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Neuroscience of free will

Index Neuroscience of free will

Neuroscience of free will, a part of neurophilosophy, is the study of the interconnections between free will and neuroscience. [1]

81 relations: Adaptive unconscious, Agency (sociology), Alfred Mele, Alvaro Pascual-Leone, Anatomical terms of location, Anterior cingulate cortex, Basal ganglia, Benjamin Libet, Bereitschaftspotential, Berlin, Brain, Brain damage, Cartesian materialism, Cartesian theater, Cingulate cortex, Compatibilism, Consciousness, Correlation does not imply causation, Cuneus, Daniel Dennett, Decision-making, Dick Swaab, Elbow Room (book), Electrode, Electroencephalography, Empirical evidence, Epilepsy, Epiphenomenalism, Event-related potential, Free will, Frontal lobe, Golf, Hans Helmut Kornhuber, Institute of Art and Ideas, Intrapersonal communication, Introspection illusion, James C. Kaufman, Jeffrey Alan Gray, John-Dylan Haynes, Lateralized readiness potential, Lüder Deecke, Libertarianism (metaphysics), Martin Seligman, Materialism, Max Velmans, Millisecond, Mind–body dualism, Moral responsibility, Motor cortex, Multiple drafts model, ..., Muscle, Nayef Al-Rodhan, Neural decoding, Neural oscillation, Neurophilosophy, Neuroscience, Neurostimulation, Oxford University Press, Parietal lobe, Philosophy of mind, Planning, Postcentral gyrus, Precuneus, Prefrontal cortex, Premotor cortex, Primary motor cortex, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Roy Baumeister, Sam Harris, Self-serving bias, Sense of agency, Spinal cord, Striatum, Substantia nigra, Supplementary motor area, Tadeusz Pacholczyk, Thought identification, Transcranial direct-current stimulation, Transcranial magnetic stimulation, Unconscious mind, Walter Jackson Freeman III. Expand index (31 more) »

Adaptive unconscious

The adaptive unconscious, first coined by Daniel Wagner in 2002, is described as a series of mental processes that is able to affect judgement and decision making, but is out of reach of the conscious mind.

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Agency (sociology)

In social science, agency is the capacity of individuals to act independently and to make their own free choices.

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Alfred Mele

Alfred Remen Mele is an American philosopher and the William H. and Lucyle T. Werkmeister Professor of Philosophy at Florida State University.

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Alvaro Pascual-Leone

Alvaro Pascual-Leone (born 7 August 1961 in Valencia, Spain) is a spanish Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School, with which he has been affiliated since 1997.

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Anatomical terms of location

Standard anatomical terms of location deal unambiguously with the anatomy of animals, including humans.

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Anterior cingulate cortex

The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is the frontal part of the cingulate cortex that resembles a "collar" surrounding the frontal part of the corpus callosum.

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Basal ganglia

The basal ganglia (or basal nuclei) is a group of subcortical nuclei, of varied origin, in the brains of vertebrates including humans, which are situated at the base of the forebrain.

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Benjamin Libet

Benjamin Libet (April 12, 1916, Chicago, Illinois – July 23, 2007, Davis, California) was a pioneering scientist in the field of human consciousness.

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Bereitschaftspotential

In neurology, the Bereitschaftspotential or BP (from German, "readiness potential"), also called the pre-motor potential or readiness potential (RP), is a measure of activity in the motor cortex and supplementary motor area of the brain leading up to voluntary muscle movement.

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Berlin

Berlin is the capital and the largest city of Germany, as well as one of its 16 constituent states.

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Brain

The brain is an organ that serves as the center of the nervous system in all vertebrate and most invertebrate animals.

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Brain damage

Brain damage or brain injury (BI) is the destruction or degeneration of brain cells.

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Cartesian materialism

In philosophy of mind, Cartesian materialism is the idea that at some place (or places) in the brain, there is some set of information that directly corresponds to our conscious experience.

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Cartesian theater

"Cartesian theater" is a derisive term coined by philosopher and cognitive scientist Daniel Dennett to refer pointedly to a defining aspect of what he calls Cartesian materialism, which he considers to be the often unacknowledged remnants of Cartesian dualism in modern materialist theories of the mind.

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Cingulate cortex

The cingulate cortex is a part of the brain situated in the medial aspect of the cerebral cortex.

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Compatibilism

Compatibilism is the belief that free will and determinism are mutually compatible and that it is possible to believe in both without being logically inconsistent.

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Consciousness

Consciousness is the state or quality of awareness, or, of being aware of an external object or something within oneself.

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Correlation does not imply causation

In statistics, many statistical tests calculate correlations between variables and when two variables are found to be correlated, it is tempting to assume that this shows that one variable causes the other.

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Cuneus

The '''cuneus''' (Latin for "wedge"; plural, cunei) is a smaller lobe in the occipital lobe of the brain.

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Daniel Dennett

Daniel Clement Dennett III (born March 28, 1942) is an American philosopher, writer, and cognitive scientist whose research centers on the philosophy of mind, philosophy of science, and philosophy of biology, particularly as those fields relate to evolutionary biology and cognitive science.

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Decision-making

In psychology, decision-making (also spelled decision making and decisionmaking) is regarded as the cognitive process resulting in the selection of a belief or a course of action among several alternative possibilities.

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Dick Swaab

Dick Frans Swaab (born 17 December 1944) is a Dutch physician and neurobiologist (brain researcher).

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Elbow Room (book)

Elbow Room: The Varieties of Free Will Worth Wanting is a 1984 book by the American philosopher Daniel Dennett, in which Dennett discusses the philosophical issues of free will and determinism.

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Electrode

An electrode is an electrical conductor used to make contact with a nonmetallic part of a circuit (e.g. a semiconductor, an electrolyte, a vacuum or air).

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Electroencephalography

Electroencephalography (EEG) is an electrophysiological monitoring method to record electrical activity of the brain.

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Empirical evidence

Empirical evidence, also known as sensory experience, is the information received by means of the senses, particularly by observation and documentation of patterns and behavior through experimentation.

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Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a group of neurological disorders characterized by epileptic seizures.

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Epiphenomenalism

Epiphenomenalism is a mind–body philosophy marked by the belief that basic physical events (sense organs, neural impulses, and muscle contractions) are causal with respect to mental events (thought, consciousness, and cognition).

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Event-related potential

An event-related potential (ERP) is the measured brain response that is the direct result of a specific sensory, cognitive, or motor event.

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Free will

Free will is the ability to choose between different possible courses of action unimpeded.

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Frontal lobe

The frontal lobe, located at the front of the brain, is the largest of the four major lobes of the cerebral cortex in the mammalian brain.

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Golf

Golf is a club-and-ball sport in which players use various clubs to hit balls into a series of holes on a course in as few strokes as possible.

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Hans Helmut Kornhuber

Hans Helmut Kornhuber (24 February 1928 in Königsberg - 30 October 2009) was a German Neurologist and Neurophysiologist.

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Institute of Art and Ideas

The Institute of Art and Ideas is an arts organisation founded in 2008 in London.

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Intrapersonal communication

Intrapersonal communication is a communicator's internal use of language or thought.

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Introspection illusion

The introspection illusion is a cognitive bias in which people wrongly think they have direct insight into the origins of their mental states, while treating others' introspections as unreliable.

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James C. Kaufman

James C. Kaufman (born September 21, 1974) is a psychologist known for his research on creativity.

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Jeffrey Alan Gray

Jeffrey Alan Gray (26 May 1934 – 30 April 2004) was a British psychologist.

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John-Dylan Haynes

John-Dylan Haynes (born 1971 in Folkestone, Great Britain) is a British-German brain researcher.

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Lateralized readiness potential

In neuroscience, the lateralized readiness potential (LRP) is an event-related brain potential, or increase in electrical activity at the surface of the brain, that is thought to reflect the preparation of motor activity on a certain side of the body; in other words, it is a spike in the electrical activity of the brain that happens when a person gets ready to move one arm, leg, or foot.

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Lüder Deecke

Lüder Deecke (born 22 June 1938) in Lohe-Rickelshof, Germany is a German Austrian neurologist, neuroscientist, teacher and physician whose scientific discoveries have influenced brain research and the treatment and rehabilitation of neurological disorders.

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Libertarianism (metaphysics)

Libertarianism is one of the main philosophical positions related to the problems of free will and determinism, which are part of the larger domain of metaphysics.

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Martin Seligman

Martin E. P. "Marty" Seligman (born August 12, 1942) is an American psychologist, educator, and author of self-help books.

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Materialism

Materialism is a form of philosophical monism which holds that matter is the fundamental substance in nature, and that all things, including mental aspects and consciousness, are results of material interactions.

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Max Velmans

Max Velmans (born 27 May 1942 in Amsterdam) is a British psychologist and Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Goldsmiths, University of London, principally known for the theory of consciousness called "reflexive monism," Reflexive monism bridges the materialist/dualist divide by noting that, in terms of their phenomenology, experiences of the external world are none other than the physical world-as-experienced, thereby placing aspects of human consciousness in the external phenomenal world, rather than exclusively within the head or brain.

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Millisecond

A millisecond (from milli- and second; symbol: ms) is a thousandth (0.001 or 10−3 or 1/1000) of a second.

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Mind–body dualism

Mind–body dualism, or mind–body duality, is a view in the philosophy of mind that mental phenomena are, in some respects, non-physical,Hart, W.D. (1996) "Dualism", in A Companion to the Philosophy of Mind, ed.

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Moral responsibility

In philosophy, moral responsibility is the status of morally deserving praise, blame, reward, or punishment for an act or omission, in accordance with one's moral obligations.

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Motor cortex

The motor cortex is the region of the cerebral cortex involved in the planning, control, and execution of voluntary movements.

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Multiple drafts model

Daniel Dennett's multiple drafts model of consciousness is a physicalist theory of consciousness based upon cognitivism, which views the mind in terms of information processing.

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Muscle

Muscle is a soft tissue found in most animals.

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Nayef Al-Rodhan

Nayef R. F. Al-Rodhan (نايف الروضان; born 1959) is a Saudi philosopher, neuroscientist, geostrategist, and author.

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Neural decoding

Neural decoding is a neuroscience field concerned with the hypothetical reconstruction of sensory and other stimuli from information that has already been encoded and represented in the brain by networks of neurons.

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Neural oscillation

Neural oscillations, or brainwaves, are rhythmic or repetitive patterns of neural activity in the central nervous system.

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Neurophilosophy

Neurophilosophy or philosophy of neuroscience is the interdisciplinary study of neuroscience and philosophy that explores the relevance of neuroscientific studies to the arguments traditionally categorized as philosophy of mind.

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Neuroscience

Neuroscience (or neurobiology) is the scientific study of the nervous system.

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Neurostimulation

Neurostimulation is the purposeful modulation of the nervous system's activity using invasive (e.g. microelectrodes) or non-invasive means (e.g. transcranial magnetic stimulation or transcranial electric stimulation, tES, such as tDCS or transcranial alternating current stimulation, tACS).

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Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press.

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Parietal lobe

The parietal lobe is one of the four major lobes of the cerebral cortex in the brain of mammals. The parietal lobe is positioned above the temporal lobe and behind the frontal lobe and central sulcus. The parietal lobe integrates sensory information among various modalities, including spatial sense and navigation (proprioception), the main sensory receptive area for the sense of touch (mechanoreception) in the somatosensory cortex which is just posterior to the central sulcus in the postcentral gyrus, and the dorsal stream of the visual system. The major sensory inputs from the skin (touch, temperature, and pain receptors), relay through the thalamus to the parietal lobe. Several areas of the parietal lobe are important in language processing. The somatosensory cortex can be illustrated as a distorted figure – the homunculus (Latin: "little man"), in which the body parts are rendered according to how much of the somatosensory cortex is devoted to them.Schacter, D. L., Gilbert, D. L. & Wegner, D. M. (2009). Psychology. (2nd ed.). New York (NY): Worth Publishers. The superior parietal lobule and inferior parietal lobule are the primary areas of body or spacial awareness. A lesion commonly in the right superior or inferior parietal lobule leads to hemineglect. The name comes from the parietal bone, which is named from the Latin paries-, meaning "wall".

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Philosophy of mind

Philosophy of mind is a branch of philosophy that studies the nature of the mind.

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Planning

Planning is the process of thinking about the activities required to achieve a desired goal.

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Postcentral gyrus

The postcentral gyrus is a prominent gyrus in the lateral parietal lobe of the human brain.

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Precuneus

The precuneus is the portion of the superior parietal lobule on the medial surface of each brain hemisphere.

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Prefrontal cortex

In mammalian brain anatomy, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is the cerebral cortex which covers the front part of the frontal lobe.

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Premotor cortex

The premotor cortex is an area of motor cortex lying within the frontal lobe of the brain just anterior to the primary motor cortex.

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Primary motor cortex

The primary motor cortex (Brodmann area 4) is a brain region that in humans is located in the dorsal portion of the frontal lobe.

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) is the official scientific journal of the National Academy of Sciences, published since 1915.

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Roy Baumeister

Roy F. Baumeister (born May 16, 1953) is a social psychologist who is known for his work on the self, social rejection, belongingness, sexuality and sex differences, self-control, self-esteem, self-defeating behaviors, motivation, aggression, consciousness, and free will.

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Sam Harris

Sam Benjamin Harris (born April 9, 1967) is an American author, philosopher, neuroscientist, critic of religion, blogger, and podcast host.

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Self-serving bias

A self-serving bias is any cognitive or perceptual process that is distorted by the need to maintain and enhance self-esteem, or the tendency to perceive oneself in an overly favorable manner.

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Sense of agency

The sense of agency (SA), or sense of control, is the subjective awareness of initiating, executing, and controlling one's own volitional actions in the world.

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Spinal cord

The spinal cord is a long, thin, tubular bundle of nervous tissue and support cells that extends from the medulla oblongata in the brainstem to the lumbar region of the vertebral column.

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Striatum

The striatum, or corpus striatum (also called the neostriatum and the striate nucleus) is a nucleus (a cluster of neurons) in the subcortical basal ganglia of the forebrain.

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Substantia nigra

The substantia nigra (SN) is a basal ganglia structure located in the midbrain that plays an important role in reward and movement.

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Supplementary motor area

The supplementary motor area (SMA) is a part of the primate cerebral cortex that contributes to the control of movement.

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Tadeusz Pacholczyk

Reverend Tadeusz Pacholczyk, Ph.D. (born 1965) is an American Roman Catholic priest, neuroscientist and writer.

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Thought identification

Thought identification refers to the empirically verified use of technology to, in some sense, read people's minds.

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Transcranial direct-current stimulation

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a form of neurostimulation that uses constant, low direct current delivered via electrodes on the head; it can be contrasted with cranial electrotherapy stimulation which generally uses alternating current the same way.

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Transcranial magnetic stimulation

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a method in which a changing magnetic field is used to cause electric current to flow in a small region of the brain via electromagnetic induction.

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Unconscious mind

The unconscious mind (or the unconscious) consists of the processes in the mind which occur automatically and are not available to introspection, and include thought processes, memories, interests, and motivations.

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Walter Jackson Freeman III

Walter Jackson Freeman III (January 30, 1927 – April 24, 2016), was an American biologist, theoretical neuroscientist and philosopher who conducted research in rabbits' olfactory perception, using EEG.

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Redirects here:

Determined Will, Determined will, Libet Experiment, Libet experiment, The Libet Experiment, The Libet experiment.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuroscience_of_free_will

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