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Louis Brandeis

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Louis Dembitz Brandeis (November 13, 1856 – October 5, 1941) was an American lawyer and associate justice on the Supreme Court of the United States from 1916 to 1939. [1]

229 relations: A.L.A. Schechter Poultry Corp. v. United States, Abolitionism in the United States, Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, American Bar Association, American Civil War, American Jewish Committee, American Jewish Congress, American Law Institute, Antisemitism, Antisemitism in Europe, Ashkenazi Jews, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, Austria-Hungary, Austrian Empire, Bachelor of Laws, Balfour Declaration, Beacon Hill, Boston, Benjamin N. Cardozo, Bohemia, Boston, Boston and Maine Corporation, Brandeis Brief, Brandeis Medal, Brandeis University, Brandeis-Bardin Institute, Brown v. Board of Education, Bruce Allen Murphy, Buck v. Bell, Casebook method, Chaim Weizmann, Charles Allen Culberson, Charles Evans Hughes, Charles Scribner's Sons, Clear and present danger, Competition law, Conspicuous consumption, Constitutional law, Cooperative Village, Courage, Courtship, Culture of Germany, Dallas, David Josiah Brewer, Dean Acheson, Dedham, Massachusetts, Democratic Party (United States), Demographics of the Supreme Court of the United States, Dissenting opinion, Dresden, Economies of scale, ..., Edward Douglass White, Efficiency Movement, Ein HaShofet, Elihu Root, Erie doctrine, Erie Railroad Co. v. Tompkins, Eve Frank, Expert witness, Federal Reserve Act, Federal Reserve System, Federal Trade Commission, Felix Frankfurter, Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Four Horsemen (Supreme Court), Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Francis G. Newlands, Frank Murphy, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Frazier–Lemke Farm Bankruptcy Act, Freedom of speech, Friedrich Schiller, Gas lighting, George W. Norris, George W. Wickersham, Habsburg Monarchy, Hadera, Harlan F. Stone, Harvard Law Review, Harvard Law School, Harvard University, Henry Cabot Lodge, History of the Jews in Russia, Horace Gray, Housing cooperative, Internet Archive, Interstate Commerce Commission, Israel, J. P. Morgan, Jacob de Haas, Jacob Frank, James Madison, James Otis Jr., Jerusalem, Jewish culture, Jewish question, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, John Adams, John Marshall Harlan II, John Steele Gordon, Joseph Goldmark, Joseph Rucker Lamar, Joseph Story, Judaism, Judicial Procedures Reform Bill of 1937, Julian Mack, Karl Goldmark, Katz v. United States, Ken Gormley (academic), Kentucky, Kfar Brandeis, Kibbutz, Kingdom of Bohemia, Kingdom of Saxony, Labour law, Law review, Lawrence, Nassau County, New York, Learned Hand, Lewis Naphtali Dembitz, List of covers of Time magazine (1920s), List of Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States, List of law clerks of the Supreme Court of the United States, List of people from the Louisville metropolitan area, List of United States Supreme Court cases by the Hughes Court, List of United States Supreme Court cases by the Taft Court, List of United States Supreme Court cases by the White Court, List of United States Supreme Court Justices by time in office, Los Angeles, Louis Brandeis House, Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights Under Law, Louis D. Brandeis High School, Louis Lipsky, Louisville Male High School, Louisville, Kentucky, Lower East Side, Ludwig van Beethoven, Massachusetts Bar Association, Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, Melville Fuller, Miles Poindexter, Minimum wage law, Minneapolis, Moot court, Muckraker, Muller v. Oregon, National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933, National Recovery Administration, New Deal, New York City, New York City Department of Education, New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, Northside Independent School District, Northwestern University Law Review, Nutter McClennen & Fish, Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., Olmstead v. United States, Oregon, Other People's Money and How the Bankers Use It, Paris Peace Conference, 1919, PBS, Philadelphia, Philanthropy, Pinchot–Ballinger controversy, Potter Stewart, Prague, Progressive Era, Reform Judaism, Restatements of the Law, Revolutions of 1848, Revolutions of 1848 in the Austrian Empire, Right to privacy, Robert M. La Follette, Robert Schumann, Robin Hood, Rockville, Maryland, Roe v. Wade, Roscoe Pound, Samuel D. Warren, San Antonio, San Francisco, San Rafael, California, Schenck v. United States, Secularity, Sherman Antitrust Act, Simi Valley, Slush fund, Socratic method, Stanley v. Georgia, State Street (Boston), Stephen Samuel Wise, Supreme Court Historical Society, Supreme Court of the United States, Surveillance, Swift v. Tyson, The Brandeis School of San Francisco, The House of Morgan, The Journal of American History, The Right to Privacy (article), The Wall Street Journal, Theodore Roosevelt, Thomas Watt Gregory, Three Musketeers (Supreme Court), Thurgood Marshall, Time (magazine), Tort, United States Attorney General, United States Bill of Rights, United States Department of Justice, United States Postal Service, United States Secretary of State, United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary, United States v. Harris, University of Alabama, University of Louisville, University of Louisville School of Law, Valedictorian, Waltham, Massachusetts, Warren Court, Washington, D.C., Whitney v. California, William Howard Taft, William J. Brennan Jr., William Jennings Bryan, William O. Douglas, Wisconsin Central Railway (1897–1954), Woodrow Wilson, World War I, World Zionist Organization, Zionism, Zionist Organization of America. Expand index (179 more) »

A.L.A. Schechter Poultry Corp. v. United States

A.L.A. Schechter Poultry Corp.

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Abolitionism in the United States

Abolitionism in the United States was the movement before and during the American Civil War to end slavery in the United States.

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Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America

The Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA) was a United States labor union known for its support for "social unionism" and progressive political causes.

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American Bar Association

The American Bar Association (ABA), founded August 21, 1878, is a voluntary bar association of lawyers and law students, which is not specific to any jurisdiction in the United States.

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American Civil War

The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865.

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American Jewish Committee

American Jewish Committee (AJC) is a Jewish advocacy group established on November 11, 1906.

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American Jewish Congress

The American Jewish Congress is as an association of Jewish Americans organized to defend Jewish interests at home and abroad through public policy advocacy, using diplomacy, legislation, and the courts.

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American Law Institute

The American Law Institute (ALI) was established in 1923 to promote the clarification and simplification of United States common law and its adaptation to changing social needs.

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Antisemitism

Antisemitism (also spelled anti-Semitism or anti-semitism) is hostility to, prejudice, or discrimination against Jews.

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Antisemitism in Europe

Antisemitism (also spelled anti-Semitism) – prejudice, hatred of, or discrimination against Jews for reasons connected to their Jewish heritage – has experienced a long history of expression since the days of ancient civilizations, with most of it having originated in the Christian and pre-Christian civilizations of Europe.

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Ashkenazi Jews

Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or simply Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכְּנַזִּים, Ashkenazi Hebrew pronunciation:, singular:, Modern Hebrew:; also), are a Jewish diaspora population who coalesced in the Holy Roman Empire around the end of the first millennium.

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Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are the members of the Supreme Court of the United States other than the Chief Justice of the United States.

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Austria-Hungary

Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire or the Dual Monarchy in English-language sources, was a constitutional union of the Austrian Empire (the Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council, or Cisleithania) and the Kingdom of Hungary (Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen or Transleithania) that existed from 1867 to 1918, when it collapsed as a result of defeat in World War I. The union was a result of the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 and came into existence on 30 March 1867.

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Austrian Empire

The Austrian Empire (Kaiserthum Oesterreich, modern spelling Kaisertum Österreich) was a Central European multinational great power from 1804 to 1919, created by proclamation out of the realms of the Habsburgs.

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Bachelor of Laws

The Bachelor of Laws (Legum Baccalaureus; LL.B. or B.L.) is an undergraduate degree in law (or a first professional degree in law, depending on jurisdiction) originating in England and offered in Japan and most common law jurisdictionsexcept the United States and Canadaas the degree which allows a person to become a lawyer.

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Balfour Declaration

The Balfour Declaration was a public statement issued by the British government during World War I announcing support for the establishment of a "national home for the Jewish people" in Palestine, then an Ottoman region with a minority Jewish population (around 3–5% of the total).

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Beacon Hill, Boston

Beacon Hill is a historic neighborhood in Boston, Massachusetts.

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Benjamin N. Cardozo

Benjamin Nathan Cardozo (May 24, 1870 – July 9, 1938) was an American lawyer and jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

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Bohemia

Bohemia (Čechy;; Czechy; Bohême; Bohemia; Boemia) is the westernmost and largest historical region of the Czech lands in the present-day Czech Republic.

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Boston

Boston is the capital city and most populous municipality of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States.

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Boston and Maine Corporation

The Boston and Maine Corporation, known as the Boston and Maine Railroad (B&M), was a U.S. Class I railroad in northern New England.

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Brandeis Brief

The Brandeis Brief was a pioneering legal brief that was the first in United States legal history to rely more on a compilation of scientific information and social science than on legal citations.

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Brandeis Medal

The Brandeis Medal is awarded to individuals whose lives reflect United States Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis' commitment to the ideals of individual liberty, concern for the disadvantaged and public service.

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Brandeis University

Brandeis University is an American private research university in Waltham, Massachusetts, 9 miles (14 km) west of Boston.

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Brandeis-Bardin Institute

The Brandeis-Bardin Campus of American Jewish University is a Jewish retreat located since 1947 in the northeastern Simi Hills, in the city of Simi Valley, California.

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Brown v. Board of Education

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483 (1954), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case in which the Court declared state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students to be unconstitutional.

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Bruce Allen Murphy

Bruce Allen Murphy, Ph.D., is a judicial biographer and scholar of American Constitutional law and politics.

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Buck v. Bell

Buck v. Bell,, is a decision of the United States Supreme Court, written by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., in which the Court ruled that a state statute permitting compulsory sterilization of the unfit, including the intellectually disabled, "for the protection and health of the state" did not violate the Due Process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

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Casebook method

The casebook method, similar to but not exactly the same as the case method, is the primary method of teaching law in law schools in the United States.

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Chaim Weizmann

Chaim Azriel Weizmann (חיים עזריאל ויצמן, Хаим Вейцман Khaim Veytsman; 27 November 1874 – 9 November 1952) was a Zionist leader and Israeli statesman who served as President of the Zionist Organization and later as the first President of Israel.

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Charles Allen Culberson

Charles Allen Culberson (June 10, 1855March 19, 1925) was an American political figure and Democrat who served as the 21st Governor of Texas from 1895 to 1899, and as a United States Senator from Texas from 1899 to 1923.

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Charles Evans Hughes

Charles Evans Hughes Sr. (April 11, 1862 – August 27, 1948) was an American statesman, Republican politician, and the 11th Chief Justice of the United States.

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Charles Scribner's Sons

Charles Scribner's Sons, or simply Scribner's or Scribner, is an American publisher based in New York City, known for publishing American authors including Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Kurt Vonnegut, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Stephen King, Robert A. Heinlein, Thomas Wolfe, George Santayana, John Clellon Holmes, Don DeLillo, and Edith Wharton.

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Christmas

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ,Martindale, Cyril Charles.

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Christmas and holiday season

The Christmas season, also called the festive season, or the holiday season (mainly in the U.S. and Canada; often simply called the holidays),, is an annually recurring period recognized in many Western and Western-influenced countries that is generally considered to run from late November to early January.

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Christmas Eve

Christmas Eve is the evening or entire day before Christmas Day, the festival commemorating the birth of Jesus.

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Christmas traditions

Christmas traditions vary from country to country.

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Clear and present danger

Clear and present danger was a doctrine adopted by the Supreme Court of the United States to determine under what circumstances limits can be placed on First Amendment freedoms of speech, press, or assembly.

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Competition law

Competition law is a law that promotes or seeks to maintain market competition by regulating anti-competitive conduct by companies.

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Conspicuous consumption

Conspicuous consumption is the spending of money on and the acquiring of luxury goods and services to publicly display economic power—of the income or of the accumulated wealth of the buyer.

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Constitutional law

Constitutional law is a body of law which defines the role, powers, and structure of different entities within a state, namely, the executive, the parliament or legislature, and the judiciary; as well as the basic rights of citizens and, in federal countries such as the United States and Canada, the relationship between the central government and state, provincial, or territorial governments.

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Cooperative Village

Hillman Housing buildings on Grand Street as seen from the East River towers. Amalgamated Dwellings is seen between the second and the third tower Cooperative Village is a community of housing cooperatives on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City.

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Courage

Courage (also called bravery or valour) is the choice and willingness to confront agony, pain, danger, uncertainty, or intimidation.

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Courtship

Courtship is the period of development towards an intimate relationship wherein people (usually a couple) get to know each other and decide if there will be an engagement or other romantic arrangement.

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Culture of Germany

German culture has spanned the entire German-speaking world.

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Dallas

Dallas is a city in the U.S. state of Texas.

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David Josiah Brewer

David Josiah Brewer (June 20, 1837 – March 28, 1910) was an American jurist and an Associate Justice of the US Supreme Court for 20 years.

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Dean Acheson

Dean Gooderham Acheson (pronounced; April 11, 1893 – October 12, 1971) was an American statesman and lawyer.

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Dedham, Massachusetts

Dedham is a town in and the county seat of Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States.

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Democratic Party (United States)

The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (nicknamed the GOP for Grand Old Party).

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Demographics of the Supreme Court of the United States

The demographics of the Supreme Court of the United States encompass the gender, ethnicity, and religious, geographic, and economic backgrounds of the 113 people who have been appointed and confirmed as justices to the Supreme Court.

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Dissenting opinion

A dissenting opinion (or dissent) is an opinion in a legal case in certain legal systems written by one or more judges expressing disagreement with the majority opinion of the court which gives rise to its judgment.

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Dresden

Dresden (Upper and Lower Sorbian: Drježdźany, Drážďany, Drezno) is the capital city and, after Leipzig, the second-largest city of the Free State of Saxony in Germany.

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Economies of scale

In microeconomics, economies of scale are the cost advantages that enterprises obtain due to their scale of operation (typically measured by amount of output produced), with cost per unit of output decreasing with increasing scale.

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Edward Douglass White

Edward Douglass White Jr. (November 3, 1845 – May 19, 1921), American politician and jurist, was a United States Senator and the ninth Chief Justice of the United States.

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Efficiency Movement

The Efficiency Movement was a major movement in the United States, Britain and other industrial nations in the early 20th century that sought to identify and eliminate waste in all areas of the economy and society, and to develop and implement best practices.

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Ein HaShofet

Ein HaShofet (עֵין הַשּׁוֹפֵט, lit. Spring of the Judge) is a kibbutz in northern Israel.

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Elihu Root

Elihu Root (February 15, 1845February 7, 1937) was an American lawyer and statesman who served as the Secretary of State under President Theodore Roosevelt and as Secretary of War under Roosevelt and President William McKinley.

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Erie doctrine

The Erie doctrine is a fundamental legal doctrine of civil procedure in the United States which mandates that a federal court sitting in diversity jurisdiction (or in general, when hearing state law claims in contexts like supplemental jurisdiction or adversarial proceedings in bankruptcy) must apply state substantive law to resolve claims under state law.

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Erie Railroad Co. v. Tompkins

Erie Railroad Co.

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Eve Frank

Eve Frank or Eva Frank (1754 article by Rachel Elior in the Encyclopedia Judaica. – 1816 or 1817), born in Nikopol, Ottoman Empire (now Bulgaria) under the name Rebecca or Rachel, was a Mystic cult leader, and the only woman to have been declared a Jewish messiah.

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Expert witness

An expert witness, in England, Wales and the United States, is a person whose opinion by virtue of education, training, certification, skills or experience, is accepted by the judge as an expert.

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Federal Reserve Act

The Federal Reserve Act (ch. 6,, enacted December 23, 1913) is an Act of Congress that created and established the Federal Reserve System (the central banking system of the United States), and which created the authority to issue Federal Reserve Notes (commonly known as the US Dollar) as legal tender.

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Federal Reserve System

The Federal Reserve System (also known as the Federal Reserve or simply the Fed) is the central banking system of the United States of America.

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Federal Trade Commission

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is an independent agency of the United States government, established in 1914 by the Federal Trade Commission Act.

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Felix Frankfurter

Felix Frankfurter (November 15, 1882February 22, 1965) was an American lawyer, professor, and jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

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Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Fifth Amendment (Amendment V) to the United States Constitution is part of the Bill of Rights and, among other things, protects individuals from being compelled to be witnesses against themselves in criminal cases.

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Four Horsemen (Supreme Court)

The "Four Horsemen" was the nickname given by the press to four conservative members of the United States Supreme Court during the 1932–1937 terms, who opposed the New Deal agenda of President Franklin Roosevelt.

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Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Fourth Amendment (Amendment IV) to the United States Constitution is part of the Bill of Rights that prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures.

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Francis G. Newlands

Francis Griffith Newlands (August 28, 1846December 24, 1917) was a United States Representative and Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party.

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Frank Murphy

William Francis "Frank" Murphy (April 13, 1890July 19, 1949) was a Democratic politician and jurist from Michigan.

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Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Sr. (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), often referred to by his initials FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd President of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945.

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Frazier–Lemke Farm Bankruptcy Act

The Frazier–Lemke Farm Bankruptcy Act was an Act of Congress passed in the United States in 1934 that restricted the ability of banks to repossess farms.

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Freedom of speech

Freedom of speech is a principle that supports the freedom of an individual or a community to articulate their opinions and ideas without fear of retaliation, censorship, or sanction.

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Friedrich Schiller

Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller (10 November 17599 May 1805) was a German poet, philosopher, physician, historian, and playwright.

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Gas lighting

Gas lighting is production of artificial light from combustion of a gaseous fuel, such as hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, propane, butane, acetylene, ethylene, or natural gas.

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George W. Norris

George William Norris (July 11, 1861September 2, 1944) was a politician from the state of Nebraska in the Midwestern United States. He served five terms in the United States House of Representatives as a Republican, from 1903 until 1913, and five terms in the United States Senate, from 1913 until 1943, four terms as a Republican and the final term as an independent. Norris was defeated for reelection in 1942. Norris was a leader of progressive and liberal causes in Congress. He is best known for his intense crusades against what he characterized as "wrong and evil", his liberalism, his insurgency against party leaders, his isolationist foreign policy, his support for labor unions, and especially for creating the Tennessee Valley Authority. President Franklin Roosevelt called him "the very perfect, gentle knight of American progressive ideals," and this has been the theme of all of his biographers. A 1957 advisory panel of 160 scholars recommended that Norris was the top choice for the five best Senators in U.S. history.

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George W. Wickersham

George Woodward Wickersham (September 19, 1858 – January 25, 1936) was an American lawyer and Attorney General of the United States in the administration of President William H. Taft.

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Habsburg Monarchy

The Habsburg Monarchy (Habsburgermonarchie) or Empire is an unofficial appellation among historians for the countries and provinces that were ruled by the junior Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg between 1521 and 1780 and then by the successor branch of Habsburg-Lorraine until 1918.

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Hadera

Hadera (חֲדֵרָה, الخضيرة) is a city located in the Haifa District of Israel, in the northern Sharon region, approximately 45 kilometers (28 miles) from the major cities of Tel Aviv and Haifa.

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Harlan F. Stone

Harlan Fiske Stone (October 11, 1872 – April 22, 1946) was an American political figure, lawyer, and jurist.

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Harvard Law Review

The Harvard Law Review is a law review published by an independent student group at Harvard Law School.

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Harvard Law School

Harvard Law School (also known as Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University located in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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Harvard University

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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Henry Cabot Lodge

Henry Cabot Lodge (May 12, 1850 November 9, 1924) was an American Republican Congressman and historian from Massachusetts.

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History of the Jews in Russia

Jews in the Russian Empire have historically constituted a large religious diaspora; the vast territories of the Russian Empire at one time hosted the largest population of Jews in the world.

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Horace Gray

Horace Gray (March 24, 1828 – September 15, 1902) was an American jurist who ultimately served on the United States Supreme Court.

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Housing cooperative

A housing cooperative, co-op, or housing company (especially in Finland), is a legal entity, usually a cooperative or a corporation, which owns real estate, consisting of one or more residential buildings; it is one type of housing tenure.

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Internet Archive

The Internet Archive is a San Francisco–based nonprofit digital library with the stated mission of "universal access to all knowledge." It provides free public access to collections of digitized materials, including websites, software applications/games, music, movies/videos, moving images, and nearly three million public-domain books.

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Interstate Commerce Commission

The Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) was a regulatory agency in the United States created by the Interstate Commerce Act of 1887.

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Israel

Israel, officially the State of Israel, is a country in the Middle East, on the southeastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea and the northern shore of the Red Sea.

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J. P. Morgan

John Pierpont Morgan Sr. (April 17, 1837 – March 31, 1913) was an American financier and banker who dominated corporate finance and industrial consolidation in the United States of America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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Jacob de Haas

Jacob de Haas (13 August 1872 – 21 March 1937) was a British-born Jewish journalist and an early leader of the Zionist movement in the United States.

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Jacob Frank

Jacob Joseph Frank (יעקב פרנק, Jakub Józef Frank, born Jakub Lejbowicz; 1726 – December 10, 1791) was an 18th-century Polish-Jewish religious leader who claimed to be the reincarnation of the self-proclaimed messiah Sabbatai Zevi (1626–1676) and also of the biblical patriarch Jacob.

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James Madison

James Madison Jr. (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was an American statesman and Founding Father who served as the fourth President of the United States from 1809 to 1817.

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James Otis Jr.

James Otis Jr. (February 5, 1725 – May 23, 1783) was a lawyer, political activist, pamphleteer and legislator in Boston, a member of the Massachusetts provincial assembly, and an early advocate of the Patriot views against British policy that led to the American Revolution.

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Jerusalem

Jerusalem (יְרוּשָׁלַיִם; القُدس) is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea.

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Jewish culture

Jewish culture is the culture of the Jewish people from the formation of the Jewish nation in biblical times through life in the diaspora and the modern state of Israel.

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Jewish question

The Jewish question was a wide-ranging debate in 19th- and 20th-century European society pertaining to the appropriate status and treatment of Jews in society.

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Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German writer and statesman.

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John Adams

John Adams (October 30 [O.S. October 19] 1735 – July 4, 1826) was an American statesman and Founding Father who served as the first Vice President (1789–1797) and second President of the United States (1797–1801).

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John Marshall Harlan II

John Marshall Harlan (May 20, 1899 – December 29, 1971) was an American jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court from 1955 to 1971.

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John Steele Gordon

John Steele Gordon (born May 7, 1944) is an American writer who specializes in the history of business and finance.

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Joseph Goldmark

Joseph Jacob Goldmark (15 August 1819 – 18 April 1881) was a Hungarian American physician and chemist, credited with the discovery of red phosphorus.

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Joseph Rucker Lamar

Joseph Rucker Lamar (October 14, 1857 – January 2, 1916) was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court appointed by President William Howard Taft.

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Joseph Story

Joseph Story (September 18, 1779 – September 10, 1845) was an American lawyer and jurist who served on the Supreme Court of the United States from 1811 to 1845.

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Judaism

Judaism (originally from Hebrew, Yehudah, "Judah"; via Latin and Greek) is the religion of the Jewish people.

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Judicial Procedures Reform Bill of 1937

The Judicial Procedures Reform Bill of 1937 (frequently called the "court-packing plan")Epstein, at 451.

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Julian Mack

Julian William Mack (July 19, 1866 – September 5, 1943) was a United States federal judge and social reformer.

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Karl Goldmark

Karl Goldmark (born Károly Goldmark, Keszthely, May 18, 1830 – Vienna, January 2, 1915) was a Hungarian-born Viennese composer.

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Katz v. United States

Katz v. United States,, was a landmark United States Supreme Court case discussing the nature of the "right to privacy" and the legal definition of a "search" of intangible property, such as electronic-based communications like telephone calls.

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Ken Gormley (academic)

Kenneth Gerald Gormley (born March 19, 1955) is an American lawyer and academic who is the 13th president of Duquesne University.

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Kentucky

Kentucky, officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a state located in the east south-central region of the United States.

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Kfar Brandeis

Kfar Brandeis (lit: Brandeis village) is a neighborhood in the Israeli city of Hadera.

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Kibbutz

A kibbutz (קִבּוּץ /, lit. "gathering, clustering"; regular plural kibbutzim /) is a collective community in Israel that was traditionally based on agriculture.

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Kingdom of Bohemia

The Kingdom of Bohemia, sometimes in English literature referred to as the Czech Kingdom (České království; Königreich Böhmen; Regnum Bohemiae, sometimes Regnum Czechorum), was a medieval and early modern monarchy in Central Europe, the predecessor of the modern Czech Republic.

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Kingdom of Saxony

The Kingdom of Saxony (Königreich Sachsen), lasting between 1806 and 1918, was an independent member of a number of historical confederacies in Napoleonic through post-Napoleonic Germany.

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Labour law

Labour law (also known as labor law or employment law) mediates the relationship between workers, employing entities, trade unions and the government.

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Law review

A law review (or law journal) is a scholarly journal focusing on legal issues.

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Lawrence, Nassau County, New York

Lawrence is a village in Nassau County, New York in the United States.

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Learned Hand

Billings Learned Hand (January 27, 1872 – August 18, 1961) was an American judge and judicial philosopher.

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Lewis Naphtali Dembitz

Lewis Naphtali Dembitz (February 3, 1833 – March 11, 1907) was a German American legal scholar.

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List of covers of Time magazine (1920s)

This is a list of people appearing on the cover of ''Time'' magazine in the 1920s.

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List of Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States

The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest ranking judicial body in the United States.

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List of law clerks of the Supreme Court of the United States

Law clerks have assisted the Supreme Court Justices in various capacities, since the first one was hired by Justice Horace Gray in 1882.

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List of people from the Louisville metropolitan area

This is a list of people from the Louisville metropolitan area in the U.S. state of Kentucky.

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List of United States Supreme Court cases by the Hughes Court

This is a partial chronological list of cases decided by the United States Supreme Court during the Hughes Court, the tenure of Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes from February 24, 1930 through June 30, 1941.

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List of United States Supreme Court cases by the Taft Court

This is a partial chronological list of cases decided by the United States Supreme Court during the Taft Court, the tenure of Chief Justice William Howard Taft from July 11, 1921 through February 3, 1930.

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List of United States Supreme Court cases by the White Court

This is a partial chronological list of cases decided by the United States Supreme Court during the White Court, the tenure of Chief Justice Edward Douglass White from December 19, 1910 through May 19, 1921.

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List of United States Supreme Court Justices by time in office

A total of 113 Justices have served on the Supreme Court of the United States, the highest judicial body in the United States, since it was established in 1789.

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Los Angeles

Los Angeles (Spanish for "The Angels";; officially: the City of Los Angeles; colloquially: by its initials L.A.) is the second-most populous city in the United States, after New York City.

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Louis Brandeis House

The Louis Brandeis House is a National Historic Landmark on Judges Way, a private way off Stage Neck Road (off Cedar Street) in Chatham, Massachusetts.

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Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights Under Law

The Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights Under Law (LDB) is an independent, unaffiliated, nonprofit corporation established to advance the civil and human rights of the Jewish people and promote justice for all.

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Louis D. Brandeis High School

Louis D. Brandeis High School is public high school located in San Antonio, Texas (USA).

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Louis Lipsky

Louis Lipsky (November 30, 1876 – May 27, 1963) was an American Zionist leader, President of the Zionist Organization of America, magazine editor, and author of books on Jewish culture and politics.

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Louisville Male High School

Louisville Male Traditional High School is a public secondary school serving students in grades 9 through 12 in the southside of Louisville, Kentucky, USA.

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Louisville, Kentucky

Louisville is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the 29th most-populous city in the United States.

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Lower East Side

The Lower East Side, sometimes abbreviated as LES, is a neighborhood in the southeastern part of the New York City borough of Manhattan, roughly located between the Bowery and the East River, and Canal Street and Houston Street.

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Ludwig van Beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven (baptised 17 December 1770Beethoven was baptised on 17 December. His date of birth was often given as 16 December and his family and associates celebrated his birthday on that date, and most scholars accept that he was born on 16 December; however there is no documentary record of his birth.26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist.

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Massachusetts Bar Association

The Massachusetts Bar Association (MBA) is a voluntary, non-profit bar association in Massachusetts with a headquarters on West Street in Boston's Downtown Crossing.

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Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (SJC) is the highest court in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

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Melville Fuller

Melville Weston Fuller (February 11, 1833 – July 4, 1910) was a politician, lawyer, and judge from Illinois.

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Miles Poindexter

Miles Poindexter (April 22, 1868September 21, 1946) was an American politician and author.

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Minimum wage law

Minimum wage law is the body of law which prohibits employers from hiring employees or workers for less than a given hourly, daily or monthly minimum wage.

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Minneapolis

Minneapolis is the county seat of Hennepin County, and the larger of the Twin Cities, the 16th-largest metropolitan area in the United States.

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Moot court

Moot court is an extracurricular activity at many law schools in which participants take part in simulated court or arbitration proceedings, usually involving drafting memorials or memoranda and participating in oral argument.

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Muckraker

The term muckraker was used in the Progressive Era to characterize reform-minded American journalists who attacked established institutions and leaders as corrupt.

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Muller v. Oregon

Muller v. Oregon, 208 U.S. 412 (1908), was a landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court.

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National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933

The National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933 (NIRA) was a US labor law and consumer law passed by the US Congress to authorize the President to regulate industry for fair wages and prices that would stimulate economic recovery.

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National Recovery Administration

The National Recovery Administration was a prime New Deal agency established by U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt (FDR) in 1933.

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New Deal

The New Deal was a series of programs, public work projects, financial reforms and regulations enacted in the United States 1933-36, in response to the Great Depression.

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New Year

New Year is the time or day at which a new calendar year begins and the calendar's year count increments by one.

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New Year's Day

New Year's Day, also called simply New Year's or New Year, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar.

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New Year's Eve

In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December which is the seventh day of Christmastide.

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New York City

The City of New York, often called New York City (NYC) or simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States.

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New York City Department of Education

The New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) is the department of the government of New York City that manages the city's public school system.

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New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad

The New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, commonly known as the New Haven, was a railroad that operated in northeastern United States from 1872 to 1968, dominating the region's rail traffic for the first half of the 20th century.

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Northside Independent School District

Northside Independent School District is a school district headquartered in Leon Valley, Texas.

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Northwestern University Law Review

The Northwestern University Law Review is a scholarly legal publication and student organization at Northwestern University School of Law.

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Nutter McClennen & Fish

Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP is a long-standing law firm in Boston, Massachusetts.

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Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.

Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. (March 8, 1841 – March 6, 1935) was an American jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1902 to 1932, and as Acting Chief Justice of the United States from January–February 1930.

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Olmstead v. United States

Olmstead v. United States,, was a decision of the Supreme Court of the United States, in which the Court reviewed whether the use of wiretapped private telephone conversations, obtained by federal agents without judicial approval and subsequently used as evidence, constituted a violation of the defendant’s rights provided by the Fourth and Fifth Amendments.

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Oregon

Oregon is a state in the Pacific Northwest region on the West Coast of the United States.

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Other People's Money and How the Bankers Use It

Other People's Money And How the Bankers Use It (1914) is a collection of essays written by Louis Brandeis first published as a book in 1914, and reissued in 1933.

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Paris Peace Conference, 1919

The Paris Peace Conference, also known as Versailles Peace Conference, was the meeting of the victorious Allied Powers following the end of World War I to set the peace terms for the defeated Central Powers.

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PBS

The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) is an American public broadcaster and television program distributor.

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Philadelphia

Philadelphia is the largest city in the U.S. state and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the sixth-most populous U.S. city, with a 2017 census-estimated population of 1,580,863.

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Philanthropy

Philanthropy means the love of humanity.

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Pinchot–Ballinger controversy

The Pinchot–Ballinger controversy, also known as the "Ballinger Affair", was a dispute between U.S. Forest Service Chief Gifford Pinchot and U.S. Secretary of the Interior Richard A. Ballinger that contributed to the split of the Republican Party before the 1912 presidential election and helped to define the U.S. conservation movement in the early 20th century.

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Potter Stewart

Potter Stewart (January 23, 1915December 7, 1985) was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court, serving from 1958 to 1981.

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Prague

Prague (Praha, Prag) is the capital and largest city in the Czech Republic, the 14th largest city in the European Union and also the historical capital of Bohemia.

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Progressive Era

The Progressive Era was a period of widespread social activism and political reform across the United States that spanned from the 1890s to the 1920s.

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Reform Judaism

Reform Judaism (also known as Liberal Judaism or Progressive Judaism) is a major Jewish denomination that emphasizes the evolving nature of the faith, the superiority of its ethical aspects to the ceremonial ones, and a belief in a continuous revelation not centered on the theophany at Mount Sinai.

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Restatements of the Law

In American jurisprudence, the Restatements of the Law are a set of treatises on legal subjects that seek to inform judges and lawyers about general principles of common law.

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Revolutions of 1848

The Revolutions of 1848, known in some countries as the Spring of Nations, People's Spring, Springtime of the Peoples, or the Year of Revolution, were a series of political upheavals throughout Europe in 1848.

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Revolutions of 1848 in the Austrian Empire

A set of revolutions took place in the Austrian Empire from March 1848 to November 1849.

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Right to privacy

The right to privacy is an element of various legal traditions to restrain governmental and private actions that threaten the privacy of individuals.

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Robert M. La Follette

Robert Marion La Follette, Sr. (June 14, 1855June 18, 1925) was an American lawyer and politician.

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Robert Schumann

Robert Schumann (8 June 181029 July 1856) was a German composer and an influential music critic.

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Robin Hood

Robin Hood is a legendary heroic outlaw originally depicted in English folklore and subsequently featured in literature and film.

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Rockville, Maryland

Rockville is a city and the county seat of Montgomery County, Maryland, United States, part of the Baltimore–Washington metropolitan area.

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Roe v. Wade

Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113 (1973), is a landmark decision issued in 1973 by the United States Supreme Court on the issue of the constitutionality of laws that criminalized or restricted access to abortions.

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Roscoe Pound

Nathan Roscoe Pound (October 27, 1870 – June 30, 1964) was a distinguished American legal scholar and educator.

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Samuel D. Warren

Samuel Dennis Warren (1852 – February 18, 1910), also Samuel Dennis Warren II, was a Boston attorney.

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San Antonio

San Antonio (Spanish for "Saint Anthony"), officially the City of San Antonio, is the seventh most populous city in the United States and the second most populous city in both Texas and the Southern United States.

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San Francisco

San Francisco (initials SF;, Spanish for 'Saint Francis'), officially the City and County of San Francisco, is the cultural, commercial, and financial center of Northern California.

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San Rafael, California

San Rafael ("Saint Raphael") is a city and the county seat of Marin County, California, United States.

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Schenck v. United States

Schenck v. United States,, is a United States Supreme Court case concerning enforcement of the Espionage Act of 1917 during World War I. A unanimous Supreme Court, in an opinion by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., concluded that defendants who distributed fliers to draft-age men, urging resistance to induction, could be convicted of an attempt to obstruct the draft, a criminal offense.

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Secularity

Secularity (adjective form secular, from Latin saeculum meaning "worldly", "of a generation", "temporal", or a span of about 100 years) is the state of being separate from religion, or of not being exclusively allied with or against any particular religion.

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Sherman Antitrust Act

The Sherman Antitrust Act (Sherman Act) is a landmark federal statute in the history of United States antitrust law (or "competition law") passed by Congress in 1890 under the presidency of Benjamin Harrison.

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Simi Valley

Simi Valley is a synclinal valley in Southern California in the United States.

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Slush fund

A slush fund, also known as a black fund, is a fund or account maintained for corrupt or illegal purposes, especially in the political sphere.

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Socratic method

The Socratic method, also can be known as maieutics, method of elenchus, elenctic method, or Socratic debate, is a form of cooperative argumentative dialogue between individuals, based on asking and answering questions to stimulate critical thinking and to draw out ideas and underlying presumptions.

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Stanley v. Georgia

Stanley v. Georgia,, was a United States Supreme Court decision that helped to establish an implied "right to privacy" in U.S. law, in the form of mere possession of obscene materials.

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State Street (Boston)

State Street in Boston, Massachusetts, is one of the oldest streets in the city.

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Stephen Samuel Wise

Stephen Samuel Wise (1874–1949) was an early 20th-century American, Progressive Era, Reform rabbi, and Zionist leader.

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Supreme Court Historical Society

The Supreme Court Historical Society is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving and communicating the history of the U.S. Supreme Court.

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Supreme Court of the United States

The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS) is the highest federal court of the United States.

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Surveillance

Surveillance is the monitoring of behavior, activities, or other changing information for the purpose of influencing, managing, directing, or protecting people.

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Swift v. Tyson

Swift v. Tyson,, was a case brought in diversity in the Circuit Court for the Southern District of New York on a bill of Exchange accepted in New York in which the Supreme Court of the United States determined that United States federal courts hearing cases brought under their diversity jurisdiction pursuant to the Judiciary Act of 1789 must apply the statutory law of the states when the state legislature of the state in question had spoken on the issue but did not have to apply the state's common law in those cases in which that state's legislature had not spoken on the issue.

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The Brandeis School of San Francisco

The Brandeis School of San Francisco, or Brandeis, is an independent, co-educational, Jewish day school for students in kindergarten through eighth grade, located in the Park Merced neighborhood of San Francisco, California, United States.

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The House of Morgan

The House of Morgan: An American Banking Dynasty and the Rise of Modern Finance is a non-fiction book by Ron Chernow, published in 1990.

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The Journal of American History

The Journal of American History is the official academic journal of the Organization of American Historians.

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The Right to Privacy (article)

"The Right to Privacy" (4 Harvard L.R. 193 (Dec. 15, 1890)) is a law review article written by Samuel Warren and Louis Brandeis, and published in the 1890 Harvard Law Review.

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The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal is a U.S. business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City.

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Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt Jr. (October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was an American statesman and writer who served as the 26th President of the United States from 1901 to 1909.

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Thomas Watt Gregory

Thomas Watt Gregory (November 6, 1861February 26, 1933) was a political progressive and American attorney who served as United States Attorney General from 1914 to 1919, during President Woodrow Wilson's administration.

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Three Musketeers (Supreme Court)

The "Three Musketeers" was the nickname given to three liberal members during the 1932–37 terms of the United States Supreme Court, who generally supported the New Deal agenda of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

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Thurgood Marshall

Thurgood Marshall (July 2, 1908January 24, 1993) was an American lawyer, serving as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from October 1967 until October 1991.

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Time (magazine)

Time is an American weekly news magazine and news website published in New York City.

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Tort

A tort, in common law jurisdictions, is a civil wrong that causes a claimant to suffer loss or harm resulting in legal liability for the person who commits the tortious act.

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United States Attorney General

The United States Attorney General (A.G.) is the head of the United States Department of Justice per, concerned with all legal affairs, and is the chief lawyer of the United States government.

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United States Bill of Rights

The Bill of Rights is the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution.

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United States Department of Justice

The United States Department of Justice (DOJ), also known as the Justice Department, is a federal executive department of the U.S. government, responsible for the enforcement of the law and administration of justice in the United States, equivalent to the justice or interior ministries of other countries. The department was formed in 1870 during the Ulysses S. Grant administration. The Department of Justice administers several federal law enforcement agencies including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). The department is responsible for investigating instances of financial fraud, representing the United States government in legal matters (such as in cases before the Supreme Court), and running the federal prison system. The department is also responsible for reviewing the conduct of local law enforcement as directed by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994. The department is headed by the United States Attorney General, who is nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate and is a member of the Cabinet. The current Attorney General is Jeff Sessions.

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United States Postal Service

The United States Postal Service (USPS; also known as the Post Office, U.S. Mail, or Postal Service) is an independent agency of the United States federal government responsible for providing postal service in the United States, including its insular areas and associated states.

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United States Secretary of State

The Secretary of State is a senior official of the federal government of the United States of America, and as head of the U.S. Department of State, is principally concerned with foreign policy and is considered to be the U.S. government's equivalent of a Minister for Foreign Affairs.

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United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary

The United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary, informally the Senate Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of 21 U.S. Senators whose role is to oversee the Department of Justice (DOJ), consider executive nominations, and review pending legislation.

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United States v. Harris

United States v. Harris,, sometimes referred to as the Ku Klux Case, was a case in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that it was unconstitutional for the federal government to penalize crimes such as assault and murder.

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University of Alabama

The University of Alabama (Alabama or UA) is a public research university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, United States, and the flagship of the University of Alabama System.

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University of Louisville

The University of Louisville (UofL) is a public university in Louisville, Kentucky, a member of the Kentucky state university system.

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University of Louisville School of Law

The University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law, commonly referred to as The University of Louisville School of Law, U of L Brandeis School of Law, or the Brandeis School of Law, is the law school of the University of Louisville.

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Valedictorian

Valedictorian is an academic title of success used in the United States, Canada, Central America, and the Philippines for the student who delivers the closing or farewell statement at a graduation ceremony (called a valediction).

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Waltham, Massachusetts

Waltham is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States, and was an early center for the labor movement as well as a major contributor to the American Industrial Revolution.

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Warren Court

The Warren Court was the period in the history of the Supreme Court of the United States during which Earl Warren served as Chief Justice.

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Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.

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Whitney v. California

Whitney v. California,, was a United States Supreme Court decision upholding the conviction of an individual who had engaged in speech that raised a threat to society.

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William Howard Taft

William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was the 27th President of the United States (1909–1913) and the tenth Chief Justice of the United States (1921–1930), the only person to have held both offices.

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William J. Brennan Jr.

William Joseph Brennan Jr. (April 25, 1906 – July 24, 1997) was an American judge who served as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1956 to 1990.

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William Jennings Bryan

William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American orator and politician from Nebraska.

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William O. Douglas

William Orville Douglas (October 16, 1898January 19, 1980) was an American jurist and politician who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

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Wisconsin Central Railway (1897–1954)

The US Wisconsin Central Railway Company was created in 1897 when the Wisconsin Central Railroad (1871–99) was reorganized from bankruptcy.

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Woodrow Wilson

Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was an American statesman and academic who served as the 28th President of the United States from 1913 to 1921.

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World War I

World War I (often abbreviated as WWI or WW1), also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.

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World Zionist Organization

The World Zionist Organization (הַהִסְתַּדְּרוּת הַצִּיּוֹנִית הָעוֹלָמִית; HaHistadrut HaTzionit Ha'Olamit), or WZO, was founded as the Zionist Organization (ZO; 1897–1960) at the initiative of Theodor Herzl at the First World Zionist Congress, which took place in August 1897 in Basel, Switzerland.

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Zionism

Zionism (צִיּוֹנוּת Tsiyyonut after Zion) is the national movement of the Jewish people that supports the re-establishment of a Jewish homeland in the territory defined as the historic Land of Israel (roughly corresponding to Canaan, the Holy Land, or the region of Palestine).

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Zionist Organization of America

The Zionist Organization of America (ZOA), founded in 1897, was the first official Zionist organization in the United States, and, especially early in the 20th century, the primary representative of American Jews to the World Zionist Organization, espousing primarily Political Zionism.

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2018

2018 has been designated as the third International Year of the Reef by the International Coral Reef Initiative.

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2019

2019 (MMXIX) will be a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2019th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 19th year of the 3rd millennium, the 19th year of the 21st century, and the 10th and last year of the 2010s decade.

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Redirects here:

Brandeis J, Brandeis J., Brandeis, Louis, Justice Brandeis, L Brandeis, LD Brandeis, Louis D Brandeis, Louis Dembitz Brandeis, William Brandeis.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Brandeis

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