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John Millington Synge

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Edmund John Millington Synge (16 April 1871 – 24 March 1909) was an Irish playwright, poet, prose writer, travel writer and collector of folklore. [1]

99 relations: Abbey Theatre, Adultery, Anglo-Irish people, Aran Islands, Arthur Griffith, Augusta, Lady Gregory, Bachelor's degree, Barrister, Bray, Brendan Behan, Brinsley MacNamara, Brittany, Catholic Church, Celtic Revival, Charles Darwin, Charles Elkin Mathews, Chemise, Church of Ireland, Counterpoint, County Dublin, County Wicklow, Cuala Press, Daniel Corkery (author), David H. Greene, David M. Kiely, Dún Laoghaire, Defamation, Deirdre of the Sorrows, Deutsches Theater (Berlin), Dublin, Dumbshow, Eavan Boland, Edward Hutchinson Synge, Edward Martyn, Fin de siècle, Folklore, Freeman's Journal, George William Russell, German Empire, Great Famine (Ireland), Greystones, Harold's Cross, Hebrew language, Hodgkin's lymphoma, In the Shadow of the Glen, Irish language, Irish Literary Revival, Irish Literary Theatre, Irish mythology, Irish nationalism, ..., Irish people, Jack Butler Yeats, John Lighton Synge, John Masefield, Joseph O'Connor, Katharine O'Shea, Koblenz, Landed gentry, Lennox Robinson, List of patricides, Literary realism, London, Maire O'Neill, Marie Henri d'Arbois de Jubainville, Maud Gonne, Metastasis, Mount Jerome Cemetery and Crematorium, Music theory, Paganism, Patrick Pearse, Peasant, Plymouth Brethren, Prose, Protestantism in Ireland, Rathdrum, County Wicklow, Rathfarnham, Rathgar, Rector (ecclesiastical), Riders to the Sea, River Dodder, Robert Prescott Stewart, Robert Traill (clergyman), Royal Irish Academy of Music, Samuel Beckett, Schull, Seán O'Casey, Smallpox, Stephen MacKenna, The Playboy of the Western World, The Plough and the Stars, The Tinker's Wedding, The Well of the Saints, Trinity College Dublin, University of Paris, Upper middle class, Vivian Mercier, W. B. Yeats, Würzburg, William Wordsworth. Expand index (49 more) »

Abbey Theatre

The Abbey Theatre (Amharclann na Mainistreach), also known as the National Theatre of Ireland (Amharclann Náisiúnta na hÉireann), in Dublin, Republic of Ireland, first opened its doors to the public on 27 December 1904.

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Adultery

Adultery (from Latin adulterium) is extramarital sex that is considered objectionable on social, religious, moral, or legal grounds.

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Anglo-Irish people

Anglo-Irish is a term which was more commonly used in the 19th and early 20th centuries to identify a social class in Ireland, whose members are mostly the descendants and successors of the English Protestant Ascendancy.

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Aran Islands

The Aran Islands (Oileáin Árann—pronunciation) or The Arans (na hÁrainneacha—) are a group of three islands located at the mouth of Galway Bay, on the west coast of Ireland, with a total area of about.

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Arthur Griffith

Arthur Joseph Griffith (Art Seosamh Ó Gríobhtha; 31 March 1871 – 12 August 1922) was an Irish politician and writer, who founded and later led the political party Sinn Féin.

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Augusta, Lady Gregory

Isabella Augusta, Lady Gregory (née Persse; 15 March 1852 – 22 May 1932) was an Irish dramatist, folklorist and theatre manager.

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Bachelor's degree

A bachelor's degree (from Middle Latin baccalaureus) or baccalaureate (from Modern Latin baccalaureatus) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded by colleges and universities upon completion of a course of study lasting three to seven years (depending on institution and academic discipline).

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Barrister

A barrister (also known as barrister-at-law or bar-at-law) is a type of lawyer in common law jurisdictions.

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Bray

Bray (formerly Brí Chualann) is a coastal town in north County Wicklow, Ireland.

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Brendan Behan

Brendan Francis Aidan Behan (christened Francis Behan) (Breandán Ó Beacháin; 9 February 1923 – 20 March 1964) was an Irish poet, short story writer, novelist and playwright who wrote in both English and Irish.

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Brinsley MacNamara

John Weldon (6 September 1890 – 4 February 1963; alternatively "A. E. Weldon"), known by his pen- and stage-name Brinsley MacNamara, was an Irish writer, playwright, and the registrar of the National Gallery of Ireland.

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Brittany

Brittany (Bretagne; Breizh, pronounced or; Gallo: Bertaèyn, pronounced) is a cultural region in the northwest of France, covering the western part of what was known as Armorica during the period of Roman occupation.

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Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.299 billion members worldwide.

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Celtic Revival

The Celtic Revival (also referred to as the Celtic Twilight or Celtomania) was a variety of movements and trends in the 19th and 20th centuries that saw a renewed interest in aspects of Celtic culture.

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Charles Darwin

Charles Robert Darwin, (12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution.

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Charles Elkin Mathews

Charles Elkin Mathews (1851 – 10 November 1921) was a British publisher and bookseller who played an important role in the literary life of London in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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Chemise

A chemise or shift is a classic smock, or a modern type of women's undergarment or dress.

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Church of Ireland

The Church of Ireland (Eaglais na hÉireann; Ulster-Scots: Kirk o Airlann) is a Christian church in Ireland and an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion.

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Counterpoint

In music, counterpoint is the relationship between voices that are harmonically interdependent (polyphony) yet independent in rhythm and contour.

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County Dublin

County Dublin (Contae Bhaile Átha Cliath or Contae Átha Cliath) is a county in Ireland.

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County Wicklow

County Wicklow (Contae Chill Mhantáin) is a county in Ireland.

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Cuala Press

The Cuala Press was an Irish private press set up in 1908 by Elizabeth Yeats with support from her brother William Butler Yeats that played an important role in the Celtic Revival of the early 20th century.

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Daniel Corkery (author)

Daniel Corkery (Dónall Ó Corcora; 14 February 1878 – 31 December 1964) was an Irish politician, writer and academic.

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David H. Greene

David Herbert Greene (November 4, 1913 – July 9, 2008) was an author and professor at Harvard University, Boston University, The College of New Rochelle, the U.S. Naval Academy and New York University, where he was chairman of the English Department.

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David M. Kiely

David M. Kiely (born 10 July 1949, Dublin) is a writer of fiction and non-fiction.

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Dún Laoghaire

Dún Laoghaire is a suburban coastal town in County Dublin, Ireland, about 12 km (7.5 miles) south of Dublin city centre.

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Defamation

Defamation, calumny, vilification, or traducement is the communication of a false statement that, depending on the law of the country, harms the reputation of an individual, business, product, group, government, religion, or nation.

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Deirdre of the Sorrows

Deirdre of the Sorrows is a three-act play written by Irish playwright John Millington Synge, first performed at the Abbey Theatre by the Irish National Theatre Society in 1910.

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Deutsches Theater (Berlin)

The Deutsches Theater in Berlin is a well-known German theatre.

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Dublin

Dublin is the capital of and largest city in Ireland.

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Dumbshow

Dumbshow, also dumb show or dumb-show, is defined by the Oxford Dictionary of English as "gestures used to convey a meaning or message without speech; mime." In the theatre the word refers to a piece of dramatic mime in general, or more particularly a piece of action given in mime within a play "to summarise, supplement, or comment on the main action".

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Eavan Boland

Eavan Boland (born 24 September 1944) is an Irish poet, author, professor, and activist who has been active since the 1960s.

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Edward Hutchinson Synge

Edward Hutchinson Synge (1 June 1890 – 26 May 1957) was an Irish physicist who published a complete theoretical description of the near-field scanning optical microscope, an instrument used in nanotechnology, several decades before it was experimentally developed.

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Edward Martyn

Edward Martyn (30 January 1859 – 5 December 1923) was an Irish playwright and early republican political and cultural activist, as the first president of Sinn Féin from 1905 to 1908.

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Fin de siècle

Fin de siècle is a French term meaning end of the century, a term which typically encompasses both the meaning of the similar English idiom turn of the century and also makes reference to the closing of one era and onset of another.

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Folklore

Folklore is the expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the traditions common to that culture, subculture or group.

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Freeman's Journal

The Freeman's Journal was the oldest nationalist newspaper in Ireland.

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George William Russell

George William Russell (10 April 1867 – 17 July 1935) who wrote with the pseudonym Æ (sometimes written AE or A.E.), was an Irish writer, editor, critic, poet, painter and Irish nationalist.

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German Empire

The German Empire (Deutsches Kaiserreich, officially Deutsches Reich),Herbert Tuttle wrote in September 1881 that the term "Reich" does not literally connote an empire as has been commonly assumed by English-speaking people.

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Great Famine (Ireland)

The Great Famine (an Gorta Mór) or the Great Hunger was a period of mass starvation, disease, and emigration in Ireland between 1845 and 1849.

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Greystones

Greystones is a coastal town and seaside resort in County Wicklow, Ireland.

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Harold's Cross

Harold's Cross is an urban village and inner suburb on the south side of Dublin, Ireland.

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Hebrew language

No description.

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Hodgkin's lymphoma

Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is a type of lymphoma which is generally believed to result from white blood cells of the lymphocyte kind.

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In the Shadow of the Glen

In the Shadow of the Glen, also known as The Shadow of the Glen, is a one-act play written by the Irish playwright J. M. Synge and first performed at the Molesworth Hall, Dublin, on October 8, 1903.

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Irish language

The Irish language (Gaeilge), also referred to as the Gaelic or the Irish Gaelic language, is a Goidelic language (Gaelic) of the Indo-European language family originating in Ireland and historically spoken by the Irish people.

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Irish Literary Revival

The Irish Literary Revival (also called the Irish Literary Renaissance, nicknamed the Celtic Twilight) was a flowering of Irish literary talent in the late 19th and early 20th century.

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Irish Literary Theatre

W. B. Yeats, Lady Gregory and Edward Martyn published a "Manifesto for Irish Literary Theatre" in 1897, in which they proclaimed their intention of establishing a national theater for Ireland.

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Irish mythology

The mythology of pre-Christian Ireland did not entirely survive the conversion to Christianity.

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Irish nationalism

Irish nationalism is an ideology which asserts that the Irish people are a nation.

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Irish people

The Irish people (Muintir na hÉireann or Na hÉireannaigh) are a nation and ethnic group native to the island of Ireland, who share a common Irish ancestry, identity and culture.

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Jack Butler Yeats

John Butler Yeats (29 August 1871 – 28 March 1957) was an Irish artist and Olympic medalist.

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John Lighton Synge

John Lighton Synge (23 March 1897 – 30 March 1995) was an Irish mathematician and physicist, whose seven decade career included significant periods in Ireland, Canada, and the USA.

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John Masefield

John Edward Masefield (1 June 1878 – 12 May 1967) English poet and writer, was Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1930.

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Joseph O'Connor

Joseph Victor O'Connor is an Irish novelist.

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Katharine O'Shea

Katharine Parnell (née Wood; 30 January 1846 – 5 February 1921), known before her second marriage as Katharine O'Shea, and usually called by friends Katie O'Shea and by enemies Kitty O'Shea, was an English woman of aristocratic background, whose decade-long secret adultery with Charles Stewart Parnell led to a widely publicized divorce in 1890 and his political downfall.

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Koblenz

Koblenz (Coblence), spelled Coblenz before 1926, is a German city situated on both banks of the Rhine where it is joined by the Moselle.

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Landed gentry

Landed gentry or gentry is a largely historical British social class consisting in theory of landowners who could live entirely from rental income, or at least had a country estate.

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Lennox Robinson

Esmé Stuart Lennox Robinson (4 October 1886 – 15 October 1958) was an Irish dramatist, poet and theatre producer and director who was involved with the Abbey Theatre.

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List of patricides

Patricide is (i) the act of killing one's father, or (ii) a person who kills his or her father.

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Literary realism

Literary realism is part of the realist art movement beginning with mid nineteenth-century French literature (Stendhal), and Russian literature (Alexander Pushkin) and extending to the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

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London

London is the capital and most populous city of England and the United Kingdom.

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Maire O'Neill

Maire O'Neill (11 January 1886 – 2 November 1952) was an Irish actress of stage and film.

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Marie Henri d'Arbois de Jubainville

Marie Henri d'Arbois de Jubainville (5 December 1827 – 26 February 1910) was a French historian and philologist.

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Maud Gonne

Maud Gonne MacBride (Maud Nic Ghoinn Bean Mac Giolla Bhríghde, 21 December 1866 – 27 April 1953) was an English-born Irish revolutionary, suffragette and actress.

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Metastasis

Metastasis is a pathogenic agent's spread from an initial or primary site to a different or secondary site within the host's body; it is typically spoken of as such spread by a cancerous tumor.

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Mount Jerome Cemetery and Crematorium

Mount Jerome Cemetery & Crematorium (Reilig Chnoc Ieróim) is situated in Harold's Cross on the south side of Dublin, Ireland.

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Music theory

Music theory is the study of the practices and possibilities of music.

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Paganism

Paganism is a term first used in the fourth century by early Christians for populations of the Roman Empire who practiced polytheism, either because they were increasingly rural and provincial relative to the Christian population or because they were not milites Christi (soldiers of Christ).

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Patrick Pearse

Patrick Henry Pearse (also known as Pádraig or Pádraic Pearse; Pádraig Anraí Mac Piarais; An Piarsach; 10 November 1879 – 3 May 1916) was an Irish teacher, barrister, poet, writer, nationalist, republican political activist and revolutionary who was one of the leaders of the Easter Rising in 1916.

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Peasant

A peasant is a pre-industrial agricultural laborer or farmer, especially one living in the Middle Ages under feudalism and paying rent, tax, fees or services to a landlord.

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Plymouth Brethren

The Plymouth Brethren are a conservative, low church, nonconformist, evangelical Christian movement whose history can be traced to Dublin, Ireland, in the late 1820s, originating from Anglicanism.

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Prose

Prose is a form of language that exhibits a natural flow of speech and grammatical structure rather than a rhythmic structure as in traditional poetry, where the common unit of verse is based on meter or rhyme.

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Protestantism in Ireland

Protestantism is a Christian minority on the island of Ireland.

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Rathdrum, County Wicklow

Rathdrum is a village in County Wicklow, Ireland.

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Rathfarnham

Ráth Fearnáin; Rathfarnham or Rathfarnam is a Southside suburb of Dublin, Ireland.

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Rathgar

Rathgar, originally a village, from 1862 part of the township Rathmines and Rathgar, in 1930 became a suburb of Dublin, Ireland.

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Rector (ecclesiastical)

A rector is, in an ecclesiastical sense, a cleric who functions as an administrative leader in some Christian denominations.

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Riders to the Sea

Riders to the Sea is a play written by Irish Literary Renaissance playwright John Millington Synge.

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River Dodder

The River Dodder (An Dothra) is one of the three main rivers in Dublin, Ireland, the others being the Liffey, of which the Dodder is the largest tributary, and the Tolka.

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Robert Prescott Stewart

Sir Robert Prescott Stewart (16 December 1825 – 24 March 1894) was an Irish composer, organist, conductor, and teacher – one of the most influential (classical) musicians in 19th-century Ireland.

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Robert Traill (clergyman)

Robert Traill (1793–1847) was clergyman in the Calvinistic-oriented Established Church of Ireland (the influence of Calvin was rejected by the Church of England from the late 16th century).

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Royal Irish Academy of Music

The Royal Irish Academy of Music (RIAM) in Dublin, Ireland, is one of Europe's oldest music conservatoires, specialising in Classical Music and the Irish harp.

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Samuel Beckett

Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish avant-garde novelist, playwright, theatre director, poet, and literary translator who lived in Paris for most of his adult life.

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Schull

Schull or Skull (or An Scoil, meaning "Mary's School") is a town in County Cork, Ireland.

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Seán O'Casey

Seán O'Casey (Seán Ó Cathasaigh; born John Casey; 30 March 1880 – 18 September 1964) was an Irish dramatist and memoirist.

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Smallpox

Smallpox was an infectious disease caused by one of two virus variants, Variola major and Variola minor.

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Stephen MacKenna

Stephen MacKenna (15 January 1872 – 8 March 1934) was a journalist, linguist and writer of Irish descent.

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The Playboy of the Western World

The Playboy of the Western World is a three-act play written by Irish playwright John Millington Synge and first performed at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin, on 26 January 1907.

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The Plough and the Stars

The Plough and the Stars is a play by the Irish writer Seán O'Casey first performed on February 8, 1926 by the Abbey Theatre in the writer's native Dublin.

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The Tinker's Wedding

The Tinker's Wedding is a two-act play by the Irish playwright J. M. Synge, whose main characters - as the title suggests - are Irish Tinkers.

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The Well of the Saints

The Well of the Saints is a three-act play written by Irish playwright J. M. Synge, first performed at the Abbey Theatre by the Irish National Theatre Society in February 1905.

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Trinity College Dublin

Trinity College (Coláiste na Tríonóide), officially the College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin, is the sole constituent college of the University of Dublin, a research university located in Dublin, Ireland.

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University of Paris

The University of Paris (Université de Paris), metonymically known as the Sorbonne (one of its buildings), was a university in Paris, France, from around 1150 to 1793, and from 1806 to 1970.

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Upper middle class

In sociology, the upper middle class is the social group constituted by higher status members of the middle class.

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Vivian Mercier

Vivian Mercier (1919–1989) was an Irish literary critic.

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W. B. Yeats

William Butler Yeats (13 June 186528 January 1939) was an Irish poet and one of the foremost figures of 20th-century literature.

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Würzburg

Würzburg (Main-Franconian: Wörtzburch) is a city in the region of Franconia, northern Bavaria, Germany.

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William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth (7 April 1770 – 23 April 1850) was a major English Romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their joint publication Lyrical Ballads (1798).

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Redirects here:

Edmund John Millington Synge, J M Synge, J. M. Synge, J.M. Synge, Jm synge, John M. Synge, John Milllington Synge, Synge.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Millington_Synge

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