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Order of Saint Benedict

Index Order of Saint Benedict

The Order of Saint Benedict (OSB; Latin: Ordo Sancti Benedicti), also known as the Black Monksin reference to the colour of its members' habitsis a Catholic religious order of independent monastic communities that observe the Rule of Saint Benedict. [1]

268 relations: Abbess, Abbey, Abbot, Adalbert of Prague, Adam Easton, Alban Roe, Alberic of Cîteaux, Alcuin, Aldhelm, Alfredo Ildefonso Schuster, Ampleforth Abbey, Anglican Communion, Anno Domini, Anselm Grün, Anselm of Canterbury, Ansgar, Antoine Augustin Calmet, Antoine-Joseph Mège, Augustine Baker, Augustine of Canterbury, Æthelthryth, Æthelwold of Winchester, Basil Hume, Bede, Bede Griffiths, Bede Polding, Belmont Abbey, North Carolina, Benedict Biscop, Benedict of Aniane, Benedict of Nursia, Benedictine Confederation, Benedictine Congregation of Saint Ottilien, Benedictus van Haeften, Bernard de Montfaucon, Bernard of Clairvaux, Bernard of Cluny, Bernardo Tolomei, Berno of Cluny, Bertin, Boniface Wimmer, Bourbon Restoration, Camaldolese, Canterbury, Catholic Church, Catholic religious order, Cenobitic monasticism, Charles Walmesley, Christian monasticism, Cistercians, Clergy house, ..., Cluny Abbey, Columba Marmion, Columbanus, Consecrated life, Cuthbert, Cuthbert Butler, Daniel M. Buechlein, Dissolution of the Monasteries, Domenico Serafini, Dorothy Day, Douai Abbey, Downside Abbey, Dunstan, Eadmer, Ealing Abbey, Earconwald, Eastern Orthodox Church, Edith of Wilton, Edmond Martène, Edmund of Abingdon, Eichstätt, Engelberg Abbey, English Reformation, Evangelical counsels, Excommunication, Fernand Cabrol, Florence of Worcester, François Lamy (theologian), Frances of Rome, Francis Aidan Gasquet, French Revolution, French Third Republic, Gabriel Gifford, Gerard of Csanád, Germain Morin, Gertrude the Great, Gervase of Canterbury, Glossary of the Catholic Church, Gospel, Gregorian mission, Gregory of Tours, Guglielmo Sanfelice d'Acquavilla, Guido of Arezzo, Hans Hermann Groër, Henry II, Holy Roman Emperor, Hermann of Reichenau, Hilda of Whitby, Hildegard of Bingen, Hincmar, Honoratus, Honoré Bonet, House of Bread Monastery, Hugh Cook alias Faringdon, Isle of Thanet, Jacques Maritain, Jean Baptiste François Pitra, Jean Mabillon, Jean-Baptiste Muard, Jerome Hanus, Joan Chittister, Jocelyn de Brakelond, Johannes Trithemius, John Chapman (priest), John Gualbert, John Hedley (bishop), John Lydgate, John of Beverley, John Roberts (martyr), John Whethamstede, Jonas of Bobbio, Joris-Karl Huysmans, Joseph Pothier, Justus, Kathleen Norris (poet), Kent, Lambert Beauduin, Lanfranc, Latin, Latrobe, Pennsylvania, Laurence of Canterbury, Laurent Bénard, Lérins Abbey, Leudwinus, Library, Linton Hall School, List of monarchs of Kent, Louis de Blois, Luc d'Achery, Luigi Tosti, Lutheranism, Magnoald Ziegelbauer, Majolus of Cluny, Margit Slachta, Mariano Armellino, Marquard Herrgott, Martin Marty (bishop), Martyrology, Matthew Paris, Maurus Wolter, Melk Abbey, Mellitus, Michael Ellis (bishop), Mildrith, Minster-in-Thanet, Monastery, Monk, Monte Cassino, Motherhouse, Nicolas-Hugues Ménard, Noella Marcellino, Notker Labeo, Nun, Oblate, Oda of Canterbury, Odilo of Cluny, Odo of Cluny, Olivetans, Oxford Movement, Papal brief, Paris, Paschasius Radbertus, Paul Augustin Mayer, Paul the Deacon, Paulinus of York, Peter Damian, Peter the Deacon, Peter the Venerable, Pierre Coustant, Placidus Nkalanga, Pope Celestine V, Pope Clement VI, Pope Gelasius II, Pope Gregory I, Pope Gregory VII, Pope Gregory XVI, Pope Leo XIII, Pope Paschal II, Pope Pius VII, Pope Sylvester II, Pope Urban V, Pope Victor III, Portsmouth Abbey, Prinknash Abbey, Priory, Prosper Guéranger, Psalter, Rabanus Maurus, Ratramnus, Religious habit, Religious institute, Religious order, Rembert Weakland, René-Prosper Tassin, Richard Whiting (abbot), Robert of Arbrissel, Robert of Molesme, Roger of Wendover, Roger Vaughan, Romano Guardini, Romuald, Rule of Saint Benedict, Rupert of Salzburg, Sacristy, Saint Anselm Abbey (New Hampshire), Saint Benedict Medal, Saint Blaise Abbey, Black Forest, Saint Boniface, Saint Emma Monastery, Saint Ernest, Saint John's Abbey, Collegeville, Saint Louis Abbey, Saint Maurus of Pécs, Saint Sturm, Saint Vincent Archabbey, Saint Walpurga, Sant'Anselmo all'Aventino, Scholastica, Selby Abbey, Sigebert Buckley, Sisters of Social Service, St. Benedict Abbey (Massachusetts), St. Marys, Pennsylvania, St. Meinrad Archabbey, Stephen Harding, Stephen of Obazine, Subiaco Abbey (Arkansas), Subiaco, Lazio, Suger, Suitbert Bäumer, Suitbert of Kaiserswerdt, Superior general, Swithun, Sylvester Gozzolini, Sylvestrines, Symeon of Durham, Teresa Forcades, Theodore of Tarsus, Thierry Ruinart, Thomas Marshall (Abbot of Colchester), Trappists, Ursin Durand, Walafrid Strabo, Walker Percy, Werburgh, Westminster Abbey, Wilfrid, William Bernard Ullathorne, William I, Duke of Aquitaine, William of Hirsau, William of Malmesbury, William of Montevergine, William Placid Morris, Willibrord, Wolfgang of Regensburg, Worth Abbey, Wulfthryth of Wilton, Yorkshire, 1983 Code of Canon Law. Expand index (218 more) »

Abbess

In Christianity, an abbess (Latin abbatissa, feminine form of abbas, abbot) is the female superior of a community of nuns, which is often an abbey.

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Abbey

An abbey is a complex of buildings used by members of a religious order under the governance of an abbot or abbess.

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Abbot

Abbot, meaning father, is an ecclesiastical title given to the male head of a monastery in various traditions, including Christianity.

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Adalbert of Prague

Adalbert of Prague (Adalbertus / Wojciech Sławnikowic); 95623 April 997), known in Czech by his birth name Vojtěch (Voitecus), was a Bohemian missionary and Christian saint. He was the Bishop of Prague and a missionary to the Hungarians, Poles, and Prussians, who was martyred in his efforts to convert the Baltic Prussians to Christianity. He is said to be the composer of the oldest Czech hymn Hospodine, pomiluj ny and Bogurodzica, the oldest known Polish hymn, but the authorship has not confirmed. St. Adalbert (or St.

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Adam Easton

Adam Easton (– 15 September 1397) was an English Cardinal, born at Easton in Norfolk.

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Alban Roe

Saint Alban Roe (20 July 1583 – 21 January 1642) was an English Benedictine priest, remembered as one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales.

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Alberic of Cîteaux

Alberic of Cîteaux, O.Cist. (died January 26, 1109), sometimes known as Aubrey of Cîteaux, was a French monk and abbot, one of the founders of the Cistercian Order.

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Alcuin

Alcuin of York (Flaccus Albinus Alcuinus; 735 – 19 May 804 AD)—also called Ealhwine, Alhwin or Alchoin—was an English scholar, clergyman, poet and teacher from York, Northumbria.

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Aldhelm

Aldhelm (c. 63925 May 709), Abbot of Malmesbury Abbey, Bishop of Sherborne, Latin poet and scholar of Anglo-Saxon literature, was born before the middle of the 7th century.

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Alfredo Ildefonso Schuster

Blessed Alfredo Ildefonso Schuster (18 January 1880 – 30 August 1954) - born Alfredo Ludovico Schuster - was an Italian Roman Catholic prelate and professed member from the Benedictines who served as the Archbishop of Milan from 1929 until his death.

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Ampleforth Abbey

Ampleforth Abbey is a monastery of Benedictine Monks a mile to the east of Ampleforth, North Yorkshire, England, part of the English Benedictine Congregation.

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Anglican Communion

The Anglican Communion is the third largest Christian communion with 85 million members, founded in 1867 in London, England.

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Anno Domini

The terms anno Domini (AD) and before Christ (BC) are used to label or number years in the Julian and Gregorian calendars.

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Anselm Grün

Anselm Grün (in English also: Anselm Gruen), OSB (born January 14, 1945 in, Germany) is a German Benedictine padre.

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Anselm of Canterbury

Anselm of Canterbury (1033/4-1109), also called (Anselmo d'Aosta) after his birthplace and (Anselme du Bec) after his monastery, was a Benedictine monk, abbot, philosopher and theologian of the Catholic Church, who held the office of archbishop of Canterbury from 1093 to 1109.

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Ansgar

Saint Ansgar (8 September 801 – 3 February 865), also known as Anskar or Saint Anschar, was a Archbishop of Hamburg-Bremen – a northern part of the Kingdom of the East Franks.

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Antoine Augustin Calmet

Antoine Augustin Calmet, O.S.B. (26 February 167225 October 1757), a French Benedictine monk, was born at Ménil-la-Horgne, then in the Duchy of Bar, part of the Holy Roman Empire (now the French department of Meuse, located in the region of Lorraine).

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Antoine-Joseph Mège

Antoine-Joseph Mège (1625 at Clermont – 15 April 1691, at the monastery of St. Germain-des-Prés near Paris) was a French Benedictine of the Congregation of St. Maur.

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Augustine Baker

Fr.

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Augustine of Canterbury

Augustine of Canterbury (born first third of the 6th century – died probably 26 May 604) was a Benedictine monk who became the first Archbishop of Canterbury in the year 597.

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Æthelthryth

Æthelthryth (or Æðelþryð or Æþelðryþe; 636 – 23 June 679 AD) is the name for the Anglo-Saxon saint known, particularly in a religious context, as Etheldreda or Audrey.

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Æthelwold of Winchester

Æthelwold of Winchester (904/9 – 984) was Bishop of Winchester from 963 to 984 and one of the leaders of the tenth-century monastic reform movement in Anglo-Saxon England.

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Basil Hume

Basil Hume OSB OM (2 March 1923 – 17 June 1999) was an English Roman Catholic bishop.

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Bede

Bede (italic; 672/3 – 26 May 735), also known as Saint Bede, Venerable Bede, and Bede the Venerable (Bēda Venerābilis), was an English Benedictine monk at the monastery of St.

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Bede Griffiths

Bede Griffiths OSB Cam (17 December 1906 – 13 May 1993), born Alan Richard Griffiths and also known by the end of his life as Swami Dayananda ("bliss of compassion"), was a British-born Benedictine monk and priest who lived in ashrams in South India and became a noted yogi.

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Bede Polding

John Bede Polding, OSB (18 October 1794 in Liverpool, England16 March 1877 in Sydney, Australia) was the first Roman Catholic Bishop and then Archbishop of Sydney, Australia.

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Belmont Abbey, North Carolina

The Abbey of Mary Help of Christians, better known as Belmont Abbey, is a small American monastery of Benedictine monks and Basilica in the town of Belmont, Gaston County, North Carolina, outside of Charlotte, North Carolina.

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Benedict Biscop

Benedict Biscop (pronounced "bishop"; – 690), also known as Biscop Baducing, was an Anglo-Saxon abbot and founder of Monkwearmouth-Jarrow Priory (where he also founded the famous library) and was considered a saint after his death.

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Benedict of Aniane

Saint Benedict of Aniane (Benedictus Anianensis; Benedikt von Aniane; 747 – 12 February 821 AD), born Witiza and called the Second Benedict, was a Benedictine monk and monastic reformer, who left a large imprint on the religious practice of the Carolingian Empire.

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Benedict of Nursia

Benedict of Nursia (Benedictus Nursiae; Benedetto da Norcia; Vulgar Latin: *Benedecto; Benedikt; 2 March 480 – 543 or 547 AD) is a Christian saint, who is venerated in the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches, the Oriental Orthodox Churches, the Anglican Communion and Old Catholic Churches.

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Benedictine Confederation

The Benedictine Confederation of the Order of Saint Benedict (Confœderatio Benedictina Ordinis Sancti Benedicti) is the international governing body of the Order of Saint Benedict.

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Benedictine Congregation of Saint Ottilien

The Ottilien Congregation, often also known as the St.

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Benedictus van Haeften

Benedictus van Haeften (1588 – 31 July 1648) was the Provost of Affligem Abbey and a writer of religious works.

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Bernard de Montfaucon

Dom Bernard de Montfaucon, O.S.B. (13 January 1655 – 21 December 1741) was a French Benedictine monk of the Congregation of Saint Maur.

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Bernard of Clairvaux

Bernard of Clairvaux, O.Cist (Bernardus Claraevallensis; 109020 August 1153) was a French abbot and a major leader in the reform of Benedictine monasticism that caused the formation of the Cistercian order.

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Bernard of Cluny

Bernard of Cluny (or, of Morlaix or Morlay) was a twelfth-century French Benedictine monk, best known as the author of De contemptu mundi (On Contempt for the World), a long verse satire in Latin.

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Bernardo Tolomei

Saint Bernardo Tolomei (10 May 1272 – 20 August 1348) was an Italian Roman Catholic theologian and the founder of the Congregation of the Blessed Virgin of Monte Oliveto.

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Berno of Cluny

Saint Berno of Cluny (French: Bernon) or Berno of Baume (c. 850 – 13 January 927) was the first abbot of Cluny from its foundation in 910 until he resigned in 925.

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Bertin

Bertin (c. 615 – c. 709), also known as Saint Bertin the Great, was the Frankish abbot of a monastery in Saint-Omer later named the Abbey of Saint Bertin after him.

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Boniface Wimmer

Archabbot Boniface Wimmer, O.S.B. (1809 – 1887) was a German monk who in 1846 founded the first Benedictine monastery in the United States, Saint Vincent Archabbey, in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, forty miles southeast of Pittsburgh.

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Bourbon Restoration

The Bourbon Restoration was the period of French history following the fall of Napoleon in 1814 until the July Revolution of 1830.

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Camaldolese

The Camaldolese (Ordo Camaldulensium) monks and nuns are two different, but related, monastic communities that trace their lineage to the monastic movement begun by Saint Romuald.

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Canterbury

Canterbury is a historic English cathedral city and UNESCO World Heritage Site, which lies at the heart of the City of Canterbury, a local government district of Kent, England.

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Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.299 billion members worldwide.

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Catholic religious order

Catholic religious order is a religious order of the Catholic Church.

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Cenobitic monasticism

Cenobitic (or coenobitic) monasticism is a monastic tradition that stresses community life.

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Charles Walmesley

Charles Walmesley, OSB (best known by the pseudonyms Signor Pastorino or Pastorini; 13 January 1722 – 25 November 1797) was the Roman Catholic Titular Bishop of Rama and Vicar Apostolic of the Western District of England.

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Christian monasticism

Christian monasticism is the devotional practice of individuals who live ascetic and typically cloistered lives that are dedicated to Christian worship.

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Cistercians

A Cistercian is a member of the Cistercian Order (abbreviated as OCist, SOCist ((Sacer) Ordo Cisterciensis), or ‘’’OCSO’’’ (Ordo Cisterciensis Strictioris Observantiae), which are religious orders of monks and nuns. They are also known as “Trappists”; as Bernardines, after the highly influential St. Bernard of Clairvaux (though that term is also used of the Franciscan Order in Poland and Lithuania); or as White Monks, in reference to the colour of the "cuccula" or white choir robe worn by the Cistercians over their habits, as opposed to the black cuccula worn by Benedictine monks. The original emphasis of Cistercian life was on manual labour and self-sufficiency, and many abbeys have traditionally supported themselves through activities such as agriculture and brewing ales. Over the centuries, however, education and academic pursuits came to dominate the life of many monasteries. A reform movement seeking to restore the simpler lifestyle of the original Cistercians began in 17th-century France at La Trappe Abbey, leading eventually to the Holy See’s reorganization in 1892 of reformed houses into a single order Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance (OCSO), commonly called the Trappists. Cistercians who did not observe these reforms became known as the Cistercians of the Original Observance. The term Cistercian (French Cistercien), derives from Cistercium, the Latin name for the village of Cîteaux, near Dijon in eastern France. It was in this village that a group of Benedictine monks from the monastery of Molesme founded Cîteaux Abbey in 1098, with the goal of following more closely the Rule of Saint Benedict. The best known of them were Robert of Molesme, Alberic of Cîteaux and the English monk Stephen Harding, who were the first three abbots. Bernard of Clairvaux entered the monastery in the early 1110s with 30 companions and helped the rapid proliferation of the order. By the end of the 12th century, the order had spread throughout France and into England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, Spain, Portugal, Italy, and Eastern Europe. The keynote of Cistercian life was a return to literal observance of the Rule of St Benedict. Rejecting the developments the Benedictines had undergone, the monks tried to replicate monastic life exactly as it had been in Saint Benedict's time; indeed in various points they went beyond it in austerity. The most striking feature in the reform was the return to manual labour, especially agricultural work in the fields, a special characteristic of Cistercian life. Cistercian architecture is considered one of the most beautiful styles of medieval architecture. Additionally, in relation to fields such as agriculture, hydraulic engineering and metallurgy, the Cistercians became the main force of technological diffusion in medieval Europe. The Cistercians were adversely affected in England by the Protestant Reformation, the Dissolution of the Monasteries under King Henry VIII, the French Revolution in continental Europe, and the revolutions of the 18th century, but some survived and the order recovered in the 19th century.

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Clergy house

A clergy house or rectory is the residence, or former residence, of one or more priests or ministers of religion.

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Cluny Abbey

Cluny Abbey (formerly also Cluni, or Clugny) is a former Benedictine monastery in Cluny, Saône-et-Loire, France.

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Columba Marmion

Columba Marmion, OSB, born Joseph Aloysius Marmion (April 1, 1858 – January 30, 1923) was a Roman Catholic Benedictine Irish monk and the third Abbot of Maredsous Abbey in Belgium.

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Columbanus

Columbanus (Columbán, 543 – 21 November 615), also known as St.

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Consecrated life

Consecrated life, in the canon law of the Catholic Church, is a stable form of Christian living by those faithful who are called to follow Jesus Christ in a more exacting way recognized by the Church.

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Cuthbert

Cuthbert (c. 634 – 20 March 687) is a saint of the early Northumbrian church in the Celtic tradition.

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Cuthbert Butler

Cuthbert Butler (born Edward Joseph Aloysius Butler, 6 May 1858 – 1 April 1934) was a Benedictine monk of Downside Abbey in England, who gained notice as an ecclesiastical historian.

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Daniel M. Buechlein

Daniel Mark Buechlein, OSB (April 20, 1938 – January 25, 2018) was a Benedictine monk and an American prelate of the Roman Catholic Church.

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Dissolution of the Monasteries

The Dissolution of the Monasteries, sometimes referred to as the Suppression of the Monasteries, was the set of administrative and legal processes between 1536 and 1541 by which Henry VIII disbanded monasteries, priories, convents and friaries in England and Wales and Ireland, appropriated their income, disposed of their assets, and provided for their former personnel and functions.

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Domenico Serafini

Domenico Serafini, OSB (August 3, 1852 – March 5, 1918) was an Italian Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church who served in various pastoral, diplomatic, and curial posts, and was elevated to the cardinalate in 1914.

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Dorothy Day

Dorothy Day (November 8, 1897 – November 29, 1980) was an American journalist, social activist, and Catholic convert.

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Douai Abbey

Douai Abbey is a Benedictine Abbey at Woolhampton, near Thatcham, in the English county of Berkshire, situated within the Roman Catholic Diocese of Portsmouth.

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Downside Abbey

The Basilica of St Gregory the Great at Downside, commonly known as Downside Abbey, is a Benedictine monastery in England and the senior community of the English Benedictine Congregation.

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Dunstan

Dunstan (909 – 19 May 988 AD)Lapidge, "Dunstan (d. 988)" was successively Abbot of Glastonbury Abbey, Bishop of Worcester, Bishop of London, and Archbishop of Canterbury, later canonised as a saint.

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Eadmer

Eadmer or Edmer (&ndash) was an English historian, theologian, and ecclesiastic.

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Ealing Abbey

Ealing Abbey is a Roman Catholic Benedictine monastic foundation on Castlebar Hill in Ealing.

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Earconwald

Erkenwald (died 693) was Bishop of London in the Anglo-Saxon Christian church between 675 and 693.

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Eastern Orthodox Church

The Eastern Orthodox Church, also known as the Orthodox Church, or officially as the Orthodox Catholic Church, is the second-largest Christian Church, with over 250 million members.

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Edith of Wilton

Saint Edith of Wilton (c. 963 - c.986) (also known as Eadgyth, her name in Old English, or as Editha or Ediva, the Latinised forms of her name) was an English nun, a daughter of King Edgar of England (943–975) the Peaceful.

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Edmond Martène

Edmond Martène (22 December 1654, at Saint-Jean-de-Losne near Dijon – 20 June 1739, at Saint-Germain-des-Prés near Paris) was a French Benedictine historian and liturgist.

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Edmund of Abingdon

Edmund of Abingdon (circa 1174 – 1240) was a 13th-century Archbishop of Canterbury in England.

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Eichstätt

Eichstätt (formerly also Eichstädt or Aichstädt) is a town in the federal state of Bavaria, Germany, and capital of the district of Eichstätt.

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Engelberg Abbey

Engelberg Abbey (Kloster Engelberg) is a Benedictine monastery in Engelberg, Canton of Obwalden, Switzerland.

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English Reformation

The English Reformation was a series of events in 16th century England by which the Church of England broke away from the authority of the Pope and the Roman Catholic Church.

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Evangelical counsels

The three evangelical counsels or counsels of perfection in Christianity are chastity, poverty (or perfect charity), and obedience.

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Excommunication

Excommunication is an institutional act of religious censure used to deprive, suspend, or limit membership in a religious community or to restrict certain rights within it, in particular receiving of the sacraments.

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Fernand Cabrol

Fernand Cabrol (11 December 1855 – 4 June 1937) was a French theologian, Benedictine monk and noted writer on the history of Christian worship.

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Florence of Worcester

Florence of Worcester (died 1118), known in Latin as Florentius, was a monk of Worcester, who played some part in the production of the Chronicon ex chronicis, a Latin world chronicle which begins with the creation and ends in 1140.

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François Lamy (theologian)

François Lamy (1636 – 11 April 1711) was a French Benedictine ascetical and apologetic writer, of the Congregation of St-Maur.

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Frances of Rome

Frances of Rome, Obl.S.B., (Santa Francesca Romana) (1384 – March 9, 1440) is an Italian saint who was a wife, mother, mystic, organizer of charitable services and a Benedictine oblate who founded a religious community of oblates, who share a common life without religious vows.

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Francis Aidan Gasquet

Francis Aidan Gasquet, O.S.B. (born Francis Neil Gasquet, 5 October 1846 – 5 April 1929) was an English Benedictine monk and historical scholar.

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French Revolution

The French Revolution (Révolution française) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799.

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French Third Republic

The French Third Republic (La Troisième République, sometimes written as La IIIe République) was the system of government adopted in France from 1870 when the Second French Empire collapsed during the Franco-Prussian War until 1940 when France's defeat by Nazi Germany in World War II led to the formation of the Vichy government in France.

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Gabriel Gifford

Gabriel Gifford OSB (also known as Dom Gabriel of St Mary or Gabriel de Sainte-Marie) (1554 – 11 April 1629) was an English Roman Catholic Benedictine monk who became Archbishop of Reims.

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Gerard of Csanád

Gerard or Gerard Sagredo (Gellért; Gerardo di Sagredo; 23 April 977/1000 – 24 September 1046) was the first Bishop of Csanád in the Kingdom of Hungary from around 1030 to his death.

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Germain Morin

Germain Morin (1861–1946) was a Belgian Benedictine historical scholar and patrologist, of the Beuronese Congregation.

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Gertrude the Great

Gertrude the Great (or Saint Gertrude of Helfta) (Santa Gertrude) (January 6, 1256 – c. 1302) was a German Benedictine nun, mystic, and theologian.

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Gervase of Canterbury

Gervase of Canterbury (Latin: Gervasus Cantuariensis or Gervasius Dorobornensis) (c. 1141 – c. 1210) was an English chronicler.

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Glossary of the Catholic Church

This is a glossary of terms used within the Catholic Church.

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Gospel

Gospel is the Old English translation of Greek εὐαγγέλιον, evangelion, meaning "good news".

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Gregorian mission

The Gregorian missionJones "Gregorian Mission" Speculum p. 335 or Augustinian missionMcGowan "Introduction to the Corpus" Companion to Anglo-Saxon Literature p. 17 was a Christian mission sent by Pope Gregory the Great in 596 to convert Britain's Anglo-Saxons.

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Gregory of Tours

Saint Gregory of Tours (30 November c. 538 – 17 November 594) was a Gallo-Roman historian and Bishop of Tours, which made him a leading prelate of the area that had been previously referred to as Gaul by the Romans. He was born Georgius Florentius and later added the name Gregorius in honour of his maternal great-grandfather. He is the primary contemporary source for Merovingian history. His most notable work was his Decem Libri Historiarum (Ten Books of Histories), better known as the Historia Francorum (History of the Franks), a title that later chroniclers gave to it, but he is also known for his accounts of the miracles of saints, especially four books of the miracles of St. Martin of Tours. St. Martin's tomb was a major pilgrimage destination in the 6th century, and St. Gregory's writings had the practical effect of promoting this highly organized devotion.

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Guglielmo Sanfelice d'Acquavilla

Guglielmo Sanfelice d'Acquavilla O.S.B.Cas. (14 April 1834 – 3 January 1897) was a Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church and Archbishop of Naples.

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Guido of Arezzo

Guido of Arezzo (also Guido Aretinus, Guido Aretino, Guido da Arezzo, Guido Monaco, or Guido d'Arezzo, or Guy of Arezzo also Guy d'Arezzo) (991/992 – after 1033) was an Italian music theorist of the Medieval era.

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Hans Hermann Groër

Hans Hermann Wilhelm Groër OSB (13 October 1919 – 24 March 2003) was an Austrian Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church.

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Henry II, Holy Roman Emperor

Henry II (Heinrich II; Enrico II) (6 May 973 – 13 July 1024), also known as Saint Henry, Obl. S. B., was Holy Roman Emperor ("Romanorum Imperator") from 1014 until his death in 1024 and the last member of the Ottonian dynasty of Emperors as he had no children.

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Hermann of Reichenau

Hermann of Reichenau (July 18, 1013 – September 24, 1054), also called Hermannus Contractus or Hermannus Augiensis or Herman the Cripple, was an 11th-century scholar, composer, music theorist, mathematician, and astronomer.

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Hilda of Whitby

Hilda of Whitby or Hild of Whitby (c. 614–680) is a Christian saint and the founding abbess of the monastery at Whitby, which was chosen as the venue for the Synod of Whitby.

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Hildegard of Bingen

Hildegard of Bingen (Hildegard von Bingen; Hildegardis Bingensis; 1098 – 17 September 1179), also known as Saint Hildegard and Sibyl of the Rhine, was a German Benedictine abbess, writer, composer, philosopher, Christian mystic, visionary, and polymath.

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Hincmar

Hincmar (806 – 21 December 882), archbishop of Reims, was the friend, advisor and propagandist of Charles the Bald.

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Honoratus

Honoratus (Saint Honorat or Saint Honoré; c. 350 – January 6, 429) was an early Archbishop of Arles, who was also the Abbot of Lérins Abbey.

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Honoré Bonet

Honoré Bonet (c. 1340 – c. 1410) was a Provençal Benedictine, the prior of Salon near Embrun.

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House of Bread Monastery

House of Bread Monastery is a Benedictine monastery in Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada.

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Hugh Cook alias Faringdon

The Blessed Hugh Faringdon O.S.B. (died 14 November 1539), earlier known as Hugh Cook, later as Hugh Cook alias Faringdon and Hugh Cook of Faringdon, was a Benedictine monk who presided as the last Abbot of Reading Abbey in the English town of Reading.

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Isle of Thanet

The Isle of Thanet lies at the most easterly point of Kent, England.

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Jacques Maritain

Jacques Maritain (18 November 1882 – 28 April 1973) was a French Catholic philosopher.

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Jean Baptiste François Pitra

Cardinal Pitra in 1871. Jean-Baptiste-François Pitra (1 August 1812 – 9 February 1889) was a French Catholic cardinal, archaeologist and theologian.

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Jean Mabillon

Dom Jean Mabillon, O.S.B., (23 November 1632 – 27 December 1707) was a French Benedictine monk and scholar of the Congregation of Saint Maur.

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Jean-Baptiste Muard

Jean-Baptiste Muard (Vireaux, 1809-Pierre-Qui-Vire, 1854) was a French Benedictine, reformer, and founder of religious orders.

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Jerome Hanus

Jerome George Hanus, O.S.B. (born May 26, 1940), is an American prelate of the Catholic Church.

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Joan Chittister

Sister Joan D. Chittister, O.S.B. (born April 26, 1936) is a Benedictine nun, author and speaker.

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Jocelyn de Brakelond

Jocelyn de Brakelond or Jocelin de Brakelonde was an English monk and the author of a chronicle narrating the fortunes of the monastery of Bury St. Edmunds Abbey between 1173 and 1202.

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Johannes Trithemius

Johannes Trithemius (1 February 1462 – 13 December 1516), born Johann Heidenberg, was a German Benedictine abbot and a polymath who was active in the German Renaissance as a lexicographer, chronicler, cryptographer, and occultist.

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John Chapman (priest)

John Chapman (25 April 1865 – 7 November 1933), received into the Roman Catholic Church at the age of 25, was a Roman Catholic priest, the 4th Abbot of Downside Abbey of the English Benedictine Congregation from 1929 until his death, an internationally respected New Testament and patristics scholar, a defender of the priority of the Gospel according to Matthew and a spiritual writer enjoying enduring appreciation.

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John Gualbert

Saint Giovanni Gualberto (c. 985 – 12 July 1073) was an Italian Roman Catholic abbot and the founder of the Vallumbrosan Order.

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John Hedley (bishop)

John Cuthbert Hedley (15 April 1837 – 11 November 1915) was a British Benedictine and writer who held high offices in the Roman Catholic Church.

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John Lydgate

John Lydgate of Bury (c. 1370 – c. 1451) was a monk and poet, born in Lidgate, near Haverhill, Suffolk, England.

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John of Beverley

John of Beverley (died 7 May 721) was an English bishop active in the kingdom of Northumbria.

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John Roberts (martyr)

Saint John Roberts (1577 – 10 December 1610) was a Welsh Benedictine monk and priest, and was the first Prior of St.

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John Whethamstede

John Whethamstede (died 20 January 1465) was an English abbot.

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Jonas of Bobbio

Monk Jonas of Bobbio or Jonas Bobiensis (Sigusia, now Susa, Italy, c. 600 – after 659) was a Columbanian monk and writer of hagiography, among which his Life of Saint Columbanus is notable.

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Joris-Karl Huysmans

Charles-Marie-Georges Huysmans (5 February 1848 in Paris – 12 May 1907 in Paris) was a French novelist and art critic who published his works as Joris-Karl Huysmans (variably abbreviated as J. K. or J.-K.). He is most famous for the novel À rebours (1884, published in English as Against the Grain or Against Nature).

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Joseph Pothier

Dom Joseph Pothier, O.S.B. (1835–1923) was a worldwide known French prelate, liturgist and scholar who reconstituted the Gregorian chant.

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Justus

Justus (died on 10 November between 627 and 631) was the fourth Archbishop of Canterbury.

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Kathleen Norris (poet)

Kathleen Norris (born in Washington, D.C. on July 27, 1947) is a best-selling poet and essayist.

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Kent

Kent is a county in South East England and one of the home counties.

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Lambert Beauduin

Dom Lambert Beauduin (1873–1960) was a Belgian monk who founded the monastery now known as Chevetogne Abbey in 1925.

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Lanfranc

Lanfranc (1005 1010 – 24 May 1089) was a celebrated Italian jurist who renounced his career to become a Benedictine monk at Bec in Normandy. He served successively as prior of Bec Abbey and abbot of St Stephen in Normandy and then as archbishop of Canterbury in England, following its Conquest by William the Conqueror. He is also variously known as (Lanfranco di Pavia), (Lanfranc du Bec), and (Lanfrancus Cantuariensis).

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Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

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Latrobe, Pennsylvania

Latrobe is a city in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania in the United States and part of the Pittsburgh metropolitan area.

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Laurence of Canterbury

Laurence (died 2 February 619) was the second Archbishop of Canterbury from about 604 to 619.

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Laurent Bénard

Laurent Bénard (1573–1620) was a chief founder of the Congregation of Saint-Maur.

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Lérins Abbey

Lérins Abbey is a Cistercian monastery on the island of Saint-Honorat, one of the Lérins Islands, on the French Riviera, with an active monastic community.

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Leudwinus

Saint Leudwinus, Count of Treves (Leodewin, Liutwin, Ludwin) (c. 660 – 29 September 722 in Reims) founded an abbey in Mettlach.

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Library

A library is a collection of sources of information and similar resources, made accessible to a defined community for reference or borrowing.

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Linton Hall School

Linton Hall School is a Catholic coeducational day-school occupying a 120‑acre campus in Bristow, Virginia, in Prince William County about west of Washington, D.C..

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List of monarchs of Kent

This is a list of the kings of the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Kent.

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Louis de Blois

wooden sculpture Abbot Louis de Blois, O.S.B., (October 1506 – 7 January 1566) was a Flemish monk and mystical writer, generally known under the name of Blosius.

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Luc d'Achery

Luc d'Achery (1609 – 29 April 1685) was a learned French Benedictine of the Congregation of St. Maur, a specialist in the study and publication of medieval manuscripts.

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Luigi Tosti

Luigi Tosti (Naples, 13 February 1811 – Monte Cassino, 24 September 1897) was a Benedictine historian.

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Lutheranism

Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity which identifies with the theology of Martin Luther (1483–1546), a German friar, ecclesiastical reformer and theologian.

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Magnoald Ziegelbauer

Magnoald Ziegelbauer (1689 in Ellwangen, Swabia – 14 January 1750 at Olmütz) was a Benedictine monk and an ecclesiastical historian.

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Majolus of Cluny

Saint Majolus of Cluny (Maieul, Mayeul, Mayeule) (c. 906 – May 11, 994) was an abbot of Cluny.

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Margit Slachta

Margit Slachta (or Schlachta, September 18, 1884 – January 6, 1974) was a Hungarian social activist.

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Mariano Armellino

Mariano Armellino (1657–1737) was a Benedictine historian, born in Rome (according to others, at Ancona).

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Marquard Herrgott

Marquard Herrgott (9 October 1694 – 9 October 1762) was a German Benedictine historian and diplomat.

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Martin Marty (bishop)

Martin Marty (Schwyz, Switzerland, January 12, 1834 – Saint Cloud, Minnesota, September 19, 1896) was a Benedictine bishop and missionary in America.

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Martyrology

A martyrology is a catalogue or list of martyrs and other saints and beati arranged in the calendar order of their anniversaries or feasts.

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Matthew Paris

Matthew Paris, known as Matthew of Paris (Latin: Matthæus Parisiensis, "Matthew the Parisian"; c. 1200 – 1259), was a Benedictine monk, English chronicler, artist in illuminated manuscripts and cartographer, based at St Albans Abbey in Hertfordshire.

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Maurus Wolter

Maurus Wolter (4 June 1825, Bonn – 8 July 1890, Beuron) was the first abbot of the Benedictine Beuron Archabbey, which he founded with his brother Placidus in 1863.

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Melk Abbey

Melk Abbey (Stift Melk) is a Benedictine abbey above the town of Melk, Lower Austria, Austria, on a rocky outcrop overlooking the Danube river, adjoining the Wachau valley.

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Mellitus

Mellitus (died 24 April 624) was the first Bishop of London in the Saxon period, the third Archbishop of Canterbury, and a member of the Gregorian mission sent to England to convert the Anglo-Saxons from their native paganism to Christianity.

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Michael Ellis (bishop)

Michael Ellis (8 September 1652 – 16 November 1726) was an English Benedictine monk who was a prelate of the Catholic Church.

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Mildrith

Saint Mildrith (Mildþrȳð; floruit 694–716x733), also Mildthryth, Mildryth or Mildred, was an 8th-century Anglo-Saxon abbess of the Abbey at Minster-in-Thanet, Kent.

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Minster-in-Thanet

Minster, also known as Minster-in-Thanet, is a village and civil parish in the Thanet District of Kent, England.

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Monastery

A monastery is a building or complex of buildings comprising the domestic quarters and workplaces of monastics, monks or nuns, whether living in communities or alone (hermits).

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Monk

A monk (from μοναχός, monachos, "single, solitary" via Latin monachus) is a person who practices religious asceticism by monastic living, either alone or with any number of other monks.

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Monte Cassino

Monte Cassino (sometimes written Montecassino) is a rocky hill about southeast of Rome, in the Latin Valley, Italy, to the west of the town of Cassino and altitude.

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Motherhouse

A motherhouse is the principal house or community for a religious institute.

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Nicolas-Hugues Ménard

Nicolas-Hugues Ménard (Hugo Menardus) (Paris 1585 – 21 January 1644) was a French Benedictine scholar.

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Noella Marcellino

Mother Noella Marcellino, O.S.B., (born Martha A. Marcellino; June 30, 1951) is an American Benedictine nun who has earned a doctorate in microbiology from the University of Connecticut.

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Notker Labeo

Notker Labeo (c. 950 – 28 June 1022), also known as Notker the German (Notcerus Teutonicus) or Notker III, was a Benedictine monk and the first commentator on Aristotle active in the Middle Ages.

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Nun

A nun is a member of a religious community of women, typically living under vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience in the enclosure of a monastery.

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Oblate

In Christian monasticism (especially Catholic, Anglican and Methodist), an oblate is a person who is specifically dedicated to God or to God's service.

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Oda of Canterbury

Oda (or Odo; died 958), called the Good or the Severe, was a 10th-century Archbishop of Canterbury in England.

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Odilo of Cluny

Saint Odilo of Cluny (c. 962 – 1 January 1049) was the fifth Benedictine Abbot of Cluny, holding the post for around 54 years.

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Odo of Cluny

Odo of Cluny (French: Odon) (880 – 18 November 942) was the second abbot of Cluny.

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Olivetans

The Olivetans, or the Order of Our Lady of Mount Olivet, are a monastic order formally recognised in 1344.

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Oxford Movement

The Oxford Movement was a movement of High Church members of the Church of England which eventually developed into Anglo-Catholicism.

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Papal brief

A Papal brief is a formal document emanating from the Pope, in a somewhat simpler and more modern form than a Papal bull.

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Paris

Paris is the capital and most populous city of France, with an area of and a population of 2,206,488.

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Paschasius Radbertus

Saint Paschasius Radbertus (785–865) was a Carolingian theologian, and the abbot of Corbie, a monastery in Picardy founded in 657 or 660 by the queen regent Bathilde with a founding community of monks from Luxeuil Abbey.

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Paul Augustin Mayer

Paul Augustin Mayer, OSB (23 May 1911 – 30 April 2010) was a German Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church.

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Paul the Deacon

Paul the Deacon (720s 13 April 799 AD), also known as Paulus Diaconus, Warnefridus, Barnefridus, Winfridus and sometimes suffixed Cassinensis (i.e. "of Monte Cassino"), was a Benedictine monk, scribe, and historian of the Lombards.

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Paulinus of York

Paulinus (died 10 October 644) was a Roman missionary and the first Bishop of York.

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Peter Damian

Saint Peter Damian (Petrus Damianus; Pietro or Pier Damiani; – 21 or 22 February 1072 or 1073) was a reforming Benedictine monk and cardinal in the circle of Pope Leo IX.

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Peter the Deacon

Peter the Deacon (Pierre le Diacre) was the librarian of the abbey of Montecassino and continuator of the Chronicon Monasterii Casinensis, usually called the Montecassino Chronicle in English.

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Peter the Venerable

Peter the Venerable (c. 1092 – 25 December 1156), also known as Peter of Montboissier, abbot of the Benedictine abbey of Cluny, was born to Blessed Raingarde in Auvergne, France.

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Pierre Coustant

Pierre Coustant (born at Compiègne, France, 30 April 1654; died at the Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés, near Paris, 18 October 1721) was a French Benedictine scholar, of the Congregation of Saint-Maur.

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Placidus Nkalanga

Placidus Gervasius Nkalanga, OSB (June 19, 1919 – December 18, 2015) was a Tanzanian Prelate of the Roman Catholic Church.

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Pope Celestine V

Pope Celestine V (Caelestinus V; 1215 – 19 May 1296), born Pietro Angelerio (according to some sources Angelario, Angelieri, Angelliero, or Angeleri), also known as Pietro da Morrone, Peter of Morrone, and Peter Celestine, was pope for five months from 5 July to 13 December 1294, when he resigned.

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Pope Clement VI

Clement VI (Clemens VI; 1291 – 6 December 1352), born Pierre Roger, was Pope from 7 May 1342 to his death in 1352.

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Pope Gelasius II

Pope Gelasius II (c. 1060/1064 – 29 January 1119), born Giovanni Caetani or Giovanni da Gaeta (also called Coniulo), was Pope from 24 January 1118 to his death in 1119.

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Pope Gregory I

Pope Saint Gregory I (Gregorius I; – 12 March 604), commonly known as Saint Gregory the Great, Gregory had come to be known as 'the Great' by the late ninth century, a title which is still applied to him.

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Pope Gregory VII

Gregory VII (Gregorius VII; 1015 – 25 May 1085), born Hildebrand of Sovana (Ildebrando da Soana), was Pope from 22 April 1073 to his death in 1085.

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Pope Gregory XVI

Pope Gregory XVI (Gregorius; 18 September 1765 – 1 June 1846), born Bartolomeo Alberto Cappellari EC, was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 2 February 1831 to his death in 1846.

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Pope Leo XIII

Pope Leo XIII (Leone; born Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci; 2 March 1810 – 20 July 1903) was head of the Catholic Church from 20 February 1878 to his death.

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Pope Paschal II

Pope Paschal II (Paschalis II; 1050 1055 – 21 January 1118), born Ranierius, was Pope from 13 August 1099 to his death in 1118.

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Pope Pius VII

Pope Pius VII (14 August 1742 – 20 August 1823), born Barnaba Niccolò Maria Luigi Chiaramonti, was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 14 March 1800 to his death in 1823.

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Pope Sylvester II

Pope Sylvester II or Silvester II (– 12 May 1003) was Pope from 2 April 999 to his death in 1003.

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Pope Urban V

Pope Urban V (Urbanus V; 1310 – 19 December 1370), born Guillaume de Grimoard, was Pope from 28 September 1362 to his death in 1370 and was also a member of the Order of Saint Benedict.

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Pope Victor III

Pope Victor III (c. 1026 – 16 September 1087), born Dauferio, was Pope from 24 May 1086 to his death in 1087.

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Portsmouth Abbey

Portsmouth Abbey is a Benedictine monastery in Portsmouth, on Aquidneck Island in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, United States.

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Prinknash Abbey

Prinknash Abbey is a Roman Catholic monastery in the Vale of Gloucester in the Diocese of Clifton, near the village of Cranham.

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Priory

A priory is a monastery of men or women under religious vows that is headed by a prior or prioress.

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Prosper Guéranger

Prosper Louis Pascal Guéranger, O.S.B. (commonly referred to as Dom Guéranger, 4 April 1805, Sablé-sur-Sarthe, France – 30 January 1875, Solesmes, France) was a French Benedictine monk and priest, who served for nearly 40 years as the Abbot of Solesmes Abbey (which he founded in the abandoned Priory of Solesmes).

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Psalter

A psalter is a volume containing the Book of Psalms, often with other devotional material bound in as well, such as a liturgical calendar and litany of the Saints.

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Rabanus Maurus

Rabanus Maurus Magnentius (780 – 4 February 856), also known as Hrabanus or Rhabanus, was a Frankish Benedictine monk and theologian who became archbishop of Mainz in Germany.

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Ratramnus

Ratramnus (died c. 868) a Frankish monk of the monastery of Corbie, near Amiens in northern France, was a Carolingian theologian known best for his writings on the Eucharist and predestination.

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Religious habit

A religious habit is a distinctive set of religious clothing worn by members of a religious order.

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Religious institute

In the Roman Catholic Church, a religious institute is "a society in which members...pronounce public vows...and lead a life of brothers or sisters in common".

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Religious order

A religious order is a lineage of communities and organizations of people who live in some way set apart from society in accordance with their specific religious devotion, usually characterized by the principles of its founder's religious practice.

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Rembert Weakland

Rembert George Weakland (born April 2, 1927) is an American Benedictine monk, who served as Archbishop of Milwaukee from 1977 to 2002.

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René-Prosper Tassin

Title page of Volume 4 of Tassin and Toustain's ''Nouveau traité de diplomatique'' (1759) René-Prosper Tassin (17 November 1697 – 10 September 1777) was a French historian, belonging to the Benedictine Congregation of Saint-Maur.

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Richard Whiting (abbot)

Blessed Richard Whiting (1461 – 15 November 1539) was an English clergyman and the last Abbot of Glastonbury.

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Robert of Arbrissel

Robert of Arbrissel (1045 – 1116) was an itinerant preacher, and founder of the abbey of Fontevrault.

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Robert of Molesme

Saint Robert of Molesme (1028 – 17 April 1111) was an abbot, one of the founders of the Cistercian Order and is honored as a Christian saint.

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Roger of Wendover

Roger of Wendover (died 6 May 1236), probably a native of Wendover in Buckinghamshire, was an English chronicler of the 13th century.

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Roger Vaughan

Roger William Bede Vaughan (9 January 1834 – 18 August 1883) was an English Benedictine monk of Downside Abbey and the second Roman Catholic Archbishop of Sydney, Australia from 1877 to 1883.

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Romano Guardini

Romano Guardini (17 February 1885 – 1 October 1968) was an Italian-born German Catholic priest, author, and academic.

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Romuald

Romuald (Romualdus; 951 – traditionally 19 June, c. 1025/27 AD) was the founder of the Camaldolese order and a major figure in the eleventh-century "Renaissance of eremitical asceticism".

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Rule of Saint Benedict

The Rule of Saint Benedict (Regula Benedicti) is a book of precepts written by Benedict of Nursia (AD 480–550) for monks living communally under the authority of an abbot.

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Rupert of Salzburg

Rupert of Salzburg (Ruprecht, Robertus, Rupertus; 660 – 710 AD) was Bishop of Worms as well as the first Bishop of Salzburg and abbot of St. Peter's in Salzburg.

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Sacristy

A sacristy is a room for keeping vestments (such as the alb and chasuble) and other church furnishings, sacred vessels, and parish records.

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Saint Anselm Abbey (New Hampshire)

Saint Anselm Abbey, located in Goffstown, New Hampshire, United States, is a Benedictine abbey composed of men living under the Rule of Saint Benedict within the Catholic Church.

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Saint Benedict Medal

The Saint Benedict Medal is a Christian sacramental medal containing symbols and text related to the life of Saint Benedict of Nursia, used by Roman Catholics, as well as Anglicans, Lutherans, Methodists and the Western Orthodox, in the Benedictine Christian tradition, especially votarists and oblates.

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Saint Blaise Abbey, Black Forest

Saint Blaise Abbey (Kloster Sankt Blasien) was a Benedictine monastery in the village of St. Blasien in the Black Forest in Baden-Württemberg, Germany.

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Saint Boniface

Saint Boniface (Bonifatius; 675 – 5 June 754 AD), born Winfrid (also spelled Winifred, Wynfrith, Winfrith or Wynfryth) in the kingdom of Wessex in Anglo-Saxon England, was a leading figure in the Anglo-Saxon mission to the Germanic parts of the Frankish Empire during the 8th century.

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Saint Emma Monastery

Saint Emma Monastery (founded 1931) is a Roman Catholic retreat house and monastery for the Sisters of Saint Benedict of Westmoreland County, located in Greensburg, Pennsylvania.

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Saint Ernest

Saint Ernest (died 1148) was the abbot of the Benedictine Zwiefalten Abbey at Zwiefalten, Germany from 1141 to 1146.

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Saint John's Abbey, Collegeville

Saint John's Abbey is a Benedictine monastery in Collegeville Township, Minnesota, United States, affiliated with the American-Cassinese Congregation.

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Saint Louis Abbey

The Abbey of Saint Mary and Saint Louis is an abbey of the Roman Catholic English Benedictine Congregation (EBC) located in Creve Coeur, in St. Louis County, Missouri in the United States.

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Saint Maurus of Pécs

Saint Maurus of Pécs or Mór (Mór pécsi püspök) was the first known prelate who was born in the Kingdom of Hungary.

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Saint Sturm

Saint Sturm (c. 705 – 17 December 779), also called Sturmius or Sturmi, was a disciple of Saint Boniface and founder and first abbot of the Benedictine monastery and abbey of Fulda in 742 or 744.

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Saint Vincent Archabbey, is a Roman Catholic Benedictine Monastery in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania in the city of Latrobe.

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Saint Walpurga

Saint Walpurga or Walburga (Wealdburg, Valpurga, Walpurga, Walpurgis; c. AD 710 – 25 February 777 or 779), also spelled Valderburg or Guibor, was an Anglo-Saxon missionary to the Frankish Empire.

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Sant'Anselmo all'Aventino

Sant'Anselmo all'Aventino (Italian:St Anselm on the Aventine) is a Roman Catholic church, monastery and college located on Cavalieri di Malta Square on the Aventine Hill in Rome's Ripa rione.

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Scholastica

Scholastica (c. 480 – 10 February 543) is a saint of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Churches.

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Selby Abbey

Selby Abbey is an Anglican parish church in the town of Selby, North Yorkshire, England.

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Sigebert Buckley

Sigebert Buckley (b. c. 1520 AD; d. probably 1610) was a Benedictine monk in England, who is regarded by the Benedictines and by Ampleforth College in particular as representing the continuity of the community through the English Reformation.

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Sisters of Social Service

The Sisters of Social Service (SSS) are a Roman Catholic religious institute of women founded in Hungary in 1923 by Margaret Slachta.

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St. Benedict Abbey (Massachusetts)

St.

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St. Marys, Pennsylvania

St.

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St. Meinrad Archabbey

Saint Meinrad Archabbey in Spencer County, Indiana, USA, was founded by monks from Einsiedeln Abbey in Switzerland on March 21, 1854, and is home to approximately 85 monks.

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Stephen Harding

Stephen Harding, O.Cist., (Étienne Harding),(born 1060, Sherborne, Dorsetshire, England - died 28 March 1134) was an English-born monk and abbot, who was one of the founders of the Cistercian Order.

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Stephen of Obazine

Stephen of Obazine, (1085 1154) was a French priest and hermit, famed for his pious nature, even from a young age.

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Subiaco Abbey (Arkansas)

Subiaco Abbey is an American Benedictine monastery located in the Arkansas River valley of Logan County, Arkansas, part of the Swiss-American Congregation of Benedictine monasteries.

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Subiaco, Lazio

Subiaco is a town and comune in the Metropolitan City of Rome, in Lazio, central Italy, from Tivoli alongside the river Aniene.

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Suger

Suger (Sugerius; 1081 – 13 January 1151) was a French abbot, statesman, and historian.

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Suitbert Bäumer

Suitbert Bäumer (28 March 1845 – 12 August 1894) was a Benedictine monk and historian of the Breviary and one of the most scholarly patrologists of the nineteenth century.

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Suitbert of Kaiserswerdt

Saint Suitbert, Suidbert, Suitbertus, Swithbert, or Swidbert was the "Apostle of the Frisians", born in Northumbria, England, in the seventh century.

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Superior general

A Superior General or General Superior is the leader or head of a religious institute in the Roman Catholic Church.

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Swithun

Swithun (or Swithin, Swīþhūn, Swithunus; died 862 AD) was an Anglo-Saxon bishop of Winchester and subsequently patron saint of Winchester Cathedral.

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Sylvester Gozzolini

Saint Silvestro Guzzolini (1177 – 26 November 1267) was an Italian Roman Catholic priest and the founder of the Silvestrini.

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Sylvestrines

The Sylvestrines are a congregation of monks of the Order of St. Benedict who form the Sylvestrine Congregation.

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Symeon of Durham

Symeon (or Simeon) of Durham (died after 1129) was an English chronicler and a monk of Durham Priory.

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Teresa Forcades

Teresa Forcades i Vila, O.S.B. (born 1966), is a Catalan physician and a Benedictine nun.

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Theodore of Tarsus

Theodore of Tarsus (602 – 19 September 690.) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 668 to 690, best known for his reform of the English Church and establishment of a school in Canterbury.

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Thierry Ruinart

Dom Thierry Ruinart (also Theodore, Theodoricus) (1657–1709) was a French Benedictine monk and scholar.

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Thomas Marshall (Abbot of Colchester)

Thomas Marshall (the Blessed John Beche), also known as John Beche, (died 1 December 1539) was the last Abbot of Colchester Abbey.

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Trappists

The Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance (OCSO: Ordo Cisterciensis Strictioris Observantiae) is a Catholic religious order of cloistered contemplative monastics who follow the Rule of St. Benedict.

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Ursin Durand

Ursin Durand (20 May 1682, Tours – 31 August 1771, Paris) was a French Benedictine of the Maurist Congregation, and historian.

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Walafrid Strabo

Walafrid, alternatively spelt Walahfrid, surnamed Strabo (or Strabus, i.e. "squint-eyed") (c. 808 – 18 August 849), was an Alemannic Benedictine monk and theological writer who lived on Reichenau Island.

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Walker Percy

Walker Percy, Obl.S.B. (May 28, 1916 – May 10, 1990) was an American author from Covington, Louisiana, whose interests included philosophy and semiotics.

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Werburgh

Werburgh (also spelled Wærburh, Werburh or Werburga) (d. 3 February 699 at Trentham in modern-day Staffordshire) was an Anglo-Saxon princess who became the patron saint of the city of Chester in Cheshire.

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Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, England, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster.

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Wilfrid

Wilfrid (c. 633 – c. 709) was an English bishop and saint.

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William Bernard Ullathorne

William Bernard Ullathorne (7 May 180621 March 1889) was an English prelate who held high offices in the Roman Catholic Church during the nineteenth century.

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William I, Duke of Aquitaine

William I (22 March 875 – 6 July 918), called the Pious, was the Count of Auvergne from 886 and Duke of Aquitaine from 893, succeeding the Poitevin ruler Ebalus Manser.

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William of Hirsau

William of Hirsau (or Wilhelm von Hirschau) (1030 – 5 July 1091) was a Benedictine abbot and monastic reformer.

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William of Malmesbury

William of Malmesbury (Willelmus Malmesbiriensis) was the foremost English historian of the 12th century.

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William of Montevergine

William of Montevergine, or William of Vercelli, (1085 – 25 June 1142) was a Catholic hermit and the founder of the Congregation of Monte Vergine, or "Williamites".

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William Placid Morris

William Placid Morris OSB (29 September 1794 – 18 February 1872) was a London-born Roman Catholic bishop.

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Willibrord

Willibrord (658 – 7 November AD 739) was a Northumbrian missionary saint, known as the "Apostle to the Frisians" in the modern Netherlands.

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Wolfgang of Regensburg

Saint Wolfgang of Regensburg (Wolfgangus; 934 – October 31, 994 AD) was bishop of Regensburg in Bavaria from Christmas 972 until his death.

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Worth Abbey

The Abbey of Our Lady, Help of Christians, commonly known as Worth Abbey, is a community of Roman Catholic monks who follow the Rule of St Benedict near Turners Hill village, in West Sussex, England.

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Wulfthryth of Wilton

Wilfrida also known as Wulfthryth, was a 10th-century Catholic female saint and abbess from Anglo-Saxon England who was venerated locally in Wiltshire.

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Yorkshire

Yorkshire (abbreviated Yorks), formally known as the County of York, is a historic county of Northern England and the largest in the United Kingdom.

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1983 Code of Canon Law

The 1983 Code of Canon Law (abbreviated 1983 CIC from its Latin title Codex Iuris Canonici), also called the Johanno-Pauline Code, is the "fundamental body of ecclesiastical laws for the Latin Church".

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Redirects here:

Benedictian, Benedictine, Benedictine Nuns, Benedictine Order, Benedictine abbey, Benedictine centuries, Benedictine monasteries, Benedictine monastery, Benedictine monasticism, Benedictine monk, Benedictine monks, Benedictine nun, Benedictine nuns, Benedictine order, Benedictine religious order, Benedictine spirituality, Benedictines, Benedictinian, Benedictinian Order, Benedictinians, Black Benedictines, Black Monk, Black Monks, Black monk, Black monks, Collatines, Congregation of St. Justina of Padua, O. S. B., O.S.B., O.S.B.Cas., Obl.S.B., Oblate of Saint Benedict, Oblates of Saint Frances of Rome, Oblates of St Benedict, Oblates of St. Benedict, Olivetian, Order of St Benedict, Order of St. Benedict, Order of St. Benedictine, Ordo Sancti Benedicti, St. Benedict's monks.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Order_of_Saint_Benedict

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