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Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

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Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, most commonly known as NMR spectroscopy or magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), is a spectroscopic technique to observe local magnetic fields around atomic nuclei. [1]

108 relations: Acronym, Anatole Abragam, Angular momentum coupling, Aromaticity, Atomic nucleus, Benchtop nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, Carbohydrate, Carbon-13, Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance, Charles Pence Slichter, Chemical Science (journal), Color reaction, Conformation–activity relationship, Cyclic compound, Degenerate energy levels, Deuterium, Dihedral angle, Distance geometry problem, DNA, Earth's field NMR, Edward Mills Purcell, Electromagnetic radiation, Felix Bloch, Fick's laws of diffusion, Fourier transform, Free induction decay, Functional group, Functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain, Glycosidic bond, Harvard University, Hertz, Heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectroscopy, Hydrocarbon, Hydrogen, Hydrogen bond, Hyperfine structure, In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Integral, Intrinsically disordered proteins, Isotope, J-coupling, John D. Roberts, John Emsley, John Pople, Karplus equation, Liquid helium, Low field nuclear magnetic resonance, Magic angle, Magic angle spinning, Magnetic resonance imaging, ..., Millisecond, Molecule, Nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, NMR tube, Nobel Prize in Physics, Nuclear magnetic moment, Nuclear magnetic resonance, Nuclear magnetic resonance crystallography, Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra database, Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of carbohydrates, Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of nucleic acids, Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of proteins, Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of stereoisomers, Nuclear Overhauser effect, Nuclear quadrupole resonance, Nucleic acid, Nucleic acid double helix, Nucleic acid tertiary structure, Order of magnitude, Organic chemistry, Organic compound, Paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Parts-per notation, Pascal's triangle, Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance, Polar effect, Pople notation, Protein, Proton nuclear magnetic resonance, Proton-enhanced nuclear induction spectroscopy, Pseudoknot, Pulsed field magnet, Radio wave, Relaxation (NMR), Richard R. Ernst, RNA, Shim (magnetism), Signal-to-noise ratio, Sine wave, Small molecule, Spectroscopy, Spin (physics), Spin quantum number, Stanford University, Stem-loop, Structural biology, Superconductivity, Tesla (unit), Tetramethylsilane, Triple-resonance nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Unified atomic mass unit, University of California, Irvine, University of Cambridge, Wet chemistry, William G. Schneider, X-ray crystallography, Zero field NMR. Expand index (58 more) »

Acronym

An acronym is a word or name formed as an abbreviation from the initial components in a phrase or a word, usually individual letters (as in NATO or laser) and sometimes syllables (as in Benelux).

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Anatole Abragam

Anatole Abragam (December 15, 1914 – June 8, 2011) was a French physicist who wrote The Principles of Nuclear Magnetism and made significant contributions to the field of nuclear magnetic resonance.

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Angular momentum coupling

In quantum mechanics, the procedure of constructing eigenstates of total angular momentum out of eigenstates of separate angular momenta is called angular momentum coupling.

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Aromaticity

In organic chemistry, the term aromaticity is used to describe a cyclic (ring-shaped), planar (flat) molecule with a ring of resonance bonds that exhibits more stability than other geometric or connective arrangements with the same set of atoms.

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Atomic nucleus

The atomic nucleus is the small, dense region consisting of protons and neutrons at the center of an atom, discovered in 1911 by Ernest Rutherford based on the 1909 Geiger–Marsden gold foil experiment.

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Benchtop nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

A Benchtop nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer (Benchtop NMR spectrometer) refers to a Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FT-NMR) spectrometer that is significantly more compact and portable than the conventional equivalents, such that it is portable and can reside on a laboratory benchtop.

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Carbohydrate

A carbohydrate is a biomolecule consisting of carbon (C), hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) atoms, usually with a hydrogen–oxygen atom ratio of 2:1 (as in water); in other words, with the empirical formula (where m may be different from n).

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Carbon-13

Carbon-13 (13C) is a natural, stable isotope of carbon with a nucleus containing six protons and seven neutrons.

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Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance

Carbon-13 (C13)nuclear magnetic resonance (most commonly known as carbon-13 NMR or 13C NMR or sometimes simply referred to as carbon NMR) is the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to carbon.

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Charles Pence Slichter

Charles Pence Slichter (January 21, 1924 – February 19, 2018) was an American physicist, best known for his work on nuclear magnetic resonance and superconductivity.

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Chemical Science (journal)

Chemical Science is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal covering all aspects of chemistry.

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Color reaction

In chemistry, a color reaction or colour reaction is a chemical reaction that is used to transform colorless chemical compounds into colored derivatives which can be detected visually or with the aid of a colorimeter.

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Conformation–activity relationship

The conformation–activity relationship is the relationship between the biological activity and the chemical structure or conformational changes of a biomolecule.

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Cyclic compound

A cyclic compound (ring compound) is a term for a compound in the field of chemistry in which one or more series of atoms in the compound is connected to form a ring.

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Degenerate energy levels

In quantum mechanics, an energy level is degenerate if it corresponds to two or more different measurable states of a quantum system.

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Deuterium

Deuterium (or hydrogen-2, symbol or, also known as heavy hydrogen) is one of two stable isotopes of hydrogen (the other being protium, or hydrogen-1).

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Dihedral angle

A dihedral angle is the angle between two intersecting planes.

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Distance geometry problem

The distance geometry problem is that of characterization and study of sets of points based only on given values of the distances between member pairs.

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DNA

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a thread-like chain of nucleotides carrying the genetic instructions used in the growth, development, functioning and reproduction of all known living organisms and many viruses.

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Earth's field NMR

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in the geomagnetic field is conventionally referred to as Earth's field NMR (EFNMR).

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Edward Mills Purcell

Edward Mills Purcell (August 30, 1912 – March 7, 1997) was an American physicist who shared the 1952 Nobel Prize for Physics for his independent discovery (published 1946) of nuclear magnetic resonance in liquids and in solids.

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Electromagnetic radiation

In physics, electromagnetic radiation (EM radiation or EMR) refers to the waves (or their quanta, photons) of the electromagnetic field, propagating (radiating) through space-time, carrying electromagnetic radiant energy.

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Felix Bloch

Felix Bloch (23 October 1905 – 10 September 1983) was a Swiss physicist, working mainly in the U.S. He and Edward Mills Purcell were awarded the 1952 Nobel Prize for Physics for "their development of new ways and methods for nuclear magnetic precision measurements."Sohlman, M (Ed.) Nobel Foundation directory 2003. Vastervik, Sweden: AB CO Ekblad; 2003.

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Fick's laws of diffusion

Fick's laws of diffusion describe diffusion and were derived by Adolf Fick in 1855.

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Fourier transform

The Fourier transform (FT) decomposes a function of time (a signal) into the frequencies that make it up, in a way similar to how a musical chord can be expressed as the frequencies (or pitches) of its constituent notes.

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Free induction decay

In Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, free induction decay (FID) is the observable NMR signal generated by non-equilibrium nuclear spin magnetization precessing about the magnetic field (conventionally along z).

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Functional group

In organic chemistry, functional groups are specific substituents or moieties within molecules that are responsible for the characteristic chemical reactions of those molecules.

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Functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain

Functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain (fMRS) uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study brain metabolism during brain activation.

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Glycosidic bond

In chemistry, a glycosidic bond or glycosidic linkage is a type of covalent bond that joins a carbohydrate (sugar) molecule to another group, which may or may not be another carbohydrate.

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Harvard University

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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Hertz

The hertz (symbol: Hz) is the derived unit of frequency in the International System of Units (SI) and is defined as one cycle per second.

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Heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectroscopy

The heteronuclear single quantum coherence or heteronuclear single quantum correlation experiment, normally abbreviated as HSQC, is used frequently in NMR spectroscopy of organic molecules and is of particular significance in the field of protein NMR.

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Hydrocarbon

In organic chemistry, a hydrocarbon is an organic compound consisting entirely of hydrogen and carbon.

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Hydrogen

Hydrogen is a chemical element with symbol H and atomic number 1.

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Hydrogen bond

A hydrogen bond is a partially electrostatic attraction between a hydrogen (H) which is bound to a more electronegative atom such as nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), or fluorine (F), and another adjacent atom bearing a lone pair of electrons.

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Hyperfine structure

In atomic physics, hyperfine structure refers to small shifts and splittings in the energy levels of atoms, molecules and ions, due to interaction between the state of the nucleus and the state of the electron clouds.

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In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy

In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a specialized technique associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

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Integral

In mathematics, an integral assigns numbers to functions in a way that can describe displacement, area, volume, and other concepts that arise by combining infinitesimal data.

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Intrinsically disordered proteins

An intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) is a protein that lacks a fixed or ordered three-dimensional structure.

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Isotope

Isotopes are variants of a particular chemical element which differ in neutron number.

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J-coupling

In nuclear chemistry and nuclear physics, Scalar or J-couplings (also called indirect dipole–dipole coupling) are mediated through chemical bonds connecting two spins.

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John D. Roberts

John Dombrowski Roberts (June 8, 1918 – October 29, 2016) was an American chemist.

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John Emsley

Dr John Emsley (born 1938) is a UK popular science writer, broadcaster and academic specialising in chemistry.

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John Pople

Sir John Anthony Pople, (31 October 1925 – 15 March 2004) was a British theoretical chemist who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Walter Kohn in 1998 for his development of computational methods in quantum chemistry.

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Karplus equation

The Karplus equation, named after Martin Karplus, describes the correlation between 3J-coupling constants and dihedral torsion angles in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: where J is the 3J coupling constant, \phi is the dihedral angle, and A, B, and C are empirically derived parameters whose values depend on the atoms and substituents involved.

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Liquid helium

At standard pressure, the chemical element helium exists in a liquid form only at the extremely low temperature of −270 °C (about 4 K or −452.2 °F).

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Low field nuclear magnetic resonance

Low field NMR spans a range of different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) modalities, going from NMR conducted in permanent magnets, supporting magnetic fields of a few T, all the way down to zero field NMR, where the Earth's field is carefully shielded such that magnetic fields of nT are achieved where nuclear spin precession is close to zero.

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Magic angle

The magic angle is a precisely defined angle, the value of which is approximately 54.7356°.

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Magic angle spinning

In nuclear magnetic resonance, magic-angle spinning (MAS) is a technique often used to perform experiments in solid-state NMR spectroscopy and, more recently, liquid Proton nuclear magnetic resonance.

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Magnetic resonance imaging

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique used in radiology to form pictures of the anatomy and the physiological processes of the body in both health and disease.

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Millisecond

A millisecond (from milli- and second; symbol: ms) is a thousandth (0.001 or 10−3 or 1/1000) of a second.

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Molecule

A molecule is an electrically neutral group of two or more atoms held together by chemical bonds.

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Nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

Nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopy, or just simply 15N NMR) is a version of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that examines samples containing the 15N nucleus.

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NMR tube

An NMR tube is a thin glass walled tube used to contain samples in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

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Nobel Prize in Physics

The Nobel Prize in Physics (Nobelpriset i fysik) is a yearly award given by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for those who conferred the most outstanding contributions for mankind in the field of physics.

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Nuclear magnetic moment

The nuclear magnetic moment is the magnetic moment of an atomic nucleus and arises from the spin of the protons and neutrons.

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Nuclear magnetic resonance

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a physical phenomenon in which nuclei in a magnetic field absorb and re-emit electromagnetic radiation.

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Nuclear magnetic resonance crystallography

Nuclear magnetic resonance crystallography (NMR crystallography) is a method which utilizes primarily NMR spectroscopy to determine the structure of solid materials on the atomic scale.

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Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra database

A nuclear magnetic resonance spectra database is an electronic repository of information concerning Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra.

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Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of carbohydrates

Carbohydrate NMR Spectroscopy is the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to structural and conformational analysis of carbohydrates.

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Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of nucleic acids

Nucleic acid NMR is the use of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to obtain information about the structure and dynamics of nucleic acid molecules, such as DNA or RNA.

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Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of proteins

Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of proteins (usually abbreviated protein NMR) is a field of structural biology in which NMR spectroscopy is used to obtain information about the structure and dynamics of proteins, and also nucleic acids, and their complexes.

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Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of stereoisomers

Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of stereoisomers most commonly known as NMR spectroscopy of stereoisomers is a chemical analysis method that uses NMR spectroscopy to determine the absolute configuration of stereoisomers.

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Nuclear Overhauser effect

The nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE or nOe) is the transfer of nuclear spin polarization from one spin bath to another spin bath via cross-relaxation.

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Nuclear quadrupole resonance

Nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy or NQR is a chemical analysis technique related to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).

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Nucleic acid

Nucleic acids are biopolymers, or small biomolecules, essential to all known forms of life.

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Nucleic acid double helix

In molecular biology, the term double helix refers to the structure formed by double-stranded molecules of nucleic acids such as DNA.

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Nucleic acid tertiary structure

Nucleic acid tertiary structure is the three-dimensional shape of a nucleic acid polymer.

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Order of magnitude

An order of magnitude is an approximate measure of the number of digits that a number has in the commonly-used base-ten number system.

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Organic chemistry

Organic chemistry is a chemistry subdiscipline involving the scientific study of the structure, properties, and reactions of organic compounds and organic materials, i.e., matter in its various forms that contain carbon atoms.

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Organic compound

In chemistry, an organic compound is generally any chemical compound that contains carbon.

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Paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

Paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy refers to NMR spectroscopy of paramagnetic compounds.

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Parts-per notation

In science and engineering, the parts-per notation is a set of pseudo-units to describe small values of miscellaneous dimensionless quantities, e.g. mole fraction or mass fraction.

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Pascal's triangle

In mathematics, Pascal's triangle is a triangular array of the binomial coefficients.

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Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance

Phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopy is an analytical chemistry technique that uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study chemical compounds that contain phosphorus.

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Polar effect

The polar effect or electronic effect in chemistry is the effect exerted by a substituent on modifying electrostatic forces operating on a nearby reaction center.

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Pople notation

The Pople notation is named after the Nobel laureate John Pople and is a simple method of presenting second-order spin coupling systems in NMR.

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Protein

Proteins are large biomolecules, or macromolecules, consisting of one or more long chains of amino acid residues.

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Proton nuclear magnetic resonance

Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (proton NMR, hydrogen-1 NMR, or 1H NMR) is the application of nuclear magnetic resonance in NMR spectroscopy with respect to hydrogen-1 nuclei within the molecules of a substance, in order to determine the structure of its molecules.

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Proton-enhanced nuclear induction spectroscopy

Proton-enhanced nuclear induction spectroscopy (PENIS), also sometimes called Cross Polarisation (CP), is a nuclear magnetic resonance technique invented by Michael Gibby and Alexander Pines while they were graduate students in the lab of Professor John S. Waugh at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Pseudoknot

A pseudoknot is a nucleic acid secondary structure containing at least two stem-loop structures in which half of one stem is intercalated between the two halves of another stem.

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Pulsed field magnet

A pulsed field magnet is a strong electromagnet which is powered by a brief pulse of electric current through its windings rather than a continuous current, producing a brief but strong pulse of magnetic field.

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Radio wave

Radio waves are a type of electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths in the electromagnetic spectrum longer than infrared light.

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Relaxation (NMR)

In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) the term relaxation describes how signals change with time.

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Richard R. Ernst

Richard Robert Ernst (born 14 August 1933) is a Swiss physical chemist and Nobel Laureate.

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RNA

Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a polymeric molecule essential in various biological roles in coding, decoding, regulation, and expression of genes.

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Shim (magnetism)

A shim is a device used to adjust the homogeneity of a magnetic field.

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Signal-to-noise ratio

Signal-to-noise ratio (abbreviated SNR or S/N) is a measure used in science and engineering that compares the level of a desired signal to the level of background noise.

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Sine wave

A sine wave or sinusoid is a mathematical curve that describes a smooth periodic oscillation.

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Small molecule

Within the fields of molecular biology and pharmacology, a small molecule is a low molecular weight (< 900 daltons) organic compound that may regulate a biological process, with a size on the order of 1 nm.

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Spectroscopy

Spectroscopy is the study of the interaction between matter and electromagnetic radiation.

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Spin (physics)

In quantum mechanics and particle physics, spin is an intrinsic form of angular momentum carried by elementary particles, composite particles (hadrons), and atomic nuclei.

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Spin quantum number

In atomic physics, the spin quantum number is a quantum number that parameterizes the intrinsic angular momentum (or spin angular momentum, or simply spin) of a given particle.

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Stanford University

Stanford University (officially Leland Stanford Junior University, colloquially the Farm) is a private research university in Stanford, California.

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Stem-loop

Stem-loop intramolecular base pairing is a pattern that can occur in single-stranded DNA or, more commonly, in RNA.

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Structural biology

Structural biology is a branch of molecular biology, biochemistry, and biophysics concerned with the molecular structure of biological macromolecules (especially proteins, made up of amino acids, and RNA or DNA, made up of nucleic acids), how they acquire the structures they have, and how alterations in their structures affect their function.

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Superconductivity

Superconductivity is a phenomenon of exactly zero electrical resistance and expulsion of magnetic flux fields occurring in certain materials, called superconductors, when cooled below a characteristic critical temperature.

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Tesla (unit)

The tesla (symbol T) is a derived unit of magnetic flux density (informally, magnetic field strength) in the International System of Units.

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Tetramethylsilane

Tetramethylsilane (abbreviated as TMS) is the organosilicon compound with the formula Si(CH3)4.

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Triple-resonance nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

Triple resonance experiments are a set of multi-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) experiments that link three types of atomic nuclei, most typically consisting of 1H, 15N and 13C.

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Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2D NMR) is a set of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) methods which give data plotted in a space defined by two frequency axes rather than one.

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Unified atomic mass unit

The unified atomic mass unit or dalton (symbol: u, or Da) is a standard unit of mass that quantifies mass on an atomic or molecular scale (atomic mass).

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University of California, Irvine

The University of California, Irvine (UCI, UC Irvine, or Irvine), is a public research university located in Irvine, Orange County, California, United States, and one of the 10 campuses in the University of California (UC) system.

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University of Cambridge

The University of Cambridge (informally Cambridge University)The corporate title of the university is The Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the University of Cambridge.

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Wet chemistry

Wet chemistry is a form of analytical chemistry that uses classical methods such as observation to analyze materials.

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William G. Schneider

William George Schneider, (1 June 1915, Wolseley, Saskatchewan – 18 February 2013 in Ottawa, Ontario) is a Canadian chemist and research administrator, who was president of the National Research Council of Canada from 1967 to 1980.

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X-ray crystallography

X-ray crystallography is a technique used for determining the atomic and molecular structure of a crystal, in which the crystalline atoms cause a beam of incident X-rays to diffract into many specific directions.

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Zero field NMR

Zero field NMR is the acquisition of nuclear magnetic resonance spectra in an environment carefully screened from magnetic fields (Including from the Earth's field).

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References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_magnetic_resonance_spectroscopy

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