Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Install
Faster access than browser!
 

Jonathan Swift

+ Save concept

Jonathan Swift (30 November 1667 – 19 October 1745) was an Anglo-Irish satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for the Whigs, then for the Tories), poet and cleric who became Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin. [1]

132 relations: A Complete Collection of Genteel and Ingenious Conversation, A Journal to Stella, A Modest Proposal, A Tale of a Tub, Agher, Alexander Pope, Almanac, An Argument Against Abolishing Christianity, Anglo-Irish people, Anne Long, Anne, Queen of Great Britain, Astrology, Baron Berkeley, Cadenus and Vanessa, Carrickfergus, Celbridge Abbey, Charles Boyle, 4th Earl of Orrery, Charles Jervas, Church of Ireland, County Antrim, Deadpan, Dean (Christianity), Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin, Deimos (moon), Dictionary of National Biography, Diocese of Connor (Church of Ireland), Directions to Servants, Doctor of Divinity, Drapier's Letters, Dublin, Edith Sitwell, Elizabeth Raleigh, Encyclopædia Britannica, English Civil War, Epitaph, Esther Johnson, Esther Vanhomrigh, Expurgation, Francis Godwin, Frisby on the Wreake, George Berkeley, George I of Great Britain, George Orwell, Glorious Revolution, Goodrich, Herefordshire, Grand jury, Guido Guinizelli, Gulliver's Travels, Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke, Hertford College, Oxford, ..., I Live Under a Black Sun, Impact crater, Irony, Isaac Bickerstaff, J. B. Priestley, Jake Arnott, Jean-François Marmontel, John Arbuthnot, John Dryden, John Gay, John Partridge (astrologer), John Ruskin, John Temple (judge), Jonathan Swift, Kilkenny College, Kilroot, Kingdom of Ireland, Kit-Cat Club, Lemuel Gulliver, List of satirists and satires, Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, Mars, Ménière's disease, Modernist poetry, Moons of Mars, Moor Park, Farnham, National Portrait Gallery, London, Natural satellite, Pamphleteer, Prebendary, Quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns, Queen Anne's Bounty, Questia Online Library, Richard Bentley, Robert Harley, 1st Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, Royalist, Samuel Johnson, Satire, Scriblerus Club, Seditious libel, Shooting an Elephant, Sidney Godolphin, 1st Earl of Godolphin, Sir Erasmus Dryden, 1st Baronet, Sir William Temple, 1st Baronet, St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin, St. Patrick's Hospital, Summerhill, County Meath, Sweetness and light, Swift (Deimian crater), The Athenian Mercury, The Battle of the Books, The Conduct of the Allies, The Examiner (1710–1714), The Lady's Dressing Room, The Man in the Moone, The National Archives (United Kingdom), The Story of Civilization, The Very Reverend, Thomas Sheridan (actor), Thomas Sheridan (divine), Tories (British political party), Treaty of Utrecht, Trim, County Meath, Trinity College Dublin, Triple Alliance (1668), University of Oxford, Vanessa (name), W. B. Yeats, Walter Raleigh, Walter Scott, War of the Spanish Succession, Whigs (British political party), Whitehaven, Will Durant, William Davenant, William III of England, William Makepeace Thackeray, William Shakespeare, William Tisdall (priest), William Whitshed, William Wood (ironmaster), William Wotton. Expand index (82 more) »

A Complete Collection of Genteel and Ingenious Conversation

A Complete Collection of genteel and ingenious Conversation, according to the most polite mode and method now used at Court, and in the best Companies of England, commonly known as A Complete Collection of Genteel and Ingenious Conversation, or more simply as Polite Conversation is a book by Jonathan Swift offering an ironic and satirical commentary on the perceived banality of conversation among the upper classes in early-18th century Great Britain written in the form of a reference guide for those lacking in conversational skill.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and A Complete Collection of Genteel and Ingenious Conversation · See more »

A Journal to Stella

A Journal to Stella is a work by Jonathan Swift first partly published posthumously in 1766.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and A Journal to Stella · See more »

A Modest Proposal

A Modest Proposal For preventing the Children of Poor People From being a Burthen to Their Parents or Country, and For making them Beneficial to the Publick, commonly referred to as A Modest Proposal, is a Juvenalian satirical essay written and published anonymously by Jonathan Swift in 1729.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and A Modest Proposal · See more »

A Tale of a Tub

A Tale of a Tub was the first major work written by Jonathan Swift, arguably his most difficult satire and perhaps his most masterly.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and A Tale of a Tub · See more »

Agher

Agher is a crossroads and townland in County Meath, Ireland.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Agher · See more »

Alexander Pope

Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Alexander Pope · See more »

Almanac

An almanac (also spelled almanack and almanach) is an annual publication listing a set of events forthcoming in the next year.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Almanac · See more »

An Argument Against Abolishing Christianity

An Argument to Prove that the Abolishing of Christianity in England May, as Things Now Stand Today, be Attended with Some Inconveniences, and Perhaps not Produce Those Many Good Effects Proposed Thereby, commonly referred to as An Argument Against Abolishing Christianity, is a satirical essay by Jonathan Swift defending Christianity, and in particular, Anglicanism, against contemporary assaults by its various opponents, including freethinkers, deists, Antitrinitarians, atheists, Socinians, and other so-called "Dissenters." The essay was written in 1712 and, as was common at the time, was distributed widely as a pamphlet.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and An Argument Against Abolishing Christianity · See more »

Anglo-Irish people

Anglo-Irish is a term which was more commonly used in the 19th and early 20th centuries to identify a social class in Ireland, whose members are mostly the descendants and successors of the English Protestant Ascendancy.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Anglo-Irish people · See more »

Anne Long

Anne Long (c. 1681 – 22 December 1711), was born at Draycot Cerne, Wiltshire, one of six children of James Long (died c. 1690) and his wife, Susanna, née Strangways.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Anne Long · See more »

Anne, Queen of Great Britain

Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) was the Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland between 8 March 1702 and 1 May 1707.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Anne, Queen of Great Britain · See more »

Astrology

Astrology is the study of the movements and relative positions of celestial objects as a means for divining information about human affairs and terrestrial events.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Astrology · See more »

Baron Berkeley

The title Baron Berkeley originated as a feudal title and was subsequently created twice in the Peerage of England by writ.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Baron Berkeley · See more »

Cadenus and Vanessa

Cadenus and Vanessa is a poem by Jonathan Swift about one of his lovers, Esther Vanhomrigh (Vanessa), written in 1712 and published as a book in 1726, three years after the death of Vanhomrigh.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Cadenus and Vanessa · See more »

Carrickfergus

Carrickfergus, colloquially known as "Carrick", is a large town in County Antrim, Northern Ireland.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Carrickfergus · See more »

Celbridge Abbey

Celbridge Abbey is located in Celbridge, County Kildare in Ireland.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Celbridge Abbey · See more »

Charles Boyle, 4th Earl of Orrery

Charles Boyle, 4th Earl of Orrery KT PC FRS (28 July 1674 – 28 August 1731) was an English nobleman, statesman and patron of the sciences.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Charles Boyle, 4th Earl of Orrery · See more »

Charles Jervas

Charles Jervas (also Jarvis; c. 1675 – 1739) was an Irish portrait painter, translator, and art collector of the early 18th century.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Charles Jervas · See more »

Church of Ireland

The Church of Ireland (Eaglais na hÉireann; Ulster-Scots: Kirk o Airlann) is a Christian church in Ireland and an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Church of Ireland · See more »

County Antrim

County Antrim (named after the town of Antrim)) is one of six counties that form Northern Ireland. Adjoined to the north-east shore of Lough Neagh, the county covers an area of and has a population of about 618,000. County Antrim has a population density of 203 people per square kilometre or 526 people per square mile. It is also one of the thirty-two traditional counties of Ireland, as well as part of the historic province of Ulster. The Glens of Antrim offer isolated rugged landscapes, the Giant's Causeway is a unique landscape and a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Bushmills produces whiskey, and Portrush is a popular seaside resort and night-life area. The majority of Belfast, the capital city of Northern Ireland, is in County Antrim, with the remainder being in County Down. It is currently one of only two counties of Ireland to have a majority of the population from a Protestant background, according to the 2001 census. The other is County Down to the south.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and County Antrim · See more »

Deadpan

Deadpan, dry humor or dry wit describes the deliberate display of a lack of or no emotion, commonly as a form of comedic delivery to contrast with the ridiculousness of the subject matter.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Deadpan · See more »

Dean (Christianity)

A dean, in a church context, is a cleric holding certain positions of authority within a religious hierarchy.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Dean (Christianity) · See more »

Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin

The Dean of St.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin · See more »

Deimos (moon)

Deimos (systematic designation: Mars II) is the smaller and outer of the two natural satellites of the planet Mars, the other being Phobos.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Deimos (moon) · See more »

Dictionary of National Biography

The Dictionary of National Biography (DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published from 1885.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Dictionary of National Biography · See more »

Diocese of Connor (Church of Ireland)

The Diocese of Connor is in the Province of Armagh of the Church of Ireland.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Diocese of Connor (Church of Ireland) · See more »

Directions to Servants

Directions to Servants is a satirical and humorous essay by Jonathan Swift.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Directions to Servants · See more »

Doctor of Divinity

Doctor of Divinity (DD or DDiv; Doctor Divinitatis) is an advanced or honorary academic degree in divinity.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Doctor of Divinity · See more »

Drapier's Letters

Drapier's Letters is the collective name for a series of seven pamphlets written between 1724 and 1725 by the Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin, Jonathan Swift, to arouse public opinion in Ireland against the imposition of a privately minted copper coinage that Swift believed to be of inferior quality.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Drapier's Letters · See more »

Dublin

Dublin is the capital of and largest city in Ireland.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Dublin · See more »

Edith Sitwell

Dame Edith Louisa Sitwell DBE (7 September 1887 – 9 December 1964) was a British poet and critic and the eldest of the three literary Sitwells.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Edith Sitwell · See more »

Elizabeth Raleigh

Elizabeth "Bess", Lady Raleigh (née Throckmorton; 16 April 1565 – circa 1647) was Sir Walter Raleigh's wife and a Gentlewoman of the Privy Chamber to Queen Elizabeth I of England.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Elizabeth Raleigh · See more »

Encyclopædia Britannica

The Encyclopædia Britannica (Latin for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., is a general knowledge English-language encyclopaedia.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Encyclopædia Britannica · See more »

English Civil War

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and English Civil War · See more »

Epitaph

An epitaph (from Greek ἐπιτάφιος epitaphios "a funeral oration" from ἐπί epi "at, over" and τάφος taphos "tomb") is a short text honoring a deceased person.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Epitaph · See more »

Esther Johnson

Esther Johnson (March 13, 1681 – January 28, 1728) was the English friend of Jonathan Swift, known as "Stella".

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Esther Johnson · See more »

Esther Vanhomrigh

Esther Vanhomrigh (known by the pseudonym Vanessa; c. 1688 – 2 June 1723), an Irish woman of Dutch descent, was a longtime lover and correspondent of Jonathan Swift.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Esther Vanhomrigh · See more »

Expurgation

Expurgation, also known as bowdlerization, is a form of censorship which involves purging anything deemed noxious or offensive from an artistic work, or other type of writing of media.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Expurgation · See more »

Francis Godwin

Francis Godwin (1562–1633) was an English historian, science fiction author, divine, Bishop of Llandaff and of Hereford.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Francis Godwin · See more »

Frisby on the Wreake

Frisby on the Wreake is a village and civil parish on the River Wreake about west of Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire, England.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Frisby on the Wreake · See more »

George Berkeley

George Berkeley (12 March 168514 January 1753) — known as Bishop Berkeley (Bishop of Cloyne) — was an Irish philosopher whose primary achievement was the advancement of a theory he called "immaterialism" (later referred to as "subjective idealism" by others).

New!!: Jonathan Swift and George Berkeley · See more »

George I of Great Britain

George I (George Louis; Georg Ludwig; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727) was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1 August 1714 and ruler of the Duchy and Electorate of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) in the Holy Roman Empire from 1698 until his death.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and George I of Great Britain · See more »

George Orwell

Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950), better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist and critic whose work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism and outspoken support of democratic socialism.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and George Orwell · See more »

Glorious Revolution

The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange, who was James's nephew and son-in-law.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Glorious Revolution · See more »

Goodrich, Herefordshire

Goodrich is a village in south Herefordshire, England close to Gloucestershire and the Forest of Dean, situated near the River Wye at.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Goodrich, Herefordshire · See more »

Grand jury

A grand jury is a legal body empowered to conduct official proceedings and investigate potential criminal conduct, and determine whether criminal charges should be brought.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Grand jury · See more »

Guido Guinizelli

Guido Guinizelli (c. 1230–1276), born in Bologna, in present-day Emilia-Romagna, Northern Italy, was an Italian poet and 'founder' of the Dolce Stil Novo.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Guido Guinizelli · See more »

Gulliver's Travels

Gulliver's Travels, or Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Gulliver's Travels · See more »

Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke

Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke (16 September 1678 – 12 December 1751) was an English politician, government official and political philosopher.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke · See more »

Hertford College, Oxford

Hertford College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Hertford College, Oxford · See more »

I Live Under a Black Sun

I Live Under a Black Sun is a novelized biography of Jonathan Swift by poet Edith Sitwell.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and I Live Under a Black Sun · See more »

Impact crater

An impact crater is an approximately circular depression in the surface of a planet, moon, or other solid body in the Solar System or elsewhere, formed by the hypervelocity impact of a smaller body.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Impact crater · See more »

Irony

Irony, in its broadest sense, is a rhetorical device, literary technique, or event in which what appears, on the surface, to be the case, differs radically from what is actually the case.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Irony · See more »

Isaac Bickerstaff

Isaac Bickerstaff Esq was a pseudonym used by Jonathan Swift as part of a hoax to predict the death of then famous Almanac–maker and astrologer John Partridge.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Isaac Bickerstaff · See more »

J. B. Priestley

John Boynton Priestley, OM (13 September 1894 – 14 August 1984), known by his pen name J.B. Priestley, was an English novelist, playwright, scriptwriter, social commentator and broadcaster.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and J. B. Priestley · See more »

Jake Arnott

Jake Arnott (born 11 March 1961) is a British novelist and dramatist, author of The Long Firm and six other novels.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Jake Arnott · See more »

Jean-François Marmontel

Jean-François Marmontel (11 July 1723 – 31 December 1799) was a French historian and writer, a member of the Encyclopédistes movement.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Jean-François Marmontel · See more »

John Arbuthnot

John Arbuthnot (baptised 29 April 1667 – 27 February 1735), often known simply as Dr Arbuthnot, was a Scottish physician, satirist and polymath in London.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and John Arbuthnot · See more »

John Dryden

John Dryden (–) was an English poet, literary critic, translator, and playwright who was made England's first Poet Laureate in 1668.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and John Dryden · See more »

John Gay

John Gay (30 June 1685 – 4 December 1732) was an English poet and dramatist and member of the Scriblerus Club.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and John Gay · See more »

John Partridge (astrologer)

John Partridge (1644 - c. 1714) was an English astrologer, the author and publisher of a number of astrological almanacs and books.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and John Partridge (astrologer) · See more »

John Ruskin

John Ruskin (8 February 1819 – 20 January 1900) was the leading English art critic of the Victorian era, as well as an art patron, draughtsman, watercolourist, a prominent social thinker and philanthropist.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and John Ruskin · See more »

John Temple (judge)

Sir John Temple (1600 – 14 November 1677) was an Irish lawyer, courtier and politician who sat in the Irish House of Commons at various times between 1641 and 1677 and in the House of Commons of England from 1646 to 1648.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and John Temple (judge) · See more »

Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift (30 November 1667 – 19 October 1745) was an Anglo-Irish satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for the Whigs, then for the Tories), poet and cleric who became Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Jonathan Swift · See more »

Kilkenny College

Kilkenny College is an independent Church of Ireland co-educational day and boarding secondary school located in Kilkenny, in the South-East of Ireland.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Kilkenny College · See more »

Kilroot

Kilroot is a townland, population centre and civil parish in County Antrim, Northern Ireland.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Kilroot · See more »

Kingdom of Ireland

The Kingdom of Ireland (Classical Irish: Ríoghacht Éireann; Modern Irish: Ríocht Éireann) was a nominal state ruled by the King or Queen of England and later the King or Queen of Great Britain that existed in Ireland from 1542 until 1800.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Kingdom of Ireland · See more »

Kit-Cat Club

The Kit-Cat Club (sometimes Kit-Kat Club) was an early 18th-century English club in London with strong political and literary associations, committed to the furtherance of Whig objectives, meeting at the Trumpet tavern in London, and at Water Oakley in the Berkshire countryside.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Kit-Cat Club · See more »

Lemuel Gulliver

Lemuel Gulliver is the fictional protagonist and narrator of Gulliver's Travels, a novel written by Jonathan Swift, first published in 1726.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Lemuel Gulliver · See more »

List of satirists and satires

Below is an incomplete list of writers, cartoonists and others known for their involvement in satire – humorous social criticism.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and List of satirists and satires · See more »

Lord Chief Justice of Ireland

The Court of King's Bench (or Court of Queen's Bench during the reign of a Queen) was one of the senior courts of common law in Ireland.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Lord Chief Justice of Ireland · See more »

Mars

Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second-smallest planet in the Solar System after Mercury.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Mars · See more »

Ménière's disease

Ménière's disease (MD) is a disorder of the inner ear that is characterized by episodes of feeling like the world is spinning (vertigo), ringing in the ears (tinnitus), hearing loss, and a fullness in the ear.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Ménière's disease · See more »

Modernist poetry

Modernist poetry refers to poetry written, mainly in Europe and North America, between 1890 and 1950 in the tradition of modernist literature, but the dates of the term depend upon a number of factors, including the nation of origin, the particular school in question, and the biases of the critic setting the dates.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Modernist poetry · See more »

Moons of Mars

The two moons of Mars are Phobos and Deimos.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Moons of Mars · See more »

Moor Park, Farnham

Moor Park and Ivy Cottage, Farnham, Surrey, England are listed, conjoined homes in of riverside grounds, in the former chapelry of Compton.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Moor Park, Farnham · See more »

National Portrait Gallery, London

The National Portrait Gallery (NPG) is an art gallery in London housing a collection of portraits of historically important and famous British people.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and National Portrait Gallery, London · See more »

Natural satellite

A natural satellite or moon is, in the most common usage, an astronomical body that orbits a planet or minor planet (or sometimes another small Solar System body).

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Natural satellite · See more »

Pamphleteer

Pamphleteer is a historical term for someone who creates or distributes pamphlets, unbound (and therefore inexpensive) booklets intended for wide circulation.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Pamphleteer · See more »

Prebendary

tags--> A prebendary is a senior member of clergy, normally supported by the revenues from an estate or parish.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Prebendary · See more »

Quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns

The quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns (querelle des Anciens et des Modernes) began overtly as a literary and artistic debate that heated up in the early 17th century and shook the Académie française.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns · See more »

Queen Anne's Bounty

Queen Anne's Bounty was a scheme established in 1704 to augment the incomes of the poorer clergy of the Church of England, and by extension the organisation ("The Governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of the Poor Clergy") which administered the bounty (and eventually a number of other forms of assistance to poor livings).

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Queen Anne's Bounty · See more »

Questia Online Library

Questia is an online commercial digital library of books and articles that has an academic orientation, with a particular emphasis on books and journal articles in the humanities and social sciences.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Questia Online Library · See more »

Richard Bentley

Richard Bentley (27 January 1662 – 14 July 1742) was an English classical scholar, critic, and theologian.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Richard Bentley · See more »

Robert Harley, 1st Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer

Robert Harley, 1st Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, KG (5 December 1661 – 21 May 1724) was an English and later British statesman of the late Stuart and early Georgian periods.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Robert Harley, 1st Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer · See more »

Royalist

A royalist supports a particular monarch as head of state for a particular kingdom, or of a particular dynastic claim.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Royalist · See more »

Samuel Johnson

Samuel Johnson LL.D. (18 September 1709 – 13 December 1784), often referred to as Dr.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Samuel Johnson · See more »

Satire

Satire is a genre of literature, and sometimes graphic and performing arts, in which vices, follies, abuses, and shortcomings are held up to ridicule, ideally with the intent of shaming individuals, corporations, government, or society itself into improvement.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Satire · See more »

Scriblerus Club

The Scriblerus Club was an informal association of authors, based in London, that came together in the early 18th century.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Scriblerus Club · See more »

Seditious libel

Sedition and seditious libel were criminal offences under English common law, and are still criminal offences in Canada.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Seditious libel · See more »

Shooting an Elephant

"Shooting an Elephant" is an essay by George Orwell, first published in the literary magazine New Writing in late 1936 and broadcast by the BBC Home Service on 12 October 1948.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Shooting an Elephant · See more »

Sidney Godolphin, 1st Earl of Godolphin

Sidney Godolphin, 1st Earl of Godolphin, (15 June 1645 – 15 September 1712) was a leading British politician of the late 17th and early 18th centuries.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Sidney Godolphin, 1st Earl of Godolphin · See more »

Sir Erasmus Dryden, 1st Baronet

Sir Erasmus Dryden, 1st Baronet (20 December 1553 – 22 May 1632) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1624.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Sir Erasmus Dryden, 1st Baronet · See more »

Sir William Temple, 1st Baronet

Sir William Temple, 1st Baronet (25 April 1628 – 27 January 1699) was an English statesman and essayist.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Sir William Temple, 1st Baronet · See more »

St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin

Saint Patrick's Cathedral (Ard-Eaglais Naomh Pádraig) in Dublin, Ireland, founded in 1191, is the National Cathedral of the Church of Ireland.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin · See more »

St. Patrick's Hospital

This article relates to St.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and St. Patrick's Hospital · See more »

Summerhill, County Meath

Summerhill is a designated heritage village in County Meath, Ireland.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Summerhill, County Meath · See more »

Sweetness and light

Sweetness and light is an English idiom that can be used in common speech, either as statement of personal happy consciousness, (though this may be viewed by natives as being a trifle in earnest) or as literal report on another person.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Sweetness and light · See more »

Swift (Deimian crater)

Swift crater is a crater on Mars's moon Deimos.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Swift (Deimian crater) · See more »

The Athenian Mercury

The Athenian Mercury, or The Athenian Gazette, or The Question Project, or The Casuistical Mercury, was a periodical written by The Athenian Society and published in London twice weekly between 17 March 1690 (i.e. 1691 Gregorian calendar) and 14 June 1697.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and The Athenian Mercury · See more »

The Battle of the Books

"The Battle of the Books" is the name of a short satire written by Jonathan Swift and published as part of the prolegomena to his A Tale of a Tub in 1704.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and The Battle of the Books · See more »

The Conduct of the Allies

The Conduct of the Allies and of the Late Ministry in Beginning and Carrying on the Present War was a book written by Jonathan Swift in which he attacked Britain's allies in the War of the Spanish Succession.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and The Conduct of the Allies · See more »

The Examiner (1710–1714)

The Examiner was a newspaper edited by Jonathan Swift from 2 November 1710 to 1714.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and The Examiner (1710–1714) · See more »

The Lady's Dressing Room

"The Lady's Dressing Room" is a poem written by Jonathan Swift first published in 1732.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and The Lady's Dressing Room · See more »

The Man in the Moone

The Man in the Moone is a book by the English divine and Church of England bishop Francis Godwin (1562–1633), describing a "voyage of utopian discovery".

New!!: Jonathan Swift and The Man in the Moone · See more »

The National Archives (United Kingdom)

The National Archives (TNA) is a non-ministerial government department.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and The National Archives (United Kingdom) · See more »

The Story of Civilization

The Story of Civilization, by husband and wife Will and Ariel Durant, is an eleven-volume set of books covering Western history for the general reader.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and The Story of Civilization · See more »

The Very Reverend

The Very Reverend is a style given to certain religious figures.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and The Very Reverend · See more »

Thomas Sheridan (actor)

Thomas Sheridan (1719 – 14 August 1788) was an Irish stage actor, an educator, and a major proponent of the elocution movement.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Thomas Sheridan (actor) · See more »

Thomas Sheridan (divine)

Thomas Sheridan (1687 – 10 October 1738) was an Anglican divine, essayist, playwright, poet, schoolmaster and translator.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Thomas Sheridan (divine) · See more »

Tories (British political party)

The Tories were members of two political parties which existed sequentially in the Kingdom of England, the Kingdom of Great Britain and later the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from the 17th to the early 19th centuries.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Tories (British political party) · See more »

Treaty of Utrecht

The Treaty of Utrecht, which established the Peace of Utrecht, is a series of individual peace treaties, rather than a single document, signed by the belligerents in the War of the Spanish Succession, in the Dutch city of Utrecht in March and April 1713.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Treaty of Utrecht · See more »

Trim, County Meath

Trim is a town in County Meath, Ireland.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Trim, County Meath · See more »

Trinity College Dublin

Trinity College (Coláiste na Tríonóide), officially the College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin, is the sole constituent college of the University of Dublin, a research university located in Dublin, Ireland.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Trinity College Dublin · See more »

Triple Alliance (1668)

The Triple Alliance of England, Sweden, and the United Provinces was formed in 1668 to support Spain against France.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Triple Alliance (1668) · See more »

University of Oxford

The University of Oxford (formally The Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of Oxford) is a collegiate research university located in Oxford, England.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and University of Oxford · See more »

Vanessa (name)

Vanessa is a feminine given name, especially popular in the United States, Germany and Brazil.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Vanessa (name) · See more »

W. B. Yeats

William Butler Yeats (13 June 186528 January 1939) was an Irish poet and one of the foremost figures of 20th-century literature.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and W. B. Yeats · See more »

Walter Raleigh

Sir Walter Raleigh (or; circa 155429 October 1618) was an English landed gentleman, writer, poet, soldier, politician, courtier, spy and explorer.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Walter Raleigh · See more »

Walter Scott

Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet (15 August 1771 – 21 September 1832) was a Scottish historical novelist, playwright, poet and historian.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Walter Scott · See more »

War of the Spanish Succession

The War of the Spanish Succession (1701–1714) was a European conflict of the early 18th century, triggered by the death of the childless Charles II of Spain in November 1700.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and War of the Spanish Succession · See more »

Whigs (British political party)

The Whigs were a political faction and then a political party in the parliaments of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland and the United Kingdom.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Whigs (British political party) · See more »

Whitehaven

Whitehaven is a town and port on the coast of Cumbria, England.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Whitehaven · See more »

Will Durant

William James "Will" Durant (November 5, 1885 – November 7, 1981) was an American writer, historian, and philosopher.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and Will Durant · See more »

William Davenant

Sir William Davenant (baptised 3 March 1606 – 7 April 1668), also spelled D'Avenant, was an English poet and playwright.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and William Davenant · See more »

William III of England

William III (Willem; 4 November 1650 – 8 March 1702), also widely known as William of Orange, was sovereign Prince of Orange from birth, Stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht, Gelderland and Overijssel in the Dutch Republic from 1672 and King of England, Ireland and Scotland from 1689 until his death in 1702.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and William III of England · See more »

William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray (18 July 1811 – 24 December 1863) was a British novelist and author.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and William Makepeace Thackeray · See more »

William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 (baptised)—23 April 1616) was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as both the greatest writer in the English language, and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and William Shakespeare · See more »

William Tisdall (priest)

William Tisdall (1669–1735) was an Irish clergyman of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and William Tisdall (priest) · See more »

William Whitshed

William Whitshed (1679–1727) was an Irish politician and judge who held office as Solicitor-General and Lord Chief Justice of Ireland; just before his death he moved office to become Chief Justice of the Irish Common Pleas.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and William Whitshed · See more »

William Wood (ironmaster)

William Wood (1671–1730) was a hardware manufacturer, ironmaster, and mintmaster, notorious for receiving a contract to strike an issue of Irish coinage from 1722 to 1724.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and William Wood (ironmaster) · See more »

William Wotton

William Wotton (13 August 1666 – 13 February 1727) was an English theologian, classical scholar and linguist.

New!!: Jonathan Swift and William Wotton · See more »

Redirects here:

A Person of Honour, A Shoeboy, An Enemy of the Peace, Cadenus, Dean Swift, Dr. Andrew Tripe, Dr. Swift, Gregory Miso-Sarum, Gregory Misosarum, Jack Frenchman, Johathan Swift, Johnathan Swift, Johnathon swift, Jonathan swift, Jonathin swift, Jonathon Swift, M Flor O'Squarr, M. B. Drapier, M. Flor O'Squarr, MB Drapier, S. P. A. M, S. P. A. M., S.P.A.M, S.P.A.M., Sieur de Baudrier, Simon Wagstaff, Esq, Simon Wagstaff, Esq., Student of Astrology, Swift, Jonathan, Swiftian, T. Fribble, T. H. Philomath, T. N. Philomath, T. Tinker, The Very Reverend Jonathan Swift, Tom Ashe, Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Swift

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »