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New York City Hall

Index New York City Hall

New York City Hall, the seat of New York City government, is located at the center of City Hall Park in the Civic Center area of Lower Manhattan, between Broadway, Park Row, and Chambers Street. [1]

99 relations: -elect, Abraham Lincoln, Al Pacino, Albert Einstein, Alexander Hamilton, American Revolutionary War, Assassination of Abraham Lincoln, BMT Broadway Line, Broadway (Manhattan), Brooklyn Bridge, Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall/Chambers Street (New York City Subway), Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation, Brownstone, Cable car, Cable television, Castle Clinton, Chambers Street (Manhattan), Chambers Street–World Trade Center/Park Place (New York City Subway), City Hall (BMT Broadway Line), City Hall (film), City Hall (IRT Lexington Avenue Line), City Hall Post Office and Courthouse (New York City), Civic Center, Manhattan, Commons, Early history of the IRT subway, Elmer E. Ellsworth, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (film), Federal Hall, Fernando Wood, French Renaissance architecture, George Washington, Georgian architecture, Ghostbusters, Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, Government of New York City, Government-access television, Gracie Mansion, Grosvenor Atterbury, Guastavino tile, Harry Potter (film series), Hill International, History of the New York City Police Department, Interborough Rapid Transit Company, James E. Davis (New York politician), John Cusack, John H. Duncan, John McComb Jr., John Trumbull, Joseph-François Mangin, Leopold Eidlitz, ..., List of New York City Borough Halls and municipal buildings, Lists of New York City landmarks, Liverpool, Lower Manhattan, Manhattan, Manhattan Municipal Building, Mayor of New York City, Michael Bloomberg, Michael J. Fox, Nassau Street (Manhattan), National Historic Landmark, National Park Service, National Register of Historic Places, New Amsterdam, New York (magazine), New York City, New York City Council, New York City Police Department, New York City Police riot, New York City Subway, Pace University, Park Row (Manhattan), Park Row Building, Pearl Street (Manhattan), Renaissance Revival architecture, Seat of local government, Shreve, Lamb & Harmon, Spin City, St George's Hall, Liverpool, St. Patrick's Old Cathedral, St. Paul's Chapel, St. Peter Catholic Church (Manhattan), Surrogate's Courthouse, The Clancy Brothers, The Dubliners, The Irish Rover, The New York Times, The Pogues, Tweed Courthouse, Ulysses S. Grant, United States, United States ten-dollar bill, Wall Street, William Martin Aiken, Woolworth Building, World Trade Center site, Yellow fever, 1 Police Plaza, 11th New York Infantry. Expand index (49 more) »

-elect

An officer-elect refers to a person who has been elected to a position but has not yet been installed.

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Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865.

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Al Pacino

Alfredo James Pacino (born April 25, 1940) is an American actor and filmmaker.

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Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein (14 March 1879 – 18 April 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics).

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Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757July 12, 1804) was a statesman and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.

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American Revolutionary War

The American Revolutionary War (17751783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a global war that began as a conflict between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence as the United States of America. After 1765, growing philosophical and political differences strained the relationship between Great Britain and its colonies. Patriot protests against taxation without representation followed the Stamp Act and escalated into boycotts, which culminated in 1773 with the Sons of Liberty destroying a shipment of tea in Boston Harbor. Britain responded by closing Boston Harbor and passing a series of punitive measures against Massachusetts Bay Colony. Massachusetts colonists responded with the Suffolk Resolves, and they established a shadow government which wrested control of the countryside from the Crown. Twelve colonies formed a Continental Congress to coordinate their resistance, establishing committees and conventions that effectively seized power. British attempts to disarm the Massachusetts militia at Concord, Massachusetts in April 1775 led to open combat. Militia forces then besieged Boston, forcing a British evacuation in March 1776, and Congress appointed George Washington to command the Continental Army. Concurrently, an American attempt to invade Quebec and raise rebellion against the British failed decisively. On July 2, 1776, the Continental Congress voted for independence, issuing its declaration on July 4. Sir William Howe launched a British counter-offensive, capturing New York City and leaving American morale at a low ebb. However, victories at Trenton and Princeton restored American confidence. In 1777, the British launched an invasion from Quebec under John Burgoyne, intending to isolate the New England Colonies. Instead of assisting this effort, Howe took his army on a separate campaign against Philadelphia, and Burgoyne was decisively defeated at Saratoga in October 1777. Burgoyne's defeat had drastic consequences. France formally allied with the Americans and entered the war in 1778, and Spain joined the war the following year as an ally of France but not as an ally of the United States. In 1780, the Kingdom of Mysore attacked the British in India, and tensions between Great Britain and the Netherlands erupted into open war. In North America, the British mounted a "Southern strategy" led by Charles Cornwallis which hinged upon a Loyalist uprising, but too few came forward. Cornwallis suffered reversals at King's Mountain and Cowpens. He retreated to Yorktown, Virginia, intending an evacuation, but a decisive French naval victory deprived him of an escape. A Franco-American army led by the Comte de Rochambeau and Washington then besieged Cornwallis' army and, with no sign of relief, he surrendered in October 1781. Whigs in Britain had long opposed the pro-war Tories in Parliament, and the surrender gave them the upper hand. In early 1782, Parliament voted to end all offensive operations in North America, but the war continued in Europe and India. Britain remained under siege in Gibraltar but scored a major victory over the French navy. On September 3, 1783, the belligerent parties signed the Treaty of Paris in which Great Britain agreed to recognize the sovereignty of the United States and formally end the war. French involvement had proven decisive,Brooks, Richard (editor). Atlas of World Military History. HarperCollins, 2000, p. 101 "Washington's success in keeping the army together deprived the British of victory, but French intervention won the war." but France made few gains and incurred crippling debts. Spain made some minor territorial gains but failed in its primary aim of recovering Gibraltar. The Dutch were defeated on all counts and were compelled to cede territory to Great Britain. In India, the war against Mysore and its allies concluded in 1784 without any territorial changes.

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Assassination of Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States, was assassinated by well-known stage actor John Wilkes Booth on April 14, 1865, while attending the play Our American Cousin at Ford's Theatre in Washington, D.C. Shot in the head as he watched the play, Lincoln died the following day at 7:22 a.m., in the Petersen House opposite the theater.

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BMT Broadway Line

The BMT Broadway Line is a rapid transit line of the B Division of the New York City Subway in Manhattan, New York City, United States.

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Broadway (Manhattan)

Broadway is a road in the U.S. state of New York.

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Brooklyn Bridge

The Brooklyn Bridge is a hybrid cable-stayed/suspension bridge in New York City and is one of the oldest roadway bridges in the United States.

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Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall/Chambers Street (New York City Subway)

Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall/Chambers Street is a New York City Subway station complex in Lower Manhattan.

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Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation

The Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT) was an urban transit holding company, based in Brooklyn, New York City, United States, and incorporated in 1923.

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Brownstone

Brownstone is a brown Triassic-Jurassic sandstone which was once a popular building material.

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Cable car

A cable car is any of a variety of cable transportation systems relying on cables to pull vehicles along or lower them at a steady rate.

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Cable television

Cable television is a system of delivering television programming to paying subscribers via radio frequency (RF) signals transmitted through coaxial cables, or in more recent systems, light pulses through fiber-optic cables.

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Castle Clinton

Castle Clinton or Fort Clinton, previously known as Castle Garden, is a circular sandstone fort now located in Battery Park, in Manhattan, New York City.

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Chambers Street (Manhattan)

Chambers Street is a two-way street in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

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Chambers Street–World Trade Center/Park Place (New York City Subway)

Chambers Street–World Trade Center/Park Place is a New York City Subway station complex on the IND Eighth Avenue Line and IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line.

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City Hall (BMT Broadway Line)

City Hall is a local station on the BMT Broadway Line of the New York City Subway in Tribeca and Civic Center, Manhattan.

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City Hall (film)

City Hall is a 1996 American suspense drama film directed by Harold Becker and starring Al Pacino, John Cusack, Bridget Fonda and Danny Aiello.

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City Hall (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)

City Hall, also known as City Hall Loop, was the original southern terminal station of the first line of the New York City Subway, built by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT), named the "Manhattan Main Line", and now part of the IRT Lexington Avenue Line.

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City Hall Post Office and Courthouse (New York City)

The City Hall Post Office and Courthouse was a building designed by the architect Alfred B. Mullett for a triangular site in New York City along Broadway in Civic Center, lower Manhattan, across City Hall Park from New York City Hall.

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Civic Center, Manhattan

The Civic Center is the area of lower Manhattan, New York City, that encompasses New York City Hall, One Police Plaza, the courthouses in Foley Square, and the surrounding area.

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Commons

The commons is the cultural and natural resources accessible to all members of a society, including natural materials such as air, water, and a habitable earth.

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Early history of the IRT subway

The first regularly operated subway in New York City was built by the city and leased to the Interborough Rapid Transit Company for operation under Contracts 1 and 2, along with contract 3 of the Dual Contracts.

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Elmer E. Ellsworth

Elmer Ephraim Ellsworth (April 11, 1837 – May 24, 1861) was a law clerk and United States Army soldier, best known as the first conspicuous casualty and the first Union officer killed in the American Civil War.

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Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (film)

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them is a 2016 fantasy film directed by David Yates.

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Federal Hall

Federal Hall is the name given to the first of two historic buildings located at 26 Wall Street, New York City.

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Fernando Wood

Fernando Wood (June 14, 1812 – February 14, 1881) was an American politician of the Democratic Party and the 73rd and 75th mayor of New York City; he also served as a United States Representative (1841–1843, 1863–1865, and 1867–1881) and as Chairman of the Committee on Ways and Means in both the 45th and 46th Congress (1877–1881).

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French Renaissance architecture

French Renaissance architecture is the name given to the French architecture, between the 15th and early 17th centuries, in different regions of the Kingdom of France.

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George Washington

George Washington (February 22, 1732 –, 1799), known as the "Father of His Country," was an American soldier and statesman who served from 1789 to 1797 as the first President of the United States.

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Georgian architecture

Georgian architecture is the name given in most English-speaking countries to the set of architectural styles current between 1714 and 1830.

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Ghostbusters

Ghostbusters is a 1984 American comedy film directed and produced by Ivan Reitman and written by Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis.

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Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette

Marie-Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette (6 September 1757 – 20 May 1834), in the United States often known simply as Lafayette, was a French aristocrat and military officer who fought in the American Revolutionary War.

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Government of New York City

The government of New York City, headquartered at New York City Hall in Lower Manhattan, is organized under the New York City Charter and provides for a "strong" mayor-council system.

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Government-access television

Government-access television (GATV) is a type of specialty television channel created by government entities (generally local governments) and broadcast over cable TV systems or, in some cases, over-the-air broadcast television stations.

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Gracie Mansion

Archibald Gracie Mansion (commonly called Gracie Mansion) is the official residence of the Mayor of the City of New York.

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Grosvenor Atterbury

Grosvenor Atterbury (July 7, 1869 in Detroit, MI – October 18, 1956 in Southampton, NY) was an American architect, urban planner and writer.

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Guastavino tile

Guastavino tile is the "Tile Arch System" patented in the United States in 1885 by Valencian (Spanish) architect and builder Rafael Guastavino (1842–1908).

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Harry Potter (film series)

Harry Potter is a British-American film series based on the Harry Potter novels by author J. K. Rowling.

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Hill International

Hill International is an American construction consulting firm.

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History of the New York City Police Department

The New York City Police Department (NYPD) had it origins in the city government of New York trying to find a better way to control the rising crime rate in early-mid 19th century New York City.

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Interborough Rapid Transit Company

The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the private operator of the original underground New York City Subway line that opened in 1904, as well as earlier elevated railways and additional rapid transit lines in New York City. The IRT was purchased by the city in June 1940. The former IRT lines (the numbered routes in the current subway system) are now the A Division or IRT Division of the Subway.

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James E. Davis (New York politician)

James E. Davis (April 3, 1962 – July 23, 2003) was a New York City police officer, corrections officer and council member.

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John Cusack

John Paul Cusack (born June 28, 1966) is an American actor, producer and screenwriter.

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John H. Duncan

John Hemenway Duncan (1855 – October 18, 1929) was an American architect.

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John McComb Jr.

John McComb Jr. (1763 in New York City, New York – 1853 in New York City, New York) was an American architect who designed many landmarks in the 18th and 19th centuries.

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John Trumbull

John Trumbull (June 6, 1756November 10, 1843) was an American artist during the period of the American Revolutionary War and was notable for his historical paintings.

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Joseph-François Mangin

Joseph-François Mangin was born on June 10, 1758 in Dompaire, in the Vosges region of France.

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Leopold Eidlitz

Leopold Eidlitz (March 10, 1823, Prague, Bohemia – 1908, New York City) was a prominent New York architect best known for his work on the New York State Capitol (Albany, New York, 1876–1881), as well as "Iranistan" (1848), P. T. Barnum's house in Bridgeport, Connecticut; St.

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List of New York City Borough Halls and municipal buildings

This is a List of New York City Borough Halls and municipal buildings used for civic agencies.

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Lists of New York City landmarks

These are lists of New York City Landmarks designated by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission.

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Liverpool

Liverpool is a city in North West England, with an estimated population of 491,500 in 2017.

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Lower Manhattan

Lower Manhattan, also known as Downtown Manhattan or Downtown New York, is the southernmost part of Manhattan, the central borough for business, culture, and government in the City of New York, which itself originated at the southern tip of Manhattan Island in 1624, at a point which now constitutes the present-day Financial District.

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Manhattan

Manhattan is the most densely populated borough of New York City, its economic and administrative center, and its historical birthplace.

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Manhattan Municipal Building

The David N. Dinkins Municipal Building, originally the Municipal Building and then the Manhattan Municipal Building, at 1 Centre Street in Manhattan, New York City, is a 40-story building built to accommodate increased governmental space demands after the 1898 consolidation of the city's five boroughs.

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Mayor of New York City

The Mayor of the City of New York is head of the executive branch of New York City's government.

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Michael Bloomberg

Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born on February 14, 1942) is an American businessman, engineer, author, politician, and philanthropist.

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Michael J. Fox

Michael Andrew Fox (born June 9, 1961), known professionally as Michael J. Fox, is a Canadian-American actor, author, producer, and activist with a film and television career spanning from the 1970s.

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Nassau Street (Manhattan)

Nassau Street is a street in the Financial District of New York City.

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National Historic Landmark

A National Historic Landmark (NHL) is a building, district, object, site, or structure that is officially recognized by the United States government for its outstanding historical significance.

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National Park Service

The National Park Service (NPS) is an agency of the United States federal government that manages all national parks, many national monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations.

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National Register of Historic Places

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance.

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New Amsterdam

New Amsterdam (Nieuw Amsterdam, or) was a 17th-century Dutch settlement established at the southern tip of Manhattan Island that served as the seat of the colonial government in New Netherland.

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New York (magazine)

New York is an American biweekly magazine concerned with life, culture, politics, and style generally, and with a particular emphasis on New York City.

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New York City

The City of New York, often called New York City (NYC) or simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States.

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New York City Council

The New York City Council is the lawmaking body of the City of New York.

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New York City Police Department

The City of New York Police Department, commonly known as the NYPD, is the primary law enforcement and investigation agency within the five boroughs of New York City.

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New York City Police riot

The New York City Police Riot of 1857, known at the time as the Great Police Riot, was a conflict which occurred in front of New York City Hall between the recently dissolved New York Municipal Police and the newly formed Metropolitan Police on June 16, 1857.

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New York City Subway

The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system owned by the City of New York and leased to the New York City Transit Authority, a subsidiary agency of the state-run Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA).

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Pace University

Pace University is a private institution that was founded in 1906.

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Park Row (Manhattan)

Park Row is a street located in the Financial District, Civic Center, and Chinatown neighborhoods of the New York City borough of Manhattan.

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Park Row Building

The Park Row Building is a building on Park Row bordering TriBeCa and the Financial District of the New York City borough of Manhattan also known as 15 Park Row.

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Pearl Street (Manhattan)

Pearl Street is a street in the Financial District in Lower Manhattan, running northeast from Battery Park to the Brooklyn Bridge with an interruption at Fulton Street, where Pearl Street's alignment west of Fulton Street shifts one block south of its alignment east of Fulton Street, then turning west and terminating at Centre Street.

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Renaissance Revival architecture

Renaissance Revival (sometimes referred to as "Neo-Renaissance") is a broad designation that covers many 19th century architectural revival styles which were neither Grecian (see Greek Revival) nor Gothic (see Gothic Revival) but which instead drew inspiration from a wide range of classicizing Italian modes.

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Seat of local government

In local government, a city hall, town hall, civic centre, (in the UK or Australia) a guildhall, a Rathaus (German), or (more rarely) a municipal building, is the chief administrative building of a city, town, or other municipality.

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Shreve, Lamb & Harmon

Shreve, Lamb, and Harmon, founded as Shreve & Lamb, was an architectural firm, best known for designing the Empire State Building, the tallest building in the world at the time of its completion in 1931.

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Spin City

Spin City is an American television sitcom that aired from September 17, 1996, until April 30, 2002, on ABC.

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St George's Hall, Liverpool

St George's Hall is on Lime Street in the centre of the English city of Liverpool, opposite Lime Street railway station.

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St. Patrick's Old Cathedral

The Basilica of Saint Patrick's Old Cathedral, or Old St.

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St. Paul's Chapel

St.

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St. Peter Catholic Church (Manhattan)

St.

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Surrogate's Courthouse

The Surrogate's Courthouse, also known as the Hall of Records, is a Beaux Arts municipal building in lower Manhattan in New York City.

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The Clancy Brothers

The Clancy Brothers were an influential Irish folk group, which initially developed as a part of the American folk music revival.

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The Dubliners

The Dubliners were an Irish folk band founded in Dublin in 1962 as The Ronnie Drew Ballad Group after its founding member; they subsequently renamed themselves The Dubliners.

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The Irish Rover

"The Irish Rover" is an Irish folk song about a magnificent, though improbable, sailing ship that reaches an unfortunate end.

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The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

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The Pogues

The Pogues were an Irish-British Celtic punk band formed in 1982 and fronted by Shane MacGowan.

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Tweed Courthouse

The Old New York County Courthouse at 52 Chambers Street in Manhattan, New York City, more commonly known as the Tweed Courthouse, was built in Italianate style with Romanesque Revival interiors, using funds provided by the corrupt William M. "Boss" Tweed, whose Tammany Hall political machine controlled the city and state governments at the time.

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Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses Simpson Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant; April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American soldier and statesman who served as Commanding General of the Army and the 18th President of the United States, the highest positions in the military and the government of the United States.

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United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

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United States ten-dollar bill

The United States ten-dollar bill ($10) is a denomination of U.S. currency.

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Wall Street

Wall Street is an eight-block-long street running roughly northwest to southeast from Broadway to South Street, at the East River, in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan in New York City.

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William Martin Aiken

William Martin Aiken (April 1, 1855 – December 7, 1908) was an American architect who served as Supervising Architect of the United States Treasury and oversaw and participated in the design and construction of numerous federal buildings during his appointment that now reside on the National Register of Historic Places.

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Woolworth Building

The Woolworth Building, at 233 Broadway, Manhattan, New York City, designed by architect Cass Gilbert and constructed between 1910 and 1912, is an early US skyscraper.

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World Trade Center site

The World Trade Center site, formerly referred to as "Ground Zero" after the September 11 attacks, is a 14.6-acre (5.9 ha) area in Lower Manhattan in New York City.

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Yellow fever

Yellow fever is a viral disease of typically short duration.

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1 Police Plaza

One Police Plaza (often abbreviated as 1PP) is the headquarters of the New York City Police Department (NYPD).

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11th New York Infantry

The 11th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment was an infantry regiment of the Union Army in the early years of the American Civil War.

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Redirects here:

City Hall (Manhattan), City Hall (New York City), City Hall (New York), City Hall, Manhattan, NYC Hall, New York City Hall Park, New York City Municipal Building.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_City_Hall

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