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New York Society Library

Index New York Society Library

The New York Society Library (NYSL) is the oldest cultural institution in New York City. [1]

102 relations: Alexander Hamilton, American Museum of Natural History, American Revolutionary War, Armenian Revolutionary Federation, Asbarez, Ashlar, Awning, B. Altman and Company, Baluster, Bay (architecture), Bracket (architecture), British Army, Broad Street (Manhattan), Broadway (Manhattan), Cardinal (Catholic Church), Chamber music, Charter, Coffer, Columbia University, Cornice, Course (architecture), David Halberstam, Doric order, Edgar Allan Poe, Erica Jong, Federal Hall, Fifth Avenue, Financial endowment, Fireplace mantel, Frieze, Full-time, Gable, George III of the United Kingdom, George Washington, Henry David Thoreau, Henry Hope Reed Jr., Herman Melville, History of architecture, Italian language, James De Lancey, John Adams, John James Audubon, John Winthrop, Library, Library catalog, Library of Congress, Libretto, Lillian Hellman, Limestone, List of colonial governors of New York, ..., List of museums and cultural institutions in New York City, List of New York City Designated Landmarks in Manhattan from 59th to 110th Streets, Lorenzo Da Ponte, Lower Manhattan, Madison Avenue, Manhattan, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Musket, Nassau Street (Manhattan), National Register of Historic Places, National Register of Historic Places listings in Manhattan from 59th to 110th Streets, New York (state), New York City, New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, New York Public Library, New York State Legislature, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, Nonprofit organization, Park Avenue, Part-time contract, PBS, Pediment, Pilaster, Puritans, Quoin, Quran, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Renaissance Revival architecture, Rum, Rustication (architecture), Sculpture, St. Regis Hotels & Resorts, Subscription library, Terrace (building), The New York Times, The New York Times Company, Tribeca, Trowbridge & Livingston, United States, United States Congress, United States Declaration of Independence, Upper East Side, Volunteering, W. H. Auden, Wadding, Wall Street, Washington, D.C., Wendy Wasserstein, Willa Cather, William Shakespeare, WNET, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Expand index (52 more) »

Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757July 12, 1804) was a statesman and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.

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American Museum of Natural History

The American Museum of Natural History (abbreviated as AMNH), located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City, is one of the largest museums in the world.

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American Revolutionary War

The American Revolutionary War (17751783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a global war that began as a conflict between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence as the United States of America. After 1765, growing philosophical and political differences strained the relationship between Great Britain and its colonies. Patriot protests against taxation without representation followed the Stamp Act and escalated into boycotts, which culminated in 1773 with the Sons of Liberty destroying a shipment of tea in Boston Harbor. Britain responded by closing Boston Harbor and passing a series of punitive measures against Massachusetts Bay Colony. Massachusetts colonists responded with the Suffolk Resolves, and they established a shadow government which wrested control of the countryside from the Crown. Twelve colonies formed a Continental Congress to coordinate their resistance, establishing committees and conventions that effectively seized power. British attempts to disarm the Massachusetts militia at Concord, Massachusetts in April 1775 led to open combat. Militia forces then besieged Boston, forcing a British evacuation in March 1776, and Congress appointed George Washington to command the Continental Army. Concurrently, an American attempt to invade Quebec and raise rebellion against the British failed decisively. On July 2, 1776, the Continental Congress voted for independence, issuing its declaration on July 4. Sir William Howe launched a British counter-offensive, capturing New York City and leaving American morale at a low ebb. However, victories at Trenton and Princeton restored American confidence. In 1777, the British launched an invasion from Quebec under John Burgoyne, intending to isolate the New England Colonies. Instead of assisting this effort, Howe took his army on a separate campaign against Philadelphia, and Burgoyne was decisively defeated at Saratoga in October 1777. Burgoyne's defeat had drastic consequences. France formally allied with the Americans and entered the war in 1778, and Spain joined the war the following year as an ally of France but not as an ally of the United States. In 1780, the Kingdom of Mysore attacked the British in India, and tensions between Great Britain and the Netherlands erupted into open war. In North America, the British mounted a "Southern strategy" led by Charles Cornwallis which hinged upon a Loyalist uprising, but too few came forward. Cornwallis suffered reversals at King's Mountain and Cowpens. He retreated to Yorktown, Virginia, intending an evacuation, but a decisive French naval victory deprived him of an escape. A Franco-American army led by the Comte de Rochambeau and Washington then besieged Cornwallis' army and, with no sign of relief, he surrendered in October 1781. Whigs in Britain had long opposed the pro-war Tories in Parliament, and the surrender gave them the upper hand. In early 1782, Parliament voted to end all offensive operations in North America, but the war continued in Europe and India. Britain remained under siege in Gibraltar but scored a major victory over the French navy. On September 3, 1783, the belligerent parties signed the Treaty of Paris in which Great Britain agreed to recognize the sovereignty of the United States and formally end the war. French involvement had proven decisive,Brooks, Richard (editor). Atlas of World Military History. HarperCollins, 2000, p. 101 "Washington's success in keeping the army together deprived the British of victory, but French intervention won the war." but France made few gains and incurred crippling debts. Spain made some minor territorial gains but failed in its primary aim of recovering Gibraltar. The Dutch were defeated on all counts and were compelled to cede territory to Great Britain. In India, the war against Mysore and its allies concluded in 1784 without any territorial changes.

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Armenian Revolutionary Federation

The Armenian Revolutionary Federation (ARF) (classical Հայ Յեղափոխական Դաշնակցութիւն, ՀՅԴ), also known as Dashnaktsutyun (in a short form, Dashnak), is an Armenian nationalist and socialist political party founded in 1890 in Tiflis, Russian Empire (now Tbilisi, Georgia) by Christapor Mikaelian, Stepan Zorian, and Simon Zavarian.

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Asbarez

Asbarez (Ասպարէզ "Arena") is an Armenian-American bilingual daily newspaper published in Armenian and English in Los Angeles, California, by the Western USA Central Committee of the Armenian Revolutionary Federation.

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Ashlar

Ashlar is finely dressed (cut, worked) stone, either an individual stone that has been worked until squared or the structure built of it.

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Awning

An awning or overhang is a secondary covering attached to the exterior wall of a building.

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B. Altman and Company

B.

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Baluster

A baluster—also called spindle or stair stick—is a moulded shaft, square or of lathe-turned form, cut from a rectangular or square plank, one of various forms of spindle in woodwork, made of stone or wood and sometimes of metal, standing on a unifying footing, and supporting the coping of a parapet or the handrail of a staircase.

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Bay (architecture)

In architecture, a bay is the space between architectural elements, or a recess or compartment.

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Bracket (architecture)

A bracket is an architectural element: a structural or decorative member.

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British Army

The British Army is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces.

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Broad Street (Manhattan)

Broad Street is a narrow street located in the Financial District in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

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Broadway (Manhattan)

Broadway is a road in the U.S. state of New York.

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Cardinal (Catholic Church)

A cardinal (Sanctae Romanae Ecclesiae cardinalis, literally Cardinal of the Holy Roman Church) is a senior ecclesiastical leader, considered a Prince of the Church, and usually an ordained bishop of the Roman Catholic Church.

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Chamber music

Chamber music is a form of classical music that is composed for a small group of instruments—traditionally a group that could fit in a palace chamber or a large room.

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Charter

A charter is the grant of authority or rights, stating that the granter formally recognizes the prerogative of the recipient to exercise the rights specified.

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Coffer

A coffer (or coffering) in architecture is a series of sunken panels in the shape of a square, rectangle, or octagon in a ceiling, soffit or vault.

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Columbia University

Columbia University (Columbia; officially Columbia University in the City of New York), established in 1754, is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City.

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Cornice

A cornice (from the Italian cornice meaning "ledge") is generally any horizontal decorative molding that crowns a building or furniture element – the cornice over a door or window, for instance, or the cornice around the top edge of a pedestal or along the top of an interior wall.

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Course (architecture)

A course is a layer of the same unit running horizontally in a wall.

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David Halberstam

David Halberstam (April 10, 1934April 23, 2007) was an American journalist and historian, known for his work on the Vietnam War, politics, history, the Civil Rights Movement, business, media, American culture, and later, sports journalism.

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Doric order

The Doric order was one of the three orders of ancient Greek and later Roman architecture; the other two canonical orders were the Ionic and the Corinthian.

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Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe (born Edgar Poe; January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American writer, editor, and literary critic.

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Erica Jong

Erica Jong (née Mann; born March 26, 1942) is an American novelist, satirist, and poet, known particularly for her 1973 novel Fear of Flying.

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Federal Hall

Federal Hall is the name given to the first of two historic buildings located at 26 Wall Street, New York City.

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Fifth Avenue

Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, United States.

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Financial endowment

A financial endowment is a donation of money or property to a nonprofit organization for the ongoing support of that organization.

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Fireplace mantel

The fireplace mantel or mantelpiece, also known as a chimneypiece, originated in medieval times as a hood that projected over a fire grate to catch the smoke.

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Frieze

In architecture the frieze is the wide central section part of an entablature and may be plain in the Ionic or Doric order, or decorated with bas-reliefs.

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Full-time

Full-time employment is employment in which a person works a minimum number of hours defined as such by his/her employer.

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Gable

A gable is the generally triangular portion of a wall between the edges of intersecting roof pitches.

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George III of the United Kingdom

George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death in 1820.

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George Washington

George Washington (February 22, 1732 –, 1799), known as the "Father of His Country," was an American soldier and statesman who served from 1789 to 1797 as the first President of the United States.

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Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau (see name pronunciation; July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) was an American essayist, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, and historian.

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Henry Hope Reed Jr.

Henry Hope Reed Jr. (September 25, 1915 – May 1, 2013), born in Manhattan, was an American architecture critic known for his advocacy of classical architecture and his outspoken criticism of modernist architecture.

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Herman Melville

Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, and poet of the American Renaissance period.

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History of architecture

The history of architecture traces the changes in architecture through various traditions, regions, overarching stylistic trends, and dates.

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Italian language

Italian (or lingua italiana) is a Romance language.

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James De Lancey

James De Lancey (November 27, 1703 – July 30, 1760) served as chief justice, lieutenant governor, and acting colonial governor of the Province of New York.

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John Adams

John Adams (October 30 [O.S. October 19] 1735 – July 4, 1826) was an American statesman and Founding Father who served as the first Vice President (1789–1797) and second President of the United States (1797–1801).

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John James Audubon

John James Audubon (born Jean Rabin; April 26, 1785 – January 27, 1851) was an American ornithologist, naturalist, and painter.

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John Winthrop

John Winthrop (12 January 1587/88 – 26 March 1649) was an English Puritan lawyer and one of the leading figures in founding the Massachusetts Bay Colony, the second major settlement in New England, following Plymouth Colony.

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Library

A library is a collection of sources of information and similar resources, made accessible to a defined community for reference or borrowing.

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Library catalog

A library catalog or library catalogue is a register of all bibliographic items found in a library or group of libraries, such as a network of libraries at several locations.

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Library of Congress

The Library of Congress (LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States.

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Libretto

A libretto is the text used in, or intended for, an extended musical work such as an opera, operetta, masque, oratorio, cantata or musical.

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Lillian Hellman

Lillian Florence Hellman (June 20, 1905 – June 30, 1984) was an American dramatist and screenwriter known for her success as a playwright on Broadway, as well as her left-wing sympathies and political activism.

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Limestone

Limestone is a sedimentary rock, composed mainly of skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral, forams and molluscs.

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List of colonial governors of New York

The territory which would later become the state of New York was settled by European colonists as part of the New Netherland colony (parts of present-day New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Delaware) under the command of the Dutch West India Company in the Seventeenth Century.

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List of museums and cultural institutions in New York City

New York City is home to hundreds of cultural institutions and historic sites, many of which are internationally known.

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List of New York City Designated Landmarks in Manhattan from 59th to 110th Streets

This is an incomplete list of landmarks in Manhattan from 59th Street to 110th Street designated by the New York City Landmark Preservation Commission.

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Lorenzo Da Ponte

Lorenzo Da Ponte (10 March 174917 August 1838) was an Italian, later American opera librettist, poet and Roman Catholic priest.

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Lower Manhattan

Lower Manhattan, also known as Downtown Manhattan or Downtown New York, is the southernmost part of Manhattan, the central borough for business, culture, and government in the City of New York, which itself originated at the southern tip of Manhattan Island in 1624, at a point which now constitutes the present-day Financial District.

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Madison Avenue

Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, United States, that carries northbound one-way traffic.

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Manhattan

Manhattan is the most densely populated borough of New York City, its economic and administrative center, and its historical birthplace.

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Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Metropolitan Museum of Art of New York, colloquially "the Met", is the largest art museum in the United States.

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Musket

A musket is a muzzle-loaded, smoothbore long gun that appeared in early 16th century Europe, at first as a heavier variant of the arquebus, capable of penetrating heavy armor.

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Nassau Street (Manhattan)

Nassau Street is a street in the Financial District of New York City.

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National Register of Historic Places

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance.

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National Register of Historic Places listings in Manhattan from 59th to 110th Streets

List of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Manhattan from 59th to 110th Streets This is intended to be a complete list of properties and districts listed on the National Register of Historic Places between 59th and 110th Streets in Manhattan.

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New York (state)

New York is a state in the northeastern United States.

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New York City

The City of New York, often called New York City (NYC) or simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States.

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New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) is the New York City agency charged with administering the city's Landmarks Preservation Law.

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New York Public Library

The New York Public Library (NYPL) is a public library system in New York City.

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New York State Legislature

New York State Legislature are the two houses that act as the state legislature of the U.S. state of New York.

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New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation

The New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (NYS OPRHP) is a state agency within the New York State Executive Department charged with the operation of state parks and historic sites within the U.S. state of New York.

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Nonprofit organization

A non-profit organization (NPO), also known as a non-business entity or non-profit institution, is dedicated to furthering a particular social cause or advocating for a shared point of view.

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Park Avenue

Park Avenue is a wide New York City boulevard which carries north and southbound traffic in the borough of Manhattan.

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Part-time contract

A part-time contract is a form of employment that carries fewer hours per week than a full-time job.

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PBS

The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) is an American public broadcaster and television program distributor.

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Pediment

A pediment is an architectural element found particularly in classical, neoclassical and baroque architecture, and its derivatives, consisting of a gable, usually of a triangular shape, placed above the horizontal structure of the entablature, typically supported by columns.

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Pilaster

The pilaster is an architectural element in classical architecture used to give the appearance of a supporting column and to articulate an extent of wall, with only an ornamental function.

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Puritans

The Puritans were English Reformed Protestants in the 16th and 17th centuries who sought to "purify" the Church of England from its "Catholic" practices, maintaining that the Church of England was only partially reformed.

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Quoin

Quoins are masonry blocks at the corner of a wall.

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Quran

The Quran (القرآن, literally meaning "the recitation"; also romanized Qur'an or Koran) is the central religious text of Islam, which Muslims believe to be a revelation from God (Allah).

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Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, philosopher, and poet who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century.

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Renaissance Revival architecture

Renaissance Revival (sometimes referred to as "Neo-Renaissance") is a broad designation that covers many 19th century architectural revival styles which were neither Grecian (see Greek Revival) nor Gothic (see Gothic Revival) but which instead drew inspiration from a wide range of classicizing Italian modes.

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Rum

Rum is a distilled alcoholic beverage made from sugarcane byproducts, such as molasses or honeys, or directly from sugarcane juice, by a process of fermentation and distillation.

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Rustication (architecture)

Two different styles of rustication in the Palazzo Medici-Riccardi in Florence; smooth-faced above and rough-faced below. In classical architecture rustication is a range of masonry techniques giving visible surfaces a finish that contrasts in texture with the smoothly finished, squared-block masonry surfaces called ashlar.

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Sculpture

Sculpture is the branch of the visual arts that operates in three dimensions.

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St. Regis Hotels & Resorts

St.

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Subscription library

A subscription library (also membership library or independent library) is a library that is financed by private funds either from membership fees or endowments.

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Terrace (building)

A terrace is an external, raised, open, flat area in either a landscape (such as a park or garden) near a building, or as a roof terrace on a flat roof.

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The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

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The New York Times Company

The New York Times Company is an American media company which publishes its namesake, The New York Times.

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Tribeca

Tribeca, originally written as TriBeCa, is a neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City.

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Trowbridge & Livingston

Trowbridge & Livingston was an architectural practice based in New York City in the early 20th century.

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United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

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United States Congress

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the Federal government of the United States.

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United States Declaration of Independence

The United States Declaration of Independence is the statement adopted by the Second Continental Congress meeting at the Pennsylvania State House (now known as Independence Hall) in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776.

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Upper East Side

The Upper East Side is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, between Central Park/Fifth Avenue, 59th Street, the East River, and 96th Street.

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Volunteering

Volunteering is generally considered an altruistic activity where an individual or group provides services for no financial or social gain "to benefit another person, group or organization".

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W. H. Auden

Wystan Hugh Auden (21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973) was an English-American poet.

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Wadding

Wadding is a disc of material used in guns to seal gas behind a projectile or to separate powder for shot.

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Wall Street

Wall Street is an eight-block-long street running roughly northwest to southeast from Broadway to South Street, at the East River, in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan in New York City.

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Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.

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Wendy Wasserstein

Wendy Wasserstein (October 18, 1950 – January 30, 2006) was an American playwright.

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Willa Cather

Willa Sibert Cather (December 7, 1873 Cather's birth date is confirmed by a birth certificate and a January 22, 1874, letter of her father's referring to her. While working at McClure's Magazine, Cather claimed to be born in 1875. After 1920, she claimed 1876 as her birth year. That is the date carved into her gravestone at Jaffrey, New Hampshire. – April 24, 1947 Retrieved March 11, 2015.) was an American writer who achieved recognition for her novels of frontier life on the Great Plains, including O Pioneers! (1913), The Song of the Lark (1915), and My Ántonia (1918).

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William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 (baptised)—23 April 1616) was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as both the greatest writer in the English language, and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.

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WNET

WNET, channel 13 (branded as THIRTEEN), is a non-commercial educational, public television station licensed to Newark, New Jersey and serving the New York metropolitan area.

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27 January 1756 – 5 December 1791), baptised as Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart, was a prolific and influential composer of the classical era.

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John S. Rogers House, John S. Rogers Mansion.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Society_Library

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