Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Download
Faster access than browser!
 

Korean Confucianism

Index Korean Confucianism

Korean Confucianism is the form of Confucianism that emerged and developed in Korea. [1]

56 relations: Analects, Article 809 of the Korean Civil Code, Baekje, Buddhism, China, Chinese culture, Confucianism, Confucius, Culture of Korea, Donghak, First Sino-Japanese War, Four Books and Five Classics, Four Commanderies of Han, Four occupations, Gojoseon, Goryeo, Gwageo, Han dynasty, Index of Korea-related articles, Intellectual history, Jo Gwangjo, Joseon, Juche, Korea, Korea under Japanese rule, Korean Buddhism, Korean Confucian art, Korean flower arrangement, Korean garden, Korean philosophy, Korean pottery and porcelain, Korean shamanism, Korean tea ceremony, Korean War, Munmyo, Neo-Confucianism, Park Geun-hye, Religion in Korea, Russo-Japanese War, School story, Sejong the Great, Seonbi, Shang dynasty, Silhak, Song dynasty, South Korea, Spring and Autumn period, Sungkyunkwan, Tang dynasty, Taoism, ..., Taoism in Korea, Warring States period, Western Zhou, Yi Hwang, Yi I, Zhu Xi. Expand index (6 more) »

Analects

The Analects (Old Chinese: *run ŋ(r)aʔ), also known as the Analects of Confucius, is a collection of sayings and ideas attributed to the Chinese philosopher Confucius and his contemporaries, traditionally believed to have been compiled and written by Confucius's followers.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Analects · See more »

Article 809 of the Korean Civil Code

Article 809 of the Korean Civil Code (Korean: 민법 제 809조) was the codification of a traditional rule prohibiting marriage between men and women who have the same surname and ancestral home (bon-gwan).

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Article 809 of the Korean Civil Code · See more »

Baekje

Baekje (18 BC – 660 AD) was a kingdom located in southwest Korea.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Baekje · See more »

Buddhism

Buddhism is the world's fourth-largest religion with over 520 million followers, or over 7% of the global population, known as Buddhists.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Buddhism · See more »

China

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a unitary one-party sovereign state in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around /1e9 round 3 billion.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and China · See more »

Chinese culture

Chinese culture is one of the world's oldest cultures, originating thousands of years ago.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Chinese culture · See more »

Confucianism

Confucianism, also known as Ruism, is described as tradition, a philosophy, a religion, a humanistic or rationalistic religion, a way of governing, or simply a way of life.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Confucianism · See more »

Confucius

Confucius (551–479 BC) was a Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher of the Spring and Autumn period of Chinese history.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Confucius · See more »

Culture of Korea

The traditional culture of Korea refers to the shared cultural heritage of the Korean Peninsula.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Culture of Korea · See more »

Donghak

Donghak (lit. Eastern Learning) was an academic movement in Korean Neo-Confucianism founded in 1860 by Choe Je-u. The Donghak movement arose as a reaction to seohak (西學, "Western learning"), and called for a return to the "Way of Heaven".

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Donghak · See more »

First Sino-Japanese War

The First Sino-Japanese War (25 July 1894 – 17 April 1895) was fought between Qing dynasty of China and Empire of Japan, primarily for influence over Joseon.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and First Sino-Japanese War · See more »

Four Books and Five Classics

The Four Books and Five Classics are the authoritative books of Confucianism in China written before 300 BC.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Four Books and Five Classics · See more »

Four Commanderies of Han

The Four Commanderies of Han were the Chinese colony located in northern Korean Peninsula and part of the Liaodong Peninsula.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Four Commanderies of Han · See more »

Four occupations

The four occupations or "four categories of the people"Hansson, pp.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Four occupations · See more »

Gojoseon

Gojoseon, originally named Joseon, was an ancient Korean kingdom.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Gojoseon · See more »

Goryeo

Goryeo (918–1392), also spelled as Koryŏ, was a Korean kingdom established in 918 by King Taejo.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Goryeo · See more »

Gwageo

The gwageo or kwago were the national civil service examinations under the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties of Korea.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Gwageo · See more »

Han dynasty

The Han dynasty was the second imperial dynasty of China (206 BC–220 AD), preceded by the Qin dynasty (221–206 BC) and succeeded by the Three Kingdoms period (220–280 AD). Spanning over four centuries, the Han period is considered a golden age in Chinese history. To this day, China's majority ethnic group refers to themselves as the "Han Chinese" and the Chinese script is referred to as "Han characters". It was founded by the rebel leader Liu Bang, known posthumously as Emperor Gaozu of Han, and briefly interrupted by the Xin dynasty (9–23 AD) of the former regent Wang Mang. This interregnum separates the Han dynasty into two periods: the Western Han or Former Han (206 BC–9 AD) and the Eastern Han or Later Han (25–220 AD). The emperor was at the pinnacle of Han society. He presided over the Han government but shared power with both the nobility and appointed ministers who came largely from the scholarly gentry class. The Han Empire was divided into areas directly controlled by the central government using an innovation inherited from the Qin known as commanderies, and a number of semi-autonomous kingdoms. These kingdoms gradually lost all vestiges of their independence, particularly following the Rebellion of the Seven States. From the reign of Emperor Wu (r. 141–87 BC) onward, the Chinese court officially sponsored Confucianism in education and court politics, synthesized with the cosmology of later scholars such as Dong Zhongshu. This policy endured until the fall of the Qing dynasty in 1911 AD. The Han dynasty saw an age of economic prosperity and witnessed a significant growth of the money economy first established during the Zhou dynasty (c. 1050–256 BC). The coinage issued by the central government mint in 119 BC remained the standard coinage of China until the Tang dynasty (618–907 AD). The period saw a number of limited institutional innovations. To finance its military campaigns and the settlement of newly conquered frontier territories, the Han government nationalized the private salt and iron industries in 117 BC, but these government monopolies were repealed during the Eastern Han dynasty. Science and technology during the Han period saw significant advances, including the process of papermaking, the nautical steering ship rudder, the use of negative numbers in mathematics, the raised-relief map, the hydraulic-powered armillary sphere for astronomy, and a seismometer for measuring earthquakes employing an inverted pendulum. The Xiongnu, a nomadic steppe confederation, defeated the Han in 200 BC and forced the Han to submit as a de facto inferior partner, but continued their raids on the Han borders. Emperor Wu launched several military campaigns against them. The ultimate Han victory in these wars eventually forced the Xiongnu to accept vassal status as Han tributaries. These campaigns expanded Han sovereignty into the Tarim Basin of Central Asia, divided the Xiongnu into two separate confederations, and helped establish the vast trade network known as the Silk Road, which reached as far as the Mediterranean world. The territories north of Han's borders were quickly overrun by the nomadic Xianbei confederation. Emperor Wu also launched successful military expeditions in the south, annexing Nanyue in 111 BC and Dian in 109 BC, and in the Korean Peninsula where the Xuantu and Lelang Commanderies were established in 108 BC. After 92 AD, the palace eunuchs increasingly involved themselves in court politics, engaging in violent power struggles between the various consort clans of the empresses and empresses dowager, causing the Han's ultimate downfall. Imperial authority was also seriously challenged by large Daoist religious societies which instigated the Yellow Turban Rebellion and the Five Pecks of Rice Rebellion. Following the death of Emperor Ling (r. 168–189 AD), the palace eunuchs suffered wholesale massacre by military officers, allowing members of the aristocracy and military governors to become warlords and divide the empire. When Cao Pi, King of Wei, usurped the throne from Emperor Xian, the Han dynasty would eventually collapse and ceased to exist.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Han dynasty · See more »

Index of Korea-related articles

This is a list of articles on Korea-related people, places, things, and concepts.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Index of Korea-related articles · See more »

Intellectual history

Intellectual history refers to the historiography of ideas and thinkers.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Intellectual history · See more »

Jo Gwangjo

Jo Gwangjo (23 August 1482 – 10 January 1520), also often called by his pen name Jeong-am, was Korean Neo-Confucian scholar who pursued radical reforms during the reign of Jungjong of Joseon in the early 16th century.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Jo Gwangjo · See more »

Joseon

The Joseon dynasty (also transcribed as Chosŏn or Chosun, 조선; officially the Kingdom of Great Joseon, 대조선국) was a Korean dynastic kingdom that lasted for approximately five centuries.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Joseon · See more »

Juche

Juche (subject;; usually left untranslated or translated as "self-reliance") is the official state ideology of North Korea, described by the government as Kim Il-sung's "original, brilliant and revolutionary contribution to national and international thought".

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Juche · See more »

Korea

Korea is a region in East Asia; since 1945 it has been divided into two distinctive sovereign states: North Korea and South Korea.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Korea · See more »

Korea under Japanese rule

Korea under Japanese rule began with the end of the short-lived Korean Empire in 1910 and ended at the conclusion of World War II in 1945.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Korea under Japanese rule · See more »

Korean Buddhism

Korean Buddhism is distinguished from other forms of Buddhism by its attempt to resolve what it sees as inconsistencies in Mahayana Buddhism.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Korean Buddhism · See more »

Korean Confucian art

Korean Confucian art took strong hold with the Yi generals who set in place the Joseon dynasty which distinguished itself in many ways by promoting Confucian thought as the basis for a new national vision.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Korean Confucian art · See more »

Korean flower arrangement

Korean flower arrangement is being revived as an indoor art, and most often uses simple Joseon dynasty whiteware to highlight Korean flowers and tree branches in elegant and unforced natural arrangements.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Korean flower arrangement · See more »

Korean garden

Korean gardens are natural, informal, simple and unforced, seeking to merge with the natural world.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Korean garden · See more »

Korean philosophy

Korean philosophy focused on a totality of world view.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Korean philosophy · See more »

Korean pottery and porcelain

Korean ceramic history begins with the oldest earthenware dating to around 8000 BC.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Korean pottery and porcelain · See more »

Korean shamanism

Korean shamanism, also known as Shinism (Hangul 신교, Hanja 神敎; Shingyo or Shinkyo, "religion of the spirits/gods"), or Shindo (Hangul: 신도; Hanja: 神道, "way of the spirits/gods"), is the collective term for the ethnic religions of Korea which date back to prehistory, and consist in the worship of gods (신 shin) and ancestors (조상 josang).

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Korean shamanism · See more »

Korean tea ceremony

The Korean tea ceremony or darye (茶禮) is a traditional form of tea ceremony practiced in Korea.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Korean tea ceremony · See more »

Korean War

The Korean War (in South Korean, "Korean War"; in North Korean, "Fatherland: Liberation War"; 25 June 1950 – 27 July 1953) was a war between North Korea (with the support of China and the Soviet Union) and South Korea (with the principal support of the United States).

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Korean War · See more »

Munmyo

Munmyo (more specifically Seoul Munmyo or Seonggyungwan Munmyo) is Korea's primary temple of Confucius ("munmyo" is also the general Korean term for a temple of Confucius).

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Munmyo · See more »

Neo-Confucianism

Neo-Confucianism (often shortened to lixue 理學) is a moral, ethical, and metaphysical Chinese philosophy influenced by Confucianism, and originated with Han Yu and Li Ao (772–841) in the Tang Dynasty, and became prominent during the Song and Ming dynasties.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Neo-Confucianism · See more »

Park Geun-hye

Park Geun-hye (born 2 February 1952) is a former South Korean politician who served as the 11th President of South Korea from 2013 to 2017.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Park Geun-hye · See more »

Religion in Korea

Religion in Korea refers the various religious traditions practiced on the Korean peninsula.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Religion in Korea · See more »

Russo-Japanese War

The Russo–Japanese War (Russko-yaponskaya voina; Nichirosensō; 1904–05) was fought between the Russian Empire and the Empire of Japan over rival imperial ambitions in Manchuria and Korea.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Russo-Japanese War · See more »

School story

The school story is a fiction genre centering on older pre-adolescent and adolescent school life, at its most popular in the first half of the twentieth century.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and School story · See more »

Sejong the Great

Sejong the Great (7 May 1397 – 8 April 1450) was the fourth king of Joseon-dynasty Korea.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Sejong the Great · See more »

Seonbi

Seonbi were virtuous scholars during the Goryeo and Joseon periods of Korea who served the public without a government position, choosing to pass up positions of wealth and power to lead lives of study and integrity.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Seonbi · See more »

Shang dynasty

The Shang dynasty or Yin dynasty, according to traditional historiography, ruled in the Yellow River valley in the second millennium BC, succeeding the Xia dynasty and followed by the Zhou dynasty.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Shang dynasty · See more »

Silhak

Silhak was a Korean Confucian social reform movement in late Joseon Dynasty.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Silhak · See more »

Song dynasty

The Song dynasty (960–1279) was an era of Chinese history that began in 960 and continued until 1279.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Song dynasty · See more »

South Korea

South Korea, officially the Republic of Korea (대한민국; Hanja: 大韓民國; Daehan Minguk,; lit. "The Great Country of the Han People"), is a country in East Asia, constituting the southern part of the Korean Peninsula and lying east to the Asian mainland.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and South Korea · See more »

Spring and Autumn period

The Spring and Autumn period was a period in Chinese history from approximately 771 to 476 BC (or according to some authorities until 403 BC) which corresponds roughly to the first half of the Eastern Zhou Period.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Spring and Autumn period · See more »

Sungkyunkwan

Sungkyunkwan, was the foremost educational institution in Korea during the late Goryeo and Joseon Dynasties.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Sungkyunkwan · See more »

Tang dynasty

The Tang dynasty or the Tang Empire was an imperial dynasty of China preceded by the Sui dynasty and followed by the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Tang dynasty · See more »

Taoism

Taoism, also known as Daoism, is a religious or philosophical tradition of Chinese origin which emphasizes living in harmony with the Tao (also romanized as ''Dao'').

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Taoism · See more »

Taoism in Korea

Taoism or "Do" is thought to be the earliest state philosophy for the Korean people spanning several thousand years.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Taoism in Korea · See more »

Warring States period

The Warring States period was an era in ancient Chinese history of warfare, as well as bureaucratic and military reforms and consolidation, following the Spring and Autumn period and concluding with the Qin wars of conquest that saw the annexation of all other contender states, which ultimately led to the Qin state's victory in 221 BC as the first unified Chinese empire known as the Qin dynasty.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Warring States period · See more »

Western Zhou

The Western Zhou (西周; c. 1046 – 771 BC) was the first half of the Zhou dynasty of ancient China.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Western Zhou · See more »

Yi Hwang

Yi Hwang (1501–1570) is one of the two most prominent Korean Confucian scholars of the Joseon Dynasty, the other being his younger contemporary Yi I (Yulgok).

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Yi Hwang · See more »

Yi I

Yi I (December 26, 1536 – February 27, 1584) was one of the two most prominent Korean Confucian scholars of the Joseon Dynasty, the other being his older contemporary, Yi Hwang (Toegye).

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Yi I · See more »

Zhu Xi

Zhu Xi (October 18, 1130 – April 23, 1200), also known by his courtesy name Yuanhui (or Zhonghui), and self-titled Hui'an, was a Chinese philosopher, politician, and writer of the Song dynasty.

New!!: Korean Confucianism and Zhu Xi · See more »

Redirects here:

Confucianism - Korea, Confucianism in Korea, Korean Confucian, Korean Confucians, Korean confucianism, Koryo Confucian, Koryo Confucianism, Koryo Confucians.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_Confucianism

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »