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Magnitude (astronomy)

Index Magnitude (astronomy)

In astronomy, magnitude is a logarithmic measure of the brightness of an object in a defined passband, often in the visible or infrared spectrum, but sometimes across all wavelengths. [1]

93 relations: AB magnitude, Absolute magnitude, Airy disk, Aldebaran, Alpha Cancri, Alpha Centauri, Antares, Apparent magnitude, Arcturus, Asteroid, Astronomer, Astronomical object, Astronomical seeing, Astronomical unit, Astronomy, Betelgeuse, Blue, Brightness, Callirrhoe (moon), Cambridge University Press, Ceres (dwarf planet), Charon (moon), Color–color diagram, Cor Caroli, Cornell University, Cosmic distance ladder, Cosmic dust, Distance modulus, Earth, Extinction (astronomy), Fenrir (moon), Full moon, Galileo Galilei, Geocentric orbit, Hipparchus, Hubble Space Telescope, Hubble Ultra-Deep Field, Infrared, Intensity (physics), International Space Station, Jacques Cassini, Johannes Hevelius, John Keill, Jupiter, Light-year, List of brightest stars, Logarithm, Luminosity, Mars, Mercury (planet), ..., Minute and second of arc, Mizar and Alcor, Moon, N. R. Pogson, Neptune, Night sky, Nth root, Parsec, Passband, Photograph, Photographic magnitude, Photometric-standard star, Planet, Pluto, Point source, Polaris, Princeton University Press, Procyon, Proxima Centauri, Ptolemy, Red, Satellite, Satellite flare, Saturn, Sirius, Small Solar System body, SN 1006, Spica, Stellar parallax, Sun, Tycho Brahe, UBV photometric system, Uranus, Vega, Venus, Visible spectrum, Watt, William Herschel, Yellow, 0, 19P/Borrelly, 3C 273, 4 Vesta. Expand index (43 more) »

AB magnitude

The AB magnitude system is an astronomical magnitude system.

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Absolute magnitude

Absolute magnitude is a measure of the luminosity of a celestial object, on a logarithmic astronomical magnitude scale.

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Airy disk

In optics, the Airy disk (or Airy disc) and Airy pattern are descriptions of the best focused spot of light that a perfect lens with a circular aperture can make, limited by the diffraction of light.

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Aldebaran

Aldebaran, designated Alpha Tauri (α Tauri, abbreviated Alpha Tau, α Tau), is an orange giant star located about 65 light-years from the Sun in the zodiac constellation of Taurus.

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Alpha Cancri

Alpha Cancri (α Cancri, abbreviated Alpha Cnc, α Cnc), also named Acubens, is a star system in the constellation of Cancer.

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Alpha Centauri

Alpha Centauri (α Centauri, abbreviated Alf Cen or α Cen) is the star system closest to the Solar System, being from the Sun.

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Antares

Antares, also designated Alpha Scorpii (α Scorpii, abbreviated Alpha Sco, α Sco), is on average the fifteenth-brightest star in the night sky, and the brightest star in the constellation of Scorpius.

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Apparent magnitude

The apparent magnitude of a celestial object is a number that is a measure of its brightness as seen by an observer on Earth.

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Arcturus

|- bgcolor.

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Asteroid

Asteroids are minor planets, especially those of the inner Solar System.

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Astronomer

An astronomer is a scientist in the field of astronomy who concentrates their studies on a specific question or field outside the scope of Earth.

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Astronomical object

An astronomical object or celestial object is a naturally occurring physical entity, association, or structure that exists in the observable universe.

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Astronomical seeing

Astronomical seeing is the blurring and twinkling of astronomical objects like stars due to turbulent mixing in the Earth's atmosphere, causing variations of the optical refractive index.

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Astronomical unit

The astronomical unit (symbol: au, ua, or AU) is a unit of length, roughly the distance from Earth to the Sun.

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Astronomy

Astronomy (from ἀστρονομία) is a natural science that studies celestial objects and phenomena.

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Betelgeuse

Betelgeuse, also designated Alpha Orionis (α Orionis, abbreviated Alpha Ori, α Ori), is the ninth-brightest star in the night sky and second-brightest in the constellation of Orion.

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Blue

Blue is one of the three primary colours of pigments in painting and traditional colour theory, as well as in the RGB colour model.

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Brightness

Brightness is an attribute of visual perception in which a source appears to be radiating or reflecting light.

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Callirrhoe (moon)

Callirrhoe (Greek: Καλλιρρόη), also known as (17), is one of Jupiter's outermost named natural satellites.

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Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge.

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Ceres (dwarf planet)

Ceres (minor-planet designation: 1 Ceres) is the largest object in the asteroid belt that lies between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, slightly closer to Mars' orbit.

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Charon (moon)

Charon, also known as (134340) Pluto I, is the largest of the five known natural satellites of the dwarf planet Pluto.

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Color–color diagram

In astronomy, color–color diagrams are a means of comparing the apparent magnitudes of stars at different wavelengths.

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Cor Caroli

Cor Caroli is the traditional name for the binary star also designated Alpha Canum Venaticorum (α Canum Venaticorum, abbreviated Alpha CVn, α CVn), although the International Astronomical Union now regards the name as only applying to the brightest component.

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Cornell University

Cornell University is a private and statutory Ivy League research university located in Ithaca, New York.

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Cosmic distance ladder

The cosmic distance ladder (also known as the extragalactic distance scale) is the succession of methods by which astronomers determine the distances to celestial objects.

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Cosmic dust

Cosmic dust, also called extraterrestrial dust or space dust, is dust which exists in outer space, as well as all over planet Earth.

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Distance modulus

The distance modulus is a way of expressing distances that is often used in astronomy.

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Earth

Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the only astronomical object known to harbor life.

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Extinction (astronomy)

In astronomy, extinction is the absorption and scattering of electromagnetic radiation by dust and gas between an emitting astronomical object and the observer.

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Fenrir (moon)

Fenrir or Saturn XLI (provisional designation S/2004 S 16) is a natural satellite of Saturn.

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Full moon

The full moon is the lunar phase when the Moon appears fully illuminated from Earth's perspective.

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Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei (15 February 1564Drake (1978, p. 1). The date of Galileo's birth is given according to the Julian calendar, which was then in force throughout Christendom. In 1582 it was replaced in Italy and several other Catholic countries with the Gregorian calendar. Unless otherwise indicated, dates in this article are given according to the Gregorian calendar. – 8 January 1642) was an Italian polymath.

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Geocentric orbit

A geocentric orbit or Earth orbit involves any object orbiting Planet Earth, such as the Moon or artificial satellites.

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Hipparchus

Hipparchus of Nicaea (Ἵππαρχος, Hipparkhos) was a Greek astronomer, geographer, and mathematician.

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Hubble Space Telescope

The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a space telescope that was launched into low Earth orbit in 1990 and remains in operation.

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Hubble Ultra-Deep Field

The Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) is an image of a small region of space in the constellation Fornax, containing an estimated 10,000 galaxies.

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Infrared

Infrared radiation (IR) is electromagnetic radiation (EMR) with longer wavelengths than those of visible light, and is therefore generally invisible to the human eye (although IR at wavelengths up to 1050 nm from specially pulsed lasers can be seen by humans under certain conditions). It is sometimes called infrared light.

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Intensity (physics)

In physics, intensity is the power transferred per unit area, where the area is measured on the plane perpendicular to the direction of propagation of the energy.

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International Space Station

The International Space Station (ISS) is a space station, or a habitable artificial satellite, in low Earth orbit.

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Jacques Cassini

Jacques Cassini (18 February 1677 – 16 April 1756) was a French astronomer, son of the famous Italian astronomer Giovanni Domenico Cassini.

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Johannes Hevelius

Johannes Hevelius Some sources refer to Hevelius as Polish.

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John Keill

John Keill (1 December 1671 – 31 August 1721) was a Scottish mathematician, academic and author who was an important disciple of Isaac Newton.

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Jupiter

Jupiter is the fifth planet from the Sun and the largest in the Solar System.

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Light-year

The light-year is a unit of length used to express astronomical distances and measures about 9.5 trillion kilometres or 5.9 trillion miles.

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List of brightest stars

This is a list of the brightest naked eye stars to +2.50 magnitude, as determined by their maximum, total, or combined apparent visual magnitudes as seen from Earth.

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Logarithm

In mathematics, the logarithm is the inverse function to exponentiation.

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Luminosity

In astronomy, luminosity is the total amount of energy emitted per unit of time by a star, galaxy, or other astronomical object.

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Mars

Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second-smallest planet in the Solar System after Mercury.

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Mercury (planet)

Mercury is the smallest and innermost planet in the Solar System.

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Minute and second of arc

A minute of arc, arcminute (arcmin), arc minute, or minute arc is a unit of angular measurement equal to of one degree.

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Mizar and Alcor

Mizar and Alcor are two stars forming a naked eye double in the handle of the Big Dipper (or Plough) asterism in the constellation of Ursa Major.

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Moon

The Moon is an astronomical body that orbits planet Earth and is Earth's only permanent natural satellite.

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N. R. Pogson

Norman Robert Pogson, CIE (23 March 1829 – 23 June 1891) was an English astronomer who worked in India at the Madras observatory.

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Neptune

Neptune is the eighth and farthest known planet from the Sun in the Solar System.

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Night sky

The term night sky, usually associated with astronomy from Earth, refers to the nighttime appearance of celestial objects like stars, planets, and the Moon, which are visible in a clear sky between sunset and sunrise, when the Sun is below the horizon.

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Nth root

In mathematics, an nth root of a number x, where n is usually assumed to be a positive integer, is a number r which, when raised to the power n yields x: where n is the degree of the root.

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Parsec

The parsec (symbol: pc) is a unit of length used to measure large distances to astronomical objects outside the Solar System.

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Passband

A passband is the range of frequencies or wavelengths that can pass through a filter.

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Photograph

A photograph or photo is an image created by light falling on a light-sensitive surface, usually photographic film or an electronic medium such as a CCD or a CMOS chip.

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Photographic magnitude

Before the advent of photometers which accurately measure the brightness of astronomical objects, the apparent magnitude of an object was obtained by taking a picture of it with a camera.

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Photometric-standard star

Photometric-standard stars are a series of stars that have had their light output in various passbands of photometric system measured very carefully.

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Planet

A planet is an astronomical body orbiting a star or stellar remnant that is massive enough to be rounded by its own gravity, is not massive enough to cause thermonuclear fusion, and has cleared its neighbouring region of planetesimals.

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Pluto

Pluto (minor planet designation: 134340 Pluto) is a dwarf planet in the Kuiper belt, a ring of bodies beyond Neptune.

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Point source

A point source is a single identifiable localised source of something.

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Polaris

Polaris, designated Alpha Ursae Minoris (Ursae Minoris, abbreviated Alpha UMi, UMi), commonly the North Star or Pole Star, is the brightest star in the constellation of Ursa Minor.

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Princeton University Press

Princeton University Press is an independent publisher with close connections to Princeton University.

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Procyon

Procyon, also designated Alpha Canis Minoris (α Canis Minoris, abbreviated Alpha CMi, α CMi), is the brightest star in the constellation of Canis Minor.

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Proxima Centauri

Proxima Centauri, or Alpha Centauri C, is a red dwarf, a small low-mass star, about from the Sun in the constellation of Centaurus.

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Ptolemy

Claudius Ptolemy (Κλαύδιος Πτολεμαῖος, Klaúdios Ptolemaîos; Claudius Ptolemaeus) was a Greco-Roman mathematician, astronomer, geographer, astrologer, and poet of a single epigram in the Greek Anthology.

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Red

Red is the color at the end of the visible spectrum of light, next to orange and opposite violet.

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Satellite

In the context of spaceflight, a satellite is an artificial object which has been intentionally placed into orbit.

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Satellite flare

Satellite flare, also known as satellite glint, is the visible phenomenon caused by the reflective surfaces of passing satellites (such as antennas, SAR or solar panels), reflecting sunlight toward the Earth below and appearing as a brief, bright "flare".

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Saturn

Saturn is the sixth planet from the Sun and the second-largest in the Solar System, after Jupiter.

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Sirius

Sirius (a romanization of Greek Σείριος, Seirios,."glowing" or "scorching") is a star system and the brightest star in the Earth's night sky.

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Small Solar System body

A small Solar System body (SSSB) is an object in the Solar System that is neither a planet, nor a dwarf planet, nor a natural satellite.

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SN 1006

SN 1006 was a supernova that is likely the brightest observed stellar event in recorded history, reaching an estimated −7.5 visual magnitude, and exceeding roughly sixteen times the brightness of Venus.

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Spica

Spica, also designated Alpha Virginis (α Virginis, abbreviated Alpha Vir, α Vir), is the brightest star in the constellation of Virgo and the 16th brightest star in the night sky.

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Stellar parallax

Stellar parallax is the apparent shift of position of any nearby star (or other object) against the background of distant objects.

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Sun

The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System.

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Tycho Brahe

Tycho Brahe (born Tyge Ottesen Brahe;. He adopted the Latinized form "Tycho Brahe" (sometimes written Tÿcho) at around age fifteen. The name Tycho comes from Tyche (Τύχη, meaning "luck" in Greek, Roman equivalent: Fortuna), a tutelary deity of fortune and prosperity of ancient Greek city cults. He is now generally referred to as "Tycho," as was common in Scandinavia in his time, rather than by his surname "Brahe" (a spurious appellative form of his name, Tycho de Brahe, only appears much later). 14 December 154624 October 1601) was a Danish nobleman, astronomer, and writer known for his accurate and comprehensive astronomical and planetary observations.

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UBV photometric system

The UBV photometric system (Ultraviolet, Blue, Visual), also called the Johnson system (or Johnson-Morgan system), is a wide band photometric system for classifying stars according to their colors.

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Uranus

Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun.

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Vega

Vega, also designated Alpha Lyrae (α Lyrae, abbreviated Alpha Lyr or α Lyr), is the brightest star in the constellation of Lyra, the fifth-brightest star in the night sky, and the second-brightest star in the northern celestial hemisphere, after Arcturus.

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Venus

Venus is the second planet from the Sun, orbiting it every 224.7 Earth days.

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Visible spectrum

The visible spectrum is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that is visible to the human eye.

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Watt

The watt (symbol: W) is a unit of power.

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William Herschel

Frederick William Herschel, (Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel; 15 November 1738 – 25 August 1822) was a German-born British astronomer, composer and brother of fellow astronomer Caroline Herschel, with whom he worked.

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Yellow

Yellow is the color between orange and green on the spectrum of visible light.

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0

0 (zero) is both a number and the numerical digit used to represent that number in numerals.

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19P/Borrelly

Comet Borrelly or Borrelly's Comet (official designation: 19P/Borrelly) is a periodic comet, which was visited by the spacecraft Deep Space 1 in 2001.

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3C 273

3C 273 is a quasar located in the constellation Virgo.

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4 Vesta

Vesta, minor-planet designation 4 Vesta, is one of the largest objects in the asteroid belt, with a mean diameter of.

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Redirects here:

Astronomical magnitude, Combined magnitude, First magnitude, Second magnitude, Star magnitude.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnitude_(astronomy)

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