Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Martin Lewis Perl

Index Martin Lewis Perl

Martin Lewis Perl (June 24, 1927 – September 30, 2014) was an American physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1995 for his discovery of the tau lepton. [1]

55 relations: Bubble chamber, California, Chemical engineering, Columbia University, D meson, DESY, Discovery (observation), Electric charge, Electron, Elementary particle, Frederick Reines, General Electric Company, Generation (particle physics), Immigration, Isidor Isaac Rabi, Jews, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence W. Jones, Lepton, List of Jewish Nobel laureates, Muon, Neutrino, Neutron, New York City, New York University Tandon School of Engineering, Nobel Prize in Physics, Office of Scientific and Technical Information, Palo Alto, California, Parent, Photon, Physical Review Letters, Physicist, Physics, Pion, Poles, Positron, Proton, Russia, Samuel C. C. Ting, Schenectady, New York, Scientists and Engineers for America, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Sodium, Spark chamber, SPEAR, Spin-½, Strong interaction, Tau (particle), Union College, United States, ..., United States Department of Energy, University of Belgrade, University of Liverpool, University of Michigan, Valerie Halyo. Expand index (5 more) »

Bubble chamber

A bubble chamber is a vessel filled with a superheated transparent liquid (most often liquid hydrogen) used to detect electrically charged particles moving through it.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Bubble chamber · See more »

California

California is a state in the Pacific Region of the United States.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and California · See more »

Chemical engineering

Chemical engineering is a branch of engineering that uses principles of chemistry, physics, mathematics and economics to efficiently use, produce, transform, and transport chemicals, materials and energy.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Chemical engineering · See more »

Columbia University

Columbia University (Columbia; officially Columbia University in the City of New York), established in 1754, is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Columbia University · See more »

D meson

The D mesons are the lightest particle containing charm quarks.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and D meson · See more »

DESY

The Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (English German Electron Synchrotron) commonly referred to by the abbreviation DESY, is a national research center in Germany that operates particle accelerators used to investigate the structure of matter.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and DESY · See more »

Discovery (observation)

Discovery is the act of detecting something new, or something "old" that had been unrecognized as meaningful.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Discovery (observation) · See more »

Electric charge

Electric charge is the physical property of matter that causes it to experience a force when placed in an electromagnetic field.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Electric charge · See more »

Electron

The electron is a subatomic particle, symbol or, whose electric charge is negative one elementary charge.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Electron · See more »

Elementary particle

In particle physics, an elementary particle or fundamental particle is a particle with no substructure, thus not composed of other particles.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Elementary particle · See more »

Frederick Reines

Frederick Reines (March 16, 1918 – August 26, 1998) was an American physicist.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Frederick Reines · See more »

General Electric Company

The General Electric Company, or GEC, was a major UK-based industrial conglomerate involved in consumer and defence electronics, communications, and engineering.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and General Electric Company · See more »

Generation (particle physics)

In particle physics, a generation or family is a division of the elementary particles.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Generation (particle physics) · See more »

Immigration

Immigration is the international movement of people into a destination country of which they are not natives or where they do not possess citizenship in order to settle or reside there, especially as permanent residents or naturalized citizens, or to take up employment as a migrant worker or temporarily as a foreign worker.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Immigration · See more »

Isidor Isaac Rabi

Isidor Isaac Rabi (born Israel Isaac Rabi, 29 July 1898 – 11 January 1988) was an American physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1944 for his discovery of nuclear magnetic resonance, which is used in magnetic resonance imaging.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Isidor Isaac Rabi · See more »

Jews

Jews (יְהוּדִים ISO 259-3, Israeli pronunciation) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group and a nation, originating from the Israelites Israelite origins and kingdom: "The first act in the long drama of Jewish history is the age of the Israelites""The people of the Kingdom of Israel and the ethnic and religious group known as the Jewish people that descended from them have been subjected to a number of forced migrations in their history" and Hebrews of the Ancient Near East.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Jews · See more »

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), commonly referred to as Berkeley Lab, is a United States national laboratory located in the Berkeley Hills near Berkeley, California that conducts scientific research on behalf of the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory · See more »

Lawrence W. Jones

Lawrence W. Jones (born 1925) is a professor emeritus in the Physics Department at the University of Michigan.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Lawrence W. Jones · See more »

Lepton

In particle physics, a lepton is an elementary particle of half-integer spin (spin) that does not undergo strong interactions.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Lepton · See more »

List of Jewish Nobel laureates

As of 2017, Nobel PrizesThe Nobel Prize is an annual, international prize first awarded in 1901 for achievements in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and List of Jewish Nobel laureates · See more »

Muon

The muon (from the Greek letter mu (μ) used to represent it) is an elementary particle similar to the electron, with an electric charge of −1 e and a spin of 1/2, but with a much greater mass.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Muon · See more »

Neutrino

A neutrino (denoted by the Greek letter ν) is a fermion (an elementary particle with half-integer spin) that interacts only via the weak subatomic force and gravity.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Neutrino · See more »

Neutron

| magnetic_moment.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Neutron · See more »

New York City

The City of New York, often called New York City (NYC) or simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and New York City · See more »

New York University Tandon School of Engineering

The New York University Tandon School of Engineering (commonly referred to as Tandon) is the engineering and applied sciences school of New York University.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and New York University Tandon School of Engineering · See more »

Nobel Prize in Physics

The Nobel Prize in Physics (Nobelpriset i fysik) is a yearly award given by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for those who conferred the most outstanding contributions for mankind in the field of physics.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Nobel Prize in Physics · See more »

Office of Scientific and Technical Information

The Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is a component of the Office of Science within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Office of Scientific and Technical Information · See more »

Palo Alto, California

Palo Alto is a charter city located in the northwest corner of Santa Clara County, California, in the San Francisco Bay Area of the United States.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Palo Alto, California · See more »

Parent

A parent is a caregiver of the offspring in their own species.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Parent · See more »

Photon

The photon is a type of elementary particle, the quantum of the electromagnetic field including electromagnetic radiation such as light, and the force carrier for the electromagnetic force (even when static via virtual particles).

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Photon · See more »

Physical Review Letters

Physical Review Letters (PRL), established in 1958, is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal that is published 52 times per year by the American Physical Society.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Physical Review Letters · See more »

Physicist

A physicist is a scientist who has specialized knowledge in the field of physics, which encompasses the interactions of matter and energy at all length and time scales in the physical universe.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Physicist · See more »

Physics

Physics (from knowledge of nature, from φύσις phýsis "nature") is the natural science that studies matterAt the start of The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Richard Feynman offers the atomic hypothesis as the single most prolific scientific concept: "If, in some cataclysm, all scientific knowledge were to be destroyed one sentence what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words? I believe it is that all things are made up of atoms – little particles that move around in perpetual motion, attracting each other when they are a little distance apart, but repelling upon being squeezed into one another..." and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force."Physical science is that department of knowledge which relates to the order of nature, or, in other words, to the regular succession of events." Physics is one of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, and its main goal is to understand how the universe behaves."Physics is one of the most fundamental of the sciences. Scientists of all disciplines use the ideas of physics, including chemists who study the structure of molecules, paleontologists who try to reconstruct how dinosaurs walked, and climatologists who study how human activities affect the atmosphere and oceans. Physics is also the foundation of all engineering and technology. No engineer could design a flat-screen TV, an interplanetary spacecraft, or even a better mousetrap without first understanding the basic laws of physics. (...) You will come to see physics as a towering achievement of the human intellect in its quest to understand our world and ourselves."Physics is an experimental science. Physicists observe the phenomena of nature and try to find patterns that relate these phenomena.""Physics is the study of your world and the world and universe around you." Physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines and, through its inclusion of astronomy, perhaps the oldest. Over the last two millennia, physics, chemistry, biology, and certain branches of mathematics were a part of natural philosophy, but during the scientific revolution in the 17th century, these natural sciences emerged as unique research endeavors in their own right. Physics intersects with many interdisciplinary areas of research, such as biophysics and quantum chemistry, and the boundaries of physics are not rigidly defined. New ideas in physics often explain the fundamental mechanisms studied by other sciences and suggest new avenues of research in academic disciplines such as mathematics and philosophy. Advances in physics often enable advances in new technologies. For example, advances in the understanding of electromagnetism and nuclear physics led directly to the development of new products that have dramatically transformed modern-day society, such as television, computers, domestic appliances, and nuclear weapons; advances in thermodynamics led to the development of industrialization; and advances in mechanics inspired the development of calculus.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Physics · See more »

Pion

In particle physics, a pion (or a pi meson, denoted with the Greek letter pi) is any of three subatomic particles:,, and.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Pion · See more »

Poles

The Poles (Polacy,; singular masculine: Polak, singular feminine: Polka), commonly referred to as the Polish people, are a nation and West Slavic ethnic group native to Poland in Central Europe who share a common ancestry, culture, history and are native speakers of the Polish language.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Poles · See more »

Positron

The positron or antielectron is the antiparticle or the antimatter counterpart of the electron.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Positron · See more »

Proton

| magnetic_moment.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Proton · See more »

Russia

Russia (rɐˈsʲijə), officially the Russian Federation (p), is a country in Eurasia. At, Russia is the largest country in the world by area, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area, and the ninth most populous, with over 144 million people as of December 2017, excluding Crimea. About 77% of the population live in the western, European part of the country. Russia's capital Moscow is one of the largest cities in the world; other major cities include Saint Petersburg, Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg and Nizhny Novgorod. Extending across the entirety of Northern Asia and much of Eastern Europe, Russia spans eleven time zones and incorporates a wide range of environments and landforms. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland (both with Kaliningrad Oblast), Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk and the U.S. state of Alaska across the Bering Strait. The East Slavs emerged as a recognizable group in Europe between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD. Founded and ruled by a Varangian warrior elite and their descendants, the medieval state of Rus arose in the 9th century. In 988 it adopted Orthodox Christianity from the Byzantine Empire, beginning the synthesis of Byzantine and Slavic cultures that defined Russian culture for the next millennium. Rus' ultimately disintegrated into a number of smaller states; most of the Rus' lands were overrun by the Mongol invasion and became tributaries of the nomadic Golden Horde in the 13th century. The Grand Duchy of Moscow gradually reunified the surrounding Russian principalities, achieved independence from the Golden Horde. By the 18th century, the nation had greatly expanded through conquest, annexation, and exploration to become the Russian Empire, which was the third largest empire in history, stretching from Poland on the west to Alaska on the east. Following the Russian Revolution, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic became the largest and leading constituent of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the world's first constitutionally socialist state. The Soviet Union played a decisive role in the Allied victory in World War II, and emerged as a recognized superpower and rival to the United States during the Cold War. The Soviet era saw some of the most significant technological achievements of the 20th century, including the world's first human-made satellite and the launching of the first humans in space. By the end of 1990, the Soviet Union had the world's second largest economy, largest standing military in the world and the largest stockpile of weapons of mass destruction. Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, twelve independent republics emerged from the USSR: Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and the Baltic states regained independence: Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania; the Russian SFSR reconstituted itself as the Russian Federation and is recognized as the continuing legal personality and a successor of the Soviet Union. It is governed as a federal semi-presidential republic. The Russian economy ranks as the twelfth largest by nominal GDP and sixth largest by purchasing power parity in 2015. Russia's extensive mineral and energy resources are the largest such reserves in the world, making it one of the leading producers of oil and natural gas globally. The country is one of the five recognized nuclear weapons states and possesses the largest stockpile of weapons of mass destruction. Russia is a great power as well as a regional power and has been characterised as a potential superpower. It is a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council and an active global partner of ASEAN, as well as a member of the G20, the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO), the Council of Europe, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), and the World Trade Organization (WTO), as well as being the leading member of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) and one of the five members of the Eurasian Economic Union (EEU), along with Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Russia · See more »

Samuel C. C. Ting

Samuel Chao Chung Ting (born January 27, 1936) is an American physicist who received the Nobel Prize in 1976, with Burton Richter, for discovering the subatomic J/ψ particle.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Samuel C. C. Ting · See more »

Schenectady, New York

Schenectady is a city in Schenectady County, New York, United States, of which it is the county seat.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Schenectady, New York · See more »

Scientists and Engineers for America

Scientists and Engineers for America (SEA) was an organization focused on promoting sound science in American government, and supporting candidates who understand science and its applications.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Scientists and Engineers for America · See more »

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, originally named Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, is a United States Department of Energy National Laboratory operated by Stanford University under the programmatic direction of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science and located in Menlo Park, California.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory · See more »

Sodium

Sodium is a chemical element with symbol Na (from Latin natrium) and atomic number 11.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Sodium · See more »

Spark chamber

A spark chamber is a particle detector.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Spark chamber · See more »

SPEAR

SPEAR (originally Stanford Positron Electron Asymmetric Rings, now simply a name) was a collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and SPEAR · See more »

Spin-½

In quantum mechanics, spin is an intrinsic property of all elementary particles.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Spin-½ · See more »

Strong interaction

In particle physics, the strong interaction is the mechanism responsible for the strong nuclear force (also called the strong force or nuclear strong force), and is one of the four known fundamental interactions, with the others being electromagnetism, the weak interaction, and gravitation.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Strong interaction · See more »

Tau (particle)

The tau (τ), also called the tau lepton, tau particle, or tauon, is an elementary particle similar to the electron, with negative electric charge and a 2.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Tau (particle) · See more »

Union College

Union College is a private, non-denominational liberal arts college located in Schenectady, New York, United States.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Union College · See more »

United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and United States · See more »

United States Department of Energy

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a cabinet-level department of the United States Government concerned with the United States' policies regarding energy and safety in handling nuclear material.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and United States Department of Energy · See more »

University of Belgrade

The University of Belgrade (Универзитет у Београду / Univerzitet u Beogradu) is a public university in Serbia.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and University of Belgrade · See more »

University of Liverpool

The University of Liverpool is a public university based in the city of Liverpool, England.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and University of Liverpool · See more »

University of Michigan

The University of Michigan (UM, U-M, U of M, or UMich), often simply referred to as Michigan, is a public research university in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and University of Michigan · See more »

Valerie Halyo

Valerie Halyo (b. Paris, France) is an experimental physicist at Princeton University.

New!!: Martin Lewis Perl and Valerie Halyo · See more »

Redirects here:

Martin L. Perl, Martin Perl.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Lewis_Perl

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »