Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Military logistics

Index Military logistics

Military logistics is the discipline of planning and carrying out the movement and maintenance of military forces. [1]

172 relations: Aerial refueling, Air supremacy, Airbridge (logistics), Airlift, Airpower, Alcoholic drink, Allied submarines in the Pacific War, American Civil War, American Revolutionary War, Ammunition, Ancient Rome, Anti-submarine warfare, Antoine-Henri Jomini, Applied information economics, Armoured warfare, Army engineering maintenance, Army Service Forces, Artillery, Ashok Leyland Stallion, Attack on Pearl Harbor, Augsburg, Austro-Prussian War, Battle of Austerlitz, Battle of Ilomantsi, Battle of Pusan Perimeter logistics, Battle of Stalingrad, Battle of the Atlantic, Bean, Berlin Blockade, Billet, Blockade of Germany, Bolt action, Bombardment, Brehon B. Somervell, British logistics in the Falklands War, British logistics in the Second Boer War, Burma Campaign, Byzantine Empire, Cambridge University Press, Camp follower, Cannon, Combat service support, Combat vehicle, Command of the sea, Commerce raiding, Commissioner, Conscription, Consumables, Convoy, Danube, ..., DeKalb, Illinois, Distance, Edward I of England, Edward II of England, Edward III of England, Electorate of Bavaria, Eminent domain, Empire of Japan, Employment, Europe, Expeditionary maneuver warfare, Fighter aircraft, Finance, Fodder, François-Michel le Tellier, Marquis de Louvois, Franco-Prussian War, Front (military), Front line, Grande Armée, Greek language, Guerrilla warfare, Hardtack, Harper (publisher), Henry VI of England, Hindi, Horse, Hundred Years' War, India, Industrial Revolution, Industrial warfare, Integrated logistics support, Intelligence assessment, Intendant, John Balliol, Kargil War, Kenneth E. Boulding, Liberty ship, Line of communication, Logistics, Logistics Officer, Loss of Strength Gradient, Machine gun, Maréchal des logis, Materiel, Meat, Mercenary, Michel Le Tellier, Military, Military acquisition, Military aircraft, Military engineering, Military railways, Military reserve force, Military supply chain management, Military tactics, Napoleon, Napoleonic Wars, Narrow-gauge railway, NATO Stock Number, Nazi Germany, Normandy landings, North African Campaign, Operation Barbarossa, Operation Cobra, Operation Michael, Operations (military staff), Operations research, Pacific War, Pakistan, Passau, Peninsular War, Performance-based logistics, Price gouging, Principles of sustainment, Public administration, Purveyance, Rear (military), Red Ball Express, Repairable component, Replenishment oiler, Richard Abels, Scotland, Seabasing, Sealift, Second Sino-Japanese War, Secretary of State for War (France), Service (economics), Sheriff, Siege, Siege of Dunkirk (1658), Spanish Empire, Springer Science+Business Media, Strafing, Strategy, Supply depot, Sutler, Tank, The Hump, Tonnage war, Tooth-to-tail ratio, Train (military), Training, Trench railways, Trench warfare, U-boat, Ulm, Ulm Campaign, Underway replenishment, United States Army, United States Naval Academy, Unrestricted submarine warfare, Vienna, Wagon train, Wales, War profiteering, Wars of Scottish Independence, Waterway, Würzburg, World War I, World War II, Writing material, 6th Army (Wehrmacht). Expand index (122 more) »

Aerial refueling

Aerial refueling, also referred to as air refueling, in-flight refueling (IFR), air-to-air refueling (AAR), and tanking, is the process of transferring aviation fuel from one military aircraft (the tanker) to another (the receiver) during flight.

New!!: Military logistics and Aerial refueling · See more »

Air supremacy

Air supremacy is a position in war where a side holds complete control of air warfare and air power over opposing forces.

New!!: Military logistics and Air supremacy · See more »

Airbridge (logistics)

An airbridge is the route and means of delivering material from one place to another by an airlift.

New!!: Military logistics and Airbridge (logistics) · See more »

Airlift

An airlift is the organized delivery of supplies or personnel primarily via military transport aircraft.

New!!: Military logistics and Airlift · See more »

Airpower

Airpower or air power consists of the application of military strategy and strategic theory to the realm of aerial warfare.

New!!: Military logistics and Airpower · See more »

Alcoholic drink

An alcoholic drink (or alcoholic beverage) is a drink that contains ethanol, a type of alcohol produced by fermentation of grains, fruits, or other sources of sugar.

New!!: Military logistics and Alcoholic drink · See more »

Allied submarines in the Pacific War

Allied submarines were used extensively during the Pacific War and were a key contributor to the defeat of the Empire of Japan.

New!!: Military logistics and Allied submarines in the Pacific War · See more »

American Civil War

The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865.

New!!: Military logistics and American Civil War · See more »

American Revolutionary War

The American Revolutionary War (17751783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a global war that began as a conflict between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence as the United States of America. After 1765, growing philosophical and political differences strained the relationship between Great Britain and its colonies. Patriot protests against taxation without representation followed the Stamp Act and escalated into boycotts, which culminated in 1773 with the Sons of Liberty destroying a shipment of tea in Boston Harbor. Britain responded by closing Boston Harbor and passing a series of punitive measures against Massachusetts Bay Colony. Massachusetts colonists responded with the Suffolk Resolves, and they established a shadow government which wrested control of the countryside from the Crown. Twelve colonies formed a Continental Congress to coordinate their resistance, establishing committees and conventions that effectively seized power. British attempts to disarm the Massachusetts militia at Concord, Massachusetts in April 1775 led to open combat. Militia forces then besieged Boston, forcing a British evacuation in March 1776, and Congress appointed George Washington to command the Continental Army. Concurrently, an American attempt to invade Quebec and raise rebellion against the British failed decisively. On July 2, 1776, the Continental Congress voted for independence, issuing its declaration on July 4. Sir William Howe launched a British counter-offensive, capturing New York City and leaving American morale at a low ebb. However, victories at Trenton and Princeton restored American confidence. In 1777, the British launched an invasion from Quebec under John Burgoyne, intending to isolate the New England Colonies. Instead of assisting this effort, Howe took his army on a separate campaign against Philadelphia, and Burgoyne was decisively defeated at Saratoga in October 1777. Burgoyne's defeat had drastic consequences. France formally allied with the Americans and entered the war in 1778, and Spain joined the war the following year as an ally of France but not as an ally of the United States. In 1780, the Kingdom of Mysore attacked the British in India, and tensions between Great Britain and the Netherlands erupted into open war. In North America, the British mounted a "Southern strategy" led by Charles Cornwallis which hinged upon a Loyalist uprising, but too few came forward. Cornwallis suffered reversals at King's Mountain and Cowpens. He retreated to Yorktown, Virginia, intending an evacuation, but a decisive French naval victory deprived him of an escape. A Franco-American army led by the Comte de Rochambeau and Washington then besieged Cornwallis' army and, with no sign of relief, he surrendered in October 1781. Whigs in Britain had long opposed the pro-war Tories in Parliament, and the surrender gave them the upper hand. In early 1782, Parliament voted to end all offensive operations in North America, but the war continued in Europe and India. Britain remained under siege in Gibraltar but scored a major victory over the French navy. On September 3, 1783, the belligerent parties signed the Treaty of Paris in which Great Britain agreed to recognize the sovereignty of the United States and formally end the war. French involvement had proven decisive,Brooks, Richard (editor). Atlas of World Military History. HarperCollins, 2000, p. 101 "Washington's success in keeping the army together deprived the British of victory, but French intervention won the war." but France made few gains and incurred crippling debts. Spain made some minor territorial gains but failed in its primary aim of recovering Gibraltar. The Dutch were defeated on all counts and were compelled to cede territory to Great Britain. In India, the war against Mysore and its allies concluded in 1784 without any territorial changes.

New!!: Military logistics and American Revolutionary War · See more »

Ammunition

Ammunition (informally ammo) is the material fired, scattered, dropped or detonated from any weapon.

New!!: Military logistics and Ammunition · See more »

Ancient Rome

In historiography, ancient Rome is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic and Roman Empire until the fall of the western empire.

New!!: Military logistics and Ancient Rome · See more »

Anti-submarine warfare

Anti-submarine warfare (ASW, or in older form A/S) is a branch of underwater warfare that uses surface warships, aircraft, or other submarines to find, track and deter, damage, or destroy enemy submarines.

New!!: Military logistics and Anti-submarine warfare · See more »

Antoine-Henri Jomini

Antoine-Henri, Baron Jomini (6 March 177924 March 1869) was a Swiss officer who served as a general in the French and later in the Russian service, and one of the most celebrated writers on the Napoleonic art of war.

New!!: Military logistics and Antoine-Henri Jomini · See more »

Applied information economics

Applied information economics (AIE) is a decision analysis method developed by Douglas W. Hubbard and partially described in his book How to Measure Anything: Finding the Value of Intangibles in Business (2007; 2nd ed. 2010; 3rd ed. 2014).

New!!: Military logistics and Applied information economics · See more »

Armoured warfare

Armoured warfare, mechanised warfare or tank warfare is the use of armoured fighting vehicles in modern warfare.

New!!: Military logistics and Armoured warfare · See more »

Army engineering maintenance

Army engineering maintenance consists of those engineers, technicians, and military organizations responsible for the expert repair and maintenance of army vehicles, weapon systems, and other equipment.

New!!: Military logistics and Army engineering maintenance · See more »

Army Service Forces

The Army Service Forces were one of the three autonomous components of the Army of the United States during World War II, the others being the Army Air Forces and Army Ground Forces.

New!!: Military logistics and Army Service Forces · See more »

Artillery

Artillery is a class of large military weapons built to fire munitions far beyond the range and power of infantry's small arms.

New!!: Military logistics and Artillery · See more »

Ashok Leyland Stallion

The Stallion range of trucks is produced by Ashok Leyland Defence Systems (ALDS) for the Indian Armed Forces.

New!!: Military logistics and Ashok Leyland Stallion · See more »

Attack on Pearl Harbor

The attack on Pearl Harbor was a surprise military strike by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service against the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Territory, on the morning of December 7, 1941.

New!!: Military logistics and Attack on Pearl Harbor · See more »

Augsburg

Augsburg (Augschburg) is a city in Swabia, Bavaria, Germany.

New!!: Military logistics and Augsburg · See more »

Austro-Prussian War

The Austro-Prussian War or Seven Weeks' War (also known as the Unification War, the War of 1866, or the Fraternal War, in Germany as the German War, and also by a variety of other names) was a war fought in 1866 between the Austrian Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia, with each also being aided by various allies within the German Confederation.

New!!: Military logistics and Austro-Prussian War · See more »

Battle of Austerlitz

The Battle of Austerlitz (2 December 1805/11 Frimaire An XIV FRC), also known as the Battle of the Three Emperors, was one of the most important and decisive engagements of the Napoleonic Wars.

New!!: Military logistics and Battle of Austerlitz · See more »

Battle of Ilomantsi

The Battle of Ilomantsi was a part of the Continuation War (1941–1944).

New!!: Military logistics and Battle of Ilomantsi · See more »

Battle of Pusan Perimeter logistics

Logistics in the Battle of Pusan Perimeter (August 4 – September 15, 1950) during the Korean War played a decisive role in the battle.

New!!: Military logistics and Battle of Pusan Perimeter logistics · See more »

Battle of Stalingrad

The Battle of Stalingrad (23 August 1942 – 2 February 1943) was the largest confrontation of World War II, in which Germany and its allies fought the Soviet Union for control of the city of Stalingrad (now Volgograd) in Southern Russia.

New!!: Military logistics and Battle of Stalingrad · See more »

Battle of the Atlantic

The Battle of the Atlantic was the longest continuous military campaign in World War II, running from 1939 to the defeat of Germany in 1945.

New!!: Military logistics and Battle of the Atlantic · See more »

Bean

A bean is a seed of one of several genera of the flowering plant family Fabaceae, which are used for human or animal food.

New!!: Military logistics and Bean · See more »

Berlin Blockade

The Berlin Blockade (24 June 1948–12 May 1949) was one of the first major international crises of the Cold War.

New!!: Military logistics and Berlin Blockade · See more »

Billet

A billet is a living quarters to which a soldier is assigned to sleep.

New!!: Military logistics and Billet · See more »

Blockade of Germany

The Blockade of Germany, or the Blockade of Europe, occurred from 1914 to 1919.

New!!: Military logistics and Blockade of Germany · See more »

Bolt action

Bolt action is a type of firearm action where the handling of cartridges into and out of the weapon's barrel chamber are operated by manually manipulating the bolt directly via a handle, which is most commonly placed on the right-hand side of the weapon (as most users are right-handed).

New!!: Military logistics and Bolt action · See more »

Bombardment

A bombardment is an attack by artillery fire or by dropping bombs from aircraft on fortifications, combatants, or towns and buildings.

New!!: Military logistics and Bombardment · See more »

Brehon B. Somervell

Brehon Burke Somervell (9 May 1892 – 13 February 1955) was a general in the United States Army and Commanding General of the Army Service Forces in World War II.

New!!: Military logistics and Brehon B. Somervell · See more »

British logistics in the Falklands War

The British military campaign to re-take the Falkland Islands during 1982 depended on complex logistical arrangements.

New!!: Military logistics and British logistics in the Falklands War · See more »

British logistics in the Second Boer War

The Second Boer War (1899–1902) involved a global logistics effort to provide that which is needed as part of any military action, as well as, the local conditions that require out of the area resources be imported due, as in the case with southern Africa, the limited amount available from local sources or the loss of local sources due to the hostilities.

New!!: Military logistics and British logistics in the Second Boer War · See more »

Burma Campaign

The Burma Campaign was a series of battles fought in the British colony of Burma, South-East Asian theatre of World War II, primarily between the forces of the British Empire and China, with support from the United States, against the invading forces of Imperial Japan, Thailand, and the Indian National Army.

New!!: Military logistics and Burma Campaign · See more »

Byzantine Empire

The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire and Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium).

New!!: Military logistics and Byzantine Empire · See more »

Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge.

New!!: Military logistics and Cambridge University Press · See more »

Camp follower

Camp follower is a term used to identify civilians and their children who follow armies.

New!!: Military logistics and Camp follower · See more »

Cannon

A cannon (plural: cannon or cannons) is a type of gun classified as artillery that launches a projectile using propellant.

New!!: Military logistics and Cannon · See more »

Combat service support

The term Combat service support (or CSS) is utilized by numerous military organizations throughout the world to describe entities that provide direct and indirect sustainment services to the groups that engage (or are potentially to be engaged) in combat.

New!!: Military logistics and Combat service support · See more »

Combat vehicle

A combat vehicle, also known as a ground combat vehicle, is a self-propelled, weaponized military vehicle used for combat operations in mechanized warfare.

New!!: Military logistics and Combat vehicle · See more »

Command of the sea

A navy has command of the sea (also called control of the sea or sea control) when it is so strong that its rivals cannot attack it directly.

New!!: Military logistics and Command of the sea · See more »

Commerce raiding

Commerce raiding is a form of naval warfare used to destroy or disrupt logistics of the enemy on the open sea by attacking its merchant shipping, rather than engaging its combatants or enforcing a blockade against them.

New!!: Military logistics and Commerce raiding · See more »

Commissioner

A commissioner is, in principle, a member of a commission or an individual who has been given a commission (official charge or authority to do something).

New!!: Military logistics and Commissioner · See more »

Conscription

Conscription, sometimes called the draft, is the compulsory enlistment of people in a national service, most often a military service.

New!!: Military logistics and Conscription · See more »

Consumables

Consumables (also known as consumable goods, nondurable goods, or soft goods) are goods that are intended to be consumed.

New!!: Military logistics and Consumables · See more »

Convoy

A convoy is a group of vehicles, typically motor vehicles or ships, traveling together for mutual support and protection.

New!!: Military logistics and Convoy · See more »

Danube

The Danube or Donau (known by various names in other languages) is Europe's second longest river, after the Volga.

New!!: Military logistics and Danube · See more »

DeKalb, Illinois

DeKalb is a city in DeKalb County, Illinois, United States.

New!!: Military logistics and DeKalb, Illinois · See more »

Distance

Distance is a numerical measurement of how far apart objects are.

New!!: Military logistics and Distance · See more »

Edward I of England

Edward I (17/18 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), also known as Edward Longshanks and the Hammer of the Scots (Malleus Scotorum), was King of England from 1272 to 1307.

New!!: Military logistics and Edward I of England · See more »

Edward II of England

Edward II (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), also called Edward of Carnarvon, was King of England from 1307 until he was deposed in January 1327.

New!!: Military logistics and Edward II of England · See more »

Edward III of England

Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was King of England and Lord of Ireland from January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous and unorthodox reign of his father, Edward II.

New!!: Military logistics and Edward III of England · See more »

Electorate of Bavaria

The Electorate of Bavaria (Kurfürstentum Bayern) was an independent hereditary electorate of the Holy Roman Empire from 1623 to 1806, when it was succeeded by the Kingdom of Bavaria.

New!!: Military logistics and Electorate of Bavaria · See more »

Eminent domain

Eminent domain (United States, Philippines), land acquisition (Singapore), compulsory purchase (United Kingdom, New Zealand, Ireland), resumption (Hong Kong, Uganda), resumption/compulsory acquisition (Australia), or expropriation (France, Italy, Mexico, South Africa, Canada, Brazil, Portugal, Spain, Chile, Denmark, Sweden) is the power of a state, provincial, or national government to take private property for public use.

New!!: Military logistics and Eminent domain · See more »

Empire of Japan

The was the historical nation-state and great power that existed from the Meiji Restoration in 1868 to the enactment of the 1947 constitution of modern Japan.

New!!: Military logistics and Empire of Japan · See more »

Employment

Employment is a relationship between two parties, usually based on a contract where work is paid for, where one party, which may be a corporation, for profit, not-for-profit organization, co-operative or other entity is the employer and the other is the employee.

New!!: Military logistics and Employment · See more »

Europe

Europe is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere.

New!!: Military logistics and Europe · See more »

Expeditionary maneuver warfare

Expeditionary maneuver warfare (EMW) is the current concept that guides how the United States Marine Corps organizes, deploys and employs its forces.

New!!: Military logistics and Expeditionary maneuver warfare · See more »

Fighter aircraft

A fighter aircraft is a military aircraft designed primarily for air-to-air combat against other aircraft, as opposed to bombers and attack aircraft, whose main mission is to attack ground targets.

New!!: Military logistics and Fighter aircraft · See more »

Finance

Finance is a field that is concerned with the allocation (investment) of assets and liabilities (known as elements of the balance statement) over space and time, often under conditions of risk or uncertainty.

New!!: Military logistics and Finance · See more »

Fodder

Fodder, a type of animal feed, is any agricultural foodstuff used specifically to feed domesticated livestock, such as cattle, rabbits, sheep, horses, chickens and pigs.

New!!: Military logistics and Fodder · See more »

François-Michel le Tellier, Marquis de Louvois

François Michel Le Tellier, Marquis de Louvois (18 January 1641 – 16 July 1691) was the French Secretary of State for War for a significant part of the reign of Louis XIV.

New!!: Military logistics and François-Michel le Tellier, Marquis de Louvois · See more »

Franco-Prussian War

The Franco-Prussian War or Franco-German War (Deutsch-Französischer Krieg, Guerre franco-allemande), often referred to in France as the War of 1870 (19 July 1871) or in Germany as 70/71, was a conflict between the Second French Empire of Napoleon III and the German states of the North German Confederation led by the Kingdom of Prussia.

New!!: Military logistics and Franco-Prussian War · See more »

Front (military)

A military front or battlefront is a contested armed frontier between opposing forces.

New!!: Military logistics and Front (military) · See more »

Front line

A front line (alternative forms: front-line or frontline) in military terminology is the position(s) closest to the area of conflict of an armed force's personnel and equipment, generally referring to maritime or land forces.

New!!: Military logistics and Front line · See more »

Grande Armée

The Grande Armée (French for Great Army) was the army commanded by Napoleon during the Napoleonic Wars.

New!!: Military logistics and Grande Armée · See more »

Greek language

Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά, elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα, ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

New!!: Military logistics and Greek language · See more »

Guerrilla warfare

Guerrilla warfare is a form of irregular warfare in which a small group of combatants, such as paramilitary personnel, armed civilians, or irregulars, use military tactics including ambushes, sabotage, raids, petty warfare, hit-and-run tactics, and mobility to fight a larger and less-mobile traditional military.

New!!: Military logistics and Guerrilla warfare · See more »

Hardtack

Hardtack (or hard tack) is a simple type of biscuit or cracker, made from flour, water, and sometimes salt.

New!!: Military logistics and Hardtack · See more »

Harper (publisher)

Harper is an American publishing house, currently the flagship imprint of global publisher HarperCollins.

New!!: Military logistics and Harper (publisher) · See more »

Henry VI of England

Henry VI (6 December 1421 – 21 May 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 and again from 1470 to 1471, and disputed King of France from 1422 to 1453.

New!!: Military logistics and Henry VI of England · See more »

Hindi

Hindi (Devanagari: हिन्दी, IAST: Hindī), or Modern Standard Hindi (Devanagari: मानक हिन्दी, IAST: Mānak Hindī) is a standardised and Sanskritised register of the Hindustani language.

New!!: Military logistics and Hindi · See more »

Horse

The horse (Equus ferus caballus) is one of two extant subspecies of ''Equus ferus''.

New!!: Military logistics and Horse · See more »

Hundred Years' War

The Hundred Years' War was a series of conflicts waged from 1337 to 1453 by the House of Plantagenet, rulers of the Kingdom of England, against the House of Valois, over the right to rule the Kingdom of France.

New!!: Military logistics and Hundred Years' War · See more »

India

India (IAST), also called the Republic of India (IAST), is a country in South Asia.

New!!: Military logistics and India · See more »

Industrial Revolution

The Industrial Revolution was the transition to new manufacturing processes in the period from about 1760 to sometime between 1820 and 1840.

New!!: Military logistics and Industrial Revolution · See more »

Industrial warfare

Industrial warfare is a period in the history of warfare ranging roughly from the early 19th century and the start of the Industrial Revolution to the beginning of the Atomic Age, which saw the rise of nation-states, capable of creating and equipping large armies, navies, and air forces, through the process of industrialization.

New!!: Military logistics and Industrial warfare · See more »

Integrated logistics support

Integrated logistics support (ILS) is an integrated and iterative process for developing materiel and a support strategy that optimizes functional support, leverages existing resources, and guides the system engineering process to quantify and lower life cycle cost and decrease the logistics footprint (demand for logistics), making the system easier to support.

New!!: Military logistics and Integrated logistics support · See more »

Intelligence assessment

Intelligence assessment is the development of behavior forecasts or recommended courses of action to the leadership of an organisation, based on wide ranges of available overt and covert information.

New!!: Military logistics and Intelligence assessment · See more »

Intendant

The title of intendant (intendant, Portuguese and intendente) has been used in several countries through history.

New!!: Military logistics and Intendant · See more »

John Balliol

John Balliol (– late 1314), known derisively as Toom Tabard (meaning "empty coat") was King of Scots from 1292 to 1296.

New!!: Military logistics and John Balliol · See more »

Kargil War

The Kargil War (करगिल युद्ध, kargil yuddh, کرگل جنگ kargil jang), also known as the Kargil conflict, was an armed conflict between India and Pakistan that took place between May and July 1999 in the Kargil district of Kashmir and elsewhere along the Line of Control (LOC).

New!!: Military logistics and Kargil War · See more »

Kenneth E. Boulding

Kenneth Ewart Boulding (January 18, 1910 – March 18, 1993) was an English-born American economist, educator, peace activist, and interdisciplinary philosopher.

New!!: Military logistics and Kenneth E. Boulding · See more »

Liberty ship

Liberty ships were a class of cargo ship built in the United States during World War II.

New!!: Military logistics and Liberty ship · See more »

Line of communication

A line of communication (or communications) is the route that connects an operating military unit with its supply base.

New!!: Military logistics and Line of communication · See more »

Logistics

Logistics is generally the detailed organization and implementation of a complex operation.

New!!: Military logistics and Logistics · See more »

Logistics Officer

A Logistics Officer is a member of the Coast Guard or an Armed Force responsible for overseeing the support of an Army, Air Force, Marine Corps, Navy or Coast Guard fleet, both at home and abroad.

New!!: Military logistics and Logistics Officer · See more »

Loss of Strength Gradient

The Loss of Strength Gradient (LSG) is a military concept devised by Kenneth E. Boulding in his 1962 book Conflict and Defense: A General Theory.

New!!: Military logistics and Loss of Strength Gradient · See more »

Machine gun

A machine gun is a fully automatic mounted or portable firearm designed to fire bullets in rapid succession from an ammunition belt or magazine, typically at a rate of 300 rounds per minute or higher.

New!!: Military logistics and Machine gun · See more »

Maréchal des logis

Maréchal des logis (literally translated as "marshal of lodgings") is a sub-officer rank used by some units of the French Armed Forces.

New!!: Military logistics and Maréchal des logis · See more »

Materiel

Materiel, more commonly matériel in US English and also listed as the only spelling in some UK dictionaries (both pronounced, from French matériel meaning equipment or hardware), refers to military technology and supplies in military and commercial supply chain management.

New!!: Military logistics and Materiel · See more »

Meat

Meat is animal flesh that is eaten as food.

New!!: Military logistics and Meat · See more »

Mercenary

A mercenary is an individual who is hired to take part in an armed conflict but is not part of a regular army or other governmental military force.

New!!: Military logistics and Mercenary · See more »

Michel Le Tellier

Michel Le Tellier, marquis de Barbezieux, seigneur de Chaville et de Viroflay (19 April 1603 – 30 October 1685) was a French statesman.

New!!: Military logistics and Michel Le Tellier · See more »

Military

A military or armed force is a professional organization formally authorized by a sovereign state to use lethal or deadly force and weapons to support the interests of the state.

New!!: Military logistics and Military · See more »

Military acquisition

Military acquisition is the bureaucratic management and procurement process dealing with a nation's investments in the technologies, programs, and product support necessary to achieve its national security strategy and support its armed forces.

New!!: Military logistics and Military acquisition · See more »

Military aircraft

A military aircraft is any fixed-wing or rotary-wing aircraft that is operated by a legal or insurrectionary armed service of any type.

New!!: Military logistics and Military aircraft · See more »

Military engineering

Military engineering is loosely defined as the art, science, and practice of designing and building military works and maintaining lines of military transport and communications.

New!!: Military logistics and Military engineering · See more »

Military railways

The military use of railways derives from their ability to move troops or materiel rapidly and, less usually, on their use as a platform for military systems, like armoured trains, in their own right.

New!!: Military logistics and Military railways · See more »

Military reserve force

A military reserve force is a military organisation composed of citizens of a country who combine a military role or career with a civilian career.

New!!: Military logistics and Military reserve force · See more »

Military supply chain management

Military supply chain management is a cross-functional approach to procuring, producing and delivering products and services for military applications.

New!!: Military logistics and Military supply chain management · See more »

Military tactics

Military tactics encompasses the art of organising and employing fighting forces on or near the battlefield.

New!!: Military logistics and Military tactics · See more »

Napoleon

Napoléon Bonaparte (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a French statesman and military leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution and led several successful campaigns during the French Revolutionary Wars.

New!!: Military logistics and Napoleon · See more »

Napoleonic Wars

The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, financed and usually led by the United Kingdom.

New!!: Military logistics and Napoleonic Wars · See more »

Narrow-gauge railway

A narrow-gauge railway (narrow-gauge railroad in the US) is a railway with a track gauge narrower than the standard.

New!!: Military logistics and Narrow-gauge railway · See more »

NATO Stock Number

A NATO Stock Number, or National Stock Number (NSN) as it is known in the US, is a 13-digit numeric code, identifying all the 'standardized material items of supply' as they have been recognized by all NATO countries including United States Department of Defense.

New!!: Military logistics and NATO Stock Number · See more »

Nazi Germany

Nazi Germany is the common English name for the period in German history from 1933 to 1945, when Germany was under the dictatorship of Adolf Hitler through the Nazi Party (NSDAP).

New!!: Military logistics and Nazi Germany · See more »

Normandy landings

The Normandy landings were the landing operations on Tuesday, 6 June 1944 of the Allied invasion of Normandy in Operation Overlord during World War II.

New!!: Military logistics and Normandy landings · See more »

North African Campaign

The North African Campaign of the Second World War took place in North Africa from 10 June 1940 to 13 May 1943.

New!!: Military logistics and North African Campaign · See more »

Operation Barbarossa

Operation Barbarossa (German: Unternehmen Barbarossa) was the code name for the Axis invasion of the Soviet Union, which started on Sunday, 22 June 1941, during World War II.

New!!: Military logistics and Operation Barbarossa · See more »

Operation Cobra

Operation Cobra was the codename for an offensive launched by the First United States Army (Lieutenant General Omar Bradley) seven weeks after the D-Day landings, during the Normandy Campaign of World War II.

New!!: Military logistics and Operation Cobra · See more »

Operation Michael

Operation Michael was a major German military offensive during the First World War that began the Spring Offensive on 21 March 1918.

New!!: Military logistics and Operation Michael · See more »

Operations (military staff)

Military operations is a concept and application of military science that involves planning the operations for the projected maneuvering forces' provisions, services, training, and administrative functions—to allow them to commence, insert, then egress from combat.

New!!: Military logistics and Operations (military staff) · See more »

Operations research

Operations research, or operational research in British usage, is a discipline that deals with the application of advanced analytical methods to help make better decisions.

New!!: Military logistics and Operations research · See more »

Pacific War

The Pacific War, sometimes called the Asia-Pacific War, was the theater of World War II that was fought in the Pacific and Asia. It was fought over a vast area that included the Pacific Ocean and islands, the South West Pacific, South-East Asia, and in China (including the 1945 Soviet–Japanese conflict). The Second Sino-Japanese War between the Empire of Japan and the Republic of China had been in progress since 7 July 1937, with hostilities dating back as far as 19 September 1931 with the Japanese invasion of Manchuria. However, it is more widely accepted that the Pacific War itself began on 7/8 December 1941, when Japan invaded Thailand and attacked the British possessions of Malaya, Singapore, and Hong Kong as well as the United States military and naval bases in Hawaii, Wake Island, Guam and the Philippines. The Pacific War saw the Allies pitted against Japan, the latter briefly aided by Thailand and to a much lesser extent by the Axis allied Germany and Italy. The war culminated in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and other large aerial bomb attacks by the Allies, accompanied by the Soviet declaration of war and invasion of Manchuria on 9 August 1945, resulting in the Japanese announcement of intent to surrender on 15 August 1945. The formal surrender of Japan ceremony took place aboard the battleship in Tokyo Bay on 2 September 1945. Japan's Shinto Emperor was forced to relinquish much of his authority and his divine status through the Shinto Directive in order to pave the way for extensive cultural and political reforms. After the war, Japan lost all rights and titles to its former possessions in Asia and the Pacific, and its sovereignty was limited to the four main home islands.

New!!: Military logistics and Pacific War · See more »

Pakistan

Pakistan (پاکِستان), officially the Islamic Republic of Pakistan (اِسلامی جمہوریہ پاکِستان), is a country in South Asia.

New!!: Military logistics and Pakistan · See more »

Passau

Passau (') is a town in Lower Bavaria, Germany, also known as the Dreiflüssestadt ("City of Three Rivers") because the Danube is joined there by the Inn from the south and the Ilz from the north.

New!!: Military logistics and Passau · See more »

Peninsular War

The Peninsular War (1807–1814) was a military conflict between Napoleon's empire (as well as the allied powers of the Spanish Empire), the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the Kingdom of Portugal, for control of the Iberian Peninsula during the Napoleonic Wars.

New!!: Military logistics and Peninsular War · See more »

Performance-based logistics

Performance-based logistics (PBL), also known as performance-based life-cycle product support or performance-based contracting, is a strategy for cost-effective weapon system support.

New!!: Military logistics and Performance-based logistics · See more »

Price gouging

Price gouging is a pejorative term referring to when a seller spikes the prices of goods, services or commodities to a level much higher than is considered reasonable or fair, and is considered exploitative, potentially to an unethical extent.

New!!: Military logistics and Price gouging · See more »

Principles of sustainment

U.S. Army Doctrine Publication 4-0, published 31 July 2012 addresses sustainment principles.

New!!: Military logistics and Principles of sustainment · See more »

Public administration

Public Administration is the implementation of government policy and also an academic discipline that studies this implementation and prepares civil servants for working in the public service.

New!!: Military logistics and Public administration · See more »

Purveyance

Purveyance is the right of the Crown to requisition goods and services for royal use, and was developed in England over the course of the late eleventh through the fourteenth centuries.

New!!: Military logistics and Purveyance · See more »

Rear (military)

In military parlance, the rear is the part of concentration of military forces that is farthest from the enemy (compare its antonym, the front).

New!!: Military logistics and Rear (military) · See more »

Red Ball Express

The Red Ball Express was a famed truck convoy system that supplied Allied forces moving quickly through Europe after breaking out from the D-Day beaches in Normandy in 1944.

New!!: Military logistics and Red Ball Express · See more »

Repairable component

In military logistics, a repairable component is a hardware component of a weapons system that can be designated for repair.

New!!: Military logistics and Repairable component · See more »

Replenishment oiler

A replenishment oiler or replenishment tanker is a naval auxiliary ship with fuel tanks and dry cargo holds which can supply both fuel and dry stores during underway replenishment (UNREP) at sea.

New!!: Military logistics and Replenishment oiler · See more »

Richard Abels

Richard Abels FRHistS (born 1951) is professor of history at the United States Naval Academy.

New!!: Military logistics and Richard Abels · See more »

Scotland

Scotland (Alba) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.

New!!: Military logistics and Scotland · See more »

Seabasing

Seabasing is a naval capability to conduct selected functions and tasks at sea without reliance on infrastructure ashore.

New!!: Military logistics and Seabasing · See more »

Sealift

Sealift is a term used predominantly in military logistics and refers to the use of cargo ships for the deployment of military assets, such as weaponry, vehicles, military personnel, and supplies.

New!!: Military logistics and Sealift · See more »

Second Sino-Japanese War

The Second Sino-Japanese War was a military conflict fought primarily between the Republic of China and the Empire of Japan from July 7, 1937, to September 2, 1945.

New!!: Military logistics and Second Sino-Japanese War · See more »

Secretary of State for War (France)

The Secretary of State for War was one of the four or five specialized secretaries of state in France during the Ancien Régime.

New!!: Military logistics and Secretary of State for War (France) · See more »

Service (economics)

In economics, a service is a transaction in which no physical goods are transferred from the seller to the buyer.

New!!: Military logistics and Service (economics) · See more »

Sheriff

A sheriff is a government official, with varying duties, existing in some countries with historical ties to England, where the office originated.

New!!: Military logistics and Sheriff · See more »

Siege

A siege is a military blockade of a city, or fortress, with the intent of conquering by attrition, or a well-prepared assault.

New!!: Military logistics and Siege · See more »

Siege of Dunkirk (1658)

The Siege of Dunkirk in 1658 was a military operation by the allied forces of France and Commonwealth England intended to take the fortified port city of Dunkirk, Spain's greatest privateer base, from the Spanish and their confederates: the English royalists and French Fronduers.

New!!: Military logistics and Siege of Dunkirk (1658) · See more »

Spanish Empire

The Spanish Empire (Imperio Español; Imperium Hispanicum), historically known as the Hispanic Monarchy (Monarquía Hispánica) and as the Catholic Monarchy (Monarquía Católica) was one of the largest empires in history.

New!!: Military logistics and Spanish Empire · See more »

Springer Science+Business Media

Springer Science+Business Media or Springer, part of Springer Nature since 2015, is a global publishing company that publishes books, e-books and peer-reviewed journals in science, humanities, technical and medical (STM) publishing.

New!!: Military logistics and Springer Science+Business Media · See more »

Strafing

Strafing is the military practice of attacking ground targets from low-flying aircraft using aircraft-mounted automatic weapons Less commonly, the term can be used—by extension—to describe high-speed firing runs by any land or naval craft (e.g. fast boats) using smaller-caliber weapons and targeting stationary or slow-moving targets.

New!!: Military logistics and Strafing · See more »

Strategy

Strategy (from Greek στρατηγία stratēgia, "art of troop leader; office of general, command, generalship") is a high-level plan to achieve one or more goals under conditions of uncertainty.

New!!: Military logistics and Strategy · See more »

Supply depot

Supply depots are a type of military installation used by militaries to store battlefield supplies temporarily on or near the front lines until they can be distributed to military units.

New!!: Military logistics and Supply depot · See more »

Sutler

A sutler or victualer is a civilian merchant who sells provisions to an army in the field, in camp, or in quarters.

New!!: Military logistics and Sutler · See more »

Tank

A tank is an armoured fighting vehicle designed for front-line combat, with heavy firepower, strong armour, tracks and a powerful engine providing good battlefield maneuverability.

New!!: Military logistics and Tank · See more »

The Hump

The Hump was the name given by Allied pilots in the Second World War to the eastern end of the Himalayan Mountains over which they flew military transport aircraft from India to China to resupply the Chinese war effort of Chiang Kai-shek and the units of the United States Army Air Forces (AAF) based in China.

New!!: Military logistics and The Hump · See more »

Tonnage war

A tonnage war is a military strategy aimed at merchant shipping.

New!!: Military logistics and Tonnage war · See more »

Tooth-to-tail ratio

The tooth-to-tail ratio (T3R) is a military term that refers to the amount of military personnel it takes to supply and support ("tail") each combat soldier ("tooth").

New!!: Military logistics and Tooth-to-tail ratio · See more »

Train (military)

In military contexts, a train is the logistical transport elements accompanying a military force.

New!!: Military logistics and Train (military) · See more »

Training

Training is teaching, or developing in oneself or others, any skills and knowledge that relate to specific useful competencies.

New!!: Military logistics and Training · See more »

Trench railways

Trench railways represented military adaptation of early 20th century railway technology to the problem of keeping soldiers supplied during the static trench warfare phase of World War I. The large concentrations of soldiers and artillery at the front lines required delivery of enormous quantities of food, ammunition and fortification construction materials where transport facilities had been destroyed.

New!!: Military logistics and Trench railways · See more »

Trench warfare

Trench warfare is a type of land warfare using occupied fighting lines consisting largely of military trenches, in which troops are well-protected from the enemy's small arms fire and are substantially sheltered from artillery.

New!!: Military logistics and Trench warfare · See more »

U-boat

U-boat is an anglicised version of the German word U-Boot, a shortening of Unterseeboot, literally "undersea boat".

New!!: Military logistics and U-boat · See more »

Ulm

Ulm is a city in the federal German state of Baden-Württemberg, situated on the River Danube.

New!!: Military logistics and Ulm · See more »

Ulm Campaign

The Ulm Campaign was a series of French and Bavarian military maneuvers and battles to outflank and capture an Austrian army in 1805 during the War of the Third Coalition.

New!!: Military logistics and Ulm Campaign · See more »

Underway replenishment

Replenishment at sea (RAS) (North Atlantic Treaty Organisation/Commonwealth of Nations) or underway replenishment (UNREP) (US Navy) is a method of transferring fuel, munitions, and stores from one ship to another while under way.

New!!: Military logistics and Underway replenishment · See more »

United States Army

The United States Army (USA) is the land warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces.

New!!: Military logistics and United States Army · See more »

United States Naval Academy

The United States Naval Academy (also known as USNA, Annapolis, or simply Navy) is a four-year coeducational federal service academy in Annapolis, Maryland.

New!!: Military logistics and United States Naval Academy · See more »

Unrestricted submarine warfare

Unrestricted submarine warfare is a type of naval warfare in which submarines sink vessels such as freighters and tankers without warning, as opposed to attacks per prize rules (also known as "cruiser rules").

New!!: Military logistics and Unrestricted submarine warfare · See more »

Vienna

Vienna (Wien) is the federal capital and largest city of Austria and one of the nine states of Austria.

New!!: Military logistics and Vienna · See more »

Wagon train

A wagon train is a group of wagons traveling together.

New!!: Military logistics and Wagon train · See more »

Wales

Wales (Cymru) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain.

New!!: Military logistics and Wales · See more »

War profiteering

A war profiteer is any person or organization that profits from warfare or by selling weapons and other goods to parties at war.

New!!: Military logistics and War profiteering · See more »

Wars of Scottish Independence

The Wars of Scottish Independence were a series of military campaigns fought between the Kingdom of Scotland and the Kingdom of England in the late 13th and early 14th centuries.

New!!: Military logistics and Wars of Scottish Independence · See more »

Waterway

A waterway is any navigable body of water.

New!!: Military logistics and Waterway · See more »

Würzburg

Würzburg (Main-Franconian: Wörtzburch) is a city in the region of Franconia, northern Bavaria, Germany.

New!!: Military logistics and Würzburg · See more »

World War I

World War I (often abbreviated as WWI or WW1), also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.

New!!: Military logistics and World War I · See more »

World War II

World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier.

New!!: Military logistics and World War II · See more »

Writing material

Writing material refers to the materials that provide the surfaces on which humans use writing instruments to inscribe writings.

New!!: Military logistics and Writing material · See more »

6th Army (Wehrmacht)

The 6th Army, a field-army unit of the German Wehrmacht during World War II (1939-1945), has become widely remembered for its destruction by the Red Army at the Battle of Stalingrad in the winter of 1942/43.

New!!: Military logistics and 6th Army (Wehrmacht) · See more »

Redirects here:

Distance in Military Affairs, Military Logistics, Military supplies, Military supply, Military supply and transport, Sustainment (military).

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_logistics

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »