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Norwegian phonology

Index Norwegian phonology

The sound system of Norwegian resembles that of Swedish. [1]

77 relations: Allophone, Alveolar consonant, Alveolo-palatal consonant, Apical consonant, Approximant consonant, Aschehoug, Aust-Agder, Back vowel, Bergen, Bodø, Brønnøysund, Central vowel, Close vowel, Colon (punctuation), Coronal consonant, Danish dialects, Danish language, Danish phonology, Denmark–Norway, Dental consonant, Denti-alveolar consonant, Dorsal consonant, Faroese language, Flap consonant, Fricative consonant, Front vowel, Glottal consonant, Guttural, Icelandic language, Ingressive sound, Intonation (linguistics), Labial consonant, Laminal consonant, Lofoten, Mid vowel, Mora (linguistics), Nasal consonant, Nina Grønnum, Nordmøre, Nordstrand, Norway, Norwegian dialects, Norwegian language, Norwegian language conflict, Norwegian romantic nationalism, Old Norse, Open vowel, Oppdal, Oslo, Palatal consonant, Pitch-accent language, ..., Postalveolar consonant, Preterite, Retroflex consonant, Retroflex flap, Roundedness, Russia, Sandhi, Secondary stress, Stop consonant, Swedish language, Swedish phonology, The North Wind and the Sun, Tone (linguistics), Trøndelag, Trøndersk, Tromsø, Trondheimsk, University of Oslo, Urban East Norwegian, Uvular trill, Velar consonant, Vestlandsk, Voice (phonetics), Voiced uvular fricative, Voiceless uvular fricative, Voicelessness, Vowel length. Expand index (27 more) »

Allophone

In phonology, an allophone (from the ἄλλος, állos, "other" and φωνή, phōnē, "voice, sound") is one of a set of multiple possible spoken sounds, or phones, or signs used to pronounce a single phoneme in a particular language.

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Alveolar consonant

Alveolar consonants are articulated with the tongue against or close to the superior alveolar ridge, which is called that because it contains the alveoli (the sockets) of the superior teeth.

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Alveolo-palatal consonant

In phonetics, alveolo-palatal (or alveopalatal) consonants, sometimes synonymous with pre-palatal consonants, are intermediate in articulation between the coronal and dorsal consonants, or which have simultaneous alveolar and palatal articulation.

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Apical consonant

An apical consonant is a phone (speech sound) produced by obstructing the air passage with the tip of the tongue.

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Approximant consonant

Approximants are speech sounds that involve the articulators approaching each other but not narrowly enough nor with enough articulatory precision to create turbulent airflow.

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Aschehoug

H.

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Aust-Agder

Aust-Agder (East Agder) is one of 18 counties (fylker) in Norway, bordering Telemark, Rogaland, and Vest-Agder counties.

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Back vowel

A back vowel is any in a class of vowel sound used in spoken languages.

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Bergen

Bergen, historically Bjørgvin, is a city and municipality in Hordaland on the west coast of Norway.

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Bodø

Bodø (Bådåddjo) is a town and a municipality in Nordland county, Norway.

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Brønnøysund

Brønnøysund is a town and the administrative centre of the municipality of Brønnøy, Norway.

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Central vowel

A central vowel is any in a class of vowel sound used in some spoken languages.

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Close vowel

A close vowel, also known as a high vowel (in American terminology), is any in a class of vowel sound used in many spoken languages.

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Colon (punctuation)

The colon is a punctuation mark consisting of two equally sized dots centered on the same vertical line.

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Coronal consonant

Coronal consonants are consonants articulated with the flexible front part of the tongue.

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Danish dialects

The Danish language has a number of regional and local dialect varieties.

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Danish language

Danish (dansk, dansk sprog) is a North Germanic language spoken by around six million people, principally in Denmark and in the region of Southern Schleswig in northern Germany, where it has minority language status.

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Danish phonology

The phonology of Danish is similar to that of the other Scandinavian languages such as Swedish and Norwegian, but it also has distinct features setting it apart from the phonologies of its most closely related languages.

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Denmark–Norway

Denmark–Norway (Danish and Norwegian: Danmark–Norge or Danmark–Noreg; also known as the Oldenburg Monarchy or the Oldenburg realms) was an early modern multi-national and multi-lingual real unionFeldbæk 1998:11 consisting of the Kingdom of Denmark, the Kingdom of Norway (including Norwegian overseas possessions the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Greenland, et cetera), the Duchy of Schleswig, and the Duchy of Holstein.

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Dental consonant

A dental consonant is a consonant articulated with the tongue against the upper teeth, such as,,, and in some languages.

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Denti-alveolar consonant

In linguistics, a denti-alveolar consonant or dento-alveolar consonant is a consonant that is articulated with a flat tongue against the alveolar ridge and upper teeth, such as and in languages such as Spanish and French.

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Dorsal consonant

Dorsal consonants are articulated with the back of the tongue (the dorsum).

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Faroese language

Faroese (føroyskt mál,; færøsk) is a North Germanic language spoken as a first language by about 66,000 people, 45,000 of whom reside on the Faroe Islands and 21,000 in other areas, mainly Denmark.

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Flap consonant

In phonetics, a flap or tap is a type of consonantal sound, which is produced with a single contraction of the muscles so that one articulator (such as the tongue) is thrown against another.

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Fricative consonant

Fricatives are consonants produced by forcing air through a narrow channel made by placing two articulators close together.

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Front vowel

A front vowel is any in a class of vowel sound used in some spoken languages, its defining characteristic being that the highest point of the tongue is positioned relatively in front in the mouth without creating a constriction that would make it a consonant.

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Glottal consonant

Glottal consonants are consonants using the glottis as their primary articulation.

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Guttural

Guttural speech sounds are those with a primary place of articulation near the back of the oral cavity.

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Icelandic language

Icelandic (íslenska) is a North Germanic language, and the language of Iceland.

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Ingressive sound

In phonetics, ingressive sounds are sounds by which the airstream flows inward through the mouth or nose.

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Intonation (linguistics)

In linguistics, intonation is variation in spoken pitch when used, not for distinguishing words (a concept known as tone), but, rather, for a range of other functions such as indicating the attitudes and emotions of the speaker, signalling the difference between statements and questions, and between different types of questions, focusing attention on important elements of the spoken message and also helping to regulate conversational interaction.

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Labial consonant

Labial consonants are consonants in which one or both lips are the active articulator.

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Laminal consonant

A laminal consonant is a phone produced by obstructing the air passage with the blade of the tongue, the flat top front surface just behind the tip of the tongue on the top.

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Lofoten

Lofoten is an archipelago and a traditional district in the county of Nordland, Norway.

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Mid vowel

A mid vowel (or a true-mid vowel) is any in a class of vowel sounds used in some spoken languages.

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Mora (linguistics)

A mora (plural morae or moras; often symbolized μ) is a unit in phonology that determines syllable weight, which in some languages determines stress or timing.

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Nasal consonant

In phonetics, a nasal, also called a nasal occlusive, nasal stop in contrast with a nasal fricative, or nasal continuant, is an occlusive consonant produced with a lowered velum, allowing air to escape freely through the nose.

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Nina Grønnum

Nina Grønnum (born 1945) is a Danish retired phonetician.

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Nordmøre

Nordmøre (English: North-Møre) is a traditional district in the Norwegian county of Møre og Romsdal.

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Nordstrand, Norway

Nordstrand is a district of the city of Oslo, Norway.

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Norwegian dialects

The Norwegian dialects are commonly divided into 4 main groups, 'Northern Norwegian' (nordnorsk), 'Central Norwegian' (trøndersk), 'Western Norwegian' (vestlandsk), and 'Eastern Norwegian' (østnorsk).

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Norwegian language

Norwegian (norsk) is a North Germanic language spoken mainly in Norway, where it is the official language.

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Norwegian language conflict

The Norwegian language conflict (målstriden, språkstriden or sprogstriden) is an ongoing controversy within Norwegian culture and politics related to the written versions of the Norwegian language.

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Norwegian romantic nationalism

Norwegian romantic nationalism (Nasjonalromantikken) was a movement in Norway between 1840 and 1867 in art, literature, and popular culture that emphasized the aesthetics of Norwegian nature and the uniqueness of the Norwegian national identity.

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Old Norse

Old Norse was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia and inhabitants of their overseas settlements from about the 9th to the 13th century.

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Open vowel

An open vowel is a vowel sound in which the tongue is positioned as far as possible from the roof of the mouth.

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Oppdal

is a municipality in Trøndelag county, Norway.

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Oslo

Oslo (rarely) is the capital and most populous city of Norway.

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Palatal consonant

Palatal consonants are consonants articulated with the body of the tongue raised against the hard palate (the middle part of the roof of the mouth).

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Pitch-accent language

A pitch-accent language is a language that has word-accents—that is, where one syllable in a word or morpheme is more prominent than the others, but the accentuated syllable is indicated by a particular pitch contour (linguistic tones) rather than by stress.

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Postalveolar consonant

Postalveolar consonants (sometimes spelled post-alveolar) are consonants articulated with the tongue near or touching the back of the alveolar ridge, farther back in the mouth than the alveolar consonants, which are at the ridge itself but not as far back as the hard palate, the place of articulation for palatal consonants.

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Preterite

The preterite (abbreviated or) is a grammatical tense or verb form serving to denote events that took place or were completed in the past.

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Retroflex consonant

A retroflex consonant is a coronal consonant where the tongue has a flat, concave, or even curled shape, and is articulated between the alveolar ridge and the hard palate.

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Retroflex flap

The retroflex flap is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.

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Roundedness

In phonetics, vowel roundedness refers to the amount of rounding in the lips during the articulation of a vowel.

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Russia

Russia (rɐˈsʲijə), officially the Russian Federation (p), is a country in Eurasia. At, Russia is the largest country in the world by area, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area, and the ninth most populous, with over 144 million people as of December 2017, excluding Crimea. About 77% of the population live in the western, European part of the country. Russia's capital Moscow is one of the largest cities in the world; other major cities include Saint Petersburg, Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg and Nizhny Novgorod. Extending across the entirety of Northern Asia and much of Eastern Europe, Russia spans eleven time zones and incorporates a wide range of environments and landforms. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland (both with Kaliningrad Oblast), Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk and the U.S. state of Alaska across the Bering Strait. The East Slavs emerged as a recognizable group in Europe between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD. Founded and ruled by a Varangian warrior elite and their descendants, the medieval state of Rus arose in the 9th century. In 988 it adopted Orthodox Christianity from the Byzantine Empire, beginning the synthesis of Byzantine and Slavic cultures that defined Russian culture for the next millennium. Rus' ultimately disintegrated into a number of smaller states; most of the Rus' lands were overrun by the Mongol invasion and became tributaries of the nomadic Golden Horde in the 13th century. The Grand Duchy of Moscow gradually reunified the surrounding Russian principalities, achieved independence from the Golden Horde. By the 18th century, the nation had greatly expanded through conquest, annexation, and exploration to become the Russian Empire, which was the third largest empire in history, stretching from Poland on the west to Alaska on the east. Following the Russian Revolution, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic became the largest and leading constituent of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the world's first constitutionally socialist state. The Soviet Union played a decisive role in the Allied victory in World War II, and emerged as a recognized superpower and rival to the United States during the Cold War. The Soviet era saw some of the most significant technological achievements of the 20th century, including the world's first human-made satellite and the launching of the first humans in space. By the end of 1990, the Soviet Union had the world's second largest economy, largest standing military in the world and the largest stockpile of weapons of mass destruction. Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, twelve independent republics emerged from the USSR: Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and the Baltic states regained independence: Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania; the Russian SFSR reconstituted itself as the Russian Federation and is recognized as the continuing legal personality and a successor of the Soviet Union. It is governed as a federal semi-presidential republic. The Russian economy ranks as the twelfth largest by nominal GDP and sixth largest by purchasing power parity in 2015. Russia's extensive mineral and energy resources are the largest such reserves in the world, making it one of the leading producers of oil and natural gas globally. The country is one of the five recognized nuclear weapons states and possesses the largest stockpile of weapons of mass destruction. Russia is a great power as well as a regional power and has been characterised as a potential superpower. It is a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council and an active global partner of ASEAN, as well as a member of the G20, the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO), the Council of Europe, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), and the World Trade Organization (WTO), as well as being the leading member of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) and one of the five members of the Eurasian Economic Union (EEU), along with Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.

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Sandhi

SandhiThe pronunciation of the word "sandhi" is rather diverse among English speakers.

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Secondary stress

Secondary stress (or obsolete: secondary accent) is the weaker of two degrees of stress in the pronunciation of a word; the stronger degree of stress being called primary.

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Stop consonant

In phonetics, a stop, also known as a plosive or oral occlusive, is a consonant in which the vocal tract is blocked so that all airflow ceases.

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Swedish language

Swedish is a North Germanic language spoken natively by 9.6 million people, predominantly in Sweden (as the sole official language), and in parts of Finland, where it has equal legal standing with Finnish.

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Swedish phonology

Swedish has a large vowel inventory, with nine vowels distinguished in quality and to some degree quantity, making 17 vowel phonemes in most dialects.

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The North Wind and the Sun

The North Wind and the Sun is one of Aesop's Fables (Perry Index 46).

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Tone (linguistics)

Tone is the use of pitch in language to distinguish lexical or grammatical meaning – that is, to distinguish or to inflect words.

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Trøndelag

Trøndelag is a county in the central part of Norway.

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Trøndersk

Trøndersk, also known as trøndermål, trøndsk and trønder, is a Norwegian dialect, or rather a group of several sub-dialects.

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Tromsø

Tromsø (Romsa; Tromssa; Tromssa) is a city and municipality in Troms county, Norway.

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Trondheimsk

Trondheimsk, Trondheim dialect or Trondheim Norwegian is a dialect of Norwegian used in Trondheim.

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University of Oslo

The University of Oslo (Universitetet i Oslo), until 1939 named the Royal Frederick University (Det Kongelige Frederiks Universitet), is the oldest university in Norway, located in the Norwegian capital of Oslo.

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Urban East Norwegian

Urban East Norwegian (UEN) or Standard East Norwegian (Bokmål: standard østnorsk, Nynorsk: standard austnorsk) is the de facto standard variety of East Norwegian and an unofficial spoken standard of Bokmål.

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Uvular trill

The uvular trill is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.

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Velar consonant

Velars are consonants articulated with the back part of the tongue (the dorsum) against the soft palate, the back part of the roof of the mouth (known also as the velum).

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Vestlandsk

Vestandsk or Vestlandske dialekter (West Norwegian) is a collective term for the dialects that are spoken on the coast of western Norway in the area ranging from Romsdal in the north to Agder in the south.

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Voice (phonetics)

Voice is a term used in phonetics and phonology to characterize speech sounds (usually consonants).

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Voiced uvular fricative

The voiced uvular fricative or approximant is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.

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Voiceless uvular fricative

The voiceless uvular fricative is a type of consonantal sound used in some spoken languages.

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Voicelessness

In linguistics, voicelessness is the property of sounds being pronounced without the larynx vibrating.

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Vowel length

In linguistics, vowel length is the perceived duration of a vowel sound.

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Redirects here:

Norwegian Bokmål phonology, Norwegian Nynorsk phonology, Norwegian accent, Norwegian pronunciation.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norwegian_phonology

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