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Nitrite

Index Nitrite

The nitrite ion, which has the chemical formula, is a symmetric anion with equal N–O bond lengths. [1]

83 relations: Acid dissociation constant, Acid strength, Alfred Werner, Alkyl, Alkyl nitrites, Amino acid, Ammonia, Ammonium nitrite, Amyl nitrite, Aryl, Azo dye, Bipyridine, Botulism, Carcinogen, Chelation, Chemical formula, Chemische Berichte, Clostridium botulinum, Curing (food preservation), Diazonium compound, Dinitrogen trioxide, Disproportionation, Electron configuration, Endospore, Ester, Griess test, Haloalkane, Hydrazine, Hydrazoic acid, Hydrogen sulfide, Hyponitrous acid, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Isomer, Journal of the American Chemical Society, Lewis acids and bases, Liebigs Annalen, Ligand, List of IARC Group 2A carcinogens, Lone pair, Mediterranean diet, Metastability, Molecular orbital theory, Molecular symmetry, Myoglobin, Name reaction, Nitrate, Nitric oxide, Nitric oxide synthase, Nitrite reductase, Nitrosamine, ..., Nitrosation, Nitrous acid, Organic acid anhydride, Organic chemistry, Orgasm, Oxidation state, Parts-per notation, Permanganate, Pi bond, Polyatomic ion, Protonation, Reducing agent, Reduction potential, Resonance (chemistry), Sigma bond, Sodium ascorbate, Sodium carbonate, Sodium erythorbate, Sodium hydroxide, Sodium nitrite, Space-filling model, Stereoisomerism, Sulfanilic acid, Sulfur dioxide, Titration, United Nations, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Valence bond theory, Vasodilation, Viktor Meyer, Volt, World Health Organization, Xanthine oxidase. Expand index (33 more) »

Acid dissociation constant

An acid dissociation constant, Ka, (also known as acidity constant, or acid-ionization constant) is a quantitative measure of the strength of an acid in solution.

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Acid strength

The strength of an acid refers to its ability or tendency to lose a proton (H+).

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Alfred Werner

Alfred Werner (12 December 1866 – 15 November 1919) was a Swiss chemist who was a student at ETH Zurich and a professor at the University of Zurich.

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Alkyl

In organic chemistry, an alkyl substituent is an alkane missing one hydrogen.

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Alkyl nitrites

Alkyl nitrites are a group of chemical compounds based upon the molecular structure R-ONO.

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Amino acid

Amino acids are organic compounds containing amine (-NH2) and carboxyl (-COOH) functional groups, along with a side chain (R group) specific to each amino acid.

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Ammonia

Ammonia is a compound of nitrogen and hydrogen with the formula NH3.

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Ammonium nitrite

Ammonium nitrite, NH4NO2, is the ammonia salt of nitrous acid.

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Amyl nitrite

Amyl nitrite is a chemical compound with the formula C5H11ONO.

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Aryl

In the context of organic molecules, aryl is any functional group or substituent derived from an aromatic ring, usually an aromatic hydrocarbon, such as phenyl and naphthyl.

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Azo dye

Azo dyes are organic compounds bearing the functional group R−N.

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Bipyridine

Bipyridines also known as bipyridyls, dipyridyls, and dipyridines, are a family of chemical compounds with the formula (C5H4N)2, consisting of two pyridyl (C5H4N) rings.

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Botulism

Botulism is a rare and potentially fatal illness caused by a toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum.

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Carcinogen

A carcinogen is any substance, radionuclide, or radiation that promotes carcinogenesis, the formation of cancer.

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Chelation

Chelation is a type of bonding of ions and molecules to metal ions.

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Chemical formula

A chemical formula is a way of presenting information about the chemical proportions of atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound or molecule, using chemical element symbols, numbers, and sometimes also other symbols, such as parentheses, dashes, brackets, commas and plus (+) and minus (−) signs.

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Chemische Berichte

Chemische Berichte (usually abbreviated as Ber. or Chem. Ber.) was a German-language scientific journal of all disciplines of chemistry founded in 1868.

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Clostridium botulinum

Clostridium botulinum is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, anaerobic, spore-forming, motile bacterium with the ability to produce the neurotoxin botulinum.

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Curing (food preservation)

Curing is any of various food preservation and flavoring processes of foods such as meat, fish and vegetables, by the addition of combinations of salt, nitrates, nitrites,.

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Diazonium compound

Diazonium compounds or diazonium salts are a group of organic compounds sharing a common functional group where R can be any organic group, such as an alkyl or an aryl, and X is an inorganic or organic anion, such as a halogen.

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Dinitrogen trioxide

Dinitrogen trioxide is the chemical compound with the formula N2O3.

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Disproportionation

Disproportionation, sometimes called dismutation, is a redox reaction in which a compound of intermediate oxidation state converts to two different compounds, one of higher and one of lower oxidation states.

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Electron configuration

In atomic physics and quantum chemistry, the electron configuration is the distribution of electrons of an atom or molecule (or other physical structure) in atomic or molecular orbitals.

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Endospore

An endospore is a dormant, tough, and non-reproductive structure produced by certain bacteria from the Firmicute phylum.

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Ester

In chemistry, an ester is a chemical compound derived from an acid (organic or inorganic) in which at least one –OH (hydroxyl) group is replaced by an –O–alkyl (alkoxy) group.

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Griess test

The Griess test is an analytical chemistry test which detects the presence of nitrite ion in solution.

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Haloalkane

The haloalkanes (also known as halogenoalkanes or alkyl halides) are a group of chemical compounds derived from alkanes containing one or more halogens.

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Hydrazine

Hydrazine is an inorganic compound with the chemical formula (also written), called diamidogen, archaically.

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Hydrazoic acid

Hydrazoic acid, also known as hydrogen azide or azoimide, This also contains a detailed description of the contemporaneous production process.

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Hydrogen sulfide

Hydrogen sulfide is the chemical compound with the chemical formula H2S.

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Hyponitrous acid

Hyponitrous acid is a chemical compound with formula or HON.

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International Agency for Research on Cancer

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC; Centre International de Recherche sur le Cancer, CIRC) is an intergovernmental agency forming part of the World Health Organization of the United Nations.

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Isomer

An isomer (from Greek ἰσομερής, isomerès; isos.

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Journal of the American Chemical Society

The Journal of the American Chemical Society (also known as JACS) is a weekly peer-reviewed scientific journal that was established in 1879 by the American Chemical Society.

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Lewis acids and bases

A Lewis acid is a chemical species that contains an empty orbital which is capable of accepting an electron pair from a Lewis base to form a Lewis adduct.

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Liebigs Annalen

Justus Liebigs Annalen der Chemie (often cited as just Liebigs Annalen) was one of the oldest and historically most important journals in the field of organic chemistry worldwide.

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Ligand

In coordination chemistry, a ligand is an ion or molecule (functional group) that binds to a central metal atom to form a coordination complex.

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List of IARC Group 2A carcinogens

The agents in this list have been classified in Group 2A (probable carcinogens) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).

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Lone pair

In chemistry, a lone pair refers to a pair of valence electrons that are not shared with another atomIUPAC Gold Book definition: and is sometimes called a non-bonding pair.

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Mediterranean diet

The Mediterranean diet is a diet inspired by the eating habits of Greece, Southern Italy, and Spain in the 1940s and 1950s.

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Metastability

In physics, metastability is a stable state of a dynamical system other than the system's state of least energy.

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Molecular orbital theory

In chemistry, molecular orbital (MO) theory is a method for determining molecular structure in which electrons are not assigned to individual bonds between atoms, but are treated as moving under the influence of the nuclei in the whole molecule.

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Molecular symmetry

Molecular symmetry in chemistry describes the symmetry present in molecules and the classification of molecules according to their symmetry.

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Myoglobin

Myoglobin (symbol Mb or MB) is an iron- and oxygen-binding protein found in the muscle tissue of vertebrates in general and in almost all mammals.

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Name reaction

A name reaction is a chemical reaction named after its discoverers or developers.

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Nitrate

Nitrate is a polyatomic ion with the molecular formula and a molecular mass of 62.0049 u.

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Nitric oxide

Nitric oxide (nitrogen oxide or nitrogen monoxide) is a colorless gas with the formula NO.

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Nitric oxide synthase

Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) are a family of enzymes catalyzing the production of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine.

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Nitrite reductase

Nitrite reductase refers to any of several classes of enzymes that catalyze the reduction of nitrite.

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Nitrosamine

Nitrosamines are chemical compounds of the chemical structure R1N(–R2)–N.

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Nitrosation

Nitrosation is a process of converting organic compounds into nitroso derivatives, i.e. compounds containing the R-NO functionality.

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Nitrous acid

Nitrous acid (molecular formula HNO2) is a weak and monobasic acid known only in solution and in the form of nitrite salts.

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Organic acid anhydride

An organic acid anhydride is an acid anhydride that is an organic compound.

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Organic chemistry

Organic chemistry is a chemistry subdiscipline involving the scientific study of the structure, properties, and reactions of organic compounds and organic materials, i.e., matter in its various forms that contain carbon atoms.

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Orgasm

Orgasm (from Greek ὀργασμός orgasmos "excitement, swelling"; also sexual climax) is the sudden discharge of accumulated sexual excitement during the sexual response cycle, resulting in rhythmic muscular contractions in the pelvic region characterized by sexual pleasure.

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Oxidation state

The oxidation state, sometimes referred to as oxidation number, describes degree of oxidation (loss of electrons) of an atom in a chemical compound.

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Parts-per notation

In science and engineering, the parts-per notation is a set of pseudo-units to describe small values of miscellaneous dimensionless quantities, e.g. mole fraction or mass fraction.

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Permanganate

A permanganate is the general name for a chemical compound containing the manganate(VII) ion,.

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Pi bond

In chemistry, pi bonds (π bonds) are covalent chemical bonds where two lobes of an orbital on one atom overlap two lobes of an orbital on another atom.

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Polyatomic ion

A polyatomic ion, also known as a molecular ion, is a charged chemical species (ion) composed of two or more atoms covalently bonded or of a metal complex that can be considered to be acting as a single unit.

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Protonation

In chemistry, protonation is the addition of a proton (H+) to an atom, molecule, or ion, forming the conjugate acid.

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Reducing agent

A reducing agent (also called a reductant or reducer) is an element (such as calcium) or compound that loses (or "donates") an electron to another chemical species in a redox chemical reaction.

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Reduction potential

Reduction potential (also known as redox potential, oxidation / reduction potential, ORP, pE, ε, or E_) is a measure of the tendency of a chemical species to acquire electrons and thereby be reduced.

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Resonance (chemistry)

In chemistry, resonance or mesomerism is a way of describing delocalized electrons within certain molecules or polyatomic ions where the bonding cannot be expressed by one single Lewis structure.

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Sigma bond

In chemistry, sigma bonds (σ bonds) are the strongest type of covalent chemical bond.

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Sodium ascorbate

Sodium ascorbate is one of a number of mineral salts of ascorbic acid (vitamin C).

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Sodium carbonate

Sodium carbonate, Na2CO3, (also known as washing soda, soda ash and soda crystals, and in the monohydrate form as crystal carbonate) is the water-soluble sodium salt of carbonic acid.

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Sodium erythorbate

Sodium erythorbate (C6H7NaO6) is a food additive used predominantly in meats, poultry, and soft drinks.

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Sodium hydroxide

Sodium hydroxide, also known as lye, is an inorganic compound with the formula NaOH. It is a white solid ionic compound consisting of sodium cations and hydroxide anions. Sodium hydroxide is a highly caustic base and alkali that decomposes proteins at ordinary ambient temperatures and may cause severe chemical burns. It is highly soluble in water, and readily absorbs moisture and carbon dioxide from the air. It forms a series of hydrates NaOH·n. The monohydrate NaOH· crystallizes from water solutions between 12.3 and 61.8 °C. The commercially available "sodium hydroxide" is often this monohydrate, and published data may refer to it instead of the anhydrous compound. As one of the simplest hydroxides, it is frequently utilized alongside neutral water and acidic hydrochloric acid to demonstrate the pH scale to chemistry students. Sodium hydroxide is used in many industries: in the manufacture of pulp and paper, textiles, drinking water, soaps and detergents, and as a drain cleaner. Worldwide production in 2004 was approximately 60 million tonnes, while demand was 51 million tonnes.

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Sodium nitrite

Sodium nitrite is the inorganic compound with the chemical formula NaNO2.

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Space-filling model

In chemistry, a space-filling model, also known as a calotte model, is a type of three-dimensional (3D) molecular model where the atoms are represented by spheres whose radii are proportional to the radii of the atoms and whose center-to-center distances are proportional to the distances between the atomic nuclei, all in the same scale.

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Stereoisomerism

In stereochemistry, stereoisomers are isomeric molecules that have the same molecular formula and sequence of bonded atoms (constitution), but differ in the three-dimensional orientations of their atoms in space.

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Sulfanilic acid

Sulfanilic acid (4-aminobenzenesulfonic acid) is an off-white crystalline solid which finds application in quantitative analysis of nitrate and nitrite ions.

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Sulfur dioxide

Sulfur dioxide (also sulphur dioxide in British English) is the chemical compound with the formula.

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Titration

Titration, also known as titrimetry, is a common laboratory method of quantitative chemical analysis that is used to determine the concentration of an identified analyte.

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United Nations

The United Nations (UN) is an intergovernmental organization tasked to promote international cooperation and to create and maintain international order.

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United States Department of Health and Human Services

The United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), also known as the Health Department, is a cabinet-level department of the U.S. federal government with the goal of protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services.

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Valence bond theory

In chemistry, valence bond (VB) theory is one of two basic theories, along with molecular orbital (MO) theory, that were developed to use the methods of quantum mechanics to explain chemical bonding.

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Vasodilation

Vasodilation is the widening of blood vessels.

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Viktor Meyer

Viktor Meyer (8 September 1848 – 8 August 1897) was a German chemist and significant contributor to both organic and inorganic chemistry.

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Volt

The volt (symbol: V) is the derived unit for electric potential, electric potential difference (voltage), and electromotive force.

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World Health Organization

The World Health Organization (WHO; French: Organisation mondiale de la santé) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with international public health.

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Xanthine oxidase

Xanthine oxidase (XO, sometimes XAO) is a form of xanthine oxidoreductase, a type of enzyme that generates reactive oxygen species.

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Redirects here:

(NO2)-, Dinitrite, Meyer reaction, Meyer synthesis, NO2-, NO2−, NO₂⁻, Nitrate(III), Nitrite ion, Nitrites.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrite

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