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List of Roman deities

Index List of Roman deities

The Roman deities most familiar today are those the Romans identified with Greek counterparts (see interpretatio graeca), integrating Greek myths, iconography, and sometimes religious practices into Roman culture, including Latin literature, Roman art, and religious life as it was experienced throughout the Empire. [1]

347 relations: Abundantia, Acca Larentia, Acis and Galatea (mythology), Aeneas, Aeneid, Aequitas, Aeternitas, Aevum, Africa (Roman province), Aidos, Aion (deity), Aius Locutius, Ananke, Ancient Greek art, Ancient Greek philosophy, Ancient Greek religion, Anemoi, Angerona, Angitia, Anna Perenna, Annona (mythology), Antevorta, Anthropomorphism, Apollo, Apuleius, Archaic Triad, Arimanius, Artemis, Asclepius, Atropos, Augustan literature (ancient Rome), Augustine of Hippo, Augustus, Augustus (title), Aura (mythology), Aurora (mythology), Auxilia, Aventine Triad, Avernus, Averruncus, Bellona (goddess), Bona Dea, Bonus Eventus, Bubona, Caca (mythology), Cacus, Caelus, Camenae, Capitoline Triad, Cardea, ..., Cardo, Carmenta, Celtic mythology, Ceres (mythology), Charites, Chthonic, Church Fathers, Clementia, Cloacina, Clotho, College of Pontiffs, Compitalia, Concordia (mythology), Conflation, Consus, Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum, Culture of ancient Rome, Cupid, Cura (mythology), Cura Annonae, Cybele, Dactylic hexameter, Dīs Pater, Dea Dia, Dea Tacita, Decima (mythology), Deverra, Di indigetes, Di inferi, Di nixi, Di Penates, Diana (mythology), Diana Nemorensis, Dii Consentes, Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Dionysus, Disciplina, Dius Fidius, Egeria (mythology), Eirene (goddess), Emma Dench, Empanda, Ennius, Epithet, Epona, Erecura, Eris (mythology), Eros, Etruscan mythology, Evil eye, Falacer, False etymology, Fascinus, Fauna (deity), Faunus, Faustitas, Febris, Februus, Fecunditas, Felicitas, Ferentina, Feronia (mythology), Fides (deity), Fire pit, Flamen, Flora (mythology), Fontus, Fornacalia, Fornax (mythology), Fortuna, Forum (Roman), Fufluns, Fulgora (mythology), Furrina, Gaius Julius Hyginus, Gallo-Roman culture, Gauls, Genius (mythology), Georg Wissowa, Georges Dumézil, Glossary of ancient Roman religion, Grammatical gender, Greco-Roman mysteries, Greek mythology, Hecate, Helernus, Hera, Heracles, Hercules, Hercules in ancient Rome, Hermaphroditus, Hersilia, Hippolytus (son of Theseus), Honos, Honour, Hygieia, Hypnos, Imperial cult of ancient Rome, Indigitamenta, Interpretatio graeca, Inuus, Invidia, Isis, Italic peoples, Janus, Juno (mythology), Jupiter (mythology), Jupiter Indiges, Juturna, Juventas, King of Rome, Lachesis, Lady Justice, Larentalia, Lares, Larunda, Latin literature, Laverna, Lavinium, Lectisternium, Lemures, Leto, Levana, Liber, Libera (mythology), Liberalitas, Libertas, Libitina, Libra (constellation), List of Augustae, List of Greek mythological figures, List of Metamorphoses characters, List of Roman agricultural deities, List of Roman and Byzantine Empresses, List of Roman birth and childhood deities, Livia, Livy, Lua (goddess), Lucifer, Lucina (mythology), Lucus, Luna (goddess), Lupercalia, Lympha, Macrobius, Maia, Mana Genita, Manes, Mania (deity), Maniae, Mantus, Marcus Terentius Varro, Mars (mythology), Martianus Capella, Mater Matuta, Matres and Matronae, Maurus Servius Honoratus, Medea, Meditrinalia, Mefitis, Mellona, Mercury (mythology), Minerva, Mithraism, Mnemosyne, Moirai, Molae, Moneta, Mors (mythology), Morta (mythology), Mother of the Lares, Murcia (deity), Mutunus Tutunus, Nascio, Nemesis, Nenia Dea, Neptune, Neptune (mythology), Nerio, Nike (mythology), Nona (mythology), Nortia, Novensiles, Numa Pompilius, Nymph, Nyx, Ops, Orcus, Ovid, Palatine Hill, Palatua, Pales, Pan (god), Parcae, Pax (goddess), Peitho, Persephone, Phallus, Pheme, Picumnus, Picus, Pietas, Pilumnus, Pluto (mythology), Poena, Pomona (mythology), Portunus (mythology), Poseidon, Postverta, Priapus, Principate, Prometheus, Proserpina, Providentia, Pudicitia, Queen of heaven (antiquity), Querquetulanae, Quirinus, Quiritis, Religion in ancient Rome, Robigalia, Roma (mythology), Roman art, Roman emperor, Roman Empire, Roman historiography, Roman Kingdom, Roman Polytheistic Reconstructionism, Roman province, Roman Senate, Romulus, Rumina, Sabazios, Sabines, Sacred grove, Saeculum, Salacia, Salus, Sancus, Saturn (mythology), Securitas, Serapis, Sextus Pompeius Festus, Shepherd, Silvanus (mythology), Sol (mythology), Sol Invictus, Soranus (mythology), Sors, Spes, Stata Mater, Sterquilinus, Suadela, Sulis, Summanus, Syncretism, Tanit, Tempestas, Temple of Artemis, Terminus (god), Terra (mythology), Textual criticism, Thanatos, The City of God, The Golden Ass, The Rape of the Sabine Women, Tiber, Tiberinus (god), Tibertus, Titus Tatius, Tranquillitas, Trivia (mythology), Twelve Olympians, Vacuna, Vagitanus, Vejovis, Venilia, Venus, Venus (mythology), Veritas, Verminus, Vertumnus, Vesta (mythology), Vica Pota, Victoria (mythology), Viduus, Virgo (constellation), Virtus, Virtus (deity), Volturnus, Voluptas, Votum, Vulcan (mythology), Wheel of the Year, Wilhelm Heinrich Roscher, William Warde Fowler, Zeus. Expand index (297 more) »

Abundantia

In ancient Roman religion, Abundantia was a divine personification of abundance and prosperity.

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Acca Larentia

Acca Larentia or Acca Larentina was a mythical woman, later goddess, in Roman mythology whose festival, the Larentalia, was celebrated on December 23.

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Acis and Galatea (mythology)

The story of the love of Acis and the sea-nymph Galatea appears in Ovid's Metamorphoses.

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Aeneas

In Greco-Roman mythology, Aeneas (Greek: Αἰνείας, Aineías, possibly derived from Greek αἰνή meaning "praised") was a Trojan hero, the son of the prince Anchises and the goddess Aphrodite (Venus).

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Aeneid

The Aeneid (Aeneis) is a Latin epic poem, written by Virgil between 29 and 19 BC, that tells the legendary story of Aeneas, a Trojan who travelled to Italy, where he became the ancestor of the Romans.

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Aequitas

Aequitas (genitive aequitatis) is the Latin concept of justice, equality, conformity, symmetry, or fairness.

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Aeternitas

In ancient Roman religion, Aeternitas was the divine personification of eternity.

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Aevum

In Scholastic philosophy, the aevum (also called aeviternity) is the mode of existence experienced by angels and by the saints in heaven.

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Africa (Roman province)

Africa Proconsularis was a Roman province on the north African coast that was established in 146 BC following the defeat of Carthage in the Third Punic War.

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Aidos

Aidos (Greek: Αἰδώς) was the Greek goddess of shame, modesty, respect, and humility.

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Aion (deity)

Aion (Αἰών) is a Hellenistic deity associated with time, the orb or circle encompassing the universe, and the zodiac.

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Aius Locutius

Aius Locutius (āius locūtius, spoken affirmation) or Aius Loquens (āius loquens, speaking affirmation), was a Roman deity or numen associated with the Gallic invasions of Rome during the early 4th century BC.

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Ananke

In ancient Greek religion, Ananke (Ἀνάγκη, from the common noun ἀνάγκη, "force, constraint, necessity"), is a personification of inevitability, compulsion and necessity.

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Ancient Greek art

Ancient Greek art stands out among that of other ancient cultures for its development of naturalistic but idealized depictions of the human body, in which largely nude male figures were generally the focus of innovation.

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Ancient Greek philosophy

Ancient Greek philosophy arose in the 6th century BC and continued throughout the Hellenistic period and the period in which Ancient Greece was part of the Roman Empire.

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Ancient Greek religion

Ancient Greek religion encompasses the collection of beliefs, rituals, and mythology originating in ancient Greece in the form of both popular public religion and cult practices.

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Anemoi

In ancient Greek religion and myth, the Anemoi (Greek: Ἄνεμοι, "Winds") were wind gods who were each ascribed a cardinal direction from which their respective winds came (see Classical compass winds), and were each associated with various seasons and weather conditions.

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Angerona

In Roman religion, Angerona or Angeronia was an old Roman goddess, whose name and functions are variously explained.

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Angitia

Angitia was a goddess among the Marsi, the Paeligni and other Oscan-Umbrian peoples of central Italy.

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Anna Perenna

Anna Perenna was an old Roman deity of the circle or "ring" of the year, as the name (per annum) clearly indicates.

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Annona (mythology)

In ancient Roman religion, Annona (Latin annōna “corn, grain; means of subsistence”, from annus "year") is the divine personification of the grain supply to the city of Rome.

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Antevorta

In ancient Roman religion, Antevorta was a goddess of the future, also known as Porrima.

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Anthropomorphism

Anthropomorphism is the attribution of human traits, emotions, or intentions to non-human entities.

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Apollo

Apollo (Attic, Ionic, and Homeric Greek: Ἀπόλλων, Apollōn (Ἀπόλλωνος); Doric: Ἀπέλλων, Apellōn; Arcadocypriot: Ἀπείλων, Apeilōn; Aeolic: Ἄπλουν, Aploun; Apollō) is one of the most important and complex of the Olympian deities in classical Greek and Roman religion and Greek and Roman mythology.

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Apuleius

Apuleius (also called Lucius Apuleius Madaurensis; c. 124 – c. 170 AD) was a Latin-language prose writer, Platonist philosopher and rhetorician.

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Archaic Triad

The Archaic Triad comprised the original three deities worshipped on the Capitoline Hill in Rome: Jupiter, Mars and Quirinus.

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Arimanius

Arimanius (Αρειμάνιος; Arīmanius) is a name for an obscure deity found in a few Greek literary texts and five Latin inscriptions.

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Artemis

Artemis (Ἄρτεμις Artemis) was one of the most widely venerated of the Ancient Greek deities.

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Asclepius

Asclepius (Ἀσκληπιός, Asklēpiós; Aesculapius) was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.

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Atropos

Atropos or Aisa (Ἄτροπος "without turn"), in Greek mythology, was one of the three Moirai, goddesses of fate and destiny.

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Augustan literature (ancient Rome)

Augustan literature is the period of Latin literature written during the reign of Augustus (27 BC–AD 14), the first Roman emperor.

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Augustine of Hippo

Saint Augustine of Hippo (13 November 354 – 28 August 430) was a Roman African, early Christian theologian and philosopher from Numidia whose writings influenced the development of Western Christianity and Western philosophy.

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Augustus

Augustus (Augustus; 23 September 63 BC – 19 August 14 AD) was a Roman statesman and military leader who was the first Emperor of the Roman Empire, controlling Imperial Rome from 27 BC until his death in AD 14.

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Augustus (title)

Augustus (plural augusti;;, Latin for "majestic", "the increaser" or "venerable"), was an ancient Roman title given as both name and title to Gaius Octavius (often referred to simply as Augustus), Rome's first Emperor.

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Aura (mythology)

In Greek and Roman mythology, Aura (Αὔρα) is a minor deity, whose name means breeze.

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Aurora (mythology)

Aurora is the Latin word for dawn, and the goddess of dawn in Roman mythology and Latin poetry.

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Auxilia

The Auxilia (Latin, lit. "auxiliaries") constituted the standing non-citizen corps of the Imperial Roman army during the Principate era (30 BC–284 AD), alongside the citizen legions.

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Aventine Triad

The Aventine Triad (also referred to as the plebeian Triad or the agricultural Triad) is a modern term for the joint cult of the Roman deities Ceres, Liber and Libera.

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Avernus

Avernus was an ancient name for a volcanic crater near Cumae (Cuma), Italy, in the Region of Campania west of Naples.

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Averruncus

In ancient Roman religion, Averruncus or Auruncus is a god of averting harm.

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Bellona (goddess)

Bellona was an ancient Roman goddess of war.

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Bona Dea

Bona Dea ('Good Goddess') was a divinity in ancient Roman religion.

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Bonus Eventus

Bonus Eventus ("Good Outcome") was a divine personification in ancient Roman religion.

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Bubona

In ancient Roman religion, Bubona is thought to have been a goddess of cattle, but she is named only by Saint Augustine.

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Caca (mythology)

In ancient Roman religion and myth, Caca is the sister of Cacus, the son of Vulcan who stole cattle from Hercules during the course of his western labors.

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Cacus

In Roman mythology, Cacus was a fire-breathing giant and the son of Vulcan.

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Caelus

Caelus or Coelus was a primal god of the sky in Roman myth and theology, iconography, and literature (compare caelum, the Latin word for "sky" or "the heavens", hence English "celestial").

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Camenae

In Roman mythology, the Camenae (also Casmenae, Camoenae) were originally goddesses of childbirth, wells and fountains, and also prophetic deities.

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Capitoline Triad

The Capitoline Triad was a group of three deities who were worshipped in ancient Roman religion in an elaborate temple on Rome's Capitoline Hill (Latin Capitolium).

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Cardea

Cardea or Carda was the ancient Roman goddess of the hinge (Latin cardo, cardinis), Roman doors being hung on pivot hinges.

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Cardo

A cardo was the Latin name given to a north-south street in Ancient Roman cities and military camps as an integral component of city planning.

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Carmenta

In ancient Roman religion and myth, Carmenta was a goddess of childbirth and prophecy, associated with technological innovation as well as the protection of mothers and children, and a patron of midwives.

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Celtic mythology

Celtic mythology is the mythology of Celtic polytheism, the religion of the Iron Age Celts.

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Ceres (mythology)

In ancient Roman religion, Ceres (Cerēs) was a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships.

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Charites

In Greek mythology, a Charis (Χάρις) or Grace is one of three or more minor goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity, and fertility, together known as the Charites (Χάριτες) or Graces.

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Chthonic

Chthonic (from translit, "in, under, or beneath the earth", from χθών italic "earth") literally means "subterranean", but the word in English describes deities or spirits of the underworld, especially in Ancient Greek religion.

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Church Fathers

The Church Fathers, Early Church Fathers, Christian Fathers, or Fathers of the Church are ancient and influential Christian theologians and writers.

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Clementia

In Roman mythology, Clementia was the goddess of clemency, leniency, mercy, forgiveness, penance, redemption, absolution and salvation.

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Cloacina

In Roman mythology, Cloacina, "The Cleanser" (from the Latin verb cluo, "to cleanse", from which also cloaca, "sewer, drain") was the goddess who presided over the Cloaca Maxima ("Greatest Drain"), the main trunk of the system of sewers in Rome.

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Clotho

Clotho (Κλωθώ) is one of the Three Fates or Moirai who spin (Clotho), draw out (Lachesis) and cut (Atropos) the thread of Life in ancient Greek mythology.

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College of Pontiffs

The College of Pontiffs (Latin: Collegium Pontificum; see collegium) was a body of the ancient Roman state whose members were the highest-ranking priests of the state religion.

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Compitalia

In ancient Roman religion, the Compitalia (Latin: Ludi Compitalicii) was a festival celebrated once a year in honor of the Lares Compitales, household deities of the crossroads, to whom sacrifices were offered at the places where two or more ways meet.

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Concordia (mythology)

In ancient Roman religion, Concordia is the goddess who embodies agreement in marriage and society.

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Conflation

Conflation happens when the identities of two or more individuals, concepts, or places, sharing some characteristics of one another, seem to be a single identity, and the differences appear to become lost.

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Consus

In ancient Roman religion, the god Consus was the protector of grains.

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Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum

The Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum (CIL) is a comprehensive collection of ancient Latin inscriptions.

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Culture of ancient Rome

The culture of ancient Rome existed throughout almost 1200-year history of the civilization of Ancient Rome.

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Cupid

In classical mythology, Cupid (Latin Cupīdō, meaning "desire") is the god of desire, erotic love, attraction and affection.

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Cura (mythology)

Cura or Aera Cura is the name of a Roman goddess who created the first human and whose name means "Care" or "Concern".

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Cura Annonae

In ancient Rome, the Romans used the term Cura Annonae ("care for the grain supply"), in honour of their goddess Annona and the grain dole was distributed from the Temple of Ceres.

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Cybele

Cybele (Phrygian: Matar Kubileya/Kubeleya "Kubileya/Kubeleya Mother", perhaps "Mountain Mother"; Lydian Kuvava; Κυβέλη Kybele, Κυβήβη Kybebe, Κύβελις Kybelis) is an Anatolian mother goddess; she may have a possible precursor in the earliest neolithic at Çatalhöyük, where statues of plump women, sometimes sitting, have been found in excavations.

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Dactylic hexameter

Dactylic hexameter (also known as "heroic hexameter" and "the meter of epic") is a form of meter or rhythmic scheme in poetry.

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Dīs Pater

Dīs Pater was a Roman god of the underworld, later subsumed by Pluto or Hades (Hades was Greek).

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Dea Dia

Dea Dia ("The Divine Goddess") was a goddess of fertility and growth in ancient Roman religion.

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Dea Tacita

In Roman mythology, Dea Tacita ("the silent goddess") was a goddess of the dead.

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Decima (mythology)

In Roman mythology, Decima was one of the three Parcae, or often known in English as the Fates.

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Deverra

In Roman mythology, Deverra (apparently from Latin deverro "to sweep away") was one of the three gods that protected midwives and women in labor, the other two being Pilumnus and Intercidona.

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Di indigetes

In Georg Wissowa's terminology, the di indigetes or indigites were Roman deities not adopted from other religions, as distinguished from the di novensides.

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Di inferi

The di inferi or dii inferi (Latin, "the gods below") were a shadowy collective of ancient Roman deities associated with death and the underworld.

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Di nixi

In ancient Roman religion, the di nixi (or dii nixi), also Nixae, were birth deities.

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Di Penates

In ancient Roman religion, the Di Penates or Penates were among the dii familiares, or household deities, invoked most often in domestic rituals.

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Diana (mythology)

Diana (Classical Latin) was the goddess of the hunt, the moon, and nature in Roman mythology, associated with wild animals and woodland, and having the power to talk to and control animals.

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Diana Nemorensis

Diana Nemorensis ("Diana of Nemi"), also known as "Diana of the Wood", was an Italic form of the goddess who became Hellenised during the fourth century BCE and conflated with Artemis.

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Dii Consentes

The Dii Consentes, also as Di or Dei Consentes (once Dii Complices), was a list of twelve major deities, six gods and six goddesses, in the pantheon of Ancient Rome.

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Dionysius of Halicarnassus

Dionysius of Halicarnassus (Διονύσιος Ἀλεξάνδρου Ἁλικαρνασσεύς, Dionysios Alexandrou Halikarnasseus, "Dionysios son of Alexandros of Halikarnassos"; c. 60 BCafter 7 BC) was a Greek historian and teacher of rhetoric, who flourished during the reign of Caesar Augustus.

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Dionysus

Dionysus (Διόνυσος Dionysos) is the god of the grape harvest, winemaking and wine, of ritual madness, fertility, theatre and religious ecstasy in ancient Greek religion and myth.

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Disciplina

In Roman mythology, Disciplina was a minor deity and the personification of discipline.

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Dius Fidius

In ancient Roman religion, Dius Fidius (less often as Dius Fidus) was a god of oaths associated with Jupiter.

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Egeria (mythology)

Egeria (Ēgeria) was a nymph attributed a legendary role in the early history of Rome as a divine consort and counselor of Numa Pompilius, the second Sabine king of Rome, to whom she imparted laws and rituals pertaining to ancient Roman religion.

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Eirene (goddess)

Eirene (Εἰρήνη, Eirēnē,, "Peace"), more commonly known in English as Peace, was one of the Horae, the personification of peace.

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Emma Dench

Emma Dench is an English ancient historian, classicist, and academic.

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Empanda

In ancient Roman religion, Empanda or Panda was a goddess, or possibly an epithet of Juno.

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Ennius

Quintus Ennius (c. 239 – c. 169 BC) was a writer and poet who lived during the Roman Republic.

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Epithet

An epithet (from ἐπίθετον epitheton, neuter of ἐπίθετος epithetos, "attributed, added") is a byname, or a descriptive term (word or phrase), accompanying or occurring in place of a name and having entered common usage.

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Epona

In Gallo-Roman religion, Epona was a protector of horses, ponies, donkeys, and mules.

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Erecura

Erecura or Aerecura (also found as Herecura or Eracura) was a goddess worshipped in ancient times, often thought to be Celtic in origin, mostly represented with the attributes of Proserpina and associated with the Roman underworld god Dis Pater, as on an altar from Sulzbach.

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Eris (mythology)

Eris (Ἔρις, "Strife") is the Greek goddess of strife and discord.

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Eros

In Greek mythology, Eros (Ἔρως, "Desire") was the Greek god of sexual attraction.

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Etruscan mythology

Etruscan mythology comprises a set of stories, beliefs, and religious practices of the Etruscan civilization, originating in the 7th century BC from the preceding Iron Age Villanovan culture, with its influences in the mythology of ancient Greece and Phoenicia, and sharing similarities with concurrent Roman mythology.

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Evil eye

The evil eye is a curse or legend believed to be cast by a malevolent glare, usually given to a person when they are unaware.

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Falacer

Falacer, or more fully dīvus pater falacer, was an ancient Italic god, according to Varro.

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False etymology

A false etymology (popular etymology, etymythology, pseudo-etymology, or par(a)etymology), sometimes called folk etymology – although the last term is also a technical term in linguistics - is a popularly held but false belief about the origin or derivation of a specific word.

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Fascinus

In ancient Roman religion and magic, the fascinus or fascinum was the embodiment of the divine phallus.

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Fauna (deity)

In ancient Roman religion, Fauna is a goddess said in differing ancient sources to be the wife, sister, or daughter of Faunus (the Roman counterpart of Pan).

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Faunus

In ancient Roman religion and myth, Faunus was the horned god of the forest, plains and fields; when he made cattle fertile he was called Inuus.

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Faustitas

In Roman mythology, the goddess Faustitas (Latin: "good fortune") had the responsibility of protecting the herd and livestock.

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Febris

In Roman mythology, Febris ("fever") was the goddess who embodied, but also protected people from fever and malaria.

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Februus

In ancient Roman religion, Februus, whose name means "purifier", was the god of purification.

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Fecunditas

In Roman mythology, Fecunditas (Latin: "fecundity, fertility") was the goddess of fertility.

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Felicitas

In ancient Roman culture, felicitas (from the Latin adjective felix, "fruitful, blessed, happy, lucky") is a condition of divinely inspired productivity, blessedness, or happiness.

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Ferentina

Ferentina was the patron goddess of the city Ferentinum, Latium.

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Feronia (mythology)

In ancient Roman religion, Feronia was a goddess associated with wildlife, fertility, health, and abundance.

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Fides (deity)

Fides (Latin: Fidēs) was the goddess of trust and bona fides (good faith) in Roman paganism.

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Fire pit

A fire pit or a fire hole can vary from a pit dug in the ground to an elaborate gas burning structure of stone, brick, and metal.

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Flamen

In ancient Roman religion, a flamen was a priest assigned to one of fifteen deities with official cults during the Roman Republic.

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Flora (mythology)

In Roman mythology, Flora (Flōra) is a Sabine-derived goddess of flowers and of the season of spring – a symbol for nature and flowers (especially the may-flower).

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Fontus

In ancient Roman religion, Fontus or Fons (plural Fontes, "Font" or "Source") was a god of wells and springs.

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Fornacalia

The Fornacalia was an Ancient Roman religious festival celebrated in honour of the goddess Fornax, a divine personification of the oven (fornax), and was related to the proper baking of bread.

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Fornax (mythology)

In ancient Roman religion, Fornax was the divine personification of the oven (fornax).

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Fortuna

Fortuna (Fortūna, equivalent to the Greek goddess Tyche) was the goddess of fortune and the personification of luck in Roman religion.

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Forum (Roman)

A forum (Latin forum "public place outdoors", plural fora; English plural either fora or forums) was a public square in a Roman municipium, or any civitas, reserved primarily for the vending of goods; i.e., a marketplace, along with the buildings used for shops and the stoas used for open stalls.

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Fufluns

In Etruscan mythology, Fufluns (or Puphluns) was a god of plant life, happiness, wine, health, and growth in all things.

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Fulgora (mythology)

In Roman mythology, Fulgora was the female personification of lightning.

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Furrina

Furrina, also spelled Furina, was an ancient Roman goddess whose function had become obscure by the time of Varro.

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Gaius Julius Hyginus

Gaius Julius Hyginus (64 BC – AD 17) was a Latin author, a pupil of the famous Cornelius Alexander Polyhistor, and a freedman of Caesar Augustus.

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Gallo-Roman culture

The term "Gallo-Roman" describes the Romanized culture of Gaul under the rule of the Roman Empire.

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Gauls

The Gauls were Celtic people inhabiting Gaul in the Iron Age and the Roman period (roughly from the 5th century BC to the 5th century AD).

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Genius (mythology)

In Roman religion, the genius (plural geniī) is the individual instance of a general divine nature that is present in every individual person, place, or thing.

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Georg Wissowa

Georg Otto August Wissowa (17 June 1859 – 11 May 1931) was a German classical philologist born in Neudorf, near Breslau.

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Georges Dumézil

Georges Dumézil (4 March 1898 – 11 October 1986, Paris) was a French comparative philologist best known for his analysis of sovereignty and power in Proto-Indo-European religion and society.

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Glossary of ancient Roman religion

The vocabulary of ancient Roman religion was highly specialized.

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Grammatical gender

In linguistics, grammatical gender is a specific form of noun class system in which the division of noun classes forms an agreement system with another aspect of the language, such as adjectives, articles, pronouns, or verbs.

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Greco-Roman mysteries

Mystery religions, sacred mysteries or simply mysteries were religious schools of the Greco-Roman world for which participation was reserved to initiates (mystai).

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Greek mythology

Greek mythology is the body of myths and teachings that belong to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world, and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices.

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Hecate

Hecate or Hekate (Ἑκάτη, Hekátē) is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a keyThe Running Maiden from Eleusis and the Early Classical Image of Hekate by Charles M. Edwards in the American Journal of Archaeology, Vol.

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Helernus

Helernus, also known as Alernus, was an Archaic Roman deity.

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Hera

Hera (Ἥρᾱ, Hērā; Ἥρη, Hērē in Ionic and Homeric Greek) is the goddess of women, marriage, family, and childbirth in Ancient Greek religion and myth, one of the Twelve Olympians and the sister-wife of Zeus.

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Heracles

Heracles (Ἡρακλῆς, Hēraklês, Glory/Pride of Hēra, "Hera"), born Alcaeus (Ἀλκαῖος, Alkaios) or Alcides (Ἀλκείδης, Alkeidēs), was a divine hero in Greek mythology, the son of Zeus and Alcmene, foster son of AmphitryonBy his adoptive descent through Amphitryon, Heracles receives the epithet Alcides, as "of the line of Alcaeus", father of Amphitryon.

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Hercules

Hercules is a Roman hero and god.

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Hercules in ancient Rome

In ancient Roman religion and myth, Hercules was venerated as a divinized hero and incorporated into the legends of Rome's founding.

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Hermaphroditus

In Greek mythology, Hermaphroditus or Hermaphroditos (Ἑρμαφρόδιτος) was the son of Aphrodite and Hermes.

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Hersilia

In Roman mythology, Hersilia was a figure in the foundation myth of Rome.

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Hippolytus (son of Theseus)

''The Death of Hippolytus'', by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836–1912). In Greek mythology, Hippolytus (Ἱππόλυτος Hippolytos; "unleasher of horses") was a son of Theseus and either Antiope or Hippolyte.

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Honos

In Roman mythology, Honos was the god of chivalry, honor and military justice.

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Honour

Honour (or honor in American English, note) is the idea of a bond between an individual and a society, as a quality of a person that is both of social teaching and of personal ethos, that manifests itself as a code of conduct, and has various elements such as valor, chivalry, honesty, and compassion.

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Hygieia

In Greek as well as Roman mythology, Hygieia (also Hygiea or Hygeia; Ὑγιεία or Ὑγεία, Hygēa or Hygīa), was one of the Aeclepiadae; the sons and daughters of the god of medicine, Asclepius, and the goddess of healing, Epione.

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Hypnos

In Greek mythology, Hypnos (Ὕπνος, "sleep") is the personification of sleep; the Roman equivalent is known as Somnus.

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Imperial cult of ancient Rome

The Imperial cult of ancient Rome identified emperors and some members of their families with the divinely sanctioned authority (auctoritas) of the Roman State.

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Indigitamenta

In ancient Roman religion, the indigitamenta were lists of deities kept by the College of Pontiffs to assure that the correct divine names were invoked for public prayers.

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Interpretatio graeca

Interpretatio graeca (Latin, "Greek translation" or "interpretation by means of Greek ") is a discourse in which ancient Greek religious concepts and practices, deities, and myths are used to interpret or attempt to understand the mythology and religion of other cultures.

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Inuus

In ancient Roman religion, Inuus was a god, or aspect of a god, who embodied sexual intercourse.

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Invidia

In Latin, invidia is the sense of envy, a "looking upon" associated with the evil eye, from invidere, "to look against, to look in a hostile manner." Invidia ("Envy") is one of the Seven Deadly Sins in Christian belief.

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Isis

Isis was a major goddess in ancient Egyptian religion whose worship spread throughout the Greco-Roman world.

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Italic peoples

The Italic peoples are an Indo-European ethnolinguistic group identified by speaking Italic languages.

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Janus

In ancient Roman religion and myth, Janus (IANVS (Iānus)) is the god of beginnings, gates, transitions, time, duality, doorways, passages, and endings.

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Juno (mythology)

Juno (Latin: IVNO, Iūnō) is an ancient Roman goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state.

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Jupiter (mythology)

Jupiter (from Iūpiter or Iuppiter, *djous “day, sky” + *patēr “father," thus "heavenly father"), also known as Jove gen.

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Jupiter Indiges

According to the Roman historian Livy, Jupiter Indiges is the name given to the deified hero Aeneas.

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Juturna

In the myth and religion of ancient Rome, Juturna was a goddess of fountains, wells and springs, and the mother of Fontus by Janus.

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Juventas

Juventas was the ancient Roman goddess whose sphere of tutelage was youth and rejuvenation.

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King of Rome

The King of Rome (Rex Romae) was the chief magistrate of the Roman Kingdom.

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Lachesis

Lachesis (Λάχεσις, Lakhesis, "disposer of lots", from λαγχάνω, lanchano, "to obtain by lot, by fate, or by the will of the gods"), in ancient Greek religion, was the second of the Three Fates, or Moirai: Clotho, Lachesis and Atropos.

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Lady Justice

Lady Justice is an allegorical personification of the moral force in judicial systems.

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Larentalia

The Roman festival of Larentalia was held on December 23, but was ordered to be observed twice a year by Augustus; by some supposed to be in honour of the Lares, a kind of domestic genii, or divinities, worshipped in houses, and esteemed the guardians and protectors of families, supposed to reside in chimney-corners.

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Lares

Lares (archaic Lases, singular Lar), were guardian deities in ancient Roman religion.

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Larunda

Larunda (also Larunde, Laranda, Lara) was a naiad nymph, daughter of the river Almo in Ovid's Fasti.

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Latin literature

Latin literature includes the essays, histories, poems, plays, and other writings written in the Latin language.

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Laverna

In Roman mythology, Laverna was a goddess of thieves, cheats and the underworld.

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Lavinium

Lavinium was a port city of Latium, to the south of Rome, midway between the Tiber river at Ostia and Anzio.

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Lectisternium

The lectisternium was an ancient Roman propitiatory ceremony, consisting of a meal offered to gods and goddesses.

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Lemures

The lemures were shades or spirits of the restless or malignant dead in Roman mythology, and are probably cognate with an extended sense of larvae (from Latin larva, "mask") as disturbing or frightening.

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Leto

In Greek mythology, Leto (Λητώ Lētṓ; Λατώ, Lātṓ in Doric Greek) is a daughter of the Titans Coeus and Phoebe, the sister of Asteria.

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Levana

Levana (from Latin levare, "to lift") is an ancient Roman goddess involved in rituals pertaining to childbirth.

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Liber

In ancient Roman religion and mythology, Liber ("the free one"), also known as Liber Pater ("the free Father"), was a god of viticulture and wine, fertility and freedom.

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Libera (mythology)

In ancient Roman religion, Libera was a goddess of wine, fertility and freedom.

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Liberalitas

In ancient Roman culture, liberalitas was the virtue of giving freely (from liber, "free"), hence generosity.

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Libertas

Libertas (Latin for Liberty) is the Roman goddess and embodiment of liberty.

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Libitina

Libitina, also Libentina or Lubentina, is an ancient Roman goddess of funerals and burial.

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Libra (constellation)

Libra is a constellation of the zodiac.

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List of Augustae

Augusta (plural Augustae; αὐγούστα) was a Roman imperial honorific title given to empresses and honoured women of the imperial families.

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List of Greek mythological figures

The following is a list of gods, goddesses and many other divine and semi-divine figures from Ancient Greek mythology and Ancient Greek religion.

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List of Metamorphoses characters

This is a list of characters in the poem Metamorphoses by Ovid.

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List of Roman agricultural deities

In ancient Roman religion, agricultural deities were thought to care for every aspect of growing, harvesting, and storing crops.

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List of Roman and Byzantine Empresses

This is a list of women who were Roman Empress, i.e. the wife of the Roman emperor, the ruler of the Roman Empire.

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List of Roman birth and childhood deities

In ancient Roman religion, birth and childhood deities were thought to care for every aspect of conception, pregnancy, childbirth, and child development.

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Livia

Livia Drusilla (Classical Latin: Livia•Drvsilla, Livia•Avgvsta) (30 January 58 BC – 28 September 29 AD), also known as Julia Augusta after her formal adoption into the Julian family in AD 14, was the wife of the Roman emperor Augustus throughout his reign, as well as his adviser.

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Livy

Titus Livius Patavinus (64 or 59 BCAD 12 or 17) – often rendered as Titus Livy, or simply Livy, in English language sources – was a Roman historian.

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Lua (goddess)

In Roman mythology, Lua was a goddess to whom soldiers sacrificed captured weapons.

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Lucifer

Lucifer is a name that, according to dictionaries of the English language, refers either to the Devil or to the planet Venus when appearing as the morning star.

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Lucina (mythology)

In ancient Roman religion and myth, Lucina was the goddess of childbirth who safeguarded the lives of women in labour.

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Lucus

In ancient Roman religion, a lucus is a sacred grove.

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Luna (goddess)

In ancient Roman religion and myth, Luna is the divine embodiment of the Moon (Latin luna; cf. English "lunar").

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Lupercalia

Lupercalia was a very ancient, possibly pre-Roman pastoral annual festival, observed in the city of Rome on February 15, to avert evil spirits and purify the city, releasing health and fertility.

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Lympha

The Lympha (plural Lymphae) is an ancient Roman deity of fresh water.

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Macrobius

Macrobius, fully Macrobius Ambrosius Theodosius, also known as Theodosius, was a Roman provincial who lived during the early fifth century, at the transition of the Roman to the Byzantine Empire, and when Latin was as widespread as Greek among the elite.

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Maia

Maia (or; Μαῖα; Maia), in ancient Greek religion, is one of the Pleiades and the mother of Hermes.

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Mana Genita

In ancient Roman religion, Mana Genita or Geneta Mana is an obscure goddess mentioned only by Pliny and Plutarch.

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Manes

In ancient Roman religion, the Manes or Di Manes are chthonic deities sometimes thought to represent souls of deceased loved ones.

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Mania (deity)

In Roman and Etruscan mythology, Mania (or Manea) was a goddess of the dead.

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Maniae

The Maniae (singular: Mania), in ancient Greek religion, are a spirit or group of spirits personifying insanity, madness, and crazed frenzy.

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Mantus

In Etruscan myth and religion, Mantus was a god of the underworld in the Po Valley, as described by Servius.

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Marcus Terentius Varro

Marcus Terentius Varro (116 BC – 27 BC) was an ancient Roman scholar and writer.

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Mars (mythology)

In ancient Roman religion and myth, Mars (Mārs) was the god of war and also an agricultural guardian, a combination characteristic of early Rome.

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Martianus Capella

Martianus Minneus Felix Capella was a Latin prose writer of Late Antiquity (fl. c. 410–420), one of the earliest developers of the system of the seven liberal arts that structured early medieval education.

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Mater Matuta

Mater Matuta was an indigenous Latin goddess, whom the Romans eventually made equivalent to the dawn goddess Aurora, and the Greek goddess Eos.

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Matres and Matronae

The Matres (Latin "mothers"Lindow (2001:224).) and Matronae (Latin "matrons") were female deities venerated in Northwestern Europe, of whom relics are found dating from the first to the fifth century.

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Maurus Servius Honoratus

Maurus Servius Honoratus was a late fourth-century and early fifth-century grammarian, with the contemporary reputation of being the most learned man of his generation in Italy; he was the author of a set of commentaries on the works of Virgil.

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Medea

In Greek mythology, Medea (Μήδεια, Mēdeia, მედეა) was the daughter of King Aeëtes of Colchis, niece of Circe, granddaughter of the sun god Helios.

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Meditrinalia

In Roman religion, Meditrinalia was a now obscure festival celebrated on October 11 in honor of the new vintage, which was offered as libations to the gods for the first time each year.

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Mefitis

Mefitis is the Samnite goddess of the foul-smelling gases of the earth.

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Mellona

Mellona or Mellonia was an ancient Roman goddess said by St. Augustine to promote the supply of honey (Latin mel, mellis), as Pomona did for apples and Bubona for cattle.

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Mercury (mythology)

Mercury (Latin: Mercurius) is a major god in Roman religion and mythology, being one of the Dii Consentes within the ancient Roman pantheon.

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Minerva

Minerva (Etruscan: Menrva) was the Roman goddess of wisdom and strategic warfare, although it is noted that the Romans did not stress her relation to battle and warfare as the Greeks would come to, and the sponsor of arts, trade, and strategy.

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Mithraism

Mithraism, also known as the Mithraic mysteries, was a mystery religion centered around the god Mithras that was practised in the Roman Empire from about the 1st to the 4th century CE.

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Mnemosyne

Mnemosyne (Μνημοσύνη) is the goddess of memory in Greek mythology.

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Moirai

In Greek mythology, the Moirai or Moerae or (Μοῖραι, "apportioners"), often known in English as the Fates (Fata, -orum (n)), were the white-robed incarnations of destiny; their Roman equivalent was the Parcae (euphemistically the "sparing ones").

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Molae

The Moles are goddesses who appear in an ancient Roman prayer formula in connection with Mars.

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Moneta

In Roman mythology, Moneta (Latin Monēta) was a title given to two separate goddesses: the goddess of memory (identified with the Greek goddess Mnemosyne) and an epithet of Juno, called Juno Moneta (Latin Iūno Monēta).

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Mors (mythology)

In ancient Roman myth and literature, Mors (also known as Letum) is the personification of death equivalent to the Greek Thánatos.

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Morta (mythology)

In Roman mythology, Morta was the goddess of death.

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Mother of the Lares

The Mother of the Lares (Latin Mater Larum) has been identified with any of several minor Roman deities.

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Murcia (deity)

Murcia was a little-known goddess in ancient Rome.

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Mutunus Tutunus

In ancient Roman religion, Mutunus Tutunus or Mutinus Titinus was a phallic marriage deity, in some respects equated with Priapus.

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Nascio

In Roman mythology, Nascio (Latin: "birth") was one of many goddesses of birth, and a protector of infants.

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Nemesis

In the ancient Greek religion, Nemesis (Νέμεσις), also called Rhamnousia or Rhamnusia ("the goddess of Rhamnous"), was the goddess who enacted retribution against those who succumb to hubris (arrogance before the gods).

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Nenia Dea

Nenia Dea (Engl.: Goddess Nenia; rarely Naenia) was an ancient funeral deity of Rome, who had a sanctuary outside of the Porta Viminalis.

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Neptune

Neptune is the eighth and farthest known planet from the Sun in the Solar System.

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Neptune (mythology)

Neptune (Neptūnus) was the god of freshwater and the sea in Roman religion.

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Nerio

In ancient Roman religion and myth, Nerio was an ancient war goddess and the personification of valor.

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Nike (mythology)

In ancient Greek religion, Nike (Νίκη, "Victory") was a goddess who personified victory.

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Nona (mythology)

. Nona was one of the Parcae, the three personifications of destiny in Roman mythology (the Moirai in Greek mythology and in Germanic mythology, the Norns), and the Roman goddess of pregnancy.

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Nortia

Nortia is the Latinized name of the Etruscan goddess Nurtia (variant manuscript readings include Norcia, Norsia, Nercia, and Nyrtia), whose sphere of influence was time, fate, destiny, and chance.

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Novensiles

In ancient Roman religion, the dii (also di) Novensiles or Novensides are collective deities of obscure significance found in inscriptions, prayer formulary, and both ancient and early-Christian literary texts.

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Numa Pompilius

Numa Pompilius (753–673 BC; reigned 715–673 BC) was the legendary second king of Rome, succeeding Romulus.

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Nymph

A nymph (νύμφη, nýmphē) in Greek and Latin mythology is a minor female nature deity typically associated with a particular location or landform.

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Nyx

Nyx (Νύξ, "Night"; Nox) is the Greek goddess (or personification) of the night.

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Ops

In ancient Roman religion, Ops or Opis (Latin: "Plenty") was a fertility deity and earth goddess of Sabine origin.

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Orcus

Orcus (Orcus) was a god of the underworld, punisher of broken oaths in Italic and Roman mythology.

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Ovid

Publius Ovidius Naso (20 March 43 BC – 17/18 AD), known as Ovid in the English-speaking world, was a Roman poet who lived during the reign of Augustus.

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Palatine Hill

The Palatine Hill (Collis Palatium or Mons Palatinus; Palatino) is the centremost of the Seven Hills of Rome and is one of the most ancient parts of the city.

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Palatua

Palatua was a Roman goddess who was provided an official priest or flamen, the Flamen Palatualis, and was charged with guarding the Palatine Hill.

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Pales

In ancient Roman religion, Pales was a deity of shepherds, flocks and livestock.

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Pan (god)

In ancient Greek religion and mythology, Pan (Πάν, Pan) is the god of the wild, shepherds and flocks, nature of mountain wilds, rustic music and impromptus, and companion of the nymphs.

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Parcae

In ancient Roman religion and myth, the Parcae (singular, Parca) were the female personifications of destiny, often called the Fates in English.

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Pax (goddess)

Pax (Latin for Peace), more commonly known in English as Peace, was the Roman goddess of peace, the equivalent of the Greek Eirene.

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Peitho

In Greek mythology, Peitho (Persuasion) is the goddess who personifies persuasion and seduction.

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Persephone

In Greek mythology, Persephone (Περσεφόνη), also called Kore ("the maiden"), is the daughter of Zeus and Demeter and is the queen of the underworld.

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Phallus

A phallus is a penis (especially when erect), an object that resembles a penis, or a mimetic image of an erect penis.

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Pheme

In Greek mythology, Pheme (Greek: Φήμη, Roman equivalent: Fama), also known as Ossa, was the personification of fame and renown, her favour being notability, her wrath being scandalous rumors.

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Picumnus

In Roman mythology, Picumnus was a god of fertility, agriculture, matrimony, infants and children.

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Picus

Picus was a figure in Roman mythology, was the first king of Latium.

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Pietas

Pietas, translated variously as "duty", "religiosity" or "religious behavior", "loyalty", "devotion", or "filial piety" (English "piety" derives from the Latin), was one of the chief virtues among the ancient Romans.

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Pilumnus

In Roman mythology, Pilumnus ("staker") was a nature deity, brother of Picumnus.

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Pluto (mythology)

Pluto (Latin: Plūtō; Πλούτων) was the ruler of the underworld in classical mythology.

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Poena

In Roman mythology, Poena (also Poine) is the spirit of punishment and the attendant of punishment to Nemesis, the goddess of divine retribution.

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Pomona (mythology)

Pomona (Pōmōna) was a goddess of fruitful abundance in ancient Roman religion and myth.

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Portunus (mythology)

Portunus was the ancient Roman god of keys, doors, livestock and ports.

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Poseidon

Poseidon (Ποσειδῶν) was one of the Twelve Olympians in ancient Greek religion and myth.

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Postverta

In Roman mythology, Postverta or Postvorta (also Porrima) was the goddess of the past and one of the two Carmentes (along with her sister Antevorta, or prorsa contracted form of Proversa).

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Priapus

In Greek mythology, Priapus (Πρίαπος, Priapos) was a minor rustic fertility god, protector of livestock, fruit plants, gardens and male genitalia.

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Principate

The Principate is the name sometimes given to the first period of the Roman Empire from the beginning of the reign of Augustus in 27 BC to the end of the Crisis of the Third Century in 284 AD, after which it evolved into the so-called Dominate.

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Prometheus

In Greek mythology, Prometheus (Προμηθεύς,, meaning "forethought") is a Titan, culture hero, and trickster figure who is credited with the creation of man from clay, and who defies the gods by stealing fire and giving it to humanity, an act that enabled progress and civilization.

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Proserpina

Proserpina or Proserpine is an ancient Roman goddess whose cult, myths and mysteries were based on those of Greek Persephone and her mother Demeter, the Greek goddess of grain and agriculture.

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Providentia

In ancient Roman religion, Providentia is a divine personification of the ability to foresee and make provision.

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Pudicitia

Pudicitia ("modesty" or "sexual virtue") was a central concept in ancient Roman sexual ethics.

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Queen of heaven (antiquity)

Queen of Heaven was a title given to a number of ancient sky goddesses worshipped throughout the ancient Mediterranean and Near East during ancient times.

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Querquetulanae

In ancient Roman religion and myth, the Querquetulanae or Querquetulanae virae were nymphs of the oak grove (querquetum) at a stage of producing green growth.

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Quirinus

In Roman mythology and religion, Quirinus is an early god of the Roman state.

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Quiritis

Quiritis was a Sabine (pre-Roman) goddess of motherhood.

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Religion in ancient Rome

Religion in Ancient Rome includes the ancestral ethnic religion of the city of Rome that the Romans used to define themselves as a people, as well as the religious practices of peoples brought under Roman rule, in so far as they became widely followed in Rome and Italy.

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Robigalia

The Robigalia was a festival in ancient Roman religion held April 25, named for the god Robigus.

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Roma (mythology)

In ancient Roman religion, Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state.

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Roman art

Roman art refers to the visual arts made in Ancient Rome and in the territories of the Roman Empire.

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Roman emperor

The Roman Emperor was the ruler of the Roman Empire during the imperial period (starting in 27 BC).

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Roman Empire

The Roman Empire (Imperium Rōmānum,; Koine and Medieval Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Ῥωμαίων, tr.) was the post-Roman Republic period of the ancient Roman civilization, characterized by government headed by emperors and large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean Sea in Europe, Africa and Asia.

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Roman historiography

Roman historiography is indebted to the Greeks, who invented the form.

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Roman Kingdom

The Roman Kingdom, or regal period, was the period of the ancient Roman civilization characterized by a monarchical form of government of the city of Rome and its territories.

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Roman Polytheistic Reconstructionism

Roman Polytheistic Reconstructionism, known variously as Religio Romana (Roman religion) in Latin, the Roman Way to the Gods in Italian and Spanish (via romana agli dei and camino romano a los dioses, respectively), and Cultus Deorum Romanorum (care of the Gods), is a contemporary reconstructionist movement reviving traditional Roman religious cults consisting of loosely related organizations.

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Roman province

In Ancient Rome, a province (Latin: provincia, pl. provinciae) was the basic and, until the Tetrarchy (from 293 AD), the largest territorial and administrative unit of the empire's territorial possessions outside Italy.

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Roman Senate

The Roman Senate (Senatus Romanus; Senato Romano) was a political institution in ancient Rome.

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Romulus

Romulus was the legendary founder and first king of Rome.

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Rumina

In ancient Roman religion, Rumina, also known as Diva Rumina, was a goddess who protected breastfeeding mothers, and possibly nursing infants.

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Sabazios

Sabazios (translit, Savázios) is the horseman and sky father god of the Phrygians and Thracians.

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Sabines

The Sabines (Sabini; Σαβῖνοι Sabĩnoi; Sabini, all exonyms) were an Italic tribe which lived in the central Apennines of ancient Italy, also inhabiting Latium north of the Anio before the founding of Rome.

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Sacred grove

A sacred grove or sacred woods are any grove of trees that are of special religious importance to a particular culture.

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Saeculum

A saeculum is a length of time roughly equal to the potential lifetime of a person or the equivalent of the complete renewal of a human population.

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Salacia

In ancient Roman mythology, Salacia was the female divinity of the sea, worshipped as the goddess of salt water who presided over the depths of the ocean.

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Salus

Salus (salus, "safety", "salvation", "welfare") was a Roman goddess.

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Sancus

In ancient Roman religion, Sancus (also known as Sangus or Semo Sancus) was a god of trust (fides), honesty, and oaths.

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Saturn (mythology)

Saturn (Saturnus) is a god in ancient Roman religion, and a character in myth as a god of generation, dissolution, plenty, wealth, agriculture, periodic renewal and liberation.

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Securitas

In Roman mythology, Securitas was the goddess of security and stability, especially the security of the Roman Empire.

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Serapis

Serapis (Σέραπις, later form) or Sarapis (Σάραπις, earlier form, from Userhapi "Osiris-Apis") is a Graeco-Egyptian deity.

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Sextus Pompeius Festus

Sextus Pompeius Festus, usually known simply as Festus, was a Roman grammarian who probably flourished in the later 2nd century AD, perhaps at Narbo (Narbonne) in Gaul.

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Shepherd

A shepherd or sheepherder is a person who tends, herds, feeds, or guards herds of sheep.

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Silvanus (mythology)

Silvanus (meaning "of the woods" in Latin) was a Roman tutelary deity of woods and fields.

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Sol (mythology)

Sol was the solar deity in ancient Roman religion.

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Sol Invictus

Sol Invictus ("Unconquered Sun") is the official sun god of the later Roman Empire and a patron of soldiers.

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Soranus (mythology)

Soranus was a Sabine god adopted into ancient Roman religion.

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Sors

In Roman mythology, Sors, a lesser deity, was a god of luck.

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Spes

In ancient Roman religion, Spes (pronounced) was the goddess of hope.

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Stata Mater

In ancient Roman religion, Stata Mater ("Mother who stops or stabilizes") was a compital goddess who protected against fires.

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Sterquilinus

In Roman mythology, Sterquilinus ("manure" or "feces") — also called Stercutus and Sterculius — was a god of feces.

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Suadela

In Roman mythology, Suadela (or Suada) was a goddess of persuasion, particularly in romance, seduction and love.

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Sulis

In localised Celtic polytheism practised in Britain, Sulis was a deity worshipped at the thermal spring of Bath (now in Somerset).

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Summanus

In ancient Roman religion, Summanus (Summānus) was the god of nocturnal thunder, as counterposed to Jupiter, the god of diurnal (daylight) thunder.

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Syncretism

Syncretism is the combining of different beliefs, while blending practices of various schools of thought.

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Tanit

Tanit was a Punic and Phoenician goddess, the chief deity of Carthage alongside her consort Baal-hamon.

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Tempestas

In ancient Roman religion, Tempestas (Latin tempestas: "season, weather; bad weather; storm, tempest") is a goddess of storms or sudden weather.

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Temple of Artemis

The Temple of Artemis or Artemision (Ἀρτεμίσιον; Artemis Tapınağı), also known less precisely as the Temple of Diana, was a Greek temple dedicated to an ancient, local form of the goddess Artemis.

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Terminus (god)

In Roman religion, Terminus was the god who protected boundary markers; his name was the Latin word for such a marker.

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Terra (mythology)

In ancient Roman religion and myth, Tellus Mater or Terra Mater ("Mother Earth") is a goddess of the earth.

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Textual criticism

Textual criticism is a branch of textual scholarship, philology, and literary criticism that is concerned with the identification of textual variants in either manuscripts or printed books.

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Thanatos

In Greek mythology, Thanatos (Θάνατος, pronounced in "Death", from θνῄσκω thnēskō "to die, be dying") was the personification of death.

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The City of God

The City of God Against the Pagans (De civitate Dei contra paganos), often called The City of God, is a book of Christian philosophy written in Latin by Augustine of Hippo in the early 5th century AD.

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The Golden Ass

The Metamorphoses of Apuleius, which St. Augustine referred to as The Golden Ass (Asinus aureus), is the only ancient Roman novel in Latin to survive in its entirety.

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The Rape of the Sabine Women

The Rape of the Sabine Women was an incident in Roman mythology in which the men of Rome committed a mass abduction of young women from the other cities in the region.

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Tiber

The Tiber (Latin Tiberis, Italian Tevere) is the third-longest river in Italy, rising in the Apennine Mountains in Emilia-Romagna and flowing through Tuscany, Umbria and Lazio, where it is joined by the river Aniene, to the Tyrrhenian Sea, between Ostia and Fiumicino.

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Tiberinus (god)

Tiberinus is a figure in Roman mythology.

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Tibertus

In Roman mythology, Tibertus is the god of the river Anio, a tributary of the Tiber.

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Titus Tatius

According to the Roman foundation myth, Titus Tatius was the king of the Sabines from Cures and joint-ruler of Rome for several years.

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Tranquillitas

In Roman mythology, Tranquillitas was the goddess and personification of tranquility, security, calmness, peace.

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Trivia (mythology)

Trivia in Roman mythology was the goddess who "haunted crossroads, graveyards, and was the goddess of sorcery and witchcraft, she wandered about at night and was seen only by the barking of dogs who told of her approach." Despite popular belief, she was not the equivalent of the Greek goddess Hecate, the goddess of witchcraft, the three-way crossroads and the harvest moon.

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Twelve Olympians

relief (1st century BCendash1st century AD) depicting the twelve Olympians carrying their attributes in procession; from left to right, Hestia (scepter), Hermes (winged cap and staff), Aphrodite (veiled), Ares (helmet and spear), Demeter (scepter and wheat sheaf), Hephaestus (staff), Hera (scepter), Poseidon (trident), Athena (owl and helmet), Zeus (thunderbolt and staff), Artemis (bow and quiver), Apollo (lyre), from the Walters Art Museum.Walters Art Museum, http://art.thewalters.org/detail/38764 accession number 23.40. In ancient Greek religion and mythology, the twelve Olympians are the major deities of the Greek pantheon, commonly considered to be Zeus, Hera, Poseidon, Demeter, Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Ares, Aphrodite, Hephaestus, Hermes, and either Hestia or Dionysus.

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Vacuna

Vacuna was an ancient Sabine goddess, identified by ancient Roman sources and later scholars with numerous other goddesses, including Ceres, Diana, Nike, Minerva, Bellona, Venus and Victoria.

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Vagitanus

In ancient Roman religion, Vagitanus or Vaticanus was one of a number of childbirth deities who influenced or guided some aspect of parturition, in this instance the newborn's crying.

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Vejovis

Vejovis or Vejove (italic or Vēdiovis; rare Vēive or Vēdius) was a Roman god.

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Venilia

Venilia, in Roman mythology, is a deity associated with the winds and the sea.

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Venus

Venus is the second planet from the Sun, orbiting it every 224.7 Earth days.

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Venus (mythology)

Venus (Classical Latin) is the Roman goddess whose functions encompassed love, beauty, desire, sex, fertility, prosperity and victory.

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Veritas

In Roman mythology, Veritas, meaning truth, is the goddess of truth, a daughter of Chronos, the God of Time (who has been identified with Saturn-Cronus, perhaps first by Plutarch), and the mother of Virtus.

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Verminus

In Roman mythology, Verminus was the Roman god who protected cattle from disease.

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Vertumnus

In Roman mythology, Vertumnus (also Vortumnus or Vertimnus) is the god of seasons, change and plant growth, as well as gardens and fruit trees.

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Vesta (mythology)

Vesta is the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family in Roman religion.

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Vica Pota

In ancient Roman religion, Vica Pota was a goddess whose shrine (aedes) was located at the foot of the Velian Hill, on the site of the domus of Publius Valerius Publicola.

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Victoria (mythology)

Victoria, in ancient Roman religion, was the personified goddess of victory.

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Viduus

In Roman mythology, Viduus ("divider") was the god who separated the soul and the body after death.

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Virgo (constellation)

Virgo is one of the constellations of the zodiac.

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Virtus

Virtus was a specific virtue in Ancient Rome.

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Virtus (deity)

In Roman mythology, Virtus was the deity of bravery and military strength, the personification of the Roman virtue of virtus.

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Volturnus

In Roman mythology, Volturnus was a god of the Tiber, and may have been the god of all rivers.

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Voluptas

In Roman mythology, Voluptas or Volupta, according to Apuleius, is the daughter born from the union of Cupid and Psyche.

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Votum

In ancient Roman religion, a votum, plural vota, is a vow or promise made to a deity.

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Vulcan (mythology)

Vulcan (Latin: Volcānus or Vulcānus) is the god of fire including the fire of volcanoes, metalworking, and the forge in ancient Roman religion and myth.

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Wheel of the Year

The Wheel of the Year is an annual cycle of seasonal festivals, observed by many modern Pagans.

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Wilhelm Heinrich Roscher

Wilhelm Heinrich Roscher (12 February 1845, in Göttingen – 9 March 1923, in Dresden) was a German classical scholar.

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William Warde Fowler

William Warde Fowler (16 May 1847 – 15 June 1921) was an English historian and ornithologist, and tutor at Lincoln College, Oxford.

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Zeus

Zeus (Ζεύς, Zeús) is the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion, who rules as king of the gods of Mount Olympus.

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References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Roman_deities

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