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Le Antichità di Ercolano

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The Le Antichità di Ercolano Esposte (Antiquities of Herculaneum Exposed) is an eight-volume book of engravings of the findings from excavating the ruins of Herculaneum in the Kingdom of Naples (now Italy). [1]

29 relations: Achilles, Auguste Vinchon, Charles III of Spain, Chiron, Emmanuel Maurice, Duke of Elbeuf, Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies, Giovanni Battista Casanova, Gulf of Naples, Hellenistic period, Herculaneum, Hercules, Joseph-Marie Vien, Kingdom of Naples, Louvre, Luigi Vanvitelli, Marsyas, Neoclassicism, Nicolas Gosse, Olympus (musician), Palace of Portici, Pompeii, Portici, Portico, Prince Eugene of Savoy, Robert Adam, Stabiae, Syon House, Telephus, Theseus.

Achilles

In Greek mythology, Achilles or Achilleus (Ἀχιλλεύς, Achilleus) was a Greek hero of the Trojan War and the central character and greatest warrior of Homer's Iliad.

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Auguste Vinchon

Jean Baptiste Auguste Vinchon (5 August 1789 – 1855) was a French painter.

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Charles III of Spain

Charles III (Spanish: Carlos; Italian: Carlo; 20 January 1716 – 14 December 1788) was King of Spain and the Spanish Indies (1759–1788), after ruling Naples as Charles VII and Sicily as Charles V (1734–1759), kingdoms he abdicated to his son Ferdinand.

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Chiron

In Greek mythology, Chiron (also Cheiron or Kheiron; Χείρων "hand") was held to be the superlative centaur amongst his brethren, as he was called as the "wisest and justest of all the centaurs".

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Emmanuel Maurice, Duke of Elbeuf

Emmanuel Maurice de Lorraine (Emmanuel Maurice; 30 December 1677 – 17 July 1763) was Duke of Elbeuf and Prince of Lorraine.

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Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies

Ferdinand I (12 January 1751 – 4 January 1825), was the King of the Two Sicilies from 1816, after his restoration following victory in the Napoleonic Wars.

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Giovanni Battista Casanova

Giovanni Battista Casanova (2 November 1730 – 8 December 1795) was an Italian painter and printmaker of the Neoclassic period.

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Gulf of Naples

The Gulf of Naples, also called the Bay of Naples, is a roughly 15-kilometer-wide (9.3 mi) gulf located along the south-western coast of Italy (province of Naples, Campania region).

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Hellenistic period

The Hellenistic period covers the period of Mediterranean history between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the emergence of the Roman Empire as signified by the Battle of Actium in 31 BC and the subsequent conquest of Ptolemaic Egypt the following year.

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Herculaneum

Located in the shadow of Mount Vesuvius, Herculaneum (Italian: Ercolano) was an ancient Roman town destroyed by volcanic pyroclastic flows in 79 AD.

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Hercules

Hercules is a Roman hero and god.

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Joseph-Marie Vien

Joseph-Marie Vien (English name version Joseph-Mary Wien) (18 June 1716 – 27 March 1809), French painter, was born at Montpellier.

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Kingdom of Naples

The Kingdom of Naples (Regnum Neapolitanum; Reino de Nápoles; Regno di Napoli) comprised that part of the Italian Peninsula south of the Papal States between 1282 and 1816.

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Louvre

The Louvre, or the Louvre Museum, is the world's largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France.

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Luigi Vanvitelli

Luigi Vanvitelli (born Lodewijk van Wittel; 12 May 1700 – 1 March 1773) was an Italian engineer and architect.

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Marsyas

In Greek mythology, the satyr Marsyas (Μαρσύας) is a central figure in two stories involving music: in one, he picked up the double oboe (aulos) that had been abandoned by Athena and played it; in the other, he challenged Apollo to a contest of music and lost his hide and life.

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Neoclassicism

Neoclassicism (from Greek νέος nèos, "new" and Latin classicus, "of the highest rank") is the name given to Western movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that draw inspiration from the "classical" art and culture of classical antiquity.

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Nicolas Gosse

Nicolas Louis François Gosse (2 October 1787 – 9 February 1878) was a French historical painter.

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Olympus (musician)

Olympus (or Olympos, Ὄλυμπος) is the name of two ancient Greek musicians, one mythical who lived before the Trojan war, and one apparently real, who lived in the 7th century BC.

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Palace of Portici

The Royal Palace of Portici (Reggia di Portici or Palazzo Reale di Portici; Reggia ‘e Puortece) is a former royal palace in Portici, southern Italy.

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Pompeii

Pompeii was an ancient Roman city near modern Naples in the Campania region of Italy, in the territory of the comune of Pompei.

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Portici

Portici is a town and comune of the Metropolitan City of Naples in Italy.

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Portico

A portico is a porch leading to the entrance of a building, or extended as a colonnade, with a roof structure over a walkway, supported by columns or enclosed by walls.

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Prince Eugene of Savoy

Prince Eugene of Savoy (French: François-Eugène de Savoie, Italian: Principe Eugenio di Savoia-Carignano, German: Prinz Eugen von Savoyen; 18 October 1663 – 21 April 1736) was a general of the Imperial Army and statesman of the Holy Roman Empire and the Archduchy of Austria and one of the most successful military commanders in modern European history, rising to the highest offices of state at the Imperial court in Vienna.

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Robert Adam

Robert Adam (3 July 1728 – 3 March 1792) was a Scottish neoclassical architect, interior designer and furniture designer.

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Stabiae

Stabiae was an ancient Roman town near the modern town of Castellammare di Stabia and approximately 4.5 km southwest of Pompeii, which became famous for the magnificent Roman villas found there in recent times.

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Syon House

Syon House, and its 200-acre (80 hectare) park, Syon Park, is in west London, historically within the parish of Isleworth, in the county of Middlesex.

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Telephus

In Greek mythology, Telephus (Τήλεφος, Tēlephos, "far-shining") was the son of Heracles and Auge, daughter of king Aleus of Tegea; and the father of Eurypylus.

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Theseus

Theseus (Θησεύς) was the mythical king and founder-hero of Athens.

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Redirects here:

Antichità di Ercolano, Antiquities of Herculaneum, Le Antichita di Ercolano, Le Antichità di Ercolano esposte.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_Antichità_di_Ercolano

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