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Mi'kmaq language

Index Mi'kmaq language

The Mi'kmaq language (spelled and pronounced Micmac historically and now always Migmaw or Mikmaw in English, and Míkmaq, Míkmaw or Mìgmao in Mi'kmaq) is an Eastern Algonquian language spoken by nearly 11,000 Mi'kmaq in Canada and the United States out of a total ethnic Mi'kmaq population of roughly 20,000. [1]

95 relations: Abenaki language, Affricate consonant, Algic languages, Algonquian languages, Algonquian–Basque pidgin, Alveolar consonant, Amqui, Animacy, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Approximant consonant, Aspirated consonant, Back vowel, Basque language, Bilabial consonant, Bilabial nasal, Boreal woodland caribou, Boston, Canada, Cape Breton University, Cascapédia–Saint-Jules, Causapscal, Central Canada, Central vowel, Close vowel, Close-mid vowel, Cree language, Decimal, Dental, alveolar and postalveolar lateral approximants, Dental, alveolar and postalveolar nasals, Eastern Algonquian languages, English Phonotypic Alphabet, Ethnic group, Fricative consonant, Front vowel, Gaspé Peninsula, Gaspé, Quebec, Grammatical gender, History of Basque whaling, Indian Brook 14, International Journal of American Linguistics, Isaac Pitman, Kouchibouguac, New Brunswick, Labialization, Latin script, Loanword, Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia, Maine, Malecite-Passamaquoddy language, Marc Lescarbot, Massachusett language, ..., Matapedia River, Mi'kmaq, Mi'kmaq hieroglyphic writing, Miami-Illinois language, Midwestern United States, Mudflat, Munsee language, Nasal consonant, New Brunswick, Newfoundland (island), Nova Scotia, Obstruent, Open vowel, Palatal approximant, Palatal consonant, Paspébiac, Polysynthetic language, Postalveolar consonant, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Quebec City, Restigouche County, New Brunswick, Restigouche River, Saint-Zénon-du-Lac-Humqui, Quebec, Sayabec, Shediac, Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia, Silas Tertius Rand, Sonorant, Stop consonant, Tatamagouche, Unami language, United States, Velar consonant, Voice (phonetics), Voiced labio-velar approximant, Voiceless alveolar fricative, Voiceless bilabial stop, Voiceless dental and alveolar stops, Voiceless postalveolar affricate, Voiceless velar fricative, Voiceless velar stop, Voicelessness, Wabanaki Confederacy, Word order. Expand index (45 more) »

Abenaki language

Abenaki, or Abnaki, is an endangered Algonquian language of Quebec and the northern states of New England.

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Affricate consonant

An affricate is a consonant that begins as a stop and releases as a fricative, generally with the same place of articulation (most often coronal).

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Algic languages

The Algic (also Algonquian–Wiyot–Yurok or Algonquian–Ritwan) languages are an indigenous language family of North America.

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Algonquian languages

The Algonquian languages (or; also Algonkian) are a subfamily of Native American languages which includes most of the languages in the Algic language family.

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Algonquian–Basque pidgin

The Algonquian–Basque pidgin was a pidgin spoken by the Basque whalers and various Algonquian peoples.

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Alveolar consonant

Alveolar consonants are articulated with the tongue against or close to the superior alveolar ridge, which is called that because it contains the alveoli (the sockets) of the superior teeth.

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Amqui

Amqui is a town in eastern Quebec, Canada, at the base of the Gaspé peninsula in Bas-Saint-Laurent.

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Animacy

Animacy is a grammatical and semantic principle expressed in language based on how sentient or alive the referent of a noun is.

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Antigonish, Nova Scotia

Antigonish (Am Baile Mòr) is a town in Antigonish County, Nova Scotia, Canada.

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Approximant consonant

Approximants are speech sounds that involve the articulators approaching each other but not narrowly enough nor with enough articulatory precision to create turbulent airflow.

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Aspirated consonant

In phonetics, aspiration is the strong burst of breath that accompanies either the release or, in the case of preaspiration, the closure of some obstruents.

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Back vowel

A back vowel is any in a class of vowel sound used in spoken languages.

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Basque language

Basque (euskara) is a language spoken in the Basque country and Navarre. Linguistically, Basque is unrelated to the other languages of Europe and, as a language isolate, to any other known living language. The Basques are indigenous to, and primarily inhabit, the Basque Country, a region that straddles the westernmost Pyrenees in adjacent parts of northern Spain and southwestern France. The Basque language is spoken by 28.4% of Basques in all territories (751,500). Of these, 93.2% (700,300) are in the Spanish area of the Basque Country and the remaining 6.8% (51,200) are in the French portion. Native speakers live in a contiguous area that includes parts of four Spanish provinces and the three "ancient provinces" in France. Gipuzkoa, most of Biscay, a few municipalities of Álava, and the northern area of Navarre formed the core of the remaining Basque-speaking area before measures were introduced in the 1980s to strengthen the language. By contrast, most of Álava, the western part of Biscay and central and southern areas of Navarre are predominantly populated by native speakers of Spanish, either because Basque was replaced by Spanish over the centuries, in some areas (most of Álava and central Navarre), or because it was possibly never spoken there, in other areas (Enkarterri and southeastern Navarre). Under Restorationist and Francoist Spain, public use of Basque was frowned upon, often regarded as a sign of separatism; this applied especially to those regions that did not support Franco's uprising (such as Biscay or Gipuzkoa). However, in those Basque-speaking regions that supported the uprising (such as Navarre or Álava) the Basque language was more than merely tolerated. Overall, in the 1960s and later, the trend reversed and education and publishing in Basque began to flourish. As a part of this process, a standardised form of the Basque language, called Euskara Batua, was developed by the Euskaltzaindia in the late 1960s. Besides its standardised version, the five historic Basque dialects are Biscayan, Gipuzkoan, and Upper Navarrese in Spain, and Navarrese–Lapurdian and Souletin in France. They take their names from the historic Basque provinces, but the dialect boundaries are not congruent with province boundaries. Euskara Batua was created so that Basque language could be used—and easily understood by all Basque speakers—in formal situations (education, mass media, literature), and this is its main use today. In both Spain and France, the use of Basque for education varies from region to region and from school to school. A language isolate, Basque is believed to be one of the few surviving pre-Indo-European languages in Europe, and the only one in Western Europe. The origin of the Basques and of their languages is not conclusively known, though the most accepted current theory is that early forms of Basque developed prior to the arrival of Indo-European languages in the area, including the Romance languages that geographically surround the Basque-speaking region. Basque has adopted a good deal of its vocabulary from the Romance languages, and Basque speakers have in turn lent their own words to Romance speakers. The Basque alphabet uses the Latin script.

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Bilabial consonant

In phonetics, a bilabial consonant is a consonant articulated with both lips.

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Bilabial nasal

The bilabial nasal is a type of consonantal sound used in almost all spoken languages.

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Boreal woodland caribou

The boreal woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou), also known as woodland caribou, woodland caribou (boreal group) and forest-dwelling caribou, is a North American subspecies of the reindeer (or the caribou in North America) with the vast majority of animals in Canada.

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Boston

Boston is the capital city and most populous municipality of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States.

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Canada

Canada is a country located in the northern part of North America.

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Cape Breton University

Cape Breton University (CBU), formerly known as the "University College of Cape Breton" (UCCB), is a university in the Cape Breton Regional Municipality, Nova Scotia, Canada.

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Cascapédia–Saint-Jules

Cascapédia–Saint-Jules is a municipality in Quebec, Canada.

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Causapscal

Causapscal is a city in the Canadian province of Quebec, located in La Matapédia Regional County Municipality.

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Central Canada

Central Canada (sometimes the Central provinces) is a region consisting of Canada's two largest and most populous provinces: Ontario and Quebec.

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Central vowel

A central vowel is any in a class of vowel sound used in some spoken languages.

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Close vowel

A close vowel, also known as a high vowel (in American terminology), is any in a class of vowel sound used in many spoken languages.

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Close-mid vowel

A close-mid vowel (also mid-close vowel, high-mid vowel, mid-high vowel or half-close vowel) is any in a class of vowel sound used in some spoken languages.

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Cree language

Cree (also known as Cree–Montagnais–Naskapi) is a dialect continuum of Algonquian languages spoken by approximately 117,000 people across Canada, from the Northwest Territories to Alberta to Labrador.

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Decimal

The decimal numeral system (also called base-ten positional numeral system, and occasionally called denary) is the standard system for denoting integer and non-integer numbers.

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Dental, alveolar and postalveolar lateral approximants

The alveolar lateral approximant is a type of consonantal sound used in some spoken languages.

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Dental, alveolar and postalveolar nasals

The alveolar nasal is a type of consonantal sound used in numerous spoken languages.

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Eastern Algonquian languages

The Eastern Algonquian languages constitute a subgroup of the Algonquian languages.

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English Phonotypic Alphabet

The English Phonotypic Alphabet is a phonetic alphabet developed by Sir Isaac Pitman and Alexander John Ellis originally as an English language spelling reform.

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Ethnic group

An ethnic group, or an ethnicity, is a category of people who identify with each other based on similarities such as common ancestry, language, history, society, culture or nation.

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Fricative consonant

Fricatives are consonants produced by forcing air through a narrow channel made by placing two articulators close together.

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Front vowel

A front vowel is any in a class of vowel sound used in some spoken languages, its defining characteristic being that the highest point of the tongue is positioned relatively in front in the mouth without creating a constriction that would make it a consonant.

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Gaspé Peninsula

The Gaspésie (official name), or Gaspé Peninsula, the Gaspé or Gaspesia, is a peninsula along the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River to the east of the Matapédia Valley in Quebec, Canada, that extends into the Gulf of Saint Lawrence.

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Gaspé, Quebec

Gaspé is a city at the tip of the Gaspé Peninsula in the Gaspésie–Îles-de-la-Madeleine region of eastern Quebec in Canada.

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Grammatical gender

In linguistics, grammatical gender is a specific form of noun class system in which the division of noun classes forms an agreement system with another aspect of the language, such as adjectives, articles, pronouns, or verbs.

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History of Basque whaling

The Basques were among the first to catch whales commercially, as opposed to aboriginal whaling, and dominated the trade for five centuries, spreading to the far corners of the North Atlantic and even reaching the South Atlantic.

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Indian Brook 14

Indian Brook 14 is a Mi'kmaq reserve located in Hants County, Nova Scotia.

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International Journal of American Linguistics

The International Journal of American Linguistics (IJAL) is an academic journal devoted to the study of the indigenous languages of the Americas.

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Isaac Pitman

Sir Isaac Pitman (4 January 1813 – 22 January 1897), was a teacher of the:English language who developed the most widely used system of shorthand, known now as Pitman shorthand.

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Kouchibouguac, New Brunswick

Kouchibouguac is a community in the Canadian province of New Brunswick.

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Labialization

Labialization is a secondary articulatory feature of sounds in some languages.

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Latin script

Latin or Roman script is a set of graphic signs (script) based on the letters of the classical Latin alphabet, which is derived from a form of the Cumaean Greek version of the Greek alphabet, used by the Etruscans.

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Loanword

A loanword (also loan word or loan-word) is a word adopted from one language (the donor language) and incorporated into another language without translation.

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Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia

Lunenburg County is a county located on the South Shore of the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, It ranges from Hubbards to the east and Vogler's Cove to the west.

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Maine

Maine is a U.S. state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

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Malecite-Passamaquoddy language

Malecite–Passamaquoddy (also known as Maliseet–Passamaquoddy) is an endangered Algonquian language spoken by the Maliseet and Passamaquoddy peoples along both sides of the border between Maine in the United States and New Brunswick, Canada.

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Marc Lescarbot

Marc Lescarbot (c. 1570–1641) was a French author, poet and lawyer.

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Massachusett language

The Massachusett language is an Algonquian language of the Algic language family, formerly spoken by several peoples of eastern coastal and south-eastern Massachusetts and currently, in its revived form, in four communities of Wampanoag people.

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Matapedia River

The Matapedia River (Rivière Matapédia) is a river in the Matapedia Valley in the province of Quebec, Canada.

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Mi'kmaq

The Mi'kmaq or Mi'gmaq (also Micmac, L'nu, Mi'kmaw or Mi'gmaw) are a First Nations people indigenous to Canada's Atlantic Provinces and the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec as well as the northeastern region of Maine.

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Mi'kmaq hieroglyphic writing

Mi'kmaq hieroglyphic writing was a writing system and memory aid used by the Mi'kmaq, a First Nations people of the east coast of Canada.

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Miami-Illinois language

Miami-Illinois (Myaamia) is an indigenous Algonquian language formerly spoken in the United States, primarily in Illinois, Missouri, Indiana, western Ohio and adjacent areas along the Mississippi River by the Miami and Wea as well as the tribes of the Illinois Confederation, including the Kaskaskia, Peoria, Tamaroa, Cahokia, and Mitchigamea.

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Midwestern United States

The Midwestern United States, also referred to as the American Midwest, Middle West, or simply the Midwest, is one of four census regions of the United States Census Bureau (also known as "Region 2").

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Mudflat

Mudflats or mud flats, also known as tidal flats, are coastal wetlands that form when mud is deposited by tides or rivers.

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Munsee language

Munsee (also known as Munsee Delaware, Delaware, Ontario Delaware) is an endangered language of the Eastern Algonquian subgroup of the Algonquian language family, itself a branch of the Algic language family.

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Nasal consonant

In phonetics, a nasal, also called a nasal occlusive, nasal stop in contrast with a nasal fricative, or nasal continuant, is an occlusive consonant produced with a lowered velum, allowing air to escape freely through the nose.

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New Brunswick

New Brunswick (Nouveau-Brunswick; Canadian French pronunciation) is one of three Maritime provinces on the east coast of Canada.

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Newfoundland (island)

Newfoundland (Terre-Neuve) is a large Canadian island off the east coast of the North American mainland, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

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Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia (Latin for "New Scotland"; Nouvelle-Écosse; Scottish Gaelic: Alba Nuadh) is one of Canada's three maritime provinces, and one of the four provinces that form Atlantic Canada.

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Obstruent

An obstruent is a speech sound such as,, or that is formed by obstructing airflow.

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Open vowel

An open vowel is a vowel sound in which the tongue is positioned as far as possible from the roof of the mouth.

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Palatal approximant

The voiced palatal approximant is a type of consonant used in many spoken languages.

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Palatal consonant

Palatal consonants are consonants articulated with the body of the tongue raised against the hard palate (the middle part of the roof of the mouth).

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Paspébiac

Paspébiac is a city on Baie des Chaleurs in the Gaspésie region of eastern Quebec, Canada.

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Polysynthetic language

In linguistic typology, polysynthetic languages are highly synthetic languages, i.e. languages in which words are composed of many morphemes (word parts that have independent meaning but may or may not be able to stand alone).

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Postalveolar consonant

Postalveolar consonants (sometimes spelled post-alveolar) are consonants articulated with the tongue near or touching the back of the alveolar ridge, farther back in the mouth than the alveolar consonants, which are at the ridge itself but not as far back as the hard palate, the place of articulation for palatal consonants.

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Prince Edward Island

Prince Edward Island (PEI or P.E.I.; Île-du-Prince-Édouard) is a province of Canada consisting of the island of the same name, and several much smaller islands.

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Quebec

Quebec (Québec)According to the Canadian government, Québec (with the acute accent) is the official name in French and Quebec (without the accent) is the province's official name in English; the name is.

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Quebec City

Quebec City (pronounced or; Québec); Ville de Québec), officially Québec, is the capital city of the Canadian province of Quebec. The city had a population estimate of 531,902 in July 2016, (an increase of 3.0% from 2011) and the metropolitan area had a population of 800,296 in July 2016, (an increase of 4.3% from 2011) making it the second largest city in Quebec, after Montreal, and the seventh-largest metropolitan area in Canada. It is situated north-east of Montreal. The narrowing of the Saint Lawrence River proximate to the city's promontory, Cap-Diamant (Cape Diamond), and Lévis, on the opposite bank, provided the name given to the city, Kébec, an Algonquin word meaning "where the river narrows". Founded in 1608 by Samuel de Champlain, Quebec City is one of the oldest cities in North America. The ramparts surrounding Old Quebec (Vieux-Québec) are the only fortified city walls remaining in the Americas north of Mexico, and were declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1985 as the 'Historic District of Old Québec'. The city's landmarks include the Château Frontenac, a hotel which dominates the skyline, and the Citadelle of Quebec, an intact fortress that forms the centrepiece of the ramparts surrounding the old city and includes a secondary royal residence. The National Assembly of Quebec (provincial legislature), the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (National Museum of Fine Arts of Quebec), and the Musée de la civilisation (Museum of Civilization) are found within or near Vieux-Québec.

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Restigouche County, New Brunswick

Restigouche County (2011 population 32,594) is located in north-central New Brunswick, Canada.

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Restigouche River

The Restigouche River (in French, Rivière Ristigouche) is a river that flows across the northwestern part of the province of New Brunswick and the southeastern part of Quebec.

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Saint-Zénon-du-Lac-Humqui, Quebec

Saint-Zénon-du-Lac-Humqui is a parish municipality in Quebec, Canada.

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Sayabec

Sayabec is a municipality located in the La Matapédia Regional County Municipality (RCM) in Bas-Saint-Laurent, Quebec, Canada.

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Shediac

Shediac is a Canadian town in Westmorland County, New Brunswick.

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Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia

Shubenacadie is a community located in Hants County, in central Nova Scotia, Canada.

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Silas Tertius Rand

Silas Tertius Rand (May 18, 1810 – October 4, 1889) was a Canadian Baptist clergyman, missionary, ethnologist, linguist and translator.

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Sonorant

In phonetics and phonology, a sonorant or resonant is a speech sound that is produced with continuous, non-turbulent airflow in the vocal tract; these are the manners of articulation that are most often voiced in the world's languages.

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Stop consonant

In phonetics, a stop, also known as a plosive or oral occlusive, is a consonant in which the vocal tract is blocked so that all airflow ceases.

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Tatamagouche

Tatamagouche is a village in Colchester County, Nova Scotia, Canada.

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Unami language

Unami is an Algonquian language spoken by Lenape people in the late 17th-century and the early 18th-century, in what then was (or later became) the southern two-thirds of New Jersey, southeastern Pennsylvania and the northern two-thirds of Delaware, but later in Ontario and Oklahoma.

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United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

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Velar consonant

Velars are consonants articulated with the back part of the tongue (the dorsum) against the soft palate, the back part of the roof of the mouth (known also as the velum).

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Voice (phonetics)

Voice is a term used in phonetics and phonology to characterize speech sounds (usually consonants).

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Voiced labio-velar approximant

The voiced labio-velar approximant is a type of consonantal sound, used in certain spoken languages, including English.

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Voiceless alveolar fricative

A voiceless alveolar fricative is a type of fricative consonant pronounced with the tip or blade of the tongue against the alveolar ridge (gum line) just behind the teeth.

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Voiceless bilabial stop

The voiceless bilabial stop is a type of consonantal sound used in many spoken languages.

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Voiceless dental and alveolar stops

The voiceless alveolar stop is a type of consonantal sound used in many spoken languages.

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Voiceless postalveolar affricate

The voiceless palato-alveolar sibilant affricate or voiceless domed postalveolar sibilant affricate is a type of consonantal sound used in some spoken languages.

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Voiceless velar fricative

The voiceless velar fricative is a type of consonantal sound used in some spoken languages.

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Voiceless velar stop

The voiceless velar stop or voiceless velar plosive is a type of consonantal sound used in many spoken languages.

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Voicelessness

In linguistics, voicelessness is the property of sounds being pronounced without the larynx vibrating.

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Wabanaki Confederacy

The Wabanaki Confederacy (Wabenaki, Wobanaki, translated roughly as "People of the First Light" or "People of the Dawnland") are a First Nations and Native American confederation of five principal nations: the Mi'kmaq, Maliseet, Passamaquoddy, Abenaki, and Penobscot.

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Word order

In linguistics, word order typology is the study of the order of the syntactic constituents of a language, and how different languages can employ different orders.

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Redirects here:

Francis-Smith orthography, ISO 639:mic, Mi'gmaq language, Mi'kmaq (language), Mi'kmaq alphabet, Micmac Language, Micmac language, Mikmaq language, Mikmawisimk, Mikmwei, Mi’kmaq language, Míkmaq language, Míkmawísimk, Míkmwei.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mi'kmaq_language

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