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Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. [1]

347 relations: Ablative case, Accusative case, Acta Apostolicae Sedis, Acute accent, Adjective, Affix, Agent (grammar), American Classical League, Americas, Ancient Greek, Anglican Communion, Anglo-Norman language, Anglo-Saxon runes, Apex (diacritic), Approximant consonant, Arabic numerals, Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia, Article (grammar), Asterix, Augustine of Canterbury, Austronesian languages, Automated teller machine, Baltimore City College, BBC Online, Book of Common Prayer, Boston Latin Academy, Boston Latin School, Boustrophedon, Breve, Brooklyn Latin School, Cambridge Latin Course, Cambridge University Press, Canada, Canon law, Catholic Church, Central High School (Philadelphia), Cicero, Circa, Classical Association, Classical compound, Classical language, Classical Latin, Classics, Colosseum, Commentarii de Bello Gallico, Compound (linguistics), Connecticut, Contemporary Latin, Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum, Croatian language, ..., Croatian Latin literature, Croatian National Bank, Croatian Parliament, Cupid, Czech language, Dative case, Declension, Dental consonant, Deponent verb, Diocese, Diphthong, Discourse, Dutch language, Early modern Europe, Ecclesiastical Latin, Education in ancient Rome, English language, English words of Greek origin, Epigraphy, Esse quam videri, Eton College, Etruscan language, Fall of the Western Roman Empire, Finland, Franks Casket, Frederic M. Wheelock, French language, Fricative consonant, Fusional language, Galen, Gemination, Genitive case, German language, Germanic languages, Germanic peoples, Germany, Gerund, Gerundive, Glottal consonant, Government gazette, Grammar, Grammar school, Grammatical aspect, Grammatical case, Grammatical conjugation, Grammatical gender, Grammatical mood, Grammatical number, Grammatical person, Grammatical tense, Great Britain, Greek alphabet, Greek art, Gymnasium (Germany), Gymnasium (school), Haberdashers' Aske's Boys' School, Hadrian's Wall, Hard and soft C, Hard and soft G, Harrow School, Harry Potter, Harvard University, Harvard University Press, History of Taranto, Holy Roman Empire, Holy See, How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, Hybrid word, Igor Stravinsky, Imperfective aspect, Indo-European languages, Infinitive, Inflection, Inkhorn term, Instruction in Latin, Instrumental case, Interlingua, International auxiliary language, Interpunct, Intonation (linguistics), Iowa State University, Italian language, Italian Peninsula, Italic languages, Janus Pannonius, Jughead (Lost), Julius Caesar, Kansas, Kingdom of Hungary, Kingdom of Poland, Labial consonant, Labialization, Languages of Switzerland, Late antiquity, Late Latin, Latin alphabet, Latin conjugation, Latin influence in English, Latin mnemonics, Latin school, Latin Wikipedia, Latino sine flexione, Latino-Faliscan languages, Latins (Italic tribe), Latium, Letter case, Liceo classico, Liceo scientifico, Lingua franca, Linnaean taxonomy, List of Canadian provincial and territorial symbols, List of English words of French origin, List of Greek and Latin roots in English, List of Latin abbreviations, List of Latin and Greek words commonly used in systematic names, List of Latin legal terms, List of Latin phrases, List of Latin translations of modern literature, List of Latin words with English derivatives, List of Latinised names, List of medical roots, suffixes and prefixes, List of songs with Latin lyrics, List of U.S. 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Stola, Stop consonant, Sub-Saharan Africa, Subject (grammar), Subject complement, Supine, Switzerland, Syllable, Syntax, Synthetic language, Szlachta, Television, Terence, The Adventures of Tintin, The Cat in the Hat, The Daily Telegraph, The English High School, The Exorcist (film), The Hobbit, The Little Prince, The National Archives (United Kingdom), The Passion of the Christ, The Times Literary Supplement, Theology, Toponymy, Tore Janson, Treasure Island, Tridentine Mass, Turkic languages, Umayyad conquest of Hispania, United Kingdom, United States, United States Coast Guard, United States Marine Corps, University of Cambridge, University of Chicago Press, University of Kentucky, University of Oxford, Upsilon, Vatican City, Velar consonant, Venus (mythology), Veritas, Vernacular, Victoria Cross, Victoria Cross (Canada), Vietnamese language, Vindolanda tablets, Virginia, Vocabulary, Vocative case, Voice (grammar), Voice (phonetics), Voiced alveolar fricative, Voicelessness, Vowel length, Vulgar Latin, Walter the Farting Dog, Wax tablet, West Virginia, Winnie-the-Pooh, Word divider, Word order, Yle, Zeta. 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Ablative case

The ablative case (sometimes abbreviated) is a grammatical case for nouns, pronouns and adjectives in the grammar of various languages; it is sometimes used to express motion away from something, among other uses.

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Accusative case

The accusative case (abbreviated) of a noun is the grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a transitive verb.

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Acta Apostolicae Sedis

Acta Apostolicae Sedis (Latin for "Register of the Apostolic See"), often cited as AAS, is the official gazette of the Holy See, appearing about twelve times a year.

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Acute accent

The acute accent (´) is a diacritic used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin, Cyrillic, and Greek scripts.

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Adjective

In linguistics, an adjective (abbreviated) is a describing word, the main syntactic role of which is to qualify a noun or noun phrase, giving more information about the object signified.

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Affix

In linguistics, an affix is a morpheme that is attached to a word stem to form a new word or word form.

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Agent (grammar)

In linguistics, a grammatical agent is the thematic relation of the cause or initiator to an event.

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American Classical League

Founded in 1919, the American Classical League (ACL) is a professional organization which promotes the study of classical civilization at all levels of education in the United States and Canada.

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Americas

The Americas (also collectively called America)"America." The Oxford Companion to the English Language.

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Ancient Greek

The Ancient Greek language includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD.

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Anglican Communion

The Anglican Communion is the third largest Christian communion with 85 million members, founded in 1867 in London, England.

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Anglo-Norman language

Anglo-Norman, also known as Anglo-Norman French, is a variety of the Norman language that was used in England and, to a lesser extent, elsewhere in the British Isles during the Anglo-Norman period.

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Anglo-Saxon runes

Anglo-Saxon runes are runes used by the early Anglo-Saxons as an alphabet in their writing.

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Apex (diacritic)

In written Latin, the apex (plural "apices") is a mark with roughly the shape of an acute accent (´) which is placed over vowels to indicate that they are long.

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Approximant consonant

Approximants are speech sounds that involve the articulators approaching each other but not narrowly enough nor with enough articulatory precision to create turbulent airflow.

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Arabic numerals

Arabic numerals, also called Hindu–Arabic numerals, are the ten digits: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, based on the Hindu–Arabic numeral system, the most common system for the symbolic representation of numbers in the world today.

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Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia

The Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia (Middle Armenian: Կիլիկիոյ Հայոց Թագաւորութիւն), also known as the Cilician Armenia (Կիլիկյան Հայաստան), Lesser Armenia, or New Armenia, was an independent principality formed during the High Middle Ages by Armenian refugees fleeing the Seljuq invasion of Armenia.

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Article (grammar)

An article (with the linguistic glossing abbreviation) is a word that is used with a noun (as a standalone word or a prefix or suffix) to specify grammatical definiteness of the noun, and in some languages extending to volume or numerical scope.

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Asterix

Asterix or The Adventures of Asterix (Astérix or Astérix le Gaulois) is a series of French comics.

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Augustine of Canterbury

Augustine of Canterbury (born first third of the 6th century – died probably 26 May 604) was a Benedictine monk who became the first Archbishop of Canterbury in the year 597.

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Austronesian languages

The Austronesian languages are a language family that is widely dispersed throughout Maritime Southeast Asia, Madagascar and the islands of the Pacific Ocean, with a few members in continental Asia.

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Automated teller machine

An automated teller machine (ATM) is an electronic telecommunications device that enables customers of financial institutions to perform financial transactions, such as cash withdrawals, deposits, transfer funds, or obtaining account information, at any time and without the need for direct interaction with bank staff.

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Baltimore City College

The Baltimore City College, known colloquially as City, City College, B.C.C. and nicknamed "The Castle on the Hill" is a public magnet high school in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. Established and authorized by resolution in March 1839 by the Baltimore City Council, signed / approved by the 10th Mayor, Sheppard C. Leakin (1838-1840), and opened in October 1839 as "The High School", "City" is the third oldest active public high school in the US. --> A citywide college preparatory school with a liberal arts focus, The Baltimore City College has selective admissions criteria based on entrance exams and middle school grades. The four-year City College curriculum includes the IB Middle Years Programme and the IB Diploma Programme of the International Baccalaureate curriculums since the mid 1980s. --> It is located on a hill-top campus in Northeast Baltimore bordered by 33rd Street (a major/park-like bamboo shaded boulevard with a landscaped median strip), The Alameda (a similar boulevard and median), and Loch Raven Boulevard. -->Leonhart (1939), p. 120. The school's main building is a National Historic Landmark and a Baltimore City Landmark designation. According to the Maryland Historical Society, "The rough stone granite and limestone trim Collegiate Gothic architecture style structure, aptly nicknamed 'The Castle On The Hill,' since 1928, sits atop "Collegian Hill" - the highest point within the city limits. With a singular striking Gothic tower that stands 200 feet high, the building edifice and surrounding park-like campus hold scenic views of the surrounding region and the distant downtown skyline of skyscrapers and Inner Harbor, although this is soon to be hidden by future plans of a bamboo-establishment project.".

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BBC Online

BBC Online, formerly known as BBCi, is the BBC's online service.

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Book of Common Prayer

The Book of Common Prayer (BCP) is the short title of a number of related prayer books used in the Anglican Communion, as well as by the Continuing Anglican, Anglican realignment and other Anglican Christian churches.

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Boston Latin Academy

Boston Latin Academy (BLA) is a public exam school founded in 1878 in Boston, Massachusetts providing students in grades 7th through 12th a classical preparatory education.

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Boston Latin School

The Boston Latin School is a public exam school in Boston, Massachusetts.

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Boustrophedon

Boustrophedon (βουστροφηδόν, "ox-turning" from βοῦς,, "ox", στροφή,, "turn" and the adverbial suffix -δόν, "like, in the manner of"; that is, turning like oxen in ploughing) is a kind of bi-directional text, mostly seen in ancient manuscripts and other inscriptions.

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Breve

A breve (less often;; neuter form of the Latin brevis “short, brief”) is the diacritic mark ˘, shaped like the bottom half of a circle.

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Brooklyn Latin School

The Brooklyn Latin School is a specialized high school in New York City, founded in 2006.

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Cambridge Latin Course

The Cambridge Latin Course (CLC) is a series of textbooks published by Cambridge University Press, used to teach Latin to secondary school students.

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Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge.

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Canada

Canada is a country located in the northern part of North America.

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Canon law

Canon law (from Greek kanon, a 'straight measuring rod, ruler') is a set of ordinances and regulations made by ecclesiastical authority (Church leadership), for the government of a Christian organization or church and its members.

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Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.299 billion members worldwide.

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Central High School (Philadelphia)

Central High School is a public high school in the Logan"." It is the best school eva.

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Cicero

Marcus Tullius Cicero (3 January 106 BC – 7 December 43 BC) was a Roman statesman, orator, lawyer and philosopher, who served as consul in the year 63 BC.

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Circa

Circa, usually abbreviated c., ca. or ca (also circ. or cca.), means "approximately" in several European languages (and as a loanword in English), usually in reference to a date.

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Classical Association

The Classical Association is a British learned society in the field of classics, and a registered charity.

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Classical compound

Classical compounds and neoclassical compounds are compound words composed from combining forms (which act as affixes or stems) derived from classical Latin or ancient Greek roots.

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Classical language

A classical language is a language with a literature that is classical.

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Classical Latin

Classical Latin is the modern term used to describe the form of the Latin language recognized as standard by writers of the late Roman Republic and the Roman Empire.

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Classics

Classics or classical studies is the study of classical antiquity.

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Colosseum

The Colosseum or Coliseum, also known as the Flavian Amphitheatre (Latin: Amphitheatrum Flavium; Italian: Anfiteatro Flavio or Colosseo), is an oval amphitheatre in the centre of the city of Rome, Italy.

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Commentarii de Bello Gallico

Commentāriī dē Bellō Gallicō (italic), also Bellum Gallicum (italic), is Julius Caesar's firsthand account of the Gallic Wars, written as a third-person narrative.

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Compound (linguistics)

In linguistics, a compound is a lexeme (less precisely, a word) that consists of more than one stem.

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Connecticut

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

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Contemporary Latin

Contemporary Latin is the form of the Latin language used from the end of the 19th century through the present.

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Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum

The Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum (CIL) is a comprehensive collection of ancient Latin inscriptions.

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Croatian language

Croatian (hrvatski) is the standardized variety of the Serbo-Croatian language used by Croats, principally in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Serbian province of Vojvodina and other neighboring countries.

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Croatian Latin literature

Croatian Latin literature (or Croatian Latinism) is a term referring to literary works, written in the Latin language, which have evolved in present-day Croatia since the 9th century AD.

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Croatian National Bank

The Croatian National Bank (Hrvatska narodna banka or HNB) is the central bank of the Republic of Croatia.

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Croatian Parliament

The Croatian Parliament (Hrvatski sabor) or the Sabor is the unicameral representative body of the citizens of the Republic of Croatia; it is Croatia's legislature.

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Cupid

In classical mythology, Cupid (Latin Cupīdō, meaning "desire") is the god of desire, erotic love, attraction and affection.

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Czech language

Czech (čeština), historically also Bohemian (lingua Bohemica in Latin), is a West Slavic language of the Czech–Slovak group.

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Dative case

The dative case (abbreviated, or sometimes when it is a core argument) is a grammatical case used in some languages to indicate, among other uses, the noun to which something is given, as in "Maria Jacobī potum dedit", Latin for "Maria gave Jacob a drink".

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Declension

In linguistics, declension is the changing of the form of a word to express it with a non-standard meaning, by way of some inflection, that is by marking the word with some change in pronunciation or by other information.

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Dental consonant

A dental consonant is a consonant articulated with the tongue against the upper teeth, such as,,, and in some languages.

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Deponent verb

In linguistics, a deponent verb is a verb that is active in meaning but takes its form from a different voice, most commonly the middle or passive.

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Diocese

The word diocese is derived from the Greek term διοίκησις meaning "administration".

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Diphthong

A diphthong (or; from Greek: δίφθογγος, diphthongos, literally "two sounds" or "two tones"), also known as a gliding vowel, is a combination of two adjacent vowel sounds within the same syllable.

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Discourse

Discourse (from Latin discursus, "running to and from") denotes written and spoken communications.

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Dutch language

The Dutch language is a West Germanic language, spoken by around 23 million people as a first language (including the population of the Netherlands where it is the official language, and about sixty percent of Belgium where it is one of the three official languages) and by another 5 million as a second language.

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Early modern Europe

Early modern Europe is the period of European history between the end of the Middle Ages and the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, roughly the late 15th century to the late 18th century.

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Ecclesiastical Latin

Ecclesiastical Latin, also called Liturgical Latin or Church Latin, is the form of Latin that is used in the Roman and the other Latin rites of the Catholic Church, as well as in the Anglican Churches, Lutheran Churches, Methodist Churches, and the Western Rite of the Eastern Orthodox Church, for liturgical purposes.

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Education in ancient Rome

Education in ancient Rome progressed from an informal, familial system of education in the early Republic to a tuition-based system during the late Republic and the Empire.

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English language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca.

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English words of Greek origin

The Greek language has contributed to the English vocabulary in five main ways.

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Epigraphy

Epigraphy (ἐπιγραφή, "inscription") is the study of inscriptions or epigraphs as writing; it is the science of identifying graphemes, clarifying their meanings, classifying their uses according to dates and cultural contexts, and drawing conclusions about the writing and the writers.

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Esse quam videri

Esse quam videri is a Latin phrase meaning "To be, rather than to seem".

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Eton College

Eton College is an English independent boarding school for boys in Eton, Berkshire, near Windsor.

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Etruscan language

The Etruscan language was the spoken and written language of the Etruscan civilization, in Italy, in the ancient region of Etruria (modern Tuscany plus western Umbria and northern Latium) and in parts of Corsica, Campania, Veneto, Lombardy and Emilia-Romagna.

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Fall of the Western Roman Empire

The Fall of the Western Roman Empire (also called Fall of the Roman Empire or Fall of Rome) was the process of decline in the Western Roman Empire in which it failed to enforce its rule, and its vast territory was divided into several successor polities.

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Finland

Finland (Suomi; Finland), officially the Republic of Finland is a country in Northern Europe bordering the Baltic Sea, Gulf of Bothnia, and Gulf of Finland, between Norway to the north, Sweden to the northwest, and Russia to the east.

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Franks Casket

The Franks Casket (or the Auzon Casket) is a small Anglo-Saxon whale's bone (not "whalebone" in the sense of baleen) chest from the early 8th century, now in the British Museum.

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Frederic M. Wheelock

Frederic Melvin Wheelock (September 19, 1902 in Lawrence, Massachusetts – October 29, 1987 in Sharon, Connecticut) is best known for his authorship of Wheelock's Latin.

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French language

French (le français or la langue française) is a Romance language of the Indo-European family.

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Fricative consonant

Fricatives are consonants produced by forcing air through a narrow channel made by placing two articulators close together.

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Fusional language

Fusional languages or inflected languages are a type of synthetic languages, distinguished from agglutinative languages by their tendency to use a single inflectional morpheme to denote multiple grammatical, syntactic, or semantic features.

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Galen

Aelius Galenus or Claudius Galenus (Κλαύδιος Γαληνός; September 129 AD – /), often Anglicized as Galen and better known as Galen of Pergamon, was a Greek physician, surgeon and philosopher in the Roman Empire.

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Gemination

Gemination, or consonant elongation, is the pronouncing in phonetics of a spoken consonant for an audibly longer period of time than that of a short consonant.

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Genitive case

In grammar, the genitive (abbreviated); also called the second case, is the grammatical case that marks a word, usually a noun, as modifying another word, also usually a noun.

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German language

German (Deutsch) is a West Germanic language that is mainly spoken in Central Europe.

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Germanic languages

The Germanic languages are a branch of the Indo-European language family spoken natively by a population of about 515 million people mainly in Europe, North America, Oceania, and Southern Africa.

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Germanic peoples

The Germanic peoples (also called Teutonic, Suebian, or Gothic in older literature) are an Indo-European ethno-linguistic group of Northern European origin.

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Germany

Germany (Deutschland), officially the Federal Republic of Germany (Bundesrepublik Deutschland), is a sovereign state in central-western Europe.

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Gerund

A gerund (abbreviated) is any of various nonfinite verb forms in various languages, most often, but not exclusively, one that functions as a noun.

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Gerundive

In Latin grammar, a gerundive is a verb form that functions as a verbal adjective.

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Glottal consonant

Glottal consonants are consonants using the glottis as their primary articulation.

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Government gazette

A government gazette (official gazette, official journal, official newspaper or official bulletin) is a periodical publication that has been authorised to publish public or legal notices.

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Grammar

In linguistics, grammar (from Greek: γραμματική) is the set of structural rules governing the composition of clauses, phrases, and words in any given natural language.

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Grammar school

A grammar school is one of several different types of school in the history of education in the United Kingdom and other English-speaking countries, originally a school teaching Latin, but more recently an academically-oriented secondary school, differentiated in recent years from less academic Secondary Modern Schools.

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Grammatical aspect

Aspect is a grammatical category that expresses how an action, event, or state, denoted by a verb, extends over time.

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Grammatical case

Case is a special grammatical category of a noun, pronoun, adjective, participle or numeral whose value reflects the grammatical function performed by that word in a phrase, clause or sentence.

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Grammatical conjugation

In linguistics, conjugation is the creation of derived forms of a verb from its principal parts by inflection (alteration of form according to rules of grammar).

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Grammatical gender

In linguistics, grammatical gender is a specific form of noun class system in which the division of noun classes forms an agreement system with another aspect of the language, such as adjectives, articles, pronouns, or verbs.

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Grammatical mood

In linguistics, grammatical mood (also mode) is a grammatical feature of verbs, used for signaling modality.

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Grammatical number

In linguistics, grammatical number is a grammatical category of nouns, pronouns, and adjective and verb agreement that expresses count distinctions (such as "one", "two", or "three or more").

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Grammatical person

Grammatical person, in linguistics, is the grammatical distinction between deictic references to participant(s) in an event; typically the distinction is between the speaker (first person), the addressee (second person), and others (third person).

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Grammatical tense

In grammar, tense is a category that expresses time reference with reference to the moment of speaking.

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Great Britain

Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe.

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Greek alphabet

The Greek alphabet has been used to write the Greek language since the late 9th or early 8th century BC.

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Greek art

Greek art began in the Cycladic and Minoan civilization, and gave birth to Western classical art in the subsequent Geometric, Archaic and Classical periods (with further developments during the Hellenistic Period).

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Gymnasium (Germany)

Gymnasium (German plural: Gymnasien), in the German education system, is the most advanced of the three types of German secondary schools, the others being Realschule and Hauptschule. Gymnasium strongly emphasizes academic learning, comparable to the British grammar school system or with prep schools in the United States.

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Gymnasium (school)

A gymnasium is a type of school with a strong emphasis on academic learning, and providing advanced secondary education in some parts of Europe comparable to British grammar schools, sixth form colleges and US preparatory high schools.

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Haberdashers' Aske's Boys' School

The Haberdashers' Aske's Boys' School (also referred to as Haberdashers', Habs or Habs Boys) is a public school for boys aged 5–18 in Elstree, Hertfordshire, England.

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Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian's Wall (Vallum Aelium), also called the Roman Wall, Picts' Wall, or Vallum Hadriani in Latin, was a defensive fortification in the Roman province of Britannia, begun in AD 122 in the reign of the emperor Hadrian.

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Hard and soft C

In the Latin-based orthographies of many European languages (including English), a distinction between hard and soft occurs in which represents two distinct phonemes.

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Hard and soft G

In the Latin-based orthographies of many European languages (including English), the letter is used in different contexts to represent two distinct phonemes, often called hard and soft.

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Harrow School

Harrow School is an independent boarding school for boys in Harrow, London, England.

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Harry Potter

Harry Potter is a series of fantasy novels written by British author J. K. Rowling.

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Harvard University

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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Harvard University Press

Harvard University Press (HUP) is a publishing house established on January 13, 1913, as a division of Harvard University, and focused on academic publishing.

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History of Taranto

The history of Taranto dates back to the 8th century BC when it was founded as a Greek colony, known as Taras.

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Holy Roman Empire

The Holy Roman Empire (Sacrum Romanum Imperium; Heiliges Römisches Reich) was a multi-ethnic but mostly German complex of territories in central Europe that developed during the Early Middle Ages and continued until its dissolution in 1806.

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Holy See

The Holy See (Santa Sede; Sancta Sedes), also called the See of Rome, is the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the Catholic Church in Rome, the episcopal see of the Pope, and an independent sovereign entity.

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How the Grinch Stole Christmas!

How the Grinch Stole Christmas! is a children's story by Theodor "Dr. Seuss" Geisel written in rhymed verse with illustrations by the author.

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Hybrid word

A hybrid word or hybridism is a word that etymologically derives from at least two languages.

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Igor Stravinsky

Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (ˈiɡərʲ ˈfʲɵdərəvʲɪtɕ strɐˈvʲinskʲɪj; 6 April 1971) was a Russian-born composer, pianist, and conductor.

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Imperfective aspect

The imperfective (abbreviated or more ambiguously) is a grammatical aspect used to describe a situation viewed with interior composition.

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Indo-European languages

The Indo-European languages are a language family of several hundred related languages and dialects.

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Infinitive

Infinitive (abbreviated) is a grammatical term referring to certain verb forms existing in many languages, most often used as non-finite verbs.

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Inflection

In grammar, inflection or inflexion – sometimes called accidence – is the modification of a word to express different grammatical categories such as tense, case, voice, aspect, person, number, gender, and mood.

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Inkhorn term

An inkhorn term is any foreign borrowing (or a word created from existing word roots by an English speaker) into English deemed to be unnecessary or overly pretentious.

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Instruction in Latin

The Latin language is still taught in many parts of the world.

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Instrumental case

The instrumental case (abbreviated or) is a grammatical case used to indicate that a noun is the instrument or means by or with which the subject achieves or accomplishes an action.

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Interlingua

Interlingua (ISO 639 language codes ia, ina) is an Italic international auxiliary language (IAL), developed between 1937 and 1951 by the International Auxiliary Language Association (IALA).

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International auxiliary language

An international auxiliary language (sometimes abbreviated as IAL or auxlang) or interlanguage is a language meant for communication between people from different nations who do not share a common first language.

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Interpunct

An interpunct (&middot), also known as an interpoint, middle dot, middot, and centered dot or centred dot, is a punctuation mark consisting of a vertically centered dot used for interword separation in ancient Latin script.

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Intonation (linguistics)

In linguistics, intonation is variation in spoken pitch when used, not for distinguishing words (a concept known as tone), but, rather, for a range of other functions such as indicating the attitudes and emotions of the speaker, signalling the difference between statements and questions, and between different types of questions, focusing attention on important elements of the spoken message and also helping to regulate conversational interaction.

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Iowa State University

Iowa State University of Science and Technology, generally referred to as Iowa State, is a public flagship land-grant and space-grant research university located in Ames, Iowa, United States.

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Italian language

Italian (or lingua italiana) is a Romance language.

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Italian Peninsula

The Italian Peninsula or Apennine Peninsula (Penisola italiana, Penisola appenninica) extends from the Po Valley in the north to the central Mediterranean Sea in the south.

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Italic languages

The Italic languages are a subfamily of the Indo-European language family, originally spoken by Italic peoples.

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Janus Pannonius

Janus Pannonius (Pannonius, Ivan Česmički, Csezmiczei János, or Kesencei; 29 August 1434 – 27 March 1472) was a Croat-Hungarian Latinist, poet, diplomat and Bishop of Pécs.

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Jughead (Lost)

"Jughead" is the third television episode of the fifth season of ABC's Lost.

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Julius Caesar

Gaius Julius Caesar (12 or 13 July 100 BC – 15 March 44 BC), known by his cognomen Julius Caesar, was a Roman politician and military general who played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire.

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Kansas

Kansas is a U.S. state in the Midwestern United States.

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Kingdom of Hungary

The Kingdom of Hungary was a monarchy in Central Europe that existed from the Middle Ages into the twentieth century (1000–1946 with the exception of 1918–1920).

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Kingdom of Poland

"Kingdom of Poland" (Polish: Królestwo Polskie, Latin: Regnum Poloniae) was the name of Poland under a series of former monarchial governments, from c.1000/1025 CE to 1795.

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Labial consonant

Labial consonants are consonants in which one or both lips are the active articulator.

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Labialization

Labialization is a secondary articulatory feature of sounds in some languages.

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Languages of Switzerland

The four national languages of Switzerland are German, French, Italian and Romansh.

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Late antiquity

Late antiquity is a periodization used by historians to describe the time of transition from classical antiquity to the Middle Ages in mainland Europe, the Mediterranean world, and the Near East.

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Late Latin

Late Latin is the scholarly name for the written Latin of Late Antiquity.

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Latin alphabet

The Latin alphabet or the Roman alphabet is a writing system originally used by the ancient Romans to write the Latin language.

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Latin conjugation

Conjugation has two meanings.

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Latin influence in English

English is a Germanic language, with a grammar and a core vocabulary inherited from Proto-Germanic.

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Latin mnemonics

A Latin mnemonic verse or mnemonic rhyme is a mnemonic device for teaching and remembering Latin grammar.

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Latin school

The Latin school was the grammar school of 14th to 19th-century Europe, though the latter term was much more common in England.

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Latin Wikipedia

The Latin Wikipedia () is the Latin language edition of Wikipedia.

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Latino sine flexione

Latino sine flexione ("Latin without inflections"), Interlingua de Academia pro Interlingua (IL de ApI) or Peano’s Interlingua (abbreviated as IL), is an international auxiliary language compiled by the Academia pro Interlingua under chairmanship of the Italian mathematician Giuseppe Peano (1858–1932) in 1887-1914.

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Latino-Faliscan languages

The Latino-Faliscan or Latino-Venetic languages are a group of languages originating from Italy belonging to the Italic languages, a group of the Indo-European languages.

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Latins (Italic tribe)

The Latins (Latin: Latini), sometimes known as the Latians, were an Italic tribe which included the early inhabitants of the city of Rome.

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Latium

Latium is the region of central western Italy in which the city of Rome was founded and grew to be the capital city of the Roman Empire.

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Letter case

Letter case (or just case) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger upper case (also uppercase, capital letters, capitals, caps, large letters, or more formally majuscule) and smaller lower case (also lowercase, small letters, or more formally minuscule) in the written representation of certain languages.

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Liceo classico

Liceo classico (classical lyceum) is the oldest, public secondary school type in Italy.

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Liceo scientifico

Liceo scientifico (literally scientific lyceum) is a type of secondary school in Italy.

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Lingua franca

A lingua franca, also known as a bridge language, common language, trade language, auxiliary language, vernacular language, or link language is a language or dialect systematically used to make communication possible between people who do not share a native language or dialect, particularly when it is a third language that is distinct from both native languages.

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Linnaean taxonomy

Linnaean taxonomy can mean either of two related concepts.

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List of Canadian provincial and territorial symbols

This is a list of the symbols of the provinces and territories of Canada.

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List of English words of French origin

A great number of words of French origin have entered the English language to the extent that many Latin words have come to the English language.

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List of Greek and Latin roots in English

The English language uses many Greek and Latin roots, stems, and prefixes.

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List of Latin abbreviations

This is a list of common Latin abbreviations.

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List of Latin and Greek words commonly used in systematic names

This list of Latin and Greek words commonly used in systematic names is intended to help those unfamiliar with classical languages to understand and remember the scientific names of organisms.

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List of Latin legal terms

A number of Latin terms are used in legal terminology and legal maxims.

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List of Latin phrases

This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as veni, vidi, vici and et cetera.

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List of Latin translations of modern literature

A number of Latin translations of modern literature have been made to bolster interest in the language.

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List of Latin words with English derivatives

This is a list of Latin words with derivatives in English (and other modern languages).

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List of Latinised names

The Latinisation of names in the vernacular was a procedure deemed necessary for the sake of conformity by scribes and authors when incorporating references to such persons in Latin texts.

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List of medical roots, suffixes and prefixes

This is a list of roots, suffixes, and prefixes used in medical terminology, their meanings, and their etymology.

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List of songs with Latin lyrics

This is a list of songs having lyrics in Latin.

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List of U.S. state and territory mottos

All of the United States' 50 states have a state motto, as do the District of Columbia and three US territories.

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Literacy

Literacy is traditionally meant as the ability to read and write.

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Locative case

Locative (abbreviated) is a grammatical case which indicates a location.

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Loeb Classical Library

The Loeb Classical Library (LCL; named after James Loeb) is a series of books, today published by Harvard University Press, which presents important works of ancient Greek and Latin literature in a way designed to make the text accessible to the broadest possible audience, by presenting the original Greek or Latin text on each left-hand page, and a fairly literal translation on the facing page.

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Lorem ipsum

In publishing and graphic design, lorem ipsum is a placeholder text commonly used to demonstrate the visual form of a document without relying on meaningful content (also called greeking).

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Lost (TV series)

Lost is an American drama television series that originally aired on the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) from September 22, 2004, to May 23, 2010, over six seasons, comprising a total of 121 episodes.

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Macmillan Publishers

Macmillan Publishers Ltd (occasionally known as the Macmillan Group) is an international publishing company owned by Holtzbrinck Publishing Group.

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Macron (diacritic)

A macron is a diacritical mark: it is a straight bar placed above a letter, usually a vowel.

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Manuscript

A manuscript (abbreviated MS for singular and MSS for plural) was, traditionally, any document written by hand -- or, once practical typewriters became available, typewritten -- as opposed to being mechanically printed or reproduced in some indirect or automated way.

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Mary Beard (classicist)

Dame Winifred Mary Beard, (born 1 January 1955) is an English scholar and classicist.

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Mass of Paul VI

The Mass of Paul VI is the most commonly used form of the Mass in use today within the Catholic Church, first promulgated by Pope Paul VI in the 1969 edition of the Roman Missal after the Second Vatican Council (1962–65).

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Max and Moritz

Max and Moritz (A Story of Seven Boyish Pranks) (original: Max und Moritz – Eine Bubengeschichte in sieben Streichen) is a German language illustrated story in verse.

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Medical terminology

Medical terminology is language used to precisely describe the human body including its components, processes, conditions affecting it, and procedures performed upon it.

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Medicine

Medicine is the science and practice of the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.

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Medieval Latin

Medieval Latin was the form of Latin used in the Middle Ages, primarily as a medium of scholarly exchange, as the liturgical language of Chalcedonian Christianity and the Roman Catholic Church, and as a language of science, literature, law, and administration.

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Meissner's Latin Phrasebook

Meissner’s Latin Phrase-book is a book of phrases in Latin for students of composition or those wanting to learn spoken Latin.

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Michigan

Michigan is a state in the Great Lakes and Midwestern regions of the United States.

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Middle Ages

In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages (or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century.

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Minimus

The Minimus books are a series of school textbooks, written by Barbara Bell, illustrated by Dr.

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Missouri

Missouri is a state in the Midwestern United States.

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Morpheme

A morpheme is the smallest grammatical unit in a language.

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Nasal consonant

In phonetics, a nasal, also called a nasal occlusive, nasal stop in contrast with a nasal fricative, or nasal continuant, is an occlusive consonant produced with a lowered velum, allowing air to escape freely through the nose.

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Nasal vowel

A nasal vowel is a vowel that is produced with a lowering of the velum so that air escapes both through the nose as well as the mouth, such as the French vowel.

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National Junior Classical League

The National Junior Classical League (National JCL or NJCL) is a youth organization of secondary school students sponsored by the American Classical League (ACL).

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National Latin Exam

The National Latin Exam is a test given to Latin students.

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National Senior Classical League

The National Senior Classical League (National SCL or NSCL) is an organization – mostly of college students – which promotes the study, appreciation and advancement of the Classics.

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Natural History (Pliny)

The Natural History (Naturalis Historia) is a book about the whole of the natural world in Latin by Pliny the Elder, a Roman author and naval commander who died in 79 AD.

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Natural language processing

Natural language processing (NLP) is an area of computer science and artificial intelligence concerned with the interactions between computers and human (natural) languages, in particular how to program computers to process and analyze large amounts of natural language data.

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New Latin

New Latin (also called Neo-Latin or Modern Latin) was a revival in the use of Latin in original, scholarly, and scientific works between c. 1375 and c. 1900.

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Nominative case

The nominative case (abbreviated), subjective case, straight case or upright case is one of the grammatical cases of a noun or other part of speech, which generally marks the subject of a verb or the predicate noun or predicate adjective, as opposed to its object or other verb arguments.

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Norman conquest of England

The Norman conquest of England (in Britain, often called the Norman Conquest or the Conquest) was the 11th-century invasion and occupation of England by an army of Norman, Breton, Flemish and French soldiers led by Duke William II of Normandy, later styled William the Conqueror.

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North Carolina

North Carolina is a U.S. state in the southeastern region of the United States.

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Norwell High School (Massachusetts)

Norwell High School is a public secondary school, accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC).

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Noun

A noun (from Latin nōmen, literally meaning "name") is a word that functions as the name of some specific thing or set of things, such as living creatures, objects, places, actions, qualities, states of existence, or ideas.

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Oak Hall School

Oak Hall School is an independent, college-preparatory school in Gainesville, Florida, USA, that serves over 750 students in grades pre-kindergarten through 12.

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Occitan language

Occitan, also known as lenga d'òc (langue d'oc) by its native speakers, is a Romance language.

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Oceania

Oceania is a geographic region comprising Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia and Australasia.

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Oedipus rex (opera)

Oedipus rex is an "Opera-oratorio after Sophocles" by Igor Stravinsky, scored for orchestra, speaker, soloists, and male chorus.

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Old English

Old English (Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc), or Anglo-Saxon, is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland in the early Middle Ages.

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Old French

Old French (franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French: ancien français) was the language spoken in Northern France from the 8th century to the 14th century.

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Old Italic script

Old Italic is one of several now extinct alphabet systems used on the Italian Peninsula in ancient times for various Indo-European languages (predominantly Italic) and non-Indo-European (e.g. Etruscan) languages.

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Old Latin

Old Latin, also known as Early Latin or Archaic Latin, refers to the Latin language in the period before 75 BC: before the age of Classical Latin.

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Open University

The Open University (OU) is a public distance learning and research university, and one of the biggest universities in the UK for undergraduate education.

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Oscan language

Oscan is an extinct Indo-European language of southern Italy.

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Oxford Classical Texts

Oxford Classical Texts (OCTs), or Scriptorum Classicorum Bibliotheca Oxoniensis, is a series of books published by Oxford University Press.

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Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press.

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Paddington Bear

Paddington Bear is a fictional character in children's literature.

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Palatal consonant

Palatal consonants are consonants articulated with the body of the tongue raised against the hard palate (the middle part of the roof of the mouth).

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Participle

A participle is a form of a verb that is used in a sentence to modify a noun, noun phrase, verb, or verb phrase, and plays a role similar to an adjective or adverb.

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Partitive

In linguistics, the partitive is a word, phrase, or case that indicates partialness.

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Penguin Books

Penguin Books is a British publishing house.

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Penn State University Press

Penn State University Press, also called The Pennsylvania State University Press, was established in 1956 and is a non-profit publisher of scholarly books and journals.

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Per ardua ad astra

Per ardua ad astra ("Through adversity to the stars" or "Through struggle to the stars") is the motto of the Royal Air Force and other Commonwealth air forces such as the RAAF, RNZAF, the SAAF, as well as the Royal Indian Air Force until 1947.

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Per aspera ad astra

Per aspera ad astra (or, less commonly, ad astra per aspera) is a popular Latin phrase meaning "through hardship to the stars".

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Philology

Philology is the study of language in oral and written historical sources; it is a combination of literary criticism, history, and linguistics.

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Philosophy

Philosophy (from Greek φιλοσοφία, philosophia, literally "love of wisdom") is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.

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Phoenician alphabet

The Phoenician alphabet, called by convention the Proto-Canaanite alphabet for inscriptions older than around 1050 BC, is the oldest verified alphabet.

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Phoneme

A phoneme is one of the units of sound (or gesture in the case of sign languages, see chereme) that distinguish one word from another in a particular language.

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Phonology

Phonology is a branch of linguistics concerned with the systematic organization of sounds in languages.

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Pitch-accent language

A pitch-accent language is a language that has word-accents—that is, where one syllable in a word or morpheme is more prominent than the others, but the accentuated syllable is indicated by a particular pitch contour (linguistic tones) rather than by stress.

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Plautus

Titus Maccius Plautus (c. 254 – 184 BC), commonly known as Plautus, was a Roman playwright of the Old Latin period.

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Pliny the Elder

Pliny the Elder (born Gaius Plinius Secundus, AD 23–79) was a Roman author, naturalist and natural philosopher, a naval and army commander of the early Roman Empire, and friend of emperor Vespasian.

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Polish language

Polish (język polski or simply polski) is a West Slavic language spoken primarily in Poland and is the native language of the Poles.

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Pontifical Academy for Latin

The Pontifical Academy for Latin (Pontificia Academia Latinitatis) is the eleventh and newest pontifical academy.

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Pontifical university

Pontifical universities are higher education ecclesiastical schools established or approved directly by the Holy See, composed of three main ecclesiastical faculties (Theology, Philosophy and Canon Law) and at least one other faculty.

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Portuguese language

Portuguese (português or, in full, língua portuguesa) is a Western Romance language originating from the regions of Galicia and northern Portugal in the 9th century.

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Praeneste fibula

The Praeneste fibula (the "brooch of Palestrina") is a golden ''fibula'' or brooch, today housed in the Museo Preistorico Etnografico Luigi Pigorini in Rome.

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Pronoun

In linguistics and grammar, a pronoun (abbreviated) is a word that substitutes for a noun or noun phrase.

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Proto-Indo-European language

Proto-Indo-European (PIE) is the linguistic reconstruction of the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages, the most widely spoken language family in the world.

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Provenance

Provenance (from the French provenir, 'to come from/forth') is the chronology of the ownership, custody or location of a historical object.

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Public school (United Kingdom)

A public school in England and Wales is a long-established, student-selective, fee-charging independent secondary school that caters primarily for children aged between 11 or 13 and 18, and whose head teacher is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference (HMC).

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Punctuation

Punctuation (formerly sometimes called pointing) is the use of spacing, conventional signs, and certain typographical devices as aids to the understanding and correct reading of handwritten and printed text, whether read silently or aloud.

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Python (programming language)

Python is an interpreted high-level programming language for general-purpose programming.

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Radio Bremen

Radio Bremen (RB), Germany's smallest public radio and television broadcaster, is the legally mandated broadcaster for the city-state Free Hanseatic City of Bremen (which includes Bremerhaven).

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Renaissance

The Renaissance is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries.

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Renaissance humanism

Renaissance humanism is the study of classical antiquity, at first in Italy and then spreading across Western Europe in the 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries.

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Renaissance Latin

Renaissance Latin is a name given to the distinctive form of Latin style developed during the European Renaissance of the fourteenth to fifteenth centuries, particularly by the Renaissance humanism movement.

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Rhetoric

Rhetoric is the art of discourse, wherein a writer or speaker strives to inform, persuade, or motivate particular audiences in specific situations.

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Rhotic consonant

In phonetics, rhotic consonants, or "R-like" sounds, are liquid consonants that are traditionally represented orthographically by symbols derived from the Greek letter rho, including r in the Latin script and p in the Cyrillic script.

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Robinson Crusoe

Robinson Crusoe is a novel by Daniel Defoe, first published on 25 April 1719.

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Roman cursive

Roman cursive (or Latin cursive) is a form of handwriting (or a script) used in ancient Rome and to some extent into the Middle Ages.

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Roman Empire

The Roman Empire (Imperium Rōmānum,; Koine and Medieval Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Ῥωμαίων, tr.) was the post-Roman Republic period of the ancient Roman civilization, characterized by government headed by emperors and large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean Sea in Europe, Africa and Asia.

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Roman Kingdom

The Roman Kingdom, or regal period, was the period of the ancient Roman civilization characterized by a monarchical form of government of the city of Rome and its territories.

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Roman numerals

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages.

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Roman Republic

The Roman Republic (Res publica Romana) was the era of classical Roman civilization beginning with the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom, traditionally dated to 509 BC, and ending in 27 BC with the establishment of the Roman Empire.

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Roman Rite

The Roman Rite (Ritus Romanus) is the most widespread liturgical rite in the Catholic Church, as well as the most popular and widespread Rite in all of Christendom, and is one of the Western/Latin rites used in the Western or Latin Church.

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Roman Rota

The Roman Rota, formally the Apostolic Tribunal of the Roman Rota (Tribunal Apostolicum Rotae Romanae), and anciently the Apostolic Court of Audience, is the highest appellate tribunal of the Catholic Church, with respect to both Latin-rite members and the Eastern-rite members and is, with respect to judicial trials conducted in the Catholic Church, the highest ecclesiastical court constituted by the Holy See.

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Roman technology

Roman technology is the engineering practice which supported Roman civilization and made the expansion of Roman commerce and Roman military possible for over a millennium (753 BC–476 AD).

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Romance languages

The Romance languages (also called Romanic languages or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that began evolving from Vulgar Latin between the sixth and ninth centuries and that form a branch of the Italic languages within the Indo-European language family.

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Romanian language

Romanian (obsolete spellings Rumanian, Roumanian; autonym: limba română, "the Romanian language", or românește, lit. "in Romanian") is an East Romance language spoken by approximately 24–26 million people as a native language, primarily in Romania and Moldova, and by another 4 million people as a second language.

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Romanization (cultural)

Romanization or Latinization (or Romanisation or Latinisation), in the historical and cultural meanings of both terms, indicate different historical processes, such as acculturation, integration and assimilation of newly incorporated and peripheral populations by the Roman Republic and the later Roman Empire.

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Royal Air Force

The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the United Kingdom's aerial warfare force.

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Rugby School

Rugby School is a day and boarding co-educational independent school in Rugby, Warwickshire, England.

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Sacred language

A sacred language, "holy language" (in religious context) or liturgical language is any language that is cultivated and used primarily in religious service or for other religious reasons by people who speak another, primary language in their daily life.

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Salus populi suprema lex esto

Salus populi suprema lex esto (Latin: "The health (welfare, good, salvation, felicity) of the people should be the supreme law", "Let the good (or safety) of the people be the supreme (or highest) law", or "The welfare of the people shall be the supreme law") is a maxim or principle found in Cicero's De Legibus (book III, part III, sub. VIII).

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Sardinian language

Sardinian or Sard (sardu, limba sarda or língua sarda) is the primary indigenous Romance language spoken on most of the island of Sardinia (Italy).

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Science

R. P. Feynman, The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Vol.1, Chaps.1,2,&3.

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Scientific terminology

Scientific terminology is the part of the language that is used by scientists in the context of their professional activities.

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Seal of West Virginia

The Great Seal of the State of West Virginia was adopted in September 1863.

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Sebastiane

Sebastiane is a 1976 Latin-language British historical thriller film written and directed by Derek Jarman and Paul Humfress.

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Segment (linguistics)

In linguistics, a segment is "any discrete unit that can be identified, either physically or auditorily, in the stream of speech".

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Semper fidelis

Semper fidelis is a Latin phrase that means "always faithful" or "always loyal".

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Semper paratus

Semper Paratus is a Latin phrase, meaning "Always ready".

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Sic semper tyrannis

Sic semper tyrannis is a Latin phrase meaning "thus always to tyrants.".

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Slovak language

Slovak is an Indo-European language that belongs to the West Slavic languages (together with Czech, Polish, and Sorbian).

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Slovene language

Slovene or Slovenian (slovenski jezik or slovenščina) belongs to the group of South Slavic languages.

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Sovereign Military Order of Malta

The Sovereign Military Hospitaller Order of Saint John of Jerusalem, of Rhodes and of Malta (Supremus Ordo Militaris Hospitalis Sancti Ioannis Hierosolymitani Rhodius et Melitensis), also known as the Sovereign Military Order of Malta (SMOM) or the Order of Malta, is a Catholic lay religious order traditionally of military, chivalrous and noble nature.

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Spanish language

Spanish or Castilian, is a Western Romance language that originated in the Castile region of Spain and today has hundreds of millions of native speakers in Latin America and Spain.

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Standard language

A standard language or standard variety may be defined either as a language variety used by a population for public purposes or as a variety that has undergone standardization.

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Stative verb

In linguistics, a stative verb is one that describes a state of being, in contrast to a dynamic verb, which describes an action.

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Stola

The stola was the traditional garment of Roman women, corresponding to the toga, that was worn by men.

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Stop consonant

In phonetics, a stop, also known as a plosive or oral occlusive, is a consonant in which the vocal tract is blocked so that all airflow ceases.

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Sub-Saharan Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa is, geographically, the area of the continent of Africa that lies south of the Sahara.

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Subject (grammar)

The subject in a simple English sentence such as John runs, John is a teacher, or John was hit by a car is the person or thing about whom the statement is made, in this case 'John'.

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Subject complement

In grammar, a subject complement (please, note that predicative complement can be either subject complement or object complement) or predicative of the subject is a predicative expression that follows a linking verb (copula) and that complements the subject of the sentence by either (1) renaming it or (2) describing it.

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Supine

In grammar, a supine is a form of verbal noun used in some languages.

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Switzerland

Switzerland, officially the Swiss Confederation, is a sovereign state in Europe.

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Syllable

A syllable is a unit of organization for a sequence of speech sounds.

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Syntax

In linguistics, syntax is the set of rules, principles, and processes that govern the structure of sentences in a given language, usually including word order.

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Synthetic language

In linguistic typology, a synthetic language is a language with a high morpheme-per-word ratio, as opposed to a low morpheme-per-word ratio in what is described as an analytic language.

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Szlachta

The szlachta (exonym: Nobility) was a legally privileged noble class in the Kingdom of Poland, Grand Duchy of Lithuania, Ruthenia, Samogitia (both after Union of Lublin became a single state, the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth) and the Zaporozhian Host.

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Television

Television (TV) is a telecommunication medium used for transmitting moving images in monochrome (black and white), or in colour, and in two or three dimensions and sound.

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Terence

Publius Terentius Afer (c. 195/185 – c. 159? BC), better known in English as Terence, was a Roman playwright during the Roman Republic, of Berber descent.

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The Adventures of Tintin

The Adventures of Tintin (Les Aventures de Tintin) is a series of 24 comic albums created by Belgian cartoonist Georges Remi, who wrote under the pen name Hergé.

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The Cat in the Hat

The Cat in the Hat is a children's book written and illustrated by Theodor Geisel under the pen name Dr. Seuss and first published in 1957.

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The Daily Telegraph

The Daily Telegraph, commonly referred to simply as The Telegraph, is a national British daily broadsheet newspaper published in London by Telegraph Media Group and distributed across the United Kingdom and internationally.

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The English High School

The English High School of Boston, Massachusetts, is one of the first public high schools in America, founded in 1821.

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The Exorcist (film)

The Exorcist is a 1973 American supernatural horror film adapted by William Peter Blatty from his 1971 novel of the same name, directed by William Friedkin, and starring Ellen Burstyn, Linda Blair, Max von Sydow, and Jason Miller.

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The Hobbit

The Hobbit, or There and Back Again is a children's fantasy novel by English author J. R. R. Tolkien.

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The Little Prince

The Little Prince (French: Le Petit Prince), first published in April 1943, is a novella, the most famous work of French aristocrat, writer, poet, and pioneering aviator Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.

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The National Archives (United Kingdom)

The National Archives (TNA) is a non-ministerial government department.

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The Passion of the Christ

The Passion of the Christ (also known simply as The Passion) is a 2004 American biblical drama film directed by Mel Gibson, written by Gibson and Benedict Fitzgerald, and starring Jim Caviezel as Jesus Christ, Maia Morgenstern as the Virgin Mary and Monica Bellucci as Mary Magdalene.

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The Times Literary Supplement

The Times Literary Supplement (or TLS, on the front page from 1969) is a weekly literary review published in London by News UK, a subsidiary of News Corp.

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Theology

Theology is the critical study of the nature of the divine.

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Toponymy

Toponymy is the study of place names (toponyms), their origins, meanings, use, and typology.

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Tore Janson

Tore Janson (born 1936) is a Swedish linguist and professor.

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Treasure Island

Treasure Island is an adventure novel by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, narrating a tale of "buccaneers and buried gold".

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Tridentine Mass

The Tridentine Mass, the 1962 version of which has been officially declared the (authorized) extraordinary form of the Roman Rite of Mass (Extraordinary Form for short), is the Roman Rite Mass which appears in typical editions of the Roman Missal published from 1570 to 1962.

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Turkic languages

The Turkic languages are a language family of at least thirty-five documented languages, spoken by the Turkic peoples of Eurasia from Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, Central Asia, and West Asia all the way to North Asia (particularly in Siberia) and East Asia (including the Far East).

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Umayyad conquest of Hispania

The Umayyad conquest of Hispania was the initial expansion of the Umayyad Caliphate over Hispania, largely extending from 711 to 788.

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United Kingdom

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed with some organisations, including the and preferring to use Britain as shorthand for Great Britain is a sovereign country in western Europe.

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United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

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United States Coast Guard

The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is a branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the country's seven uniformed services.

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United States Marine Corps

The United States Marine Corps (USMC), also referred to as the United States Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting amphibious operations with the United States Navy.

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University of Cambridge

The University of Cambridge (informally Cambridge University)The corporate title of the university is The Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the University of Cambridge.

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University of Chicago Press

The University of Chicago Press is the largest and one of the oldest university presses in the United States.

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University of Kentucky

The University of Kentucky (UK) is a public co-educational university in Lexington, Kentucky.

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University of Oxford

The University of Oxford (formally The Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of Oxford) is a collegiate research university located in Oxford, England.

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Upsilon

Upsilon (or; uppercase Υ, lowercase υ; ύψιλον ýpsilon) or ypsilon is the 20th letter of the Greek alphabet.

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Vatican City

Vatican City (Città del Vaticano; Civitas Vaticana), officially the Vatican City State or the State of Vatican City (Stato della Città del Vaticano; Status Civitatis Vaticanae), is an independent state located within the city of Rome.

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Velar consonant

Velars are consonants articulated with the back part of the tongue (the dorsum) against the soft palate, the back part of the roof of the mouth (known also as the velum).

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Venus (mythology)

Venus (Classical Latin) is the Roman goddess whose functions encompassed love, beauty, desire, sex, fertility, prosperity and victory.

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Veritas

In Roman mythology, Veritas, meaning truth, is the goddess of truth, a daughter of Chronos, the God of Time (who has been identified with Saturn-Cronus, perhaps first by Plutarch), and the mother of Virtus.

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Vernacular

A vernacular, or vernacular language, is the language or variety of a language used in everyday life by the common people of a specific population.

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Victoria Cross

The Victoria Cross (VC) is the highest award of the British honours system.

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Victoria Cross (Canada)

The Victoria Cross (VC) is the highest award of the United Kingdom honours system.

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Vietnamese language

Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) is an Austroasiatic language that originated in Vietnam, where it is the national and official language.

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Vindolanda tablets

The Vindolanda tablets were, at the time of their discovery, the oldest surviving handwritten documents in Britain (they have now been antedated by the Bloomberg tablets).

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Virginia

Virginia (officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) is a state in the Southeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains.

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Vocabulary

A vocabulary is a set of familiar words within a person's language.

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Vocative case

The vocative case (abbreviated) is the case used for a noun that identifies a person (animal, object etc.) being addressed or occasionally the determiners of that noun.

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Voice (grammar)

In grammar, the voice of a verb describes the relationship between the action (or state) that the verb expresses and the participants identified by its arguments (subject, object, etc.). When the subject is the agent or doer of the action, the verb is in the active voice.

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Voice (phonetics)

Voice is a term used in phonetics and phonology to characterize speech sounds (usually consonants).

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Voiced alveolar fricative

The voiced alveolar fricatives are consonantal sounds.

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Voicelessness

In linguistics, voicelessness is the property of sounds being pronounced without the larynx vibrating.

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Vowel length

In linguistics, vowel length is the perceived duration of a vowel sound.

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Vulgar Latin

Vulgar Latin or Sermo Vulgaris ("common speech") was a nonstandard form of Latin (as opposed to Classical Latin, the standard and literary version of the language) spoken in the Mediterranean region during and after the classical period of the Roman Empire.

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Walter the Farting Dog

Walter the Farting Dog is the title character of a series of children's books written by William Kotzwinkle and Glenn Murray, and illustrated by Audrey Colman.

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Wax tablet

A wax tablet is a tablet made of wood and covered with a layer of wax, often linked loosely to a cover tablet, as a "double-leaved" diptych.

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West Virginia

West Virginia is a state located in the Appalachian region of the Southern United States.

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Winnie-the-Pooh

Winnie-the-Pooh, also called Pooh Bear, is a fictional anthropomorphic teddy bear created by English author A. A. Milne.

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Word divider

In punctuation, a word divider is a glyph that separates written words.

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Word order

In linguistics, word order typology is the study of the order of the syntactic constituents of a language, and how different languages can employ different orders.

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Yle

Yleisradio Oy (Finnish), also known as Rundradion (Swedish) or the Finnish Broadcasting Company (English), abbreviated to Yle (pronounced /yle/; previously stylised as YLE before the 2012 corporate rebrand), is Finland's national public broadcasting company, founded in 1926.

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Zeta

Zeta (uppercase Ζ, lowercase ζ; ζῆτα, label, classical or zē̂ta; zíta) is the sixth letter of the Greek alphabet.

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Redirects here:

ISO 639:la, ISO 639:lat, Latin (language), Latin Language, Latin language, Latin-language, Latinate, Lingua Latina, Lingua Latīna, Lingua latina.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin

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