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Labor unions in the United States

Index Labor unions in the United States

Labor unions in the United States are organizations that represent workers in many industries recognized under US labor law. [1]

100 relations: AFL–CIO, Agency shop, Al Jazeera America, American Federation of Labor, American middle class, Arbitration, Arthur Goldberg, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Capital flight, Card check, CBS, Change to Win Federation, Collective bargaining, Commission on Industrial Relations, Conservative coalition, Cornell University, Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Corporatism, Demography, Deregulation, Econometrics, Economics, Employee Free Choice Act, FiveThirtyEight, Foreign direct investment, Frances Perkins, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Gallup (company), Ghent system, Globalization, Great Recession, Gross domestic product, Harvard Law School, Harvard University Press, Health care, History of the United States Democratic Party, Human resource management, Independent agencies of the United States government, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Industrial relations, Industrial Workers of the World, Industrialisation, International Brotherhood of Teamsters, International comparisons of trade unions, International Longshore and Warehouse Union, International Longshoremen's Association, International Monetary Fund, John Thomas Dunlop, Joseph Curran, Jurisdictional strike, ..., Knights of Labor, Labor federation competition in the United States, Labor history of the United States, Labor Management Relations Act of 1947, Labor Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959, Labor Relations Reference Manual, Left-wing politics, List of strikes, List of worker deaths in United States labor disputes, Living wage, Los Angeles Times, Majority, Matthew Woll, Michael Yates (economist), Mickey Kantor, Nanotechnology, National Labor Relations Act of 1935, National Labor Relations Board, Neoliberalism, New Deal, New Deal coalition, Nicholas Kristof, Opposition to trade unions, Organizational behavior, Plurality (voting), Privatization, Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization (1968), Public-sector trade unions in the United States, Reuben G. Soderstrom, Richard J. Jensen, Right-to-work law, Robert A. Taft, Samuel Gompers, Scott Walker (politician), Social statistics, Solidarity unionism, Standard Occupational Classification System, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Examiner, The Washington Post, Thomas Geoghegan, Timeline of labor issues and events, Trade union, Union affiliation by U.S. state, Union shop, United States, United States Department of Labor, United States labor law, Weingarten Rights. Expand index (50 more) »

AFL–CIO

The American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) is the largest federation of unions in the United States.

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Agency shop

An agency shop is a form of union security agreement where the employer may hire union or non-union workers, and employees need not join the union in order to remain employed.

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Al Jazeera America

Al Jazeera America (AJAM) was an American basic cable and satellite news television channel owned by the Al Jazeera Media Network.

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American Federation of Labor

The American Federation of Labor (AFL) was a national federation of labor unions in the United States founded in Columbus, Ohio, in December 1886 by an alliance of craft unions disaffected from the Knights of Labor, a national labor union.

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American middle class

The American middle class is a social class in the United States.

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Arbitration

Arbitration, a form of alternative dispute resolution (ADR), is a way to resolve disputes outside the courts.

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Arthur Goldberg

Arthur Joseph Goldberg (August 8, 1908January 19, 1990) was an American statesman and jurist who served as the 9th U.S. Secretary of Labor, an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, and the 6th United States Ambassador to the United Nations.

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Bureau of Labor Statistics

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is a unit of the United States Department of Labor.

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Capital flight

Capital flight, in economics, occurs when assets or money rapidly flow out of a country, due to an event of economic consequence.

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Card check

Card check (also called majority sign-up) is a method for employees to organize into a labor union in which a majority of employees in a bargaining unit sign authorization forms, or "cards", stating they wish to be represented by the union.

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CBS

CBS (an initialism of the network's former name, the Columbia Broadcasting System) is an American English language commercial broadcast television network that is a flagship property of CBS Corporation.

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Change to Win Federation

The Change to Win Organizing Center (CtW) is a coalition of American labor unions originally formed in 2005 as an alternative to the AFL-CIO.

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Collective bargaining

Collective bargaining is a process of negotiation between employers and a group of employees aimed at agreements to regulate working salaries, working conditions, benefits, and other aspects of workers' compensation and rights for workers.

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Commission on Industrial Relations

For the government agency in Nebraska see Court of Industrial Relations (Nebraska) The Commission on Industrial Relations (also known as the Walsh Commission) p. 12.

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Conservative coalition

The conservative coalition was an unofficial Congressional coalition bringing together a conservative majority of the Republican Party and the conservative, mostly Southern, wing of the Democratic Party.

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Cornell University

Cornell University is a private and statutory Ivy League research university located in Ithaca, New York.

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Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations

The New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University (ILR) is an industrial relations school at Cornell University, located in Ithaca, New York, United States.

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Corporatism

Corporatism is the organization of a society by corporate groups and agricultural, labour, military or scientific syndicates and guilds on the basis of their common interests.

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Demography

Demography (from prefix demo- from Ancient Greek δῆμος dēmos meaning "the people", and -graphy from γράφω graphō, implies "writing, description or measurement") is the statistical study of populations, especially human beings.

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Deregulation

Deregulation is the process of removing or reducing state regulations, typically in the economic sphere.

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Econometrics

Econometrics is the application of statistical methods to economic data and is described as the branch of economics that aims to give empirical content to economic relations.

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Economics

Economics is the social science that studies the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.

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Employee Free Choice Act

The Employee Free Choice Act is the name for several legislative bills on US labor law (.) which have been proposed and sometimes introduced into one or both chambers of the U.S. Congress.

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FiveThirtyEight

FiveThirtyEight, sometimes referred to as 538, is a website that focuses on opinion poll analysis, politics, economics, and sports blogging.

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Foreign direct investment

A foreign direct investment (FDI) is an investment in the form of a controlling ownership in a business in one country by an entity based in another country.

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Frances Perkins

Frances Perkins (born Fannie Coralie Perkins; April 10, 1880 – May 14, 1965) was an American sociologist and workers-rights advocate who served as the U.S. Secretary of Labor from 1933 to 1945, the longest serving in that position, and the first woman appointed to the U.S. Cabinet.

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Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Sr. (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), often referred to by his initials FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd President of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945.

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Gallup (company)

Gallup, Inc. is an American research-based, global performance-management consulting company.

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Ghent system

The Ghent system is the name given to an arrangement in some countries whereby the main responsibility for welfare payments, especially unemployment benefits, is held by trade/labor unions, rather than a government agency.

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Globalization

Globalization or globalisation is the process of interaction and integration between people, companies, and governments worldwide.

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Great Recession

The Great Recession was a period of general economic decline observed in world markets during the late 2000s and early 2010s.

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Gross domestic product

Gross domestic product (GDP) is a monetary measure of the market value of all final goods and services produced in a period (quarterly or yearly) of time.

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Harvard Law School

Harvard Law School (also known as Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University located in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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Harvard University Press

Harvard University Press (HUP) is a publishing house established on January 13, 1913, as a division of Harvard University, and focused on academic publishing.

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Health care

Health care or healthcare is the maintenance or improvement of health via the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, illness, injury, and other physical and mental impairments in human beings.

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History of the United States Democratic Party

The Democratic Party is the oldest voter-based political party in the world and the oldest existing political party in the United States, tracing its heritage back to the anti-Federalists and the Jeffersonian Democratic-Republican Party of the 1790s.

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Human resource management

Human resource management (HRM or HR) is the strategic approach to the effective management of organization workers so that they help the business gain a competitive advantage, Commonly referred to as the HR Department, it is designed to maximize employee performance in service of an employer's strategic objectives.

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Independent agencies of the United States government

Independent agencies of the United States federal government are those agencies that exist outside the federal executive departments (those headed by a Cabinet secretary) and the Executive Office of the President.

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Industrial and Labor Relations Review

Industrial and Labor Relations Review (ILR Review) is a publication of the Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations.

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Industrial relations

Industrial relations is a multidisciplinary field that studies the employment relationship.

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Industrial Workers of the World

The Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), members of which are commonly termed "Wobblies", is an international labor union that was founded in 1905 in Chicago, Illinois in the United States of America.

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Industrialisation

Industrialisation or industrialization is the period of social and economic change that transforms a human group from an agrarian society into an industrial society, involving the extensive re-organisation of an economy for the purpose of manufacturing.

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International Brotherhood of Teamsters

The International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT) is a labor union in the United States and Canada.

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International comparisons of trade unions

Unions have been compared across countries by growth and decline patterns, by violence levels, and by kinds of political activity.

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International Longshore and Warehouse Union

The International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) is a labor union which primarily represents dock workers on the West Coast of the United States, Hawaii and Alaska, and in British Columbia, Canada.

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International Longshoremen's Association

The International Longshoremen's Association (ILA) is a labor union representing longshore workers along the East Coast of the United States and Canada, the Gulf Coast, the Great Lakes, Puerto Rico, and inland waterways.

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International Monetary Fund

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is an international organization headquartered in Washington, D.C., consisting of "189 countries working to foster global monetary cooperation, secure financial stability, facilitate international trade, promote high employment and sustainable economic growth, and reduce poverty around the world." Formed in 1945 at the Bretton Woods Conference primarily by the ideas of Harry Dexter White and John Maynard Keynes, it came into formal existence in 1945 with 29 member countries and the goal of reconstructing the international payment system.

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John Thomas Dunlop

John Thomas Dunlop (July 5, 1914October 2, 2003) was an American administrator and labor scholar.

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Joseph Curran

Joseph Curran (March 1, 1906 – August 14, 1981) was a merchant seaman and an American labor leader. He was founding president of the National Maritime Union (or NMU, now part of the Seafarers International Union of North America) from 1937 to 1973, and a vice president of the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO).

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Jurisdictional strike

In United States labor law, a jurisdictional strike is a concerted refusal to work undertaken by a union to assert its members' right to particular job assignments and to protest the assignment of disputed work to members of another union or to unorganized workers.

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Knights of Labor

Knights of Labor (K of L), officially Noble and Holy Order of the Knights of Labor, was the largest and one of the most important American labor organizations of the 1880s.

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Labor federation competition in the United States

Labor federation competition in the U.S. is a history of the labor movement, considering U.S. labor organizations and federations that have been regional, national, or international in scope, and that have united organizations of disparate groups of workers.

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Labor history of the United States

The labor history of the United States describes the history of organized labor, US labor law, and more general history of working people, in the United States.

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Labor Management Relations Act of 1947

The Labor Management Relations Act of 1947, better known as the Taft–Hartley Act, (80 H.R. 3020) is a United States federal law that restricts the activities and power of labor unions.

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Labor Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959

The Labor Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959 (also "LMRDA" or the "Landrum–Griffin Act"), is a US labor law that regulates labor unions' internal affairs and their officials' relationships with employers.

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Labor Relations Reference Manual

Labor Relations Reference Manual (LRRM) is an American case reporter devoted exclusively to labor law published by the Bureau of National Affairs (BNA).

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Left-wing politics

Left-wing politics supports social equality and egalitarianism, often in opposition to social hierarchy.

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List of strikes

The following is a list of specific strikes (workers refusing to work in an attempt to change their conditions in a particular industry or individual workplace, or in solidarity with those in another particular workplace) and general strikes (widespread refusal of workers to work in an organized political campaign on a broader national or international level).

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List of worker deaths in United States labor disputes

The following list of worker deaths in United States labor disputes captures known incidents of fatal labor-related violence in U.S. labor history, which began in the colonial era with the earliest worker demands around 1636 for better working conditions.

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Living wage

A living wage is the minimum income necessary for a worker to meet their basic needs.

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Los Angeles Times

The Los Angeles Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California since 1881.

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Majority

A majority is the greater part, or more than half, of the total.

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Matthew Woll

Matthew Woll (January 25, 1880 – June 1, 1956) was president of the International Photo-Engravers Union of North America from 1906 to 1929, an American Federation of Labor (AFL) vice president from 1919 to 1955 and an AFL-CIO vice president from 1955 to 1956.

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Michael Yates (economist)

Michael D. Yates (born 1946) is an economist and a labor educator, and associate editor of the socialist magazine Monthly Review (MR).

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Mickey Kantor

Michael Kantor (born August 7, 1939) is an American politician and lawyer.

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Nanotechnology

Nanotechnology ("nanotech") is manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale.

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National Labor Relations Act of 1935

The National Labor Relations Act of 1935 (49 Stat. 449) (also known as the Wagner Act after New York Senator Robert F. Wagner) is a foundational statute of United States labor law which guarantees basic rights of private sector employees to organize into trade unions, engage in collective bargaining for better terms and conditions at work, and take collective action including strike if necessary.

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National Labor Relations Board

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) is an independent US government agency with responsibilities for enforcing US labor law in relation to collective bargaining and unfair labor practices.

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Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism or neo-liberalism refers primarily to the 20th-century resurgence of 19th-century ideas associated with laissez-faire economic liberalism.

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New Deal

The New Deal was a series of programs, public work projects, financial reforms and regulations enacted in the United States 1933-36, in response to the Great Depression.

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New Deal coalition

The New Deal coalition was the alignment of interest groups and voting blocs in the United States that supported the New Deal and voted for Democratic presidential candidates from 1932 until the late 1960s.

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Nicholas Kristof

Nicholas Donabet Kristof (born April 27, 1959) is an American journalist and political commentator.

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Opposition to trade unions

Opposition to trade unions comes from a variety of groups in society and there are many different types of argument on which this opposition is based.

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Organizational behavior

Organizational behavior (OB) or organisational behaviour is "the study of human behavior in organizational settings, the interface between human behavior and the organization, and the organization itself".

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Plurality (voting)

A plurality vote (in North America) or relative majority (in the United Kingdom) describes the circumstance when a candidate or proposition polls more votes than any other, but does not receive a majority.

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Privatization

Privatization (also spelled privatisation) is the purchase of all outstanding shares of a publicly traded company by private investors, or the sale of a state-owned enterprise to private investors.

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Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization (1968)

The Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization or PATCO was a United States trade union that operated from 1968 until its decertification in 1981 following a strike that was declared illegal and broken by the Reagan Administration.

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Public-sector trade unions in the United States

A public-sector trade union (or public-sector labor union) is a trade union which primarily represents the interests of employees within public sector or governmental organizations.

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Reuben G. Soderstrom

Reuben George Soderstrom (March 10, 1888 – December 15, 1970) was an American leader of organized labor who served as President of the Illinois State Federation of Labor (ISFL) and Illinois AFL-CIO from 1930–1970.

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Richard J. Jensen

Richard Joseph Jensen (born October 24, 1941) is an American historian, who was professor of history at the University of Illinois, Chicago, from 1973 to 1996.

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Right-to-work law

"Right-to-work laws" are statutes in 28 U.S. states that prohibit union security agreements between companies and workers' unions.

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Robert A. Taft

Robert Alphonso Taft Sr. (September 8, 1889 – July 31, 1953) was an American conservative politician, lawyer, and scion of the Taft family.

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Samuel Gompers

Samuel Gompers (January 27, 1850December 13, 1924) was an English-born American labor union leader and a key figure in American labor history.

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Scott Walker (politician)

Scott Kevin Walker (born November 2, 1967) is an American politician serving as the 45th and current Governor of Wisconsin since 2011.

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Social statistics

Social statistics is the use of statistical measurement systems to study human behavior in a social environment.

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Solidarity unionism

Solidarity unionism is a model of labour organizing in which the workers themselves formulate strategy and take action against the company directly without mediation from government or paid union representatives.

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Standard Occupational Classification System

The Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) System is a United States government system of classifying occupations.

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The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

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The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal is a U.S. business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City.

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The Washington Examiner

The Washington Examiner is an American political journalism website and weekly magazine based in Washington, D.C. that covers politics and policy in the United States and internationally.

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The Washington Post

The Washington Post is a major American daily newspaper founded on December 6, 1877.

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Thomas Geoghegan

Thomas Geoghegan (born January 22, 1949 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American labor lawyer and author based in Chicago.

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Timeline of labor issues and events

Timeline of organized labor history.

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Trade union

A trade union or trades union, also called a labour union (Canada) or labor union (US), is an organization of workers who have come together to achieve many common goals; such as protecting the integrity of its trade, improving safety standards, and attaining better wages, benefits (such as vacation, health care, and retirement), and working conditions through the increased bargaining power wielded by the creation of a monopoly of the workers.

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Union affiliation by U.S. state

No description.

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Union shop

A union shop, also known as a post-entry closed shop, is a form of a union security clause.

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United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

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United States Department of Labor

The United States Department of Labor (DOL) is a cabinet-level department of the U.S. federal government responsible for occupational safety, wage and hour standards, unemployment insurance benefits, reemployment services, and some economic statistics; many U.S. states also have such departments.

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United States labor law

United States labor law sets the rights and duties for employees, labor unions, and employers in the United States.

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Weingarten Rights

In 1975 the United States Supreme Court in the case of NLRB v. J. Weingarten, Inc. upheld a National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) decision that employees have a right to union representation at investigatory interviews.

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References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labor_unions_in_the_United_States

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