Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Maltese language

Index Maltese language

Maltese (Malti) is the national language of Malta and a co-official language of the country alongside English, while also serving as an official language of the European Union, the only Semitic language so distinguished. [1]

127 relations: Adjective, Adverb, Affricate consonant, Afroasiatic languages, Alveolar consonant, Approximant consonant, Arabic, Arabic definite article, Arabic languages, Article (grammar), Assimilation (phonology), Australia, Ayin, Š-L-M, Belles-lettres, Berber languages, Biblioteca Vallicelliana, Bilabial consonant, Brill Publishers, Broken plural, Canada, Caponata, Cassata, Central Semitic languages, Classical Arabic, Clitic, Code-switching, Compensatory lengthening, Consonant cluster, Coronal consonant, Council of Europe, Crown Colony of Malta, Dental consonant, Dental stop, Diglossia, Diphthong, Dual (grammatical number), Egyptian Arabic, Emigration from Malta, Emphatic consonant, English language, European Union, Fatimid Caliphate, Final-obstruent devoicing, French language, Fricative consonant, Function word, Gemination, Genetic relationship (linguistics), Germanic languages, ..., Giovanni Pietro Francesco Agius de Soldanis, Glottal consonant, Grammatical conjugation, Grammatical tense, Hebrew language, Hieronymus Megiser, History of Malta, Il-Kantilena, Imāla, Infix, Intervocalic consonant, ISO 639 macrolanguage, Italian language, Italo-Norman, Italy, Kingdom of Italy, Knights Hospitaller, Labiodental consonant, Languages of Malta, Languages of the European Union, Larynx, Latin script, Lebanese Arabic, Levantine Arabic, List of ISO 639-1 codes, List of language regulators, Loanword, Maghrebi Arabic, Malta, Maltenglish, Maltese alphabet, Maltese Braille, Maltese people, Mesopotamian Arabic, Mikiel Anton Vassalli, Modern Standard Arabic, Moroccan Arabic, Morphology (linguistics), Mutual intelligibility, Nasal consonant, National Council for the Maltese Language, National language, Natural Language and Linguistic Theory, Norman language, Noun, Obstruent, Old Arabic, Orthography, Palatal consonant, Pharyngeal consonant, Pharyngealization, Pietru Caxaro, Place of articulation, Prefix, Punic language, Received Pronunciation, Regional Italian, Romance languages, Routledge, Saffron, Semitic languages, Semitic root, Sicilian language, Sicily, Siculo-Arabic, Stop consonant, Suffix, Sun and moon letters, Trill consonant, Tunisia, Tunisian Arabic, United Kingdom, United States, Unreleased stop, Varieties of Arabic, Velar consonant, West Semitic languages. Expand index (77 more) »

Adjective

In linguistics, an adjective (abbreviated) is a describing word, the main syntactic role of which is to qualify a noun or noun phrase, giving more information about the object signified.

New!!: Maltese language and Adjective · See more »

Adverb

An adverb is a word that modifies a verb, adjective, another adverb, determiner, noun phrase, clause, or sentence.

New!!: Maltese language and Adverb · See more »

Affricate consonant

An affricate is a consonant that begins as a stop and releases as a fricative, generally with the same place of articulation (most often coronal).

New!!: Maltese language and Affricate consonant · See more »

Afroasiatic languages

Afroasiatic (Afro-Asiatic), also known as Afrasian and traditionally as Hamito-Semitic (Chamito-Semitic) or Semito-Hamitic, is a large language family of about 300 languages and dialects.

New!!: Maltese language and Afroasiatic languages · See more »

Alveolar consonant

Alveolar consonants are articulated with the tongue against or close to the superior alveolar ridge, which is called that because it contains the alveoli (the sockets) of the superior teeth.

New!!: Maltese language and Alveolar consonant · See more »

Approximant consonant

Approximants are speech sounds that involve the articulators approaching each other but not narrowly enough nor with enough articulatory precision to create turbulent airflow.

New!!: Maltese language and Approximant consonant · See more »

Arabic

Arabic (العَرَبِيَّة) or (عَرَبِيّ) or) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world. It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia in the east to the Anti-Lebanon mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form, Modern Standard Arabic, which is derived from Classical Arabic. As the modern written language, Modern Standard Arabic is widely taught in schools and universities, and is used to varying degrees in workplaces, government, and the media. The two formal varieties are grouped together as Literary Arabic (fuṣḥā), which is the official language of 26 states and the liturgical language of Islam. Modern Standard Arabic largely follows the grammatical standards of Classical Arabic and uses much of the same vocabulary. However, it has discarded some grammatical constructions and vocabulary that no longer have any counterpart in the spoken varieties, and has adopted certain new constructions and vocabulary from the spoken varieties. Much of the new vocabulary is used to denote concepts that have arisen in the post-classical era, especially in modern times. During the Middle Ages, Literary Arabic was a major vehicle of culture in Europe, especially in science, mathematics and philosophy. As a result, many European languages have also borrowed many words from it. Arabic influence, mainly in vocabulary, is seen in European languages, mainly Spanish and to a lesser extent Portuguese, Valencian and Catalan, owing to both the proximity of Christian European and Muslim Arab civilizations and 800 years of Arabic culture and language in the Iberian Peninsula, referred to in Arabic as al-Andalus. Sicilian has about 500 Arabic words as result of Sicily being progressively conquered by Arabs from North Africa, from the mid 9th to mid 10th centuries. Many of these words relate to agriculture and related activities (Hull and Ruffino). Balkan languages, including Greek and Bulgarian, have also acquired a significant number of Arabic words through contact with Ottoman Turkish. Arabic has influenced many languages around the globe throughout its history. Some of the most influenced languages are Persian, Turkish, Spanish, Urdu, Kashmiri, Kurdish, Bosnian, Kazakh, Bengali, Hindi, Malay, Maldivian, Indonesian, Pashto, Punjabi, Tagalog, Sindhi, and Hausa, and some languages in parts of Africa. Conversely, Arabic has borrowed words from other languages, including Greek and Persian in medieval times, and contemporary European languages such as English and French in modern times. Classical Arabic is the liturgical language of 1.8 billion Muslims and Modern Standard Arabic is one of six official languages of the United Nations. All varieties of Arabic combined are spoken by perhaps as many as 422 million speakers (native and non-native) in the Arab world, making it the fifth most spoken language in the world. Arabic is written with the Arabic alphabet, which is an abjad script and is written from right to left, although the spoken varieties are sometimes written in ASCII Latin from left to right with no standardized orthography.

New!!: Maltese language and Arabic · See more »

Arabic definite article

(ال), also transliterated as el- as pronounced in varieties of Arabic, is the definite article in the Arabic language: a particle (ḥarf) whose function is to render the noun on which it is prefixed definite.

New!!: Maltese language and Arabic definite article · See more »

Arabic languages

The Arabic language family consists of all of the descendants of Proto-Arabic, including.

New!!: Maltese language and Arabic languages · See more »

Article (grammar)

An article (with the linguistic glossing abbreviation) is a word that is used with a noun (as a standalone word or a prefix or suffix) to specify grammatical definiteness of the noun, and in some languages extending to volume or numerical scope.

New!!: Maltese language and Article (grammar) · See more »

Assimilation (phonology)

In phonology, assimilation is a common phonological process by which one sound becomes more like a nearby sound.

New!!: Maltese language and Assimilation (phonology) · See more »

Australia

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania and numerous smaller islands.

New!!: Maltese language and Australia · See more »

Ayin

Ayin (also ayn, ain; transliterated) is the sixteenth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician, Hebrew, Aramaic, Syriac ܥ, and Arabic rtl (where it is sixteenth in abjadi order only).

New!!: Maltese language and Ayin · See more »

Š-L-M

Shin-Lamedh-Mem is the triconsonantal root of many Semitic words, and many of those words are used as names.

New!!: Maltese language and Š-L-M · See more »

Belles-lettres

Belles-lettres or belles lettres is a category of writing, originally meaning beautiful or fine writing.

New!!: Maltese language and Belles-lettres · See more »

Berber languages

The Berber languages, also known as Berber or the Amazigh languages (Berber name: Tamaziɣt, Tamazight; Neo-Tifinagh: ⵜⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵜ, Tuareg Tifinagh: ⵜⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵗⵜ, ⵝⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵗⵝ), are a branch of the Afroasiatic language family.

New!!: Maltese language and Berber languages · See more »

Biblioteca Vallicelliana

The Biblioteca Vallicelliana is a library in Rome, Italy.

New!!: Maltese language and Biblioteca Vallicelliana · See more »

Bilabial consonant

In phonetics, a bilabial consonant is a consonant articulated with both lips.

New!!: Maltese language and Bilabial consonant · See more »

Brill Publishers

Brill (known as E. J. Brill, Koninklijke Brill, Brill Academic Publishers) is a Dutch international academic publisher founded in 1683 in Leiden, Netherlands.

New!!: Maltese language and Brill Publishers · See more »

Broken plural

In linguistics, a broken plural (or internal plural) is an irregular plural form of a noun or adjective found in the Semitic languages and other Afroasiatic languages such as Berber.

New!!: Maltese language and Broken plural · See more »

Canada

Canada is a country located in the northern part of North America.

New!!: Maltese language and Canada · See more »

Caponata

Caponata Caponata (Sicilian: capunata) is a Sicilian eggplant (aubergine) dish consisting of a cooked vegetable salad made from chopped fried eggplant and celery seasoned with sweetened vinegar, with capers in a sweet and sour sauce.

New!!: Maltese language and Caponata · See more »

Cassata

Cassata or Cassata siciliana is a traditional sweet from Sicily, Italy.

New!!: Maltese language and Cassata · See more »

Central Semitic languages

The Central Semitic languages are a proposed intermediate group of Semitic languages, comprising the Late Iron Age, modern dialect of Arabic (prior to which Arabic was a Southern Semitic language), and older Bronze Age Northwest Semitic languages (which include Aramaic, Ugaritic, and the Canaanite languages of Hebrew and Phoenician).

New!!: Maltese language and Central Semitic languages · See more »

Classical Arabic

Classical Arabic is the form of the Arabic language used in Umayyad and Abbasid literary texts from the 7th century AD to the 9th century AD.

New!!: Maltese language and Classical Arabic · See more »

Clitic

A clitic (from Greek κλιτικός klitikos, "inflexional") is a morpheme in morphology and syntax that has syntactic characteristics of a word, but depends phonologically on another word or phrase.

New!!: Maltese language and Clitic · See more »

Code-switching

In linguistics, code-switching occurs when a speaker alternates between two or more languages, or language varieties, in the context of a single conversation.

New!!: Maltese language and Code-switching · See more »

Compensatory lengthening

Compensatory lengthening in phonology and historical linguistics is the lengthening of a vowel sound that happens upon the loss of a following consonant, usually in the syllable coda, or of a vowel in an adjacent syllable.

New!!: Maltese language and Compensatory lengthening · See more »

Consonant cluster

In linguistics, a consonant cluster, consonant sequence or consonant compound is a group of consonants which have no intervening vowel.

New!!: Maltese language and Consonant cluster · See more »

Coronal consonant

Coronal consonants are consonants articulated with the flexible front part of the tongue.

New!!: Maltese language and Coronal consonant · See more »

Council of Europe

The Council of Europe (CoE; Conseil de l'Europe) is an international organisation whose stated aim is to uphold human rights, democracy and the rule of law in Europe.

New!!: Maltese language and Council of Europe · See more »

Crown Colony of Malta

The Crown Colony of the Island of Malta and its Dependencies (commonly known as the Crown Colony of Malta) was a British colony in the present-day Republic of Malta.

New!!: Maltese language and Crown Colony of Malta · See more »

Dental consonant

A dental consonant is a consonant articulated with the tongue against the upper teeth, such as,,, and in some languages.

New!!: Maltese language and Dental consonant · See more »

Dental stop

In phonetics and phonology, a dental stop is a type of consonantal sound, made with the tongue in contact with the upper teeth (hence dental), held tightly enough to block the passage of air (hence a stop consonant).

New!!: Maltese language and Dental stop · See more »

Diglossia

In linguistics, diglossia is a situation in which two dialects or languages are used by a single language community.

New!!: Maltese language and Diglossia · See more »

Diphthong

A diphthong (or; from Greek: δίφθογγος, diphthongos, literally "two sounds" or "two tones"), also known as a gliding vowel, is a combination of two adjacent vowel sounds within the same syllable.

New!!: Maltese language and Diphthong · See more »

Dual (grammatical number)

Dual (abbreviated) is a grammatical number that some languages use in addition to singular and plural.

New!!: Maltese language and Dual (grammatical number) · See more »

Egyptian Arabic

Egyptian Arabic, locally known as the Egyptian colloquial language or Masri, also spelled Masry, meaning simply "Egyptian", is spoken by most contemporary Egyptians.

New!!: Maltese language and Egyptian Arabic · See more »

Emigration from Malta

Emigration from Malta was an important demographic phenomenon throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, leading to the creation of large Maltese communities in English-speaking countries abroad.

New!!: Maltese language and Emigration from Malta · See more »

Emphatic consonant

In Semitic linguistics, an emphatic consonant is an obstruent consonant which originally contrasted with series of both voiced and voiceless obstruents.

New!!: Maltese language and Emphatic consonant · See more »

English language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca.

New!!: Maltese language and English language · See more »

European Union

The European Union (EU) is a political and economic union of EUnum member states that are located primarily in Europe.

New!!: Maltese language and European Union · See more »

Fatimid Caliphate

The Fatimid Caliphate was an Islamic caliphate that spanned a large area of North Africa, from the Red Sea in the east to the Atlantic Ocean in the west.

New!!: Maltese language and Fatimid Caliphate · See more »

Final-obstruent devoicing

Final-obstruent devoicing or terminal devoicing is a systematic phonological process occurring in languages such as Catalan, German, Dutch, Breton, Russian, Turkish, and Wolof.

New!!: Maltese language and Final-obstruent devoicing · See more »

French language

French (le français or la langue française) is a Romance language of the Indo-European family.

New!!: Maltese language and French language · See more »

Fricative consonant

Fricatives are consonants produced by forcing air through a narrow channel made by placing two articulators close together.

New!!: Maltese language and Fricative consonant · See more »

Function word

In linguistics, function words (also called functors) are words that have little lexical meaning or have ambiguous meaning and express grammatical relationships among other words within a sentence, or specify the attitude or mood of the speaker.

New!!: Maltese language and Function word · See more »

Gemination

Gemination, or consonant elongation, is the pronouncing in phonetics of a spoken consonant for an audibly longer period of time than that of a short consonant.

New!!: Maltese language and Gemination · See more »

Genetic relationship (linguistics)

In linguistics, genetic relationship is the usual term for the relationship which exists between languages that are members of the same language family.

New!!: Maltese language and Genetic relationship (linguistics) · See more »

Germanic languages

The Germanic languages are a branch of the Indo-European language family spoken natively by a population of about 515 million people mainly in Europe, North America, Oceania, and Southern Africa.

New!!: Maltese language and Germanic languages · See more »

Giovanni Pietro Francesco Agius de Soldanis

Canon Giovanni Pietro Francesco Agius de Soldanis (Ġan Piet Franġisk Agius de Soldanis, 30 October 1712 – 30 January 1770), often called de Soldanis (Sultana), was a Maltese linguist, historian and cleric from the island of Gozo.

New!!: Maltese language and Giovanni Pietro Francesco Agius de Soldanis · See more »

Glottal consonant

Glottal consonants are consonants using the glottis as their primary articulation.

New!!: Maltese language and Glottal consonant · See more »

Grammatical conjugation

In linguistics, conjugation is the creation of derived forms of a verb from its principal parts by inflection (alteration of form according to rules of grammar).

New!!: Maltese language and Grammatical conjugation · See more »

Grammatical tense

In grammar, tense is a category that expresses time reference with reference to the moment of speaking.

New!!: Maltese language and Grammatical tense · See more »

Hebrew language

No description.

New!!: Maltese language and Hebrew language · See more »

Hieronymus Megiser

Hieronymus Megiser (c.1554 in Stuttgart – 1618 or 1619 in Linz, Austria) was a German polymath, linguist and historian.

New!!: Maltese language and Hieronymus Megiser · See more »

History of Malta

Malta has a long history and was first inhabited in around 5900 BC.

New!!: Maltese language and History of Malta · See more »

Il-Kantilena

Il-Kantilena is the oldest known literary text in the Maltese language.

New!!: Maltese language and Il-Kantilena · See more »

Imāla

Imāla (also transliterated; إمالة, literally "slanting") is a vowel shift exhibited in many dialects of Arabic where the open vowel, whether long or short, is raised to or even in certain morphological or phonological contexts.

New!!: Maltese language and Imāla · See more »

Infix

An infix is an affix inserted inside a word stem (an existing word).

New!!: Maltese language and Infix · See more »

Intervocalic consonant

In phonetics and phonology, an intervocalic consonant is a consonant that occurs in the middle of a word, between two vowels.

New!!: Maltese language and Intervocalic consonant · See more »

ISO 639 macrolanguage

ISO 639-3 is an international standard for language codes.

New!!: Maltese language and ISO 639 macrolanguage · See more »

Italian language

Italian (or lingua italiana) is a Romance language.

New!!: Maltese language and Italian language · See more »

Italo-Norman

The Italo-Normans, or Siculo-Normans when referring to Sicily and Southern Italy, are the Italian-born descendants of the first Norman conquerors to travel to southern Italy in the first half of the eleventh century.

New!!: Maltese language and Italo-Norman · See more »

Italy

Italy (Italia), officially the Italian Republic (Repubblica Italiana), is a sovereign state in Europe.

New!!: Maltese language and Italy · See more »

Kingdom of Italy

The Kingdom of Italy (Regno d'Italia) was a state which existed from 1861—when King Victor Emmanuel II of Sardinia was proclaimed King of Italy—until 1946—when a constitutional referendum led civil discontent to abandon the monarchy and form the modern Italian Republic.

New!!: Maltese language and Kingdom of Italy · See more »

Knights Hospitaller

The Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem (Ordo Fratrum Hospitalis Sancti Ioannis Hierosolymitani), also known as the Order of Saint John, Order of Hospitallers, Knights Hospitaller, Knights Hospitalier or Hospitallers, was a medieval Catholic military order.

New!!: Maltese language and Knights Hospitaller · See more »

Labiodental consonant

In phonetics, labiodentals are consonants articulated with the lower lip and the upper teeth.

New!!: Maltese language and Labiodental consonant · See more »

Languages of Malta

Malta has two official languages: Maltese and English.

New!!: Maltese language and Languages of Malta · See more »

Languages of the European Union

The languages of the European Union are languages used by people within the member states of the European Union (EU).

New!!: Maltese language and Languages of the European Union · See more »

Larynx

The larynx, commonly called the voice box, is an organ in the top of the neck of tetrapods involved in breathing, producing sound, and protecting the trachea against food aspiration.

New!!: Maltese language and Larynx · See more »

Latin script

Latin or Roman script is a set of graphic signs (script) based on the letters of the classical Latin alphabet, which is derived from a form of the Cumaean Greek version of the Greek alphabet, used by the Etruscans.

New!!: Maltese language and Latin script · See more »

Lebanese Arabic

Lebanese Arabic or Lebanese is a variety of Levantine Arabic, indigenous to and spoken primarily in Lebanon, with significant linguistic influences borrowed from other Middle Eastern and European languages, and is in some ways unique from other varieties of Arabic.

New!!: Maltese language and Lebanese Arabic · See more »

Levantine Arabic

Levantine Arabic (الـلَّـهْـجَـةُ الـشَّـامِـيَّـة,, Levantine Arabic: il-lahže š-šāmiyye) is a broad dialect of Arabic and the vernacular Arabic of the eastern coastal strip of the Levantine Sea, that is Shaam.

New!!: Maltese language and Levantine Arabic · See more »

List of ISO 639-1 codes

ISO 639 is a standardized nomenclature used to classify languages.

New!!: Maltese language and List of ISO 639-1 codes · See more »

List of language regulators

This is a list of bodies that regulate standard languages, often called language academies.

New!!: Maltese language and List of language regulators · See more »

Loanword

A loanword (also loan word or loan-word) is a word adopted from one language (the donor language) and incorporated into another language without translation.

New!!: Maltese language and Loanword · See more »

Maghrebi Arabic

Maghrebi Arabic (Western Arabic; as opposed to Eastern Arabic or Mashriqi Arabic) is an Arabic dialect continuum spoken in the Maghreb region, in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Western Sahara, and Mauritania.

New!!: Maltese language and Maghrebi Arabic · See more »

Malta

Malta, officially known as the Republic of Malta (Repubblika ta' Malta), is a Southern European island country consisting of an archipelago in the Mediterranean Sea.

New!!: Maltese language and Malta · See more »

Maltenglish

Maltenglish, also known as Manglish, Minglish, Maltese English or Maltingliż, refers to the phenomenon of code-switching between Maltese, a Semitic language, and English, an Indo-European Germanic language.

New!!: Maltese language and Maltenglish · See more »

Maltese alphabet

The Maltese alphabet is based on the Latin alphabet with the addition of some letters with diacritic marks and digraphs.

New!!: Maltese language and Maltese alphabet · See more »

Maltese Braille

Maltese Braille is the braille alphabet of the Maltese language.

New!!: Maltese language and Maltese Braille · See more »

Maltese people

The Maltese (Maltin) are an ethnic group indigenous to Malta, and identified with the Maltese language.

New!!: Maltese language and Maltese people · See more »

Mesopotamian Arabic

Mesopotamian Arabic, or Iraqi Arabic, is a continuum of mutually-intelligible varieties of Arabic native to the Mesopotamian basin of Iraq as well as spanning into Syria, Iran, southeastern Turkey, and spoken in Iraqi diaspora communities.

New!!: Maltese language and Mesopotamian Arabic · See more »

Mikiel Anton Vassalli

Mikiel Anton Vassalli (March 5, 1764 in Żebbuġ, Malta – January 12, 1829) was a Maltese writer, a philosopher, and a linguist who published important Maltese language books, including a Maltese-Italian dictionary, a Maltese grammar book, the first Protestant Gospels in Maltese, and towards the end of his life, a book on Maltese proverbs.

New!!: Maltese language and Mikiel Anton Vassalli · See more »

Modern Standard Arabic

Modern Standard Arabic (MSA; اللغة العربية الفصحى 'the most eloquent Arabic language'), Standard Arabic, or Literary Arabic is the standardized and literary variety of Arabic used in writing and in most formal speech throughout the Arab world to facilitate communication.

New!!: Maltese language and Modern Standard Arabic · See more »

Moroccan Arabic

Moroccan Arabic or Moroccan Darija (الدارجة, in Morocco) is a member of the Maghrebi Arabic language continuum spoken in Morocco.

New!!: Maltese language and Moroccan Arabic · See more »

Morphology (linguistics)

In linguistics, morphology is the study of words, how they are formed, and their relationship to other words in the same language.

New!!: Maltese language and Morphology (linguistics) · See more »

Mutual intelligibility

In linguistics, mutual intelligibility is a relationship between languages or dialects in which speakers of different but related varieties can readily understand each other without prior familiarity or special effort.

New!!: Maltese language and Mutual intelligibility · See more »

Nasal consonant

In phonetics, a nasal, also called a nasal occlusive, nasal stop in contrast with a nasal fricative, or nasal continuant, is an occlusive consonant produced with a lowered velum, allowing air to escape freely through the nose.

New!!: Maltese language and Nasal consonant · See more »

National Council for the Maltese Language

The National Council for the Maltese Language (Il-Kunsill Nazzjonali tal-Ilsien Malti) was founded in April 2005 with the enactment of the Maltese Language Act (Att dwar l-Ilsien Malti) (Chap. 470) in the Maltese Parliament.

New!!: Maltese language and National Council for the Maltese Language · See more »

National language

A national language is a language (or language variant, e.g. dialect) that has some connection—de facto or de jure—with people and the territory they occupy.

New!!: Maltese language and National language · See more »

Natural Language and Linguistic Theory

Natural Language & Linguistic Theory is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal covering theoretical and generative linguistics.

New!!: Maltese language and Natural Language and Linguistic Theory · See more »

Norman language

No description.

New!!: Maltese language and Norman language · See more »

Noun

A noun (from Latin nōmen, literally meaning "name") is a word that functions as the name of some specific thing or set of things, such as living creatures, objects, places, actions, qualities, states of existence, or ideas.

New!!: Maltese language and Noun · See more »

Obstruent

An obstruent is a speech sound such as,, or that is formed by obstructing airflow.

New!!: Maltese language and Obstruent · See more »

Old Arabic

Old Arabic is the earliest attested stage of the Arabic language, beginning with the first attestation of personal names in the 9th century BC, and culminating in the codification of Classical Arabic beginning in the 7th century AD.

New!!: Maltese language and Old Arabic · See more »

Orthography

An orthography is a set of conventions for writing a language.

New!!: Maltese language and Orthography · See more »

Palatal consonant

Palatal consonants are consonants articulated with the body of the tongue raised against the hard palate (the middle part of the roof of the mouth).

New!!: Maltese language and Palatal consonant · See more »

Pharyngeal consonant

A pharyngeal consonant is a consonant that is articulated primarily in the pharynx.

New!!: Maltese language and Pharyngeal consonant · See more »

Pharyngealization

Pharyngealization is a secondary articulation of consonants or vowels by which the pharynx or epiglottis is constricted during the articulation of the sound.

New!!: Maltese language and Pharyngealization · See more »

Pietru Caxaro

Pietru "Peter" Caxaro (c. 14001485) was a Maltese philosopher and poet.

New!!: Maltese language and Pietru Caxaro · See more »

Place of articulation

In articulatory phonetics, the place of articulation (also point of articulation) of a consonant is the point of contact where an obstruction occurs in the vocal tract between an articulatory gesture, an active articulator (typically some part of the tongue), and a passive location (typically some part of the roof of the mouth).

New!!: Maltese language and Place of articulation · See more »

Prefix

A prefix is an affix which is placed before the stem of a word.

New!!: Maltese language and Prefix · See more »

Punic language

The Punic language, also called Carthaginian or Phoenicio-Punic, is an extinct variety of the Phoenician language, a Canaanite language of the Semitic family.

New!!: Maltese language and Punic language · See more »

Received Pronunciation

Received Pronunciation (RP) is an accent of Standard English in the United Kingdom and is defined in the Concise Oxford English Dictionary as "the standard accent of English as spoken in the south of England", although it can be heard from native speakers throughout England and Wales.

New!!: Maltese language and Received Pronunciation · See more »

Regional Italian

Regional Italian, sometimes also called dialects of Italian, is any regionalRegional in the broad sense of the word; not to be confused with the Italian endonym regione for Italy's administrative units variety of the Italian language.

New!!: Maltese language and Regional Italian · See more »

Romance languages

The Romance languages (also called Romanic languages or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that began evolving from Vulgar Latin between the sixth and ninth centuries and that form a branch of the Italic languages within the Indo-European language family.

New!!: Maltese language and Romance languages · See more »

Routledge

Routledge is a British multinational publisher.

New!!: Maltese language and Routledge · See more »

Saffron

Saffron (pronounced or) is a spice derived from the flower of Crocus sativus, commonly known as the "saffron crocus".

New!!: Maltese language and Saffron · See more »

Semitic languages

The Semitic languages are a branch of the Afroasiatic language family originating in the Middle East.

New!!: Maltese language and Semitic languages · See more »

Semitic root

The roots of verbs and most nouns in the Semitic languages are characterized as a sequence of consonants or "radicals" (hence the term consonantal root).

New!!: Maltese language and Semitic root · See more »

Sicilian language

Sicilian (sicilianu; in Italian: Siciliano; also known as Siculo (siculu) or Calabro-Sicilian) is a Romance language spoken on the island of Sicily and its satellite islands.

New!!: Maltese language and Sicilian language · See more »

Sicily

Sicily (Sicilia; Sicìlia) is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea.

New!!: Maltese language and Sicily · See more »

Siculo-Arabic

Siculo-Arabic (or Sicilian Arabic) is the term used for the variety (or varieties) of Arabic that were spoken in the Emirate of Sicily (that included Malta) from the 9th century, persisting under the subsequent Norman rule till the 13th century.

New!!: Maltese language and Siculo-Arabic · See more »

Stop consonant

In phonetics, a stop, also known as a plosive or oral occlusive, is a consonant in which the vocal tract is blocked so that all airflow ceases.

New!!: Maltese language and Stop consonant · See more »

Suffix

In linguistics, a suffix (sometimes termed postfix) is an affix which is placed after the stem of a word.

New!!: Maltese language and Suffix · See more »

Sun and moon letters

In Arabic and Maltese, the consonants are divided into two groups, called the sun letters or solar letters (حروف شمسية) and moon letters or lunar letters (حروف قمرية), based on whether they assimilate the letter (ﻝ) of a preceding definite article al- (الـ).

New!!: Maltese language and Sun and moon letters · See more »

Trill consonant

In phonetics, a trill is a consonantal sound produced by vibrations between the active articulator and passive articulator.

New!!: Maltese language and Trill consonant · See more »

Tunisia

Tunisia (تونس; Berber: Tunes, ⵜⵓⵏⴻⵙ; Tunisie), officially the Republic of Tunisia, (الجمهورية التونسية) is a sovereign state in Northwest Africa, covering. Its northernmost point, Cape Angela, is the northernmost point on the African continent. It is bordered by Algeria to the west and southwest, Libya to the southeast, and the Mediterranean Sea to the north and east. Tunisia's population was estimated to be just under 11.93 million in 2016. Tunisia's name is derived from its capital city, Tunis, which is located on its northeast coast. Geographically, Tunisia contains the eastern end of the Atlas Mountains, and the northern reaches of the Sahara desert. Much of the rest of the country's land is fertile soil. Its of coastline include the African conjunction of the western and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Basin and, by means of the Sicilian Strait and Sardinian Channel, feature the African mainland's second and third nearest points to Europe after Gibraltar. Tunisia is a unitary semi-presidential representative democratic republic. It is considered to be the only full democracy in the Arab World. It has a high human development index. It has an association agreement with the European Union; is a member of La Francophonie, the Union for the Mediterranean, the Arab Maghreb Union, the Arab League, the OIC, the Greater Arab Free Trade Area, the Community of Sahel-Saharan States, the African Union, the Non-Aligned Movement, the Group of 77; and has obtained the status of major non-NATO ally of the United States. In addition, Tunisia is also a member state of the United Nations and a state party to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. Close relations with Europe in particular with France and with Italy have been forged through economic cooperation, privatisation and industrial modernization. In ancient times, Tunisia was primarily inhabited by Berbers. Phoenician immigration began in the 12th century BC; these immigrants founded Carthage. A major mercantile power and a military rival of the Roman Republic, Carthage was defeated by the Romans in 146 BC. The Romans, who would occupy Tunisia for most of the next eight hundred years, introduced Christianity and left architectural legacies like the El Djem amphitheater. After several attempts starting in 647, the Muslims conquered the whole of Tunisia by 697, followed by the Ottoman Empire between 1534 and 1574. The Ottomans held sway for over three hundred years. The French colonization of Tunisia occurred in 1881. Tunisia gained independence with Habib Bourguiba and declared the Tunisian Republic in 1957. In 2011, the Tunisian Revolution resulted in the overthrow of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, followed by parliamentary elections. The country voted for parliament again on 26 October 2014, and for President on 23 November 2014.

New!!: Maltese language and Tunisia · See more »

Tunisian Arabic

Tunisian Arabic, or Tunisian, is a set of dialects of Maghrebi Arabic spoken in Tunisia.

New!!: Maltese language and Tunisian Arabic · See more »

United Kingdom

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed with some organisations, including the and preferring to use Britain as shorthand for Great Britain is a sovereign country in western Europe.

New!!: Maltese language and United Kingdom · See more »

United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

New!!: Maltese language and United States · See more »

Unreleased stop

A stop with no audible release, also known as an unreleased stop or an applosive, is a stop consonant with no release burst: no audible indication of the end of its occlusion (hold).

New!!: Maltese language and Unreleased stop · See more »

Varieties of Arabic

There are many varieties of Arabic (dialects or otherwise) in existence.

New!!: Maltese language and Varieties of Arabic · See more »

Velar consonant

Velars are consonants articulated with the back part of the tongue (the dorsum) against the soft palate, the back part of the roof of the mouth (known also as the velum).

New!!: Maltese language and Velar consonant · See more »

West Semitic languages

The West Semitic languages are a proposed major sub-grouping of ancient Semitic languages.

New!!: Maltese language and West Semitic languages · See more »

Redirects here:

ISO 639:mlt, ISO 639:mt, Il-, Lingwa Maltija, Maltese Arabic, Maltese Language, Maltese phonology, Malti.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maltese_language

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »