Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Install
Faster access than browser!
 

NZR E class (1872)

Index NZR E class (1872)

The NZR E class of Double Fairlie steam locomotives were two different types of Fairlie locomotive, and were the first classes to take that designation, followed by the E class Mallet compound locomotive of 1906 and then the E class battery electric locomotive of 1922. [1]

29 relations: Avonside Engine Company, Christchurch, Compound locomotive, Dunedin, Electric locomotive, Fairlie locomotive, Ferrymead Railway, Main South Line, Mallet locomotive, Ministry of Works and Development, New Zealand E class locomotive (1922), New Zealand Railways Department, North Island, North Island Main Trunk, NZR AB class, NZR B class (1874), NZR E class (1906), NZR K class (1877), NZR R class, NZR S class, Otago Central Railway, Otago Province, Port Chalmers Branch, Railway preservation in New Zealand, Robert Francis Fairlie, Steam locomotive, Toitū Otago Settlers Museum, Vulcan Foundry, 0-4-4-0.

Avonside Engine Company

The Avonside Engine Company was a locomotive manufacturer in Avon Street, St. Philip's, Bristol, England between 1864 and 1934.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Avonside Engine Company · See more »

Christchurch

Christchurch (Ōtautahi) is the largest city in the South Island of New Zealand and the seat of the Canterbury Region.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Christchurch · See more »

Compound locomotive

A compound locomotive is a steam locomotive which is powered by a compound engine, a type of steam engine where steam is expanded in two or more stages.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Compound locomotive · See more »

Dunedin

Dunedin (Ōtepoti) is the second-largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the principal city of the Otago region.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Dunedin · See more »

Electric locomotive

An electric locomotive is a locomotive powered by electricity from overhead lines, a third rail or on-board energy storage such as a battery or a supercapacitor.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Electric locomotive · See more »

Fairlie locomotive

A Fairlie is a type of articulated steam locomotive that has the driving wheels on bogies.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Fairlie locomotive · See more »

Ferrymead Railway

The Ferrymead Railway is a New Zealand heritage railway built upon the formation of New Zealand's first public railway, from Ferrymead to Christchurch, which opened in 1863.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Ferrymead Railway · See more »

Main South Line

The Main South Line, sometimes referred to as part of the South Island Main Trunk Railway, is a railroad line that runs north and south from Lyttelton in New Zealand through Christchurch and along the east coast of the South Island to Invercargill via Dunedin.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Main South Line · See more »

Mallet locomotive

The Mallet locomotive is a type of articulated steam railway locomotive, invented by the Swiss engineer Anatole Mallet (1837–1919).

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Mallet locomotive · See more »

Ministry of Works and Development

The New Zealand Ministry of Works and Development, formerly the Department of Public Works and often referred to as the Public Works Department or PWD, was founded in 1876 and disestablished and privatised in 1988.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Ministry of Works and Development · See more »

New Zealand E class locomotive (1922)

The New Zealand E class battery-electric locomotive represented the third unique type of locomotive class to be given the E classification in New Zealand.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and New Zealand E class locomotive (1922) · See more »

New Zealand Railways Department

The New Zealand Railways Department, NZR or NZGR (New Zealand Government Railways) and often known as the "Railways", was a government department charged with owning and maintaining New Zealand's railway infrastructure and operating the railway system.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and New Zealand Railways Department · See more »

North Island

The North Island (Māori: Te Ika-a-Māui) is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, separated from the slightly larger but much less populous South Island by Cook Strait.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and North Island · See more »

North Island Main Trunk

The North Island Main Trunk (NIMT) is the main railway line in the North Island of New Zealand, connecting the capital city Wellington with the country's largest city, Auckland.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and North Island Main Trunk · See more »

NZR AB class

The NZR AB class was a class of 4-6-2 Pacific tender steam locomotive that operated on New Zealand's national railway system.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and NZR AB class · See more »

NZR B class (1874)

The NZR B class of 1874 was the first of two steam locomotive classes to be designated as B by the Railways Department that then oversaw New Zealand's national rail network (the second B class was introduced in 1899).

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and NZR B class (1874) · See more »

NZR E class (1906)

The New Zealand E class locomotive comprised a single steam locomotive operated by New Zealand Railways (NZR) from 1906 until 1917.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and NZR E class (1906) · See more »

NZR K class (1877)

The NZR K class of 1877 was the first example of American-built locomotives to be used on New Zealand's railways.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and NZR K class (1877) · See more »

NZR R class

The NZR R class was a class of early 0-6-4T single Fairlie steam locomotives operated by New Zealand's Railways Department (NZR) between 1879 and 1936.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and NZR R class · See more »

NZR S class

The NZR S class was a class of seven 0-6-4T single Fairlie steam locomotives used in New Zealand.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and NZR S class · See more »

Otago Central Railway

The Otago Central Railway (OCR) or in later years Otago Central Branch Railway, now often referred to as the Taieri Gorge Railway, was a secondary railway line in Central Otago, in the South Island of New Zealand.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Otago Central Railway · See more »

Otago Province

The Otago Province was a province of New Zealand until the abolition of provincial government in 1876.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Otago Province · See more »

Port Chalmers Branch

The Port Chalmers Branch was the first railway line built in Otago, New Zealand, and linked the region's major city of Dunedin with the port in Port Chalmers.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Port Chalmers Branch · See more »

Railway preservation in New Zealand

C class steam locomotive #132 on the heritage Silver Stream Railway, 6 March 2002. Railway preservation in New Zealand is the preservation of historically significant facets of New Zealand's rail transport history.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Railway preservation in New Zealand · See more »

Robert Francis Fairlie

Robert Francis Fairlie (born either March 1831 or 5 April 1830, in Glasgow, died 31 July 1885, in London) was a Scottish-born railway engineer.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Robert Francis Fairlie · See more »

Steam locomotive

A steam locomotive is a type of railway locomotive that produces its pulling power through a steam engine.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Steam locomotive · See more »

Toitū Otago Settlers Museum

The Toitū Otago Settlers Museum is a regional history museum in Dunedin, New Zealand.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Toitū Otago Settlers Museum · See more »

Vulcan Foundry

The Vulcan Foundry Limited was a British locomotive builder sited at Newton-le-Willows, Lancashire.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and Vulcan Foundry · See more »

0-4-4-0

In the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotive wheel arrangement, a 0-4-4-0 is a locomotive with no leading truck, two sets of four driving wheels, and no trailing truck.

New!!: NZR E class (1872) and 0-4-4-0 · See more »

Redirects here:

E class (Double Fairlie locomotive), NZR E Class.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NZR_E_class_(1872)

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »