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Louis-Nicolas Davout

Index Louis-Nicolas Davout

Louis-Nicolas d'Avout (10 May 17701 June 1823), better known as Davout, 1st Duke of Auerstaedt, 1st Prince of Eckmühl, was a French general who was Marshal of the Empire during the Napoleonic era. [1]

107 relations: André Masséna, Annoux, Arc de Triomphe, Auxerre, École Militaire, Élysée Palace, Battle of Abukir (1799), Battle of Austerlitz, Battle of Berezina, Battle of Borodino, Battle of Czarnowo, Battle of Eckmühl, Battle of Eylau, Battle of Friedland, Battle of Golymin, Battle of Jemappes, Battle of Jena–Auerstedt, Battle of Krasnoi, Battle of Maloyaroslavets, Battle of Marengo, Battle of Neerwinden (1793), Battle of Ratisbon, Battle of Saltanovka, Battle of Smolensk (1812), Battle of Teugen-Hausen, Battle of Vyazma, Battle of Wagram, Battle of Waterloo, Bourbon Restoration, Cavalry, Chamber of Peers (France), Charles Leclerc, Charles XIV John of Sweden, Charles-Étienne Gudin de La Sablonnière, Château de Malmaison, Duc d'Auerstaedt, Duchy of Warsaw, Eckmühl, Elba, First French Empire, French Army, French campaign in Egypt and Syria, French First Republic, French invasion of Russia, French Revolution, French Revolutionary Wars, Garrison, Given name, Grande Armée, Hamburg, ..., Henri Jacques Guillaume Clarke, Hesdin, House of Bourbon, Hundred Days, I Corps (Grande Armée), III Corps (Grande Armée), Imperial Guard (Napoleon I), Jacques MacDonald, Jean Lannes, Joachim Murat, Joseph Fouché, Kingdom of Prussia, Laurent de Gouvion Saint-Cyr, Legion of Honour, List of Marshals of France, Loire, Louis Desaix, Louis XVIII of France, Louis-Alexandre Berthier, Marc Antoine de Beaumont, Marshal of the Empire, Michel Ney, Military academy, Military Order of Maria Theresa, Military Order of Max Joseph, Military Order of St. Henry, Minister of the Armed Forces (France), Mogilev, Napoléon Louis Davout d'Auerstaedt d'Eckmühl, Napoleon, Napoleonic era, Napoleonic Wars, Nicolas Oudinot, Order of Christ (Portugal), Order of Saint Stephen of Hungary, Order of the Elephant, Order of the Iron Crown, Order of the White Eagle (Poland), Paris, Paul Thiébault, Pauline Bonaparte, Pontoise, Rhine, Savigny-sur-Orge, Siege of Hamburg, Siege of Kehl (1796–97), Treaties of Tilsit, Ulm Campaign, Virtuti Militari, War of the Fifth Coalition, War of the First Coalition, War of the Fourth Coalition, War of the Second Coalition, War of the Sixth Coalition, War of the Third Coalition, XIII Corps (Grande Armée), Yonne. Expand index (57 more) »

André Masséna

André Masséna, 1st Duc de Rivoli, 1st Prince d'Essling (born Andrea Massena; 16 May 1758 – 4 April 1817) was a French military commander during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars.

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Annoux

Annoux is a commune in the Yonne department in Bourgogne-Franche-Comté in north-central France.

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Arc de Triomphe

The Arc de Triomphe de l'Étoile (Triumphal Arch of the Star) is one of the most famous monuments in Paris, standing at the western end of the Champs-Élysées at the center of Place Charles de Gaulle, formerly named Place de l'Étoile — the étoile or "star" of the juncture formed by its twelve radiating avenues.

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Auxerre

Auxerre is the capital of the Yonne department and the fourth-largest city in Burgundy.

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École Militaire

The École Militaire ("military school") is a vast complex of buildings housing various military training facilities in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, southeast of the Champ de Mars.

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Élysée Palace

The Élysée Palace (Palais de l'Élysée) is the official residence of the President of France.

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Battle of Abukir (1799)

The Battle of Abukir (or Aboukir or Abu Qir) was a battle in which Napoleon Bonaparte defeated Seid Mustafa Pasha's Ottoman army on July 25, 1799, during the French campaign in Egypt.

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Battle of Austerlitz

The Battle of Austerlitz (2 December 1805/11 Frimaire An XIV FRC), also known as the Battle of the Three Emperors, was one of the most important and decisive engagements of the Napoleonic Wars.

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Battle of Berezina

The Battle of Berezina (or Beresina) took place from 26 to 29 November 1812, between the French army of Napoleon, retreating after his invasion of Russia and crossing the Berezina (near Borisov, Belarus), and the Russian armies under Mikhail Kutuzov, Peter Wittgenstein and Admiral Pavel Chichagov.

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Battle of Borodino

The Battle of Borodino (la Moskova) was a battle fought on 7 September 1812 in the Napoleonic Wars during the French invasion of Russia.

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Battle of Czarnowo

The Battle of Czarnowo on the night of 23–24 December 1806 saw troops of the First French Empire under the eye of Emperor Napoleon I launch an evening assault crossing of the Wkra River against Lieutenant General Alexander Ivanovich Ostermann-Tolstoy's defending Russian Empire forces.

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Battle of Eckmühl

The Battle of Eckmühl (also known as "Eggmühl") fought on 21 April – 22 April 1809, was the turning point of the 1809 Campaign, also known as the War of the Fifth Coalition.

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Battle of Eylau

The Battle of Eylau or Battle of Preussisch-Eylau, 7 and 8 February 1807, was a bloody and inconclusive battle between Napoleon's Grande Armée and the Imperial Russian Army under the command of Levin August, Count von Bennigsen near the town of Preussisch Eylau in East Prussia.

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Battle of Friedland

The Battle of Friedland (June 14, 1807) was a major engagement of the Napoleonic Wars between the armies of the French Empire commanded by Napoleon I and the armies of the Russian Empire led by Count von Bennigsen.

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Battle of Golymin

The Battle of Golymin took place on 26 December 1806 during the Napoleonic Wars at Gołymin, Poland, between around 17,000 Russian soldiers with 28 guns under Prince Golitsyn and 38,000 French soldiers under Marshal Murat.

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Battle of Jemappes

The Battle of Jemappes (6 November 1792) took place near the town of Jemappes in Hainaut, Belgium, near Mons during the War of the First Coalition, part of the French Revolutionary Wars.

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Battle of Jena–Auerstedt

The twin battles of Jena and Auerstedt (older name: Auerstädt) were fought on 14 October 1806 on the plateau west of the River Saale in today's Germany, between the forces of Napoleon I of France and Frederick William III of Prussia.

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Battle of Krasnoi

The Battle of Krasnoi (Krasny) (November 15 to 18, 1812) was a series of skirmishes fought in the final stage of Napoleon's retreat from Moscow.

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Battle of Maloyaroslavets

The Battle of Maloyaroslavets took place on 24 October 1812, between the Russians, under Marshal Mikhail Illarionovich Kutuzov, and part of the corps of Eugène de Beauharnais, Napoleon's stepson, under General Alexis Joseph Delzons which numbered about 20,000 strong.

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Battle of Marengo

The Battle of Marengo was fought on 14 June 1800 between French forces under Napoleon Bonaparte and Austrian forces near the city of Alessandria, in Piedmont, Italy.

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Battle of Neerwinden (1793)

The Second Battle of Neerwinden (18 March 1793) saw a Republican French army led by Charles François Dumouriez attack a Coalition army commanded by Prince Josias of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld.

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Battle of Ratisbon

The Battle of Ratisbon, also called the Battle of Regensburg, was fought on the 23 April 1809, during the Napoleonic Wars, between the army of the First French Empire, led by Napoleon I, and that of the Austrian Empire, led by Archduke Charles.

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Battle of Saltanovka

The Battle of Saltanovka, also known as the Battle of Mogilev (French: Bataille de Mogilev), was a battle during the early stages of the 1812 French invasion of Russia.

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Battle of Smolensk (1812)

The Battle of Smolensk was the first major battle of the French invasion of Russia.

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Battle of Teugen-Hausen

The Battle of Teugen-Hausen or the Battle of Thann was an engagement that occurred during the War of the Fifth Coalition, part of the Napoleonic Wars.

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Battle of Vyazma

The Battle of Vyazma (November 3, 1812), occurred at the beginning of Napoleon's retreat from Moscow.

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Battle of Wagram

The Battle of Wagram (5–6 July 1809) was a military engagement of the Napoleonic Wars that ended in a costly but decisive victory for Emperor Napoleon I's French and allied army against the Austrian army under the command of Archduke Charles of Austria-Teschen.

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Battle of Waterloo

The Battle of Waterloo was fought on Sunday, 18 June 1815, near Waterloo in present-day Belgium, then part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands.

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Bourbon Restoration

The Bourbon Restoration was the period of French history following the fall of Napoleon in 1814 until the July Revolution of 1830.

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Cavalry

Cavalry (from the French cavalerie, cf. cheval 'horse') or horsemen were soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback.

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Chamber of Peers (France)

The Chamber of Peers (French: Chambre des Pairs) was the upper house of the French parliament from 1814 to 1848.

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Charles Leclerc

Charles Victoire Emmanuel Leclerc (17 March 1772 – 2 November 1802) was a French Army general who served under Napoleon Bonaparte during the French Revolution.

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Charles XIV John of Sweden

Charles XIV and III John or Carl John, (Swedish and Norwegian: Karl Johan; 26 January 1763 – 8 March 1844) was King of Sweden (as Charles XIV John) and King of Norway (as Charles III John) from 1818 until his death, and served as de facto regent and head of state from 1810 to 1818.

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Charles-Étienne Gudin de La Sablonnière

Charles-Étienne César Gudin de La Sablonnière (13 February 1768 - 22 August 1812) was a French general during the French Revolutionary Wars and Napoleonic Wars.

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Château de Malmaison

Château de Malmaison is a French château near the western bank of the Seine about west of the centre of Paris in Rueil-Malmaison.

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Duc d'Auerstaedt

The title of Duc d'Auerstaedt (sometimes written Auerstädt) was created by Napoleon I, Emperor of the French, for the Marshal of France Louis Nicolas Davout in 1808 as a victory title rewarding and commemorating Davout's splendid victory at the Battle of Auerstaedt in 1806.

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Duchy of Warsaw

The Duchy of Warsaw (Księstwo Warszawskie, Duché de Varsovie, Herzogtum Warschau) was a Polish state established by Napoleon I in 1807 from the Polish lands ceded by the Kingdom of Prussia under the terms of the Treaties of Tilsit.

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Eckmühl

Eckmühl (formerly known in English as Eggmuhl, in Bavaria officially as Eggmühl) is a village of Germany, in Bavaria, on the Große Laaber, 20 km S.E. of Regensburg.

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Elba

Elba (isola d'Elba,; Ilva; Ancient Greek: Αἰθαλία, Aithalia) is a Mediterranean island in Tuscany, Italy, from the coastal town of Piombino, and the largest island of the Tuscan Archipelago.

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First French Empire

The First French Empire (Empire Français) was the empire of Napoleon Bonaparte of France and the dominant power in much of continental Europe at the beginning of the 19th century.

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French Army

The French Army, officially the Ground Army (Armée de terre) (to distinguish it from the French Air Force, Armée de L'air or Air Army) is the land-based and largest component of the French Armed Forces.

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French campaign in Egypt and Syria

The French Campaign in Egypt and Syria (1798–1801) was Napoleon Bonaparte's campaign in the Ottoman territories of Egypt and Syria, proclaimed to defend French trade interests, weaken Britain's access to British India, and to establish scientific enterprise in the region.

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French First Republic

In the history of France, the First Republic (French: Première République), officially the French Republic (République française), was founded on 22 September 1792 during the French Revolution.

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French invasion of Russia

The French invasion of Russia, known in Russia as the Patriotic War of 1812 (Отечественная война 1812 года Otechestvennaya Voyna 1812 Goda) and in France as the Russian Campaign (Campagne de Russie), began on 24 June 1812 when Napoleon's Grande Armée crossed the Neman River in an attempt to engage and defeat the Russian army.

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French Revolution

The French Revolution (Révolution française) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799.

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French Revolutionary Wars

The French Revolutionary Wars were a series of sweeping military conflicts lasting from 1792 until 1802 and resulting from the French Revolution.

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Garrison

Garrison (various spellings) (from the French garnison, itself from the verb garnir, "to equip") is the collective term for a body of troops stationed in a particular location, originally to guard it, but now often simply using it as a home base.

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Given name

A given name (also known as a first name, forename or Christian name) is a part of a person's personal name.

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Grande Armée

The Grande Armée (French for Great Army) was the army commanded by Napoleon during the Napoleonic Wars.

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Hamburg

Hamburg (locally), Hamborg, officially the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg (Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg, Friee un Hansestadt Hamborg),Constitution of Hamburg), is the second-largest city of Germany as well as one of the country's 16 constituent states, with a population of roughly 1.8 million people. The city lies at the core of the Hamburg Metropolitan Region which spreads across four German federal states and is home to more than five million people. The official name reflects Hamburg's history as a member of the medieval Hanseatic League, a free imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire, a city-state and one of the 16 states of Germany. Before the 1871 Unification of Germany, it was a fully sovereign state. Prior to the constitutional changes in 1919 it formed a civic republic headed constitutionally by a class of hereditary grand burghers or Hanseaten. The city has repeatedly been beset by disasters such as the Great Fire of Hamburg, exceptional coastal flooding and military conflicts including World War II bombing raids. Historians remark that the city has managed to recover and emerge wealthier after each catastrophe. Situated on the river Elbe, Hamburg is home to Europe's second-largest port and a broad corporate base. In media, the major regional broadcasting firm NDR, the printing and publishing firm italic and the newspapers italic and italic are based in the city. Hamburg remains an important financial center, the seat of Germany's oldest stock exchange and the world's oldest merchant bank, Berenberg Bank. Media, commercial, logistical, and industrial firms with significant locations in the city include multinationals Airbus, italic, italic, italic, and Unilever. The city is a forum for and has specialists in world economics and international law with such consular and diplomatic missions as the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea, the EU-LAC Foundation, and the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning. In recent years, the city has played host to multipartite international political conferences and summits such as Europe and China and the G20. Former German Chancellor italic, who governed Germany for eight years, and Angela Merkel, German chancellor since 2005, come from Hamburg. The city is a major international and domestic tourist destination. It ranked 18th in the world for livability in 2016. The Speicherstadt and Kontorhausviertel were declared World Heritage Sites by UNESCO in 2015. Hamburg is a major European science, research, and education hub, with several universities and institutions. Among its most notable cultural venues are the italic and italic concert halls. It gave birth to movements like Hamburger Schule and paved the way for bands including The Beatles. Hamburg is also known for several theatres and a variety of musical shows. St. Pauli's italic is among the best-known European entertainment districts.

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Henri Jacques Guillaume Clarke

Henri-Jacques-Guillaume Clarke, 1st Count of Hunebourg, 1st Duke of Feltre (17 October 1765 – 28 October 1818), born to Irish parents from Lisdowney, Co.

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Hesdin

Hesdin is a commune in the Pas-de-Calais department in northern France.

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House of Bourbon

The House of Bourbon is a European royal house of French origin, a branch of the Capetian dynasty.

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Hundred Days

The Hundred Days (les Cent-Jours) marked the period between Napoleon's return from exile on the island of Elba to Paris on20 March 1815 and the second restoration of King Louis XVIII on 8 July 1815 (a period of 110 days).

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I Corps (Grande Armée)

The I Corps of the Grande Armée was a military unit that existed during the Napoleonic Wars.

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III Corps (Grande Armée)

The III Corps of the Grande Armée was the designation of a few military units during the Napoleonic Wars.

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Imperial Guard (Napoleon I)

The Imperial Guard (French: Garde Impériale) was originally a small group of elite soldiers of the French Army under the direct command of Napoleon I, but grew considerably over time.

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Jacques MacDonald

Étienne Jacques Joseph Alexandre MacDonald, 1st Duke of Taranto (17 November 1765 – 25 September 1840) was a Marshal of the Empire and military leader during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars.

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Jean Lannes

Jean Lannes, 1st Duc de Montebello, 1st Prince de Siewierz (10 April 1769 – 31 May 1809), was a Marshal of the Empire.

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Joachim Murat

Joachim-Napoléon Murat (born Joachim Murat; Gioacchino Napoleone Murat; Joachim-Napoleon Murat; 25 March 1767 – 13 October 1815) was a Marshal of France and Admiral of France under the reign of Napoleon.

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Joseph Fouché

Joseph Fouché, 1st Duc d'Otrante, 1st Comte Fouché (21 May 1759 – 25 December 1820) was a French statesman and Minister of Police under First Consul Bonaparte, who later became Emperor Napoleon.

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Kingdom of Prussia

The Kingdom of Prussia (Königreich Preußen) was a German kingdom that constituted the state of Prussia between 1701 and 1918.

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Laurent de Gouvion Saint-Cyr

Laurent de Gouvion Saint-Cyr, 1st Marquis of Gouvion-Saint-Cyr (13 April 1764 – 17 March 1830) was a French commander in the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars who rose to Marshal of France and Marquis.

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Legion of Honour

The Legion of Honour, with its full name National Order of the Legion of Honour (Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur), is the highest French order of merit for military and civil merits, established in 1802 by Napoléon Bonaparte and retained by all the divergent governments and regimes later holding power in France, up to the present.

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List of Marshals of France

Marshal of France (Maréchal de France, plural Maréchaux de France) is a French military distinction, rather than a military rank, that is awarded to generals for exceptional achievements.

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Loire

The Loire (Léger; Liger) is the longest river in France and the 171st longest in the world.

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Louis Desaix

Louis Charles Antoine Desaix (17 August 176814 June 1800) was a French general and military leader.

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Louis XVIII of France

Louis XVIII (Louis Stanislas Xavier; 17 November 1755 – 16 September 1824), known as "the Desired" (le Désiré), was a monarch of the House of Bourbon who ruled as King of France from 1814 to 1824, except for a period in 1815 known as the Hundred Days.

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Louis-Alexandre Berthier

Louis-Alexandre Berthier (20 November 1753 – 1 June 1815), 1st Prince of Wagram, Sovereign Prince of Neuchâtel, was a French Marshal and Vice-Constable of the Empire, and Chief of Staff under Napoleon.

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Marc Antoine de Beaumont

Marc Antoine Bonnin de la Bonninière de Beaumont (23 September 1763 – 4 February 1830) a French nobleman, became a page to the king and joined the army of the Old Regime.

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Marshal of the Empire

Marshal of the Empire (Maréchal d'Empire) was a civil dignity during the First French Empire.

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Michel Ney

Marshal of the Empire Michel Ney, 1st Duke of Elchingen, 1st Prince of the Moskva (10 January 1769 – 7 December 1815), popularly known as Marshal Ney, was a French soldier and military commander during the French Revolutionary Wars and the Napoleonic Wars.

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Military academy

A military academy or service academy (in the United States) is an educational institution which prepares candidates for service in the officer corps.

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Military Order of Maria Theresa

The Military Order of Maria Theresa (Militär-Maria-Theresien-Orden, Katonai Mária Terézia-rend, Vojenský řád Marie Terezie, Wojskowy Order Marii Teresy, Vojaški red Marije Terezije, Vojni Red Marije Terezije was the highest military honour of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

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Military Order of Max Joseph

The Military Order of Max Joseph (Militär-Max-Joseph-Orden) was the highest military order of the Kingdom of Bavaria.

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Military Order of St. Henry

The Military Order of St.

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Minister of the Armed Forces (France)

The Ministry of the Armed Forces (Ministre des Armées) is the French cabinet member charged with running the French Armed Forces.

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Mogilev

Mogilev (or Mahilyow; Магілёў,; Łacinka: Mahiloŭ; Могилёв,; מאָליעוו, Molyev) is a city in eastern Belarus, about from the border with Russia's Smolensk Oblast and from the border with Russia's Bryansk Oblast.

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Napoléon Louis Davout d'Auerstaedt d'Eckmühl

Napoléon Louis Davout d'Auerstaedt d'Eckmühl, 2nd Duc d'Auerstaedt, 2nd and last Prince d'Eckmühl (6 January 1811 – 13 June 1853), was a French nobleman.

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Napoleon

Napoléon Bonaparte (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a French statesman and military leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution and led several successful campaigns during the French Revolutionary Wars.

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Napoleonic era

The Napoleonic era is a period in the history of France and Europe.

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Napoleonic Wars

The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, financed and usually led by the United Kingdom.

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Nicolas Oudinot

Nicolas Charles Oudinot, 1st Comte Oudinot, 1st Duc de Reggio (25 April 1767 in Bar-le-Duc – 13 September 1847 in Paris), was a Marshal of France.

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Order of Christ (Portugal)

The Military Order of Christ (Ordem Militar de Cristo), previously the Order of the Knights of Our Lord Jesus Christ (Ordem dos Cavaleiros de Nosso Senhor Jesus Cristo), was the former Knights Templar order as it was reconstituted in Portugal after the Templars were abolished on 22 March 1312 by the papal bull, Vox in excelso, issued by Pope Clement V. The Order of Christ was founded in 1319, with the protection of the Portuguese king, Denis I, who refused to pursue and persecute the former knights as had occurred in all the other sovereign states under the political influence of the Catholic Church.

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Order of Saint Stephen of Hungary

The Royal Hungarian Order of Saint Stephen (Magyar Királyi Szent István Iovagrend; Königlich Ungarischer Sankt-Stephans-Orden) was an order of knighthood founded by Holy Roman Empress Maria Theresa in 1764.

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Order of the Elephant

The Order of the Elephant (Elefantordenen) is a Danish order of chivalry and is Denmark's highest-ranked honour.

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Order of the Iron Crown

The Order of the Iron Crown (Ordine della Corona Ferrea) was an order of merit that was established on June 5, 1805, by Napoleon Bonaparte under his title of King Napoleon I of Italy.

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Order of the White Eagle (Poland)

The Order of the White Eagle (Order Orła Białego) is Poland's highest order awarded to both civilians and the military for their merits.

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Paris

Paris is the capital and most populous city of France, with an area of and a population of 2,206,488.

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Paul Thiébault

Paul Charles François Adrien Henri Dieudonné Thiébault (14 December 1769, Berlin - 14 October 1846, Paris) was a general who fought in Napoleon I's army.

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Pauline Bonaparte

Pauline Bonaparte (20 October 1780 – 9 June 1825) was an Italian noblewoman, the first sovereign Duchess of Guastalla in Italy, an imperial French Princess and the Princess consort of Sulmona and Rossano.

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Pontoise

Pontoise is a commune in the northwestern suburbs of Paris, France.

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Rhine

--> The Rhine (Rhenus, Rein, Rhein, le Rhin,, Italiano: Reno, Rijn) is a European river that begins in the Swiss canton of Graubünden in the southeastern Swiss Alps, forms part of the Swiss-Liechtenstein, Swiss-Austrian, Swiss-German and then the Franco-German border, then flows through the German Rhineland and the Netherlands and eventually empties into the North Sea.

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Savigny-sur-Orge

Savigny-sur-Orge is a commune in the southern suburbs of Paris, France.

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Siege of Hamburg

The city of Hamburg was one of the most powerful fortresses east of the Rhine.

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Siege of Kehl (1796–97)

The Siege of Kehl lasted from October 1796 to 9 January 1797. Habsburg and Württemberg regulars numbering 40,000, under the command of Maximilian Anton Karl, Count Baillet de Latour, besieged and captured the French-controlled fortifications at the village of Kehl in the German state of Baden-Durlach. The fortifications at Kehl represented important bridgehead crossing the Rhine to Strasbourg, an Alsatian city, a French Revolutionary stronghold. This battle was part of the Rhine Campaign of 1796, in the French Revolutionary War of the First Coalition. In the 1790s, the Rhine was wild, unpredictable, and difficult to cross, in some places more than four or more times wider than it is in the twenty-first century, even under non-flood conditions. Its channels and tributaries wound through marsh and meadow and created islands of trees and vegetation that were alternate submerged by floods or exposed during the dry seasons. At Kehl and the city of Strasbourg lay a complex of bridges, gates, fortifications and barrage dams. These had been constructed by the fortress architect Sébastien le Prestre de Vauban in the seventeenth century. The crossings had been contested before: in 1678 during the French-Dutch war, in 1703 during the War of the Spanish Succession, in 1733 during the War of the Polish Succession, and earlier in 1796, when the French crossed into the German states on 23–24 June. Critical to French success was the army's ability to cross the Rhine at will. The crossings at Hüningen, near the Swiss city of Basel, and the crossing at Kehl, gave them ready access to most of southwestern Germany; from there, French armies could sweep north, south, or east, depending on their military goal. Throughout the summer of 1796, the French and the Austrians had chased each other back and forth across the south German states. By October, the Austrian force, under the command of Archduke Charles, had pushed the French back to the Rhine. With the conclusion of the Battle of Schliengen on 24 October, the French army withdrew south and west toward the Rhine. The French commander, Jean Victor Marie Moreau, offered an armistice that the Archduke was inclined to accept. The Achduke wanted to secure the Rhine crossings so he could send troops to northern Italy to relieve Dagobert Sigmund von Wurmser at besieged Mantua; an armistice with Moreau would allow him to do that. However, his brother, Francis II, the Holy Roman Emperor, and the civilian military advisers of the Aulic Council categorically refused such an armistice, forcing Charles to order simultaneous sieges at Hüningen and Kehl. These tied his army to the Rhine for most of the winter. On 18 September 1796, the Austrians temporarily acquired control of the têtes-de-ponts (bridgeheads) joining Kehl and Strasbourg until a strong French counter-attack forced them to retreat. The situation remained in status quo until late October. Immediately after the Battle of Schliengen, while most of Moreau's army retreated south to cross the Rhine at Hüningen, Count Baillet Latour moved north to Kehl to begin the siege. On 22 November, the French defenders at Kehl, under Louis Desaix and the overall commander of the French Army of the Rhine and Moselle, Jean-Victor-Marie Moreau, almost ended the siege when they executed a sortie that nearly captured the Austrian artillery park. In early December, though, the Austrians expanded the siege, connecting a grand parallel with a series of batteries in a semi-circle around the village and the bridges. By late December, the completed Austrian batteries connected with the captured French fortification called Bonnet de Prêtre; from these positions, the Austrians bombarded the French defenses with enfilade fire. After the defenses were thoroughly riddled by heavy bombardment from the besiegers, the French defenders capitulated and withdrew on 9 January 1797.

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Treaties of Tilsit

The Treaties of Tilsit were two agreements signed by Napoleon I of France in the town of Tilsit in July 1807 in the aftermath of his victory at Friedland.

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Ulm Campaign

The Ulm Campaign was a series of French and Bavarian military maneuvers and battles to outflank and capture an Austrian army in 1805 during the War of the Third Coalition.

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Virtuti Militari

The War Order of Virtuti Militari (Latin: "For Military Virtue", Polish: Order Wojenny Virtuti Militari) is Poland's highest military decoration for heroism and courage in the face of the enemy at war.

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War of the Fifth Coalition

The War of the Fifth Coalition was fought in 1809 by a coalition of the Austrian Empire and the United Kingdom against Napoleon's French Empire and Bavaria.

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War of the First Coalition

The War of the First Coalition (Guerre de la Première Coalition) is the traditional name of the wars that several European powers fought between 1792 and 1797 against the French First Republic.

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War of the Fourth Coalition

The Fourth Coalition fought against Napoleon's French Empire and was defeated in a war spanning 1806–1807.

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War of the Second Coalition

The War of the Second Coalition (1798–1802) was the second war on revolutionary France by the European monarchies, led by Britain, Austria and Russia, and including the Ottoman Empire, Portugal, Naples, various German monarchies and Sweden.

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War of the Sixth Coalition

In the War of the Sixth Coalition (March 1813 – May 1814), sometimes known in Germany as the War of Liberation, a coalition of Austria, Prussia, Russia, the United Kingdom, Portugal, Sweden, Spain and a number of German states finally defeated France and drove Napoleon into exile on Elba.

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War of the Third Coalition

The War of the Third Coalition was a European conflict spanning the years 1803 to 1806.

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XIII Corps (Grande Armée)

The XIII Corps of the Grande Armée was the name of a French military formation that existed during the Napoleonic Wars.

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Yonne

Yonne is a French department named after the river Yonne.

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Redirects here:

Davout, Davout, Louis Nicolas, Duke of Auerstadt and Prince of Eckmuhl, Davout, Louis Nicolas, Duke of Auerstaedt and Prince of Eckmuehl, Davout, Louis Nicolas, Duke of Auerstädt and Prince of Eckmühl, Louis Davout, Louis Nicholas Davout, Louis Nicolas D'avout, Louis Nicolas Davout, Louis Nicolas d'Avout, Louis Nicolas, Duke of Auerstadt and Prince of Eckmuhl Davout, Louis Nicolas, Duke of Auerstaedt and Prince of Eckmuehl Davout, Louis Nicolas, Duke of Auerstädt and Prince of Eckmühl Davout, Louis-Nicolas D'avout, Louis-Nicolas d'Avout, Louis-Nicolas, Duc D'auerstedt, Prince D'eckmuhl Davout, Marechal Davout, Marshal Davoust, Marshal Davout, Marshall Davout, Maréchal Davout, Nicolas Davout, Prince d'Eckmuhl, Prince of Eckmühl.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis-Nicolas_Davout

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