and biographer.

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William Bernard Ullathorne

William Bernard Ullathorne (7 May 180621 March 1889) was an English prelate who held high offices in the Roman Catholic Church during the nineteenth century.

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William Beveridge (bishop)

William Beveridge (1637 – 5 March 1708) was an English writer and clergyman who served as Bishop of St Asaph from 1704 until his death.

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William Ewart Gladstone

William Ewart Gladstone, (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British statesman of the Liberal Party.

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William John Copeland

William John Copeland (1804–1885) was an English clergyman and scholar.

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William Law

William Law (1686 – 9 April 1761) was a Church of England priest who lost his position at Emmanuel College, Cambridge when his conscience would not allow him to take the required oath of allegiance to the first Hanoverian monarch, George I. Previously William Law had given his allegiance to the House of Stuart and is sometimes considered a second-generation non-juror (an earlier generation of non-jurors included Thomas Ken).

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William Lockhart (priest)

William Lockhart (22 August 1820 – 15 May 1892) was an English Roman Catholic priest; the first of the Tractarian Movement to convert from Anglicanism to Roman Catholicism.

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William Palmer (theologian)

William Patrick Palmer (1803 – 1885), who called himself Sir William Palmer, 9th Baronet, from 1865 (although his claim to the title was never acknowledged), was an Anglican theologian and liturgical scholar of the 19th century.

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Worton (civil parish), Oxfordshire

Worton is a civil parish in the West Oxfordshire district about south of Banbury.

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Zenit News Agency

ZENIT is a non-profit news agency that reports on the Catholic Church and matters important to it from the perspective of Catholic doctrine.

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19th-century philosophy

In the 19th century the philosophies of the Enlightenment began to have a dramatic effect, the landmark works of philosophers such as Immanuel Kant and Jean-Jacques Rousseau influencing new generations of thinkers.

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Redirects here:

Cardinal J. H. Newman, Cardinal Newman, J. H. Newman, J.H. Newman, JH Newman, John Cardinal Newman, John Henry Cardinal Newman, Saint John Henry Newman, St John Henry Newman, St. John Henry Newman, The Blessed John Henry Newman, Venerable John Henry Newman, CO.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Henry_Newman

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