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King William's War

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King William's War (1688–97, also known as the Second Indian War, Father Baudoin's War,Alan F. Williams, Father Baudoin's War: D'Iberville's Campaigns in Acadia and Newfoundland 1696, 1697, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1987. Castin's War,Herbert Milton Sylvester. Indian Wars of New England: The land of the Abenake. The French occupation. King Philip's war. St. Castin's war. 1910. or the First Intercolonial War in French) was the North American theater of the Nine Years' War (1688–97, also known as the War of the Grand Alliance or the War of the League of Augsburg). [1]

144 relations: Acadia, Acadians, Alan Taylor (historian), American Indian Wars, Androscoggin River, Avalon Peninsula Campaign, Battle of Falmouth (1690), Battle of Hudson's Bay, Battle of Port Royal (1690), Battle of Quebec (1690), Benjamin Church (ranger), Berwick, Maine, Bristol, Maine, British America, Brunswick, Maine, Canada (New France), Cape Elizabeth, Maine, Cape Neddick, Maine, Casco Bay, Castine, Maine, Catholic Church, Claude-Sébastien de Villieu, Colonial American military history, Cotton Mather, Dominion of New England, Dummer's War, Durham, New Hampshire, Edmund Andros, Essex County, Massachusetts, Falmouth, Maine, Famine, Father Le Loutre's War, Fitz-John Winthrop, Fort Albany First Nation, Fort Nashwaak, Franco-Indian alliance, Fredericton, French and Indian War, French and Indian Wars, French language, Garrison, Glorious Revolution, Grand Alliance (League of Augsburg), Great Lakes, Great Peace of Montreal, Gulf of Mexico, Guysborough, Nova Scotia (community), Hit-and-run tactics, Hudson Bay, Hudson Bay expedition (1686), ..., Hudson's Bay Company, Indigenous peoples of the Americas, Iroquois, Isthmus of Chignecto, James Bay, James Converse, James II of England, Jean Baudoin, Jean-Vincent d'Abbadie de Saint-Castin, John G. Reid, Joseph Robineau de Villebon, Joseph-François Hertel de la Fresnière, Kancamagus, Kennebec River, Kennebunk, Maine, King George's War, King Philip's War, Lachine massacre, Lanham, Maryland, Livermore Falls, Maine, Livestock, Louis de Buade de Frontenac, Louis-Pierre Thury, Louisiana (New France), Madockawando, Maine, Mary II of England, Massachusetts Bay Colony, Meductic Indian Village / Fort Meductic, Military history of Britain, Military history of Canada, Military history of France, Military history of Nova Scotia, Militia, Mississippi River, Montreal, Moose Factory, Naval battle off St. John (1696), New Brunswick, New England, New France, New York City, Newcastle, Maine, Nine Years' War, Norridgewock, North America, Onondaga (village), Palisade, Pennacook, Penobscot Bay, Penobscot Indian Island Reservation, Penobscot River, Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville, Pieter Schuyler, Port-Royal National Historic Site, Portland, Maine, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Province of New York, Quebec City, Queen Anne's War, Raid on Chignecto (1696), Raid on Deerfield, Raid on Dover, Raid on Oyster River, Raid on Salmon Falls, Raid on York (1692), Sachem, Saco, Maine, Saint John River (Bay of Fundy), Saint Lawrence River, Salem witch trials, Salem, Massachusetts, Sébastien Rale, Schenectady massacre, Seneca people, Siege of Fort Nashwaak (1696), Siege of Pemaquid (1689), Siege of Pemaquid (1696), Status quo ante bellum, Treaty of Ryswick, Treaty of Utrecht, U.S. Route 1 in Maine, University of Nebraska Press, University of Oklahoma Press, University of Pennsylvania Press, Wabanaki Confederacy, Wells, Maine, William and Mary Quarterly, William III of England, William Phips, Winslow, Maine, Witchcraft, York Factory, York, Maine. Expand index (94 more) »

Acadia

Acadia (Acadie) was a colony of New France in northeastern North America that included parts of eastern Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and modern-day Maine to the Kennebec River.

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Acadians

The Acadians (Acadiens) are the descendants of French colonists who settled in Acadia during the 17th and 18th centuries, some of whom are also descended from the Indigenous peoples of the region.

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Alan Taylor (historian)

Alan Shaw Taylor (born June 17, 1955) is an American historian specializing in early United States history.

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American Indian Wars

The American Indian Wars (or Indian Wars) is the collective name for the various armed conflicts fought by European governments and colonists, and later the United States government and American settlers, against various American Indian tribes.

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Androscoggin River

The Androscoggin River is a river in the U.S. states of Maine and New Hampshire, in northern New England.

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Avalon Peninsula Campaign

The Avalon Peninsula Campaign occurred during King William's War when forces of New France, led by Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville and Governor Jacques-François de Monbeton de Brouillan, destroyed 23 English settlements along the coast of the Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland in the span of three months.

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Battle of Falmouth (1690)

Not to be confused with the Battle of Falmouth (1703) The Battle of Falmouth (also known as the Battle of Fort Loyal) (May 16–20, 1690) involved Joseph-François Hertel de la Fresnière and Baron de St Castin leading troops as well as the Wabanaki Confederacy (Mi'kmaq and Maliseet from Fort Meductic) in New Brunswick to capture and destroy Fort Loyal and the English settlement on the Falmouth neck (site of present-day Portland, Maine), then part of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

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Battle of Hudson's Bay

The Battle of Hudson's Bay, also known as the Battle of York Factory, was a naval battle fought during the War of the Grand Alliance (known in England's North American colonies as "King William's War").

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Battle of Port Royal (1690)

The Battle of Port Royal (19 May 1690) occurred at Port Royal, the capital of Acadia, during King William's War.

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Battle of Quebec (1690)

The Battle of Quebec was fought in October 1690 between the colonies of New France and Massachusetts Bay, then ruled by the kingdoms of France and England, respectively.

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Benjamin Church (ranger)

Benjamin Church (c. 1639 – January 17, 1718) was an English colonist in North America.

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Berwick, Maine

Berwick is a town in York County, Maine, United States, situated in the southern part of the state beside the Salmon Falls River.

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Bristol, Maine

Bristol (known from 1632 to 1765 as Pemaquid) is a town in Lincoln County, Maine, United States.

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British America

British America refers to English Crown colony territories on the continent of North America and Bermuda, Central America, the Caribbean, and Guyana from 1607 to 1783.

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Brunswick, Maine

Brunswick is a town in Cumberland County, Maine, United States.

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Canada (New France)

Canada was a French colony within New France first claimed in the name of the King of France in 1535 during the second voyage of Jacques Cartier.

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Cape Elizabeth, Maine

Cape Elizabeth is a town in Cumberland County, Maine, United States.

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Cape Neddick, Maine

Cape Neddick is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of York in York County, Maine, United States.

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Casco Bay

Casco Bay is an inlet of the Gulf of Maine on the southern coast of Maine, New England, United States.

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Castine, Maine

Castine is a town in Hancock County in eastern Maine, USA, which served from 1670 to 1674 as the capital of Acadia.

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Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.299 billion members worldwide.

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Christmas

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ,Martindale, Cyril Charles.

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Christmas and holiday season

The Christmas season, also called the festive season, or the holiday season (mainly in the U.S. and Canada; often simply called the holidays),, is an annually recurring period recognized in many Western and Western-influenced countries that is generally considered to run from late November to early January.

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Christmas Eve

Christmas Eve is the evening or entire day before Christmas Day, the festival commemorating the birth of Jesus.

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Christmas traditions

Christmas traditions vary from country to country.

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Claude-Sébastien de Villieu

Claude-Sébastien de Villieu (fl. 1674–1705) was a French military officer best known for his service in New France.

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Colonial American military history

Colonial American military history is the military record of the Thirteen Colonies from their founding to the American Revolution in 1775.

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Cotton Mather

Cotton Mather, FRS (February 12, 1663 – February 13, 1728; A.B. 1678, Harvard College; A.M. 1681, honorary doctorate 1710, University of Glasgow) was a socially and politically influential New England Puritan minister, prolific author, and pamphleteer.

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Dominion of New England

The Dominion of New England in America (1686–89) was an administrative union of English colonies covering New England and the Mid-Atlantic Colonies (except for the Colony of Pennsylvania).

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Dummer's War

The Dummer's War (1722–1725, also known as Father Rale's War, Lovewell's War, Greylock's War, the Three Years War, the 4th Anglo-Abenaki War, or the Wabanaki-New England War of 1722–1725) was a series of battles between New England and the Wabanaki Confederacy (specifically the Mi'kmaq, Maliseet, and Abenaki) who were allied with New France.

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Durham, New Hampshire

Durham is a town in Strafford County, New Hampshire, United States.

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Edmund Andros

Sir Edmund Andros (6 December 1637 – 24 February 1714) was an English colonial administrator in North America.

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Essex County, Massachusetts

Essex County is a county in the northeastern part of the U.S. state of Massachusetts.

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Falmouth, Maine

Falmouth is a town in Cumberland County, Maine, United States.

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Famine

A famine is a widespread scarcity of food, caused by several factors including war, inflation, crop failure, population imbalance, or government policies.

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Father Le Loutre's War

Father Le Loutre's War (1749–1755), also known as the Indian War, the Micmac War and the Anglo-Micmac War, took place between King George's War and the French and Indian War in Acadia and Nova Scotia.

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Fitz-John Winthrop

Fitz-John Winthrop (March 14, 1637 – November 27, 1707), was the governor of the Colony of Connecticut from 1698 until his death on November 27, 1707.

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Fort Albany First Nation

Fort Albany First Nation is a Cree First Nation reserve in Cochrane District in Northeastern Ontario, Canada.

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Fort Nashwaak

Fort Nashwaak (also known as Fort Naxoat, Fort St. Joseph) was the capital of Acadia and is now a National Historic Site of Canada in present-day Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada.

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Franco-Indian alliance

The Franco-Indian alliance was an alliance between American Indians and the French, centered on the Great Lakes and the Illinois country during the French and Indian War (1754–1763).

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Fredericton

Fredericton is the capital of the Canadian province of New Brunswick.

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French and Indian War

The French and Indian War (1754–63) comprised the North American theater of the worldwide Seven Years' War of 1756–63.

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French and Indian Wars

The French and Indian Wars is a name used in the United States for a series of conflicts that occurred in North America between 1688 and 1763 and were related to the European dynastic wars.

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French language

French (le français or la langue française) is a Romance language of the Indo-European family.

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Garrison

Garrison (various spellings) (from the French garnison, itself from the verb garnir, "to equip") is the collective term for a body of troops stationed in a particular location, originally to guard it, but now often simply using it as a home base.

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Glorious Revolution

The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange, who was James's nephew and son-in-law.

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Grand Alliance (League of Augsburg)

The Grand Alliance is the name commonly used for the coalition formed on 20 December 1689 by England, the Dutch Republic and Emperor Leopold, on behalf of the Archduchy of Austria.

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Great Lakes

The Great Lakes (les Grands-Lacs), also called the Laurentian Great Lakes and the Great Lakes of North America, are a series of interconnected freshwater lakes located primarily in the upper mid-east region of North America, on the Canada–United States border, which connect to the Atlantic Ocean through the Saint Lawrence River.

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Great Peace of Montreal

The Great Peace of Montreal (La Grande paix de Montréal) was a peace treaty between New France and 39 First Nations of North America.

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Gulf of Mexico

The Gulf of Mexico (Golfo de México) is an ocean basin and a marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean, largely surrounded by the North American continent.

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Guysborough, Nova Scotia (community)

Guysborough (population: 922) is an unincorporated Canadian community in Guysborough County, Nova Scotia.

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Hit-and-run tactics

Hit-and-run tactics is a tactical doctrine where the purpose of the combat involved is not to seize control of territory, but to inflict damage on a target and immediately exit the area to avoid the enemy's defense and/or retaliation.

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Hudson Bay

Hudson Bay (Inuktitut: Kangiqsualuk ilua, baie d'Hudson) (sometimes called Hudson's Bay, usually historically) is a large body of saltwater in northeastern Canada with a surface area of.

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Hudson Bay expedition (1686)

The Hudson Bay expedition of 1686 was one of the Anglo-French conflicts on Hudson Bay.

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Hudson's Bay Company

The Hudson's Bay Company (HBC; Compagnie de la Baie d'Hudson) is a Canadian retail business group.

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Indigenous peoples of the Americas

The indigenous peoples of the Americas are the pre-Columbian peoples of the Americas and their descendants. Although some indigenous peoples of the Americas were traditionally hunter-gatherers—and many, especially in the Amazon basin, still are—many groups practiced aquaculture and agriculture. The impact of their agricultural endowment to the world is a testament to their time and work in reshaping and cultivating the flora indigenous to the Americas. Although some societies depended heavily on agriculture, others practiced a mix of farming, hunting and gathering. In some regions the indigenous peoples created monumental architecture, large-scale organized cities, chiefdoms, states and empires. Many parts of the Americas are still populated by indigenous peoples; some countries have sizable populations, especially Belize, Bolivia, Canada, Chile, Ecuador, Greenland, Guatemala, Guyana, Mexico, Panama and Peru. At least a thousand different indigenous languages are spoken in the Americas. Some, such as the Quechuan languages, Aymara, Guaraní, Mayan languages and Nahuatl, count their speakers in millions. Many also maintain aspects of indigenous cultural practices to varying degrees, including religion, social organization and subsistence practices. Like most cultures, over time, cultures specific to many indigenous peoples have evolved to incorporate traditional aspects but also cater to modern needs. Some indigenous peoples still live in relative isolation from Western culture, and a few are still counted as uncontacted peoples.

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Iroquois

The Iroquois or Haudenosaunee (People of the Longhouse) are a historically powerful northeast Native American confederacy.

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Isthmus of Chignecto

The Isthmus of Chignecto is an isthmus bordering the Maritime provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia which connects the Nova Scotia peninsula with North America.

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James Bay

James Bay (Baie James, Wînipekw) is a large body of water on the southern end of Hudson Bay in Canada.

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James Converse

James Converse (November 16, 1645 – July 8, 1706) was a farmer, soldier and office holder in Massachusetts, distinguishing himself as a military leader during the French and Indian Wars.

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James II of England

James II and VII (14 October 1633O.S. – 16 September 1701An assertion found in many sources that James II died 6 September 1701 (17 September 1701 New Style) may result from a miscalculation done by an author of anonymous "An Exact Account of the Sickness and Death of the Late King James II, as also of the Proceedings at St. Germains thereupon, 1701, in a letter from an English gentleman in France to his friend in London" (Somers Tracts, ed. 1809–1815, XI, pp. 339–342). The account reads: "And on Friday the 17th instant, about three in the afternoon, the king died, the day he always fasted in memory of our blessed Saviour's passion, the day he ever desired to die on, and the ninth hour, according to the Jewish account, when our Saviour was crucified." As 17 September 1701 New Style falls on a Saturday and the author insists that James died on Friday, "the day he ever desired to die on", an inevitable conclusion is that the author miscalculated the date, which later made it to various reference works. See "English Historical Documents 1660–1714", ed. by Andrew Browning (London and New York: Routledge, 2001), 136–138.) was King of England and Ireland as James II and King of Scotland as James VII, from 6 February 1685 until he was deposed in the Glorious Revolution of 1688.

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Jean Baudoin

Jean Baudoin (1662–1698) was born in Nantes, France, educated by the Sulpicians in Paris in 1682 and was ordained a priest in 1685.

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Jean-Vincent d'Abbadie de Saint-Castin

Jean-Vincent d'Abbadie de Saint-Castin (1652–1707) was a French military officer serving in Acadia and an Abenaki chief.

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John G. Reid

John G. Reid is a Canadian historian.

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Joseph Robineau de Villebon

Joseph Robineau (or Robinau) de Villebon (22 August 1655 – 5 July 1700), a governor of Acadia, was born in New France and received much of his education and military experience in France.

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Joseph-François Hertel de la Fresnière

Joseph-François Hertel de la Fresnière (baptised 3 July 1642 - buried 22 May 1722) was a military officer of New France.

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Kancamagus

Kancamagus (pronounced "Kank-ah-MAW-gus", The Fearless One), third and final Sagamore of the Penacook Confederacy of Native American tribes.

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Kennebec River

The Kennebec River is a U.S. Geological Survey.

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Kennebunk, Maine

Kennebunk is a town in York County, Maine, United States.

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King George's War

King George's War (1744–1748) is the name given to the military operations in North America that formed part of the War of the Austrian Succession (1740–1748).

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King Philip's War

King Philip's War (sometimes called the First Indian War, Metacom's War, Metacomet's War, Pometacomet's Rebellion, or Metacom's Rebellion) was an armed conflict in 1675–78 between American Indian inhabitants of the New England region of North America versus New England colonists and their Indian allies.

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Lachine massacre

The Lachine massacre, part of the Beaver Wars, occurred when 1,500 Mohawk warriors attacked by surprise the small, 375-inhabitant, settlement of Lachine, New France, at the upper end of Montreal Island on the morning of August 5, 1689.

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Lanham, Maryland

Lanham is an unincorporated community and census-designated place in Prince George's County, Maryland.

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Livermore Falls, Maine

Livermore Falls is a town in Androscoggin County, Maine, United States.

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Livestock

Livestock are domesticated animals raised in an agricultural setting to produce labor and commodities such as meat, eggs, milk, fur, leather, and wool.

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Louis de Buade de Frontenac

Louis de Buade, Comte de Frontenac et de Palluau (May 22, 1622November 28, 1698) was a French soldier, courtier, and Governor General of New France from 1672 to 1682 and from 1689 to his death in 1698.

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Louis-Pierre Thury

Louis-Pierre Thury (c. 1644, Notre Dame de Breuil en Auge (Department of Calvados), France-June 3, 1699, Halifax, Nova Scotia) was a French missionary (secular priest) who was sent to North America during the time of King William's War.

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Louisiana (New France)

Louisiana (La Louisiane; La Louisiane française) or French Louisiana was an administrative district of New France.

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Madockawando

Madockawando (born in Maine c. 1630; died 1698) was a sachem of the Penobscot Indians, an adopted son of Assaminasqua, whom he succeeded.

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Maine

Maine is a U.S. state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

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Mary II of England

Mary II (30 April 1662 – 28 December 1694) was Queen of England, Scotland, and Ireland, co-reigning with her husband and first cousin, King William III and II, from 1689 until her death; popular histories usually refer to their joint reign as that of William and Mary.

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Massachusetts Bay Colony

The Massachusetts Bay Colony (1628–1691) was an English settlement on the east coast of North America in the 17th century around the Massachusetts Bay, the northernmost of the several colonies later reorganized as the Province of Massachusetts Bay.

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Meductic Indian Village / Fort Meductic

Meductic Indian Village / Fort Meductic (also known as Medoctec, Mehtawtik meaning "the end of the path") was a Maliseet settlement until the mid-eighteenth century.

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Military history of Britain

The Military history of Britain, including the military history of the United Kingdom and the military history of the island of Great Britain, is discussed in the following articles.

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Military history of Canada

The military history of Canada comprises hundreds of years of armed actions in the territory encompassing modern Canada, and interventions by the Canadian military in conflicts and peacekeeping worldwide.

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Military history of France

The military history of France encompasses an immense panorama of conflicts and struggles extending for more than 2,000 years across areas including modern France, the European continent, and a variety of regions throughout the world.

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Military history of Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia (also known as Mi'kma'ki and Acadia) is a Canadian province located in Canada's Maritimes.

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Militia

A militia is generally an army or some other fighting organization of non-professional soldiers, citizens of a nation, or subjects of a state, who can be called upon for military service during a time of need, as opposed to a professional force of regular, full-time military personnel, or historically, members of a warrior nobility class (e.g., knights or samurai).

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Mississippi River

The Mississippi River is the chief river of the second-largest drainage system on the North American continent, second only to the Hudson Bay drainage system.

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Montreal

Montreal (officially Montréal) is the most populous municipality in the Canadian province of Quebec and the second-most populous municipality in Canada.

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Moose Factory

Moose Factory is a community in the Cochrane District, Ontario, Canada.

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Naval battle off St. John (1696)

The Naval battle off St.

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New Brunswick

New Brunswick (Nouveau-Brunswick; Canadian French pronunciation) is one of three Maritime provinces on the east coast of Canada.

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New England

New England is a geographical region comprising six states of the northeastern United States: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut.

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New France

New France (Nouvelle-France) was the area colonized by France in North America during a period beginning with the exploration of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence by Jacques Cartier in 1534 and ending with the cession of New France to Great Britain and Spain in 1763.

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New Year

New Year is the time or day at which a new calendar year begins and the calendar's year count increments by one.

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New Year's Day

New Year's Day, also called simply New Year's or New Year, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar.

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New Year's Eve

In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December which is the seventh day of Christmastide.

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New York City

The City of New York, often called New York City (NYC) or simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States.

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Newcastle, Maine

Newcastle is a town in Lincoln County, Maine, United States.

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Nine Years' War

The Nine Years' War (1688–97) – often called the War of the Grand Alliance or the War of the League of Augsburg – was a conflict between Louis XIV of France and a European coalition of Austria, the Holy Roman Empire, the Dutch Republic, Spain, England and Savoy.

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Norridgewock

Norridgewock was the name of both an Indian village and a band of the Abenaki ("People of the Dawn") Native Americans/First Nations, an Eastern Algonquian tribe of the United States and Canada.

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North America

North America is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.

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Onondaga (village)

Onondaga was a village that served as the capital of the Iroquois League and the primary settlement of the Onondaga nation.

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Palisade

A palisade—sometimes called a stakewall or a paling—is typically a fence or wall made from wooden stakes or tree trunks and used as a defensive structure or enclosure.

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Pennacook

The Pennacook, also known by the names Penacook, and Pennacock, were a North American people of the Wabanaki Confederacy who primarily inhabited the Merrimack River valley of present-day New Hampshire and Massachusetts, as well as portions of southern Maine.

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Penobscot Bay

Penobscot Bay is an inlet of the Gulf of Maine and Atlantic Ocean in south central Maine.

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Penobscot Indian Island Reservation

Penobscot Indian Island Reservation is an Indian reservation for the Penobscot Tribe of Maine, a federally recognized tribe of the Penobscot National Congress of American Indians. Retrieved 30 Aug 2012.

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Penobscot River

The Penobscot River is a U.S. Geological Survey.

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Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville

Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville (16 July 1661 – 9 July 1706) was a soldier, ship captain, explorer, colonial administrator, knight of the order of Saint-Louis, adventurer, privateer, trader, member of Compagnies Franches de la Marine and founder of the French colony of La Louisiane of New France.

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Pieter Schuyler

Pieter Schuyler (September 17, 1657 – February 19, 1724) was the first mayor of Albany, New York.

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Port-Royal National Historic Site

Port-Royal National Historic Site is a National Historic Site located on the north bank of the Annapolis Basin in the community of Port Royal, Nova Scotia.

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Portland, Maine

Portland is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Maine, with a population of 67,067 as of 2017.

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Portsmouth, New Hampshire

Portsmouth is a city in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, in the United States.

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Province of New York

The Province of New York (1664–1776) was a British proprietary colony and later royal colony on the northeast coast of North America.

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Quebec City

Quebec City (pronounced or; Québec); Ville de Québec), officially Québec, is the capital city of the Canadian province of Quebec. The city had a population estimate of 531,902 in July 2016, (an increase of 3.0% from 2011) and the metropolitan area had a population of 800,296 in July 2016, (an increase of 4.3% from 2011) making it the second largest city in Quebec, after Montreal, and the seventh-largest metropolitan area in Canada. It is situated north-east of Montreal. The narrowing of the Saint Lawrence River proximate to the city's promontory, Cap-Diamant (Cape Diamond), and Lévis, on the opposite bank, provided the name given to the city, Kébec, an Algonquin word meaning "where the river narrows". Founded in 1608 by Samuel de Champlain, Quebec City is one of the oldest cities in North America. The ramparts surrounding Old Quebec (Vieux-Québec) are the only fortified city walls remaining in the Americas north of Mexico, and were declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1985 as the 'Historic District of Old Québec'. The city's landmarks include the Château Frontenac, a hotel which dominates the skyline, and the Citadelle of Quebec, an intact fortress that forms the centrepiece of the ramparts surrounding the old city and includes a secondary royal residence. The National Assembly of Quebec (provincial legislature), the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (National Museum of Fine Arts of Quebec), and the Musée de la civilisation (Museum of Civilization) are found within or near Vieux-Québec.

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Queen Anne's War

Queen Anne's War (1702–1713) was the North American theater of the War of the Spanish Succession, as known in the British colonies, and the second in a series of French and Indian Wars fought between France and England in North America for control of the continent.

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Raid on Chignecto (1696)

The Raid on Chignecto occurred during King William's War when New England forces from Boston attacked the Isthmus of Chignecto, Acadia in present-day Nova Scotia. The raid was in retaliation for the French and Indian Siege of Pemaquid (1696) at present day Bristol, Maine. In the English Province of Massachusetts Bay. Colonel Benjamin Church was the leader of the New England force of 400 men. The raid lasted nine days, between September 20–29, 1696, and formed part of a larger expedition by Church against a number of other Acadian communities.

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Raid on Deerfield

The 1704 Raid on Deerfield (or the Deerfield Massacre) occurred during Queen Anne's War on February 29 when French and Native American forces under the command of Jean-Baptiste Hertel de Rouville attacked the English frontier settlement at Deerfield, Massachusetts, just before dawn, burning part of the town, killing 47 villagers, and taking 112 settlers captive to Montreal.

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Raid on Dover

The Raid on Dover (known as the Cochecho Massacre) happened in Dover, New Hampshire on June 27–28, 1689.

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Raid on Oyster River

The Raid on Oyster River (also known as the Oyster River Massacre) happened during King William's War, on July 18, 1694, at present-day Durham, New Hampshire.

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Raid on Salmon Falls

The Raid on Salmon Falls (March 27, 1690) involved Joseph-François Hertel de la Fresnière (and his son Jean-Baptiste Hertel de Rouville), along with Norridgewock Abnaki chief Wahowa, and possibly Maliseet Abnaki war chief Assacumbuit, leading his troops as well as the Wabanaki Confederacy (Mi'kmaq and Maliseet from Fort Meductic) in New Brunswick to capture and destroy an English settlement of Salmon Falls (present-day Berwick, Maine) during King William's War.

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Raid on York (1692)

The Raid on York (also known as the Candlemas Massacre) took place on 24 January 1692 during King William's War, when Chief Madockawando and Father Louis-Pierre Thury led 200-300 natives into the town of York (then in the District of Maine and part of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, now in the state of Maine), killing about 100 of the English settlers and burning down buildings, taking another estimated 80 villagers hostage. The villagers were forced to walk to Canada, New France, where they were ransomed by Capt. John Alden Jr. of Boston (son of John Alden and Priscilla Mullins of the Plymouth Colony). One of those taken Captive was a young Jeremiah Moulton, who would later gain notoriety during the Father Rale's War. Capt. Floyd wrote that "the houses are all burned and rifled except the half dozen or thereabout"...later in the same letter he adds: "there is about seventeen or eighteen houses burned". Forty-eight people were buried by Capt. Floyd, and the remaining number were young children whose names never appeared on the existing town records. Amongst those killed was Reverend Shubael Dummer, the Congregational church minister; Dummer was shot at his own front door, while Dummer's wife, Lydia and their son, were carried away captive where "through snows and hardships among those dragons of the desert she also quickly died"; nothing further was heard of the boy. The Indians set fire to all undefended houses on the north side of the York River, the principal route for trade and around which the town had grown. After the settlement was reduced to ashes, however, it was rebuilt on higher ground at what is today York Village. Capt. John Flood, who had come with the militia from Portsmouth, found on his arrival that "the greatest part of the whole town was burned and robbed," with nearly 50 killed and another 100 captured. He reported that Rev. Dummer was "barbarously murthered, stript naked, cut and mangled by these sons of Beliall." Today the event is commemorated annually in York, with historical re-enactments and lectures, events presented by the Old York Historical Society and sponsored in part by the Maine Humanities Council. There is a memorial plaque in York on a large stone where, according to the plaque, Abenaki Indians left their snowshoes before creeping into York and attacking the settlers.

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Sachem

Sachem and Sagamore refer to paramount chiefs among the Algonquians or other Native American tribes of the northeast.

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Saco, Maine

Saco is a city in York County, Maine, United States.

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Saint John River (Bay of Fundy)

The Saint John River (Fleuve Saint-Jean; Maliseet: Wolastoq) is a river, approximately long, located principally in the Canadian province of New Brunswick, but also in and arising from the province of Quebec and the U.S. state of Maine.

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Saint Lawrence River

The Saint Lawrence River (Fleuve Saint-Laurent; Tuscarora: Kahnawáʼkye; Mohawk: Kaniatarowanenneh, meaning "big waterway") is a large river in the middle latitudes of North America.

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Salem witch trials

The Salem witch trials were a series of hearings and prosecutions of people accused of witchcraft in colonial Massachusetts between February 1692 and May 1693.

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Salem, Massachusetts

Salem is a historic, coastal city in Essex County, Massachusetts, in the United States, located on Massachusetts' North Shore.

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Sébastien Rale

Sébastien Racle (anglicized as Sebastian Rale or Râle, Rasle, Rasles (January 20, 1657 – August 23, 1724)) was a Jesuit missionary and lexicographer who worked among the eastern Abenaki people.

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Schenectady massacre

The Schenectady Massacre was an attack against the village of Schenectady in the colony of New York on 8 February 1690.

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Seneca people

The Seneca are a group of indigenous Iroquoian-speaking people native to North America who historically lived south of Lake Ontario.

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Siege of Fort Nashwaak (1696)

The Siege of Fort Nashwaak occurred during King William's War when New England forces from Boston attacked the capital of Acadia, Fort Nashwaak, at present-day Fredericton, New Brunswick.

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Siege of Pemaquid (1689)

The Siege of Pemaquid (August 2–3, 1689) was a successful attack by a large band of Abenaki Indians on the English fort at Pemaquid, Fort Charles, then the easternmost outpost of colonial Massachusetts (present-day Bristol, Maine). The French-Abenaki attack was led by Jean-Vincent d'Abbadie de Saint-Castin and Father Louis-Pierre Thury and Chief Moxus. The fall of Pemaquid was a significant setback to the English. It pushed the frontier back to Casco (Falmouth), Maine.

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Siege of Pemaquid (1696)

The Siege of Pemaquid occurred during King William's War when French and Native forces from New France attacked the English settlement at Pemaquid (present-day Bristol, Maine), a community on the border with Acadia.

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Status quo ante bellum

The term status quo ante bellum (often shortened to status quo ante) is a Latin phrase meaning "the state existing before the war".

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Treaty of Ryswick

The Treaty or Peace of Ryswick, also known as The Peace of Rijswijk was a series of agreements signed in the Dutch city of Rijswijk between 20 September and 30 October 1697, ending the 1689-97 Nine Years War between France and the Grand Alliance of England, Spain, the Holy Roman Empire and the Dutch Republic.

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Treaty of Utrecht

The Treaty of Utrecht, which established the Peace of Utrecht, is a series of individual peace treaties, rather than a single document, signed by the belligerents in the War of the Spanish Succession, in the Dutch city of Utrecht in March and April 1713.

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U.S. Route 1 in Maine

In the U.S. state of Maine, U.S. Route 1 (US 1) is a major north–south state highway serving the eastern part of the state.

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University of Nebraska Press

The University of Nebraska Press, also known as UNP, was founded in 1941 and is an academic publisher of scholarly and general-interest books.

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University of Oklahoma Press

The University of Oklahoma Press (OU Press) is the publishing arm of the University of Oklahoma.

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University of Pennsylvania Press

The University of Pennsylvania Press (or Penn Press) is a university press affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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Wabanaki Confederacy

The Wabanaki Confederacy (Wabenaki, Wobanaki, translated roughly as "People of the First Light" or "People of the Dawnland") are a First Nations and Native American confederation of five principal nations: the Mi'kmaq, Maliseet, Passamaquoddy, Abenaki, and Penobscot.

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Wells, Maine

Wells is a town in York County, Maine, United States.

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William and Mary Quarterly

The William and Mary Quarterly is a quarterly history journal published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture.

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William III of England

William III (Willem; 4 November 1650 – 8 March 1702), also widely known as William of Orange, was sovereign Prince of Orange from birth, Stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht, Gelderland and Overijssel in the Dutch Republic from 1672 and King of England, Ireland and Scotland from 1689 until his death in 1702.

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William Phips

Sir William Phips (or Phipps; February 2, 1651 – February 18, 1695) was a shepherd boy born in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, a shipwright, ship's captain, treasure hunter, a major general, and the first royally appointed governor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay.

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Winslow, Maine

Winslow is a town and census-designated place in Kennebec County, Maine, United States, along the Kennebec River.

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Witchcraft

Witchcraft or witchery broadly means the practice of and belief in magical skills and abilities exercised by solitary practitioners and groups.

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York Factory

York Factory was a settlement and Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) factory (trading post) located on the southwestern shore of Hudson Bay in northeastern Manitoba, Canada at the mouth of the Hayes River, approximately south-southeast of Churchill.

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York, Maine

York is a town in York County, Maine, United States, near the southern tip of the state.

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2018

2018 has been designated as the third International Year of the Reef by the International Coral Reef Initiative.

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2019

2019 (MMXIX) will be a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2019th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 19th year of the 3rd millennium, the 19th year of the 21st century, and the 10th and last year of the 2010s decade.

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Redirects here:

1st intercolonial war, King Williams War, Second Indian War.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_William's_War

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