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Oxford University Press

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Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press. [1]

263 relations: A Greek–English Lexicon, A. S. Hornby, Academic journal, Advanced learner's dictionary, Alan Rawsthorne, Albert Einstein, Alexander MacMillan (publisher), Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, American Revolutionary War, Ancient philosophy, Antiquarian, Arabian Peninsula, Arabic, Archbishop, Asia, Pacific and Africa Collections, British Library, August Immanuel Bekker, B. Altman and Company, Balliol College, Oxford, Bartholomew Price, Benjamin Jowett, Bestseller, Bible errata, Bishop, Blackstone Press, Blavatnik School of Government, Book, Book History (journal), Botswana, Brasenose College, Oxford, British Council, British Library, Broad Street, Oxford, Broadsheet, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge University Press v. 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A Greek–English Lexicon

A Greek–English Lexicon, often referred to as Liddell & Scott, Liddell–Scott–Jones, or LSJ, is a standard lexicographical work of the Ancient Greek language.

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A. S. Hornby

Albert Sidney (or Sydney) Hornby, usually just A. S. Hornby (1898–1978), was an English grammarian, lexicographer, and pioneer in the field of English language learning and teaching (ELT).

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Academic journal

An academic or scholarly journal is a periodical publication in which scholarship relating to a particular academic discipline is published.

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Advanced learner's dictionary

The advanced learner's dictionary is the most common type of monolingual learner's dictionary, that is, a dictionary written for someone who is learning a foreign language and who has a proficiency level of B2 or above according to the Common European Framework.

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Alan Rawsthorne

Alan Rawsthorne (2 May 1905 – 24 July 1971) was a British composer.

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Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein (14 March 1879 – 18 April 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics).

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Alexander MacMillan (publisher)

Alexander MacMillan (Alasdair MacMhaolain; 3 October 1818 – 26 January 1896), born in Irvine, Ayrshire, Scotland, was a cofounder, in 1843, with his brother Daniel of Macmillan Publishers.

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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (commonly shortened to Alice in Wonderland) is an 1865 novel written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll.

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American Revolutionary War

The American Revolutionary War (17751783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a global war that began as a conflict between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence as the United States of America. After 1765, growing philosophical and political differences strained the relationship between Great Britain and its colonies. Patriot protests against taxation without representation followed the Stamp Act and escalated into boycotts, which culminated in 1773 with the Sons of Liberty destroying a shipment of tea in Boston Harbor. Britain responded by closing Boston Harbor and passing a series of punitive measures against Massachusetts Bay Colony. Massachusetts colonists responded with the Suffolk Resolves, and they established a shadow government which wrested control of the countryside from the Crown. Twelve colonies formed a Continental Congress to coordinate their resistance, establishing committees and conventions that effectively seized power. British attempts to disarm the Massachusetts militia at Concord, Massachusetts in April 1775 led to open combat. Militia forces then besieged Boston, forcing a British evacuation in March 1776, and Congress appointed George Washington to command the Continental Army. Concurrently, an American attempt to invade Quebec and raise rebellion against the British failed decisively. On July 2, 1776, the Continental Congress voted for independence, issuing its declaration on July 4. Sir William Howe launched a British counter-offensive, capturing New York City and leaving American morale at a low ebb. However, victories at Trenton and Princeton restored American confidence. In 1777, the British launched an invasion from Quebec under John Burgoyne, intending to isolate the New England Colonies. Instead of assisting this effort, Howe took his army on a separate campaign against Philadelphia, and Burgoyne was decisively defeated at Saratoga in October 1777. Burgoyne's defeat had drastic consequences. France formally allied with the Americans and entered the war in 1778, and Spain joined the war the following year as an ally of France but not as an ally of the United States. In 1780, the Kingdom of Mysore attacked the British in India, and tensions between Great Britain and the Netherlands erupted into open war. In North America, the British mounted a "Southern strategy" led by Charles Cornwallis which hinged upon a Loyalist uprising, but too few came forward. Cornwallis suffered reversals at King's Mountain and Cowpens. He retreated to Yorktown, Virginia, intending an evacuation, but a decisive French naval victory deprived him of an escape. A Franco-American army led by the Comte de Rochambeau and Washington then besieged Cornwallis' army and, with no sign of relief, he surrendered in October 1781. Whigs in Britain had long opposed the pro-war Tories in Parliament, and the surrender gave them the upper hand. In early 1782, Parliament voted to end all offensive operations in North America, but the war continued in Europe and India. Britain remained under siege in Gibraltar but scored a major victory over the French navy. On September 3, 1783, the belligerent parties signed the Treaty of Paris in which Great Britain agreed to recognize the sovereignty of the United States and formally end the war. French involvement had proven decisive,Brooks, Richard (editor). Atlas of World Military History. HarperCollins, 2000, p. 101 "Washington's success in keeping the army together deprived the British of victory, but French intervention won the war." but France made few gains and incurred crippling debts. Spain made some minor territorial gains but failed in its primary aim of recovering Gibraltar. The Dutch were defeated on all counts and were compelled to cede territory to Great Britain. In India, the war against Mysore and its allies concluded in 1784 without any territorial changes.

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Ancient philosophy

This page lists some links to ancient philosophy.

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Antiquarian

An antiquarian or antiquary (from the Latin: antiquarius, meaning pertaining to ancient times) is an aficionado or student of antiquities or things of the past.

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Arabian Peninsula

The Arabian Peninsula, simplified Arabia (شِبْهُ الْجَزِيرَةِ الْعَرَبِيَّة, ‘Arabian island’ or جَزِيرَةُ الْعَرَب, ‘Island of the Arabs’), is a peninsula of Western Asia situated northeast of Africa on the Arabian plate.

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Arabic

Arabic (العَرَبِيَّة) or (عَرَبِيّ) or) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world. It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia in the east to the Anti-Lebanon mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form, Modern Standard Arabic, which is derived from Classical Arabic. As the modern written language, Modern Standard Arabic is widely taught in schools and universities, and is used to varying degrees in workplaces, government, and the media. The two formal varieties are grouped together as Literary Arabic (fuṣḥā), which is the official language of 26 states and the liturgical language of Islam. Modern Standard Arabic largely follows the grammatical standards of Classical Arabic and uses much of the same vocabulary. However, it has discarded some grammatical constructions and vocabulary that no longer have any counterpart in the spoken varieties, and has adopted certain new constructions and vocabulary from the spoken varieties. Much of the new vocabulary is used to denote concepts that have arisen in the post-classical era, especially in modern times. During the Middle Ages, Literary Arabic was a major vehicle of culture in Europe, especially in science, mathematics and philosophy. As a result, many European languages have also borrowed many words from it. Arabic influence, mainly in vocabulary, is seen in European languages, mainly Spanish and to a lesser extent Portuguese, Valencian and Catalan, owing to both the proximity of Christian European and Muslim Arab civilizations and 800 years of Arabic culture and language in the Iberian Peninsula, referred to in Arabic as al-Andalus. Sicilian has about 500 Arabic words as result of Sicily being progressively conquered by Arabs from North Africa, from the mid 9th to mid 10th centuries. Many of these words relate to agriculture and related activities (Hull and Ruffino). Balkan languages, including Greek and Bulgarian, have also acquired a significant number of Arabic words through contact with Ottoman Turkish. Arabic has influenced many languages around the globe throughout its history. Some of the most influenced languages are Persian, Turkish, Spanish, Urdu, Kashmiri, Kurdish, Bosnian, Kazakh, Bengali, Hindi, Malay, Maldivian, Indonesian, Pashto, Punjabi, Tagalog, Sindhi, and Hausa, and some languages in parts of Africa. Conversely, Arabic has borrowed words from other languages, including Greek and Persian in medieval times, and contemporary European languages such as English and French in modern times. Classical Arabic is the liturgical language of 1.8 billion Muslims and Modern Standard Arabic is one of six official languages of the United Nations. All varieties of Arabic combined are spoken by perhaps as many as 422 million speakers (native and non-native) in the Arab world, making it the fifth most spoken language in the world. Arabic is written with the Arabic alphabet, which is an abjad script and is written from right to left, although the spoken varieties are sometimes written in ASCII Latin from left to right with no standardized orthography.

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Archbishop

In Christianity, an archbishop (via Latin archiepiscopus, from Greek αρχιεπίσκοπος, from αρχι-, 'chief', and επίσκοπος, 'bishop') is a bishop of higher rank or office.

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Asia, Pacific and Africa Collections, British Library

The Asia, Pacific and Africa Collections previously called the Oriental and India Office Collections (OIOC) form a significant part of the holdings of the British Library in London, England.

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August Immanuel Bekker

August Immanuel Bekker (21 May 17857 June 1871) was a German philologist and critic.

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B. Altman and Company

B.

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Balliol College, Oxford

Balliol College, founded in 1263,: Graduate Studies Prospectus - Last updated 17 Sep 08 is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England.

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Bartholomew Price

Bartholomew Price (181829 December 1898) was an English mathematician and educator.

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Benjamin Jowett

Benjamin Jowett (modern variant; 15 April 1817 – 1 October 1893) was renowned as an influential tutor and administrative reformer in the University of Oxford, a theologian and translator of Plato and Thucydides.

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Bestseller

A bestseller is, usually, a book that is included on a list of top-selling or frequently-borrowed titles, normally based on publishing industry and book trade figures and library circulation statistics; such lists may be published by newspapers, magazines, or book store chains.

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Bible errata

Throughout history, printers' errors and peculiar translations have appeared in Bibles published throughout the world.

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Bishop

A bishop (English derivation from the New Testament of the Christian Bible Greek επίσκοπος, epískopos, "overseer", "guardian") is an ordained, consecrated, or appointed member of the Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of authority and oversight.

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Blackstone Press

Blackstone Press Limited is now a subsidiary of Oxford University Press.

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Blavatnik School of Government

The Blavatnik School of Government is a school of public policy founded in 2010 at the University of Oxford in England.

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Book

A book is a series of pages assembled for easy portability and reading, as well as the composition contained in it.

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Book History (journal)

Book History is the official publication of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing.

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Botswana

Botswana, officially the Republic of Botswana (Lefatshe la Botswana), is a landlocked country located in Southern Africa.

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Brasenose College, Oxford

Brasenose College (BNC), officially The King's Hall and College of Brasenose, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.

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British Council

The British Council is a British organisation specialising in international cultural and educational opportunities.

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British Library

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and the largest national library in the world by number of items catalogued.

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Broad Street, Oxford

Broad Street is a wide street in central Oxford, England, just north of the former city wall.

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Broadsheet

A broadsheet is the largest newspaper format and is characterized by long vertical pages (typically). Other common newspaper formats include the smaller Berliner and tabloid/compact formats.

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Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge.

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Cambridge University Press v. Patton

Cambridge University Press et al.

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Cape Town

Cape Town (Kaapstad,; Xhosa: iKapa) is a coastal city in South Africa.

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Carnegie United Kingdom Trust

The Carnegie United Kingdom Trust is an independent, endowed charitable trust based in Scotland, and operating throughout Great Britain and Ireland.

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Carols for Choirs

Carols for Choirs is a collection of vocal scores, predominantly of Christmas carols and hymns, first published in 1961 by Oxford University Press.

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Cassell (publisher)

Cassell & Co is a British book publishing house, founded in 1848 by John Cassell (1817–1865), which became in the 1890s an international publishing group company.

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Chancellor

Chancellor (cancellarius) is a title of various official positions in the governments of many nations.

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Chancellor (education)

A chancellor is a leader of a college or university, usually either the executive or ceremonial head of the university or of a university campus within a university system.

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Charitable organization

A charitable organization or charity is a non-profit organization (NPO) whose primary objectives are philanthropy and social well-being (e.g. charitable, educational, religious, or other activities serving the public interest or common good).

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Charles I of England

Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649.

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Chennai

Chennai (formerly known as Madras or) is the capital of the Indian state of Tamil Nadu.

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Cheshire Cat

The Cheshire Cat is a fictional cat popularised by Lewis Carroll in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and known for its distinctive mischievous grin.

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China

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a unitary one-party sovereign state in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around /1e9 round 3 billion.

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Christ Church, Oxford

Christ Church (Ædes Christi, the temple or house, ædēs, of Christ, and thus sometimes known as "The House") is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England.

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Christmas

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ,Martindale, Cyril Charles.

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Christmas and holiday season

The Christmas season, also called the festive season, or the holiday season (mainly in the U.S. and Canada; often simply called the holidays),, is an annually recurring period recognized in many Western and Western-influenced countries that is generally considered to run from late November to early January.

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Christmas Eve

Christmas Eve is the evening or entire day before Christmas Day, the festival commemorating the birth of Jesus.

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Christmas traditions

Christmas traditions vary from country to country.

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Church Fathers

The Church Fathers, Early Church Fathers, Christian Fathers, or Fathers of the Church are ancient and influential Christian theologians and writers.

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Clarendon Building

The Clarendon Building is an early 18th-century neoclassical building of the University of Oxford.

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Clarendon Fund

The Clarendon Fund is a global scholarship scheme at the University of Oxford.

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Clarendon Institute

The Clarendon Institute (aka the Clarendon Press Institute) is a building in Walton Street, central Oxford, England.

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Cologne

Cologne (Köln,, Kölle) is the largest city in the German federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia and the fourth most populated city in Germany (after Berlin, Hamburg, and Munich).

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Compact Oxford English Dictionary of Current English

The Compact Oxford English Dictionary of Current English is a one-volume dictionary published by Oxford University Press.

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Concise Oxford English Dictionary

Henry Watson Fowler The Concise Oxford English Dictionary (officially titled The Concise Oxford Dictionary until 2002, and widely abbreviated COD or COED) is probably the best-known of the 'smaller' Oxford dictionaries.

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Constant Lambert

Leonard Constant Lambert (23 August 190521 August 1951) was a British composer, conductor, and author.

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Copyright

Copyright is a legal right, existing globally in many countries, that basically grants the creator of an original work exclusive rights to determine and decide whether, and under what conditions, this original work may be used by others.

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Corporate tax in the United States

Corporate tax is imposed in the United States at the federal, most state, and some local levels on the income of entities treated for tax purposes as corporations.

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Daniel Robertson (architect)

Daniel Robertson (died 1849) was a British architect.

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Dean (Christianity)

A dean, in a church context, is a cleric holding certain positions of authority within a religious hierarchy.

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Defence of the Realm Act 1914

The Defence of the Realm Act (DORA) was passed in the United Kingdom on 8 August 1914, four days after it entered World War I. It gave the government wide-ranging powers during the war period, such as the power to requisition buildings or land needed for the war effort, or to make regulations creating criminal offences.

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Dictionary of National Biography

The Dictionary of National Biography (DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published from 1885.

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Don Quixote

The Ingenious Nobleman Sir Quixote of La Mancha (El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha), or just Don Quixote (Oxford English Dictionary, ""), is a Spanish novel by Miguel de Cervantes.

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Dora Carrington

Dora de Houghton Carrington (29 March 1893 – 11 March 1932), known generally as Carrington, was an English painter and decorative artist, remembered in part for her association with members of the Bloomsbury Group, especially the writer Lytton Strachey.

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Dutch Republic

The Dutch Republic was a republic that existed from the formal creation of a confederacy in 1581 by several Dutch provinces (which earlier seceded from the Spanish rule) until the Batavian Revolution in 1795.

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E. V. Rieu

Emile Victor Rieu CBE (10 February 1887 – 11 May 1972) was a British classicist, publisher, poet, and initiator and editor of the Penguin Classics series of books.

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East Asia

East Asia is the eastern subregion of the Asian continent, which can be defined in either geographical or ethno-cultural "The East Asian cultural sphere evolves when Japan, Korea, and what is today Vietnam all share adapted elements of Chinese civilization of this period (that of the Tang dynasty), in particular Buddhism, Confucian social and political values, and literary Chinese and its writing system." terms.

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Edinburgh

Edinburgh (Dùn Èideann; Edinburgh) is the capital city of Scotland and one of its 32 council areas.

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Edinburgh University Press

Edinburgh University Press is a scholarly publisher of academic books and journals, based in Edinburgh, Scotland.

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Edmund Blunden

Edmund Charles Blunden, CBE, MC (1 November 1896 – 20 January 1974) was an English poet, author and critic.

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Edmund Rubbra

Edmund Rubbra (23 May 190114 February 1986) was a British composer.

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Edward Blore

Edward Blore (13 September 1787 – 4 September 1879) was a 19th-century (Victorian and pre-Victorian) British landscape and architectural artist, architect and antiquary.

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Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon

Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon (18 February 16099 December 1674) was an English statesman who served as Lord Chancellor to King Charles II from 1658, two years before the Restoration of the Monarchy, until 1667.

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Edward John Thompson

Edward John Thompson (9 April 1886 – 28 April 1946) was a British scholar, novelist, historian and translator.

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Edward Pococke

Edward Pococke (baptised 8 November 1604 – 10 September 1691) was an English Orientalist and biblical scholar.

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Electrotyping

Electrotyping (also galvanoplasty) is a chemical method for forming metal parts that exactly reproduce a model.

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Elizabeth I of England

Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603.

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England

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.

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English Civil War

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance.

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Europe

Europe is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere.

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Express Publishing

Express Publishing is an independent UK based publishing house with its headquarters in Berkshire, UK.

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G. P. Putnam's Sons

G.

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George Huddesford (academic)

George Huddesford (1699?1776), D.D., was an English academic administrator and museum keeper at the University of Oxford.

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Glasgow

Glasgow (Glesga; Glaschu) is the largest city in Scotland, and third most populous in the United Kingdom.

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Grammar

In linguistics, grammar (from Greek: γραμματική) is the set of structural rules governing the composition of clauses, phrases, and words in any given natural language.

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Great Clarendon Street

Great Clarendon Street is one of the principal thoroughfares of the Jericho district of Oxford, England, an inner suburb northwest of the centre of the city.

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Greek language

Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά, elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα, ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

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Hachette (publisher)

Hachette is a French publisher.

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Hart's Rules

Hart's Rules for Compositors and Readers at the University Press, Oxford – today published under the short title New Hart's Rules – is an authoritative reference book and style guide published in England by Oxford University Press (OUP).

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Harvard University Press

Harvard University Press (HUP) is a publishing house established on January 13, 1913, as a division of Harvard University, and focused on academic publishing.

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Hebrew language

No description.

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Henry Aldrich

Henry Aldrich (1647 – 14 December 1710) was an English theologian, philosopher, and composer.

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Hodder & Stoughton

Hodder & Stoughton is a British publishing house, now an imprint of Hachette.

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Horace Hart

Horace Henry Hart (1840–1916) was an English printer and biographer.

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House of Stuart

The House of Stuart, originally Stewart, was a European royal house that originated in Scotland.

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House of Tudor

The House of Tudor was an English royal house of Welsh origin, descended in the male line from the Tudors of Penmynydd.

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Hubert J. Foss

Hubert James Foss (2 May 1899 – 27 May 1953) was an English pianist, composer, and first Musical Editor (1923–1941) for Oxford University Press (OUP) at Amen House in London.

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Humphrey Sumner Milford

Sir Humphrey Sumner Milford (8 February 1877 – 6 September 1952) was an English publisher and editor who from 1913 to 1945 was publisher to the University of Oxford and head of the London operations of Oxford University Press (OUP).

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Hybrid open-access journal

A hybrid open-access journal is a subscription journal in which some of the articles are open access.

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India

India (IAST), also called the Republic of India (IAST), is a country in South Asia.

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India paper

India paper is a type of paper which from 1875 has been based on bleached hemp and rag fibres, that produced a very thin, tough opaque white paper.

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Insect

Insects or Insecta (from Latin insectum) are hexapod invertebrates and the largest group within the arthropod phylum.

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International Standard Book Number

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier.

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International Standard Music Number

The International Standard Music Number or ISMN (ISO 10957) is a thirteen-character alphanumeric identifier for printed music developed by ISO.

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Iran

Iran (ایران), also known as Persia, officially the Islamic Republic of Iran (جمهوری اسلامی ایران), is a sovereign state in Western Asia. With over 81 million inhabitants, Iran is the world's 18th-most-populous country. Comprising a land area of, it is the second-largest country in the Middle East and the 17th-largest in the world. Iran is bordered to the northwest by Armenia and the Republic of Azerbaijan, to the north by the Caspian Sea, to the northeast by Turkmenistan, to the east by Afghanistan and Pakistan, to the south by the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman, and to the west by Turkey and Iraq. The country's central location in Eurasia and Western Asia, and its proximity to the Strait of Hormuz, give it geostrategic importance. Tehran is the country's capital and largest city, as well as its leading economic and cultural center. Iran is home to one of the world's oldest civilizations, beginning with the formation of the Elamite kingdoms in the fourth millennium BCE. It was first unified by the Iranian Medes in the seventh century BCE, reaching its greatest territorial size in the sixth century BCE, when Cyrus the Great founded the Achaemenid Empire, which stretched from Eastern Europe to the Indus Valley, becoming one of the largest empires in history. The Iranian realm fell to Alexander the Great in the fourth century BCE and was divided into several Hellenistic states. An Iranian rebellion culminated in the establishment of the Parthian Empire, which was succeeded in the third century CE by the Sasanian Empire, a leading world power for the next four centuries. Arab Muslims conquered the empire in the seventh century CE, displacing the indigenous faiths of Zoroastrianism and Manichaeism with Islam. Iran made major contributions to the Islamic Golden Age that followed, producing many influential figures in art and science. After two centuries, a period of various native Muslim dynasties began, which were later conquered by the Turks and the Mongols. The rise of the Safavids in the 15th century led to the reestablishment of a unified Iranian state and national identity, with the country's conversion to Shia Islam marking a turning point in Iranian and Muslim history. Under Nader Shah, Iran was one of the most powerful states in the 18th century, though by the 19th century, a series of conflicts with the Russian Empire led to significant territorial losses. Popular unrest led to the establishment of a constitutional monarchy and the country's first legislature. A 1953 coup instigated by the United Kingdom and the United States resulted in greater autocracy and growing anti-Western resentment. Subsequent unrest against foreign influence and political repression led to the 1979 Revolution and the establishment of an Islamic republic, a political system that includes elements of a parliamentary democracy vetted and supervised by a theocracy governed by an autocratic "Supreme Leader". During the 1980s, the country was engaged in a war with Iraq, which lasted for almost nine years and resulted in a high number of casualties and economic losses for both sides. According to international reports, Iran's human rights record is exceptionally poor. The regime in Iran is undemocratic, and has frequently persecuted and arrested critics of the government and its Supreme Leader. Women's rights in Iran are described as seriously inadequate, and children's rights have been severely violated, with more child offenders being executed in Iran than in any other country in the world. Since the 2000s, Iran's controversial nuclear program has raised concerns, which is part of the basis of the international sanctions against the country. The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, an agreement reached between Iran and the P5+1, was created on 14 July 2015, aimed to loosen the nuclear sanctions in exchange for Iran's restriction in producing enriched uranium. Iran is a founding member of the UN, ECO, NAM, OIC, and OPEC. It is a major regional and middle power, and its large reserves of fossil fuels – which include the world's largest natural gas supply and the fourth-largest proven oil reserves – exert considerable influence in international energy security and the world economy. The country's rich cultural legacy is reflected in part by its 22 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the third-largest number in Asia and eleventh-largest in the world. Iran is a multicultural country comprising numerous ethnic and linguistic groups, the largest being Persians (61%), Azeris (16%), Kurds (10%), and Lurs (6%).

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James Clerk Maxwell

James Clerk Maxwell (13 June 1831 – 5 November 1879) was a Scottish scientist in the field of mathematical physics.

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James Murray (lexicographer)

Sir James Augustus Henry Murray, FBA (7 February 1837 – 26 July 1915) was a Scottish lexicographer and philologist.

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Japanese invasion of Manchuria

The Japanese invasion of Manchuria began on 18 September 1931, when the Kwantung Army of the Empire of Japan invaded Manchuria immediately following the Mukden Incident.

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Jeremiah Markland

Jeremiah Markland (18 October (or 29) 1693 – 7 July 1776) was an English classical scholar.

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Jericho, Oxford

Jericho is an historic suburb of the English city of Oxford.

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Jesus College, Oxford

Jesus College (in full: Jesus College in the University of Oxford of Queen Elizabeth's Foundation) is one of the colleges of the University of Oxford in England.

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John Baskett

John Baskett (1664/5 – 1742), was the king's printer.

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John Fell (bishop)

John Fell (23 June 1625 – 10 July 1686) was an English churchman and influential academic.

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John Gilbert Newton Brown

Sir John Gilbert Newton Brown CBE (1916–2003) was Publisher of the Oxford University Press and has been credited as one of the great leaders of British publishing throughout its post World War II recovery.

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Joint-stock company

A joint-stock company is a business entity in which shares of the company's stock can be bought and sold by shareholders.

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Journal of Experimental Botany

The Journal of Experimental Botany (JXB) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

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Karl Wilhelm Dindorf

Karl Wilhelm Dindorf (Guilielmus Dindorfius; 2 January 1802 – 1 August 1883) was a German classical scholar.

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Keith Robbins

Keith Gilbert Robbins FRSE FRHistS FLSW (born 9 April 1940) is a historian and former Vice-Chancellor of the University of Wales, Lampeter.

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King James Version

The King James Version (KJV), also known as the King James Bible (KJB) or simply the Version (AV), is an English translation of the Christian Bible for the Church of England, begun in 1604 and completed in 1611.

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Kobe

is the sixth-largest city in Japan and the capital city of Hyōgo Prefecture.

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Kolkata

Kolkata (also known as Calcutta, the official name until 2001) is the capital of the Indian state of West Bengal.

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Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

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League of Nations

The League of Nations (abbreviated as LN in English, La Société des Nations abbreviated as SDN or SdN in French) was an intergovernmental organisation founded on 10 January 1920 as a result of the Paris Peace Conference that ended the First World War.

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Leipzig

Leipzig is the most populous city in the federal state of Saxony, Germany.

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Leoline Jenkins

Sir Leoline Jenkins (1625 – 1 September 1685) was a Welsh academic, jurist and politician.

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Lesotho

Lesotho officially the Kingdom of Lesotho ('Muso oa Lesotho), is an enclaved country in southern Africa.

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Let's Go (textbooks)

Let's Go is a series of American-English based EFL (English as a foreign language) textbooks developed by Oxford University Press and first released in 1990.

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Lewis Carroll

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon, and photographer.

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List of Chancellors of the University of Oxford

This is a list of Chancellors of the University of Oxford in England by year of appointment.

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List of largest book publishers of the United Kingdom

This is a list of largest UK trade book publishers, with some of their principal imprints, ranked by sales value, according to Nielsen BookScan.

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List of Vice-Chancellors of the University of Oxford

The following people have been Vice-Chancellors of the University of Oxford in England.

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London

London is the capital and most populous city of England and the United Kingdom.

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Luke the Evangelist

Luke the Evangelist (Latin: Lūcās, Λουκᾶς, Loukãs, לוקאס, Lūqās, לוקא, Lūqā&apos) is one of the Four Evangelists—the four traditionally ascribed authors of the canonical Gospels.

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Madhya Pradesh

Madhya Pradesh (MP;; meaning Central Province) is a state in central India.

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Mandela Rhodes Scholarship

A Mandela Rhodes Scholarship provides full funding for up to a maximum of two years of postgraduate study for an African citizen under 30 years of age.

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Martin Routh

Martin Joseph Routh (18 September 175522 December 1854) was an English classical scholar and President of Magdalen College, Oxford (1791–1854).

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Martyr

A martyr (Greek: μάρτυς, mártys, "witness"; stem μάρτυρ-, mártyr-) is someone who suffers persecution and death for advocating, renouncing, refusing to renounce, or refusing to advocate a belief or cause as demanded by an external party.

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Max Müller

Friedrich Max Müller (6 December 1823 – 28 October 1900), generally known as Max Müller, was a German-born philologist and Orientalist, who lived and studied in Britain for most of his life.

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Maxwell's equations

Maxwell's equations are a set of partial differential equations that, together with the Lorentz force law, form the foundation of classical electromagnetism, classical optics, and electric circuits.

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Melbourne

Melbourne is the state capital of Victoria and the second-most populous city in Australia and Oceania.

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Middle Ages

In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages (or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century.

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Moses Pitt

Moses Pitt (c. 1639–1697) was a bookseller and printer known for the production of his Atlas of the world, a project supported by the Royal Society, and in particular by Christopher Wren.

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Mumbai

Mumbai (also known as Bombay, the official name until 1995) is the capital city of the Indian state of Maharashtra.

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Music of the United Kingdom

Throughout its history, the United Kingdom has been a major producer and source of musical creation, drawing its artistic basis from the history of the United Kingdom, from church music, Western culture and the ancient and traditional folk music and instrumentation of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales.

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Namibia

Namibia, officially the Republic of Namibia (German:; Republiek van Namibië), is a country in southern Africa whose western border is the Atlantic Ocean.

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New Testament

The New Testament (Ἡ Καινὴ Διαθήκη, trans. Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē; Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, based on the Hebrew Bible.

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New Year

New Year is the time or day at which a new calendar year begins and the calendar's year count increments by one.

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New Year's Day

New Year's Day, also called simply New Year's or New Year, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar.

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New Year's Eve

In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December which is the seventh day of Christmastide.

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New York City

The City of New York, often called New York City (NYC) or simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States.

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New-York Historical Society

The New-York Historical Society is an American history museum and library located in New York City at the corner of 77th Street and Central Park West in Manhattan, founded in 1804 as New York's first museum.

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Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o

Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o (born 5 January 1938) is a Kenyan writer, formerly working in English and now working in Gikuyu.

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Nicholas Hawksmoor

Nicholas Hawksmoor (probably 1661 – 25 March 1736) was an English architect.

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Noel Carrington

Noel Carrington (1895–1989) was an English book designer, editor, publisher, and the originator of Puffin Books.

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Nucleic Acids Research

Nucleic Acids Research is an open-access peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Oxford University Press.

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Open access

Open access (OA) refers to research outputs which are distributed online and free of cost or other barriers, and possibly with the addition of a Creative Commons license to promote reuse.

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Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association

The Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA) is a non-profit trade association representing the interests of open access journal publishers globally in all scientific, technical and scholarly disciplines.

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Oriental studies

Oriental studies is the academic field of study that embraces Near Eastern and Far Eastern societies and cultures, languages, peoples, history and archaeology; in recent years the subject has often been turned into the newer terms of Asian studies and Middle Eastern studies.

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Oxford

Oxford is a city in the South East region of England and the county town of Oxfordshire.

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Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary (OALD) was the first advanced learner's dictionary of English.

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Oxford Almanack

The Oxford Almanack is an annual almanac published by the Oxford University Press for the University of Oxford since 1674.

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Oxford Annotated Bible

The Oxford Annotated Bible (OAB) is a study Bible published by the Oxford University Press (OUP).

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Oxford Bibliographies Online

Oxford Bibliographies Online (OBO), also known as Oxford Bibliographies, is a web-based compendium of peer-reviewed annotated bibliographies and short encyclopedia entries maintained by Oxford University Press.

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Oxford Classical Texts

Oxford Classical Texts (OCTs), or Scriptorum Classicorum Bibliotheca Oxoniensis, is a series of books published by Oxford University Press.

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Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History, John B. Hattendorf, editor in chief, was published by Oxford University Press in 2007.

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Oxford English Dictionary

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is the main historical dictionary of the English language, published by the Oxford University Press.

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Oxford Hebrew Bible

The Hebrew Bible: A Critical Edition, formerly known as the Oxford Hebrew Bible, is an in-progress critical edition of the Hebrew Bible (also known as the Old Testament, Tanakh, Mikra, or Jewish Bible) to be published by Oxford University Press.

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Oxford Historical Monographs

Oxford Historical Monographs is a monographic series published by Oxford University Press.

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Oxford History of Art

The Oxford History of Art is a monographic series about the history of art, design and architecture published by Oxford University Press.

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Oxford History of England

The Oxford History of England is a modern history series of the British Isles, with each individual volume written by historians of that period.

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Oxford History of the United States

The Oxford History of the United States (1982–2017) is an ongoing multi-volume narrative history of the United States published by Oxford University Press.

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Oxford History of Wales

The Oxford History of Wales is a history series on the history of Wales, written by leading historians for each period.

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Oxford Lectern Bible

The Oxford Lectern Bible was a massive edition of the English Bible designed by American typographer Bruce Rogers.

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Oxford World's Classics

Oxford World's Classics is an imprint of Oxford University Press.

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Paternoster Row

Paternoster Row was a street in the City of London that is supposed to have received its name from the fact that, when the monks and clergy of St Paul's Cathedral would go in procession chanting the great litany, they would recite the Lord's Prayer (Pater Noster being its opening line in Latin) in the litany along this part of the route.

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Percy Dearmer

Percival Dearmer (1867–1936), known as Percy Dearmer, was an English priest and liturgist best known as the author of The Parson's Handbook, a liturgical manual for Anglican clergy.

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Percy Scholes

Percy Alfred Scholes M.A., Hon.D.Mus.

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Peter Elmsley

Peter Elmsley (1773–1825) was an English classical scholar.

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Peter Warlock

Philip Arnold Heseltine (30 October 189417 December 1930), known by the pseudonym Peter Warlock, was a British composer and music critic.

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Philip Lyttelton Gell

Philip Lyttelton Gell (1852–1926) was a British editor for Oxford University Press between 1884 and 1896 and President of the British South Africa Company between 1920–1923.

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Philological Society

The Philological Society, or London Philological Society, is the oldest learned society in Great Britain dedicated to the study of language.

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Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood

The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood (later known as the Pre-Raphaelites) was a group of English painters, poets, and critics, founded in 1848 by William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais and Dante Gabriel Rossetti.

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Printer (publishing)

In publishing, printers are both companies providing printing services and individuals who directly operate printing presses.

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Printing press

A printing press is a device for applying pressure to an inked surface resting upon a print medium (such as paper or cloth), thereby transferring the ink.

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Proofreading

Proofreading is the reading of a galley proof or an electronic copy of a publication to detect and correct production errors of text or art.

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PRS for Music

PRS for Music Limited (formerly The MCPS-PRS Alliance Limited) is the UK’s leading collection society, bringing together two collection societies: the Mechanical-Copyright Protection Society (MCPS) and the Performing Right Society (PRS).

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Punchcutting

Punchcutting is a craft used in traditional typography to cut letter punches in steel as the first stage of making metal type.

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Quarto

Quarto (abbreviated Qto, 4to or 4°) is a book or pamphlet produced from full "blanksheets", each of which is printed with eight pages of text, four to a side, then folded twice to produce four leaves (that is, eight book pages).

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Queen's Printer

The Queen's Printer (known as King's Printer during the reign of a male monarch) is typically a bureau of the national, state, or provincial government responsible for producing official documents issued by the Queen-in-Council, ministers of the Crown, or other departments.

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Rabindranath Tagore

Rabindranath Tagore FRAS, also written Ravīndranātha Ṭhākura (7 May 1861 – 7 August 1941), sobriquet Gurudev, was a Bengali polymath who reshaped Bengali literature and music, as well as Indian art with Contextual Modernism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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Ralph Vaughan Williams

Ralph Vaughan Williams (12 October 1872– 26 August 1958) was an English composer.

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Regius Professor

A Regius Professor is a university professor with royal patronage or appointment.

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Religious text

Religious texts (also known as scripture, or scriptures, from the Latin scriptura, meaning "writing") are texts which religious traditions consider to be central to their practice or beliefs.

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Restoration (England)

The Restoration of the English monarchy took place in the Stuart period.

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Revised Version

The Revised Version (RV) or English Revised Version (ERV) of the Bible is a late 19th-century British revision of the King James Version.

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Richard Allestree

Richard Allestree or Allestry (1621/2 – 28 January 1681) was an English Royalist churchman and provost of Eton College from 1665.

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Rimi B. Chatterjee

Rimi B. Chatterjee is an author based in Kolkata, India.

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Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester

Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester (24 June 1532 – 4 September 1588) was an English nobleman and the favourite and close friend of Elizabeth I's, from her first year on the throne until his death.

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Royal Commission

A Royal Commission is a major ad-hoc formal public inquiry into a defined issue in some monarchies.

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Royalist

A royalist supports a particular monarch as head of state for a particular kingdom, or of a particular dynastic claim.

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Rulers of India series

The Rulers of India was a biographical book series edited by William Wilson Hunter and published from the Clarendon Press, Oxford.

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Russia

Russia (rɐˈsʲijə), officially the Russian Federation (p), is a country in Eurasia. At, Russia is the largest country in the world by area, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area, and the ninth most populous, with over 144 million people as of December 2017, excluding Crimea. About 77% of the population live in the western, European part of the country. Russia's capital Moscow is one of the largest cities in the world; other major cities include Saint Petersburg, Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg and Nizhny Novgorod. Extending across the entirety of Northern Asia and much of Eastern Europe, Russia spans eleven time zones and incorporates a wide range of environments and landforms. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland (both with Kaliningrad Oblast), Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk and the U.S. state of Alaska across the Bering Strait. The East Slavs emerged as a recognizable group in Europe between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD. Founded and ruled by a Varangian warrior elite and their descendants, the medieval state of Rus arose in the 9th century. In 988 it adopted Orthodox Christianity from the Byzantine Empire, beginning the synthesis of Byzantine and Slavic cultures that defined Russian culture for the next millennium. Rus' ultimately disintegrated into a number of smaller states; most of the Rus' lands were overrun by the Mongol invasion and became tributaries of the nomadic Golden Horde in the 13th century. The Grand Duchy of Moscow gradually reunified the surrounding Russian principalities, achieved independence from the Golden Horde. By the 18th century, the nation had greatly expanded through conquest, annexation, and exploration to become the Russian Empire, which was the third largest empire in history, stretching from Poland on the west to Alaska on the east. Following the Russian Revolution, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic became the largest and leading constituent of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the world's first constitutionally socialist state. The Soviet Union played a decisive role in the Allied victory in World War II, and emerged as a recognized superpower and rival to the United States during the Cold War. The Soviet era saw some of the most significant technological achievements of the 20th century, including the world's first human-made satellite and the launching of the first humans in space. By the end of 1990, the Soviet Union had the world's second largest economy, largest standing military in the world and the largest stockpile of weapons of mass destruction. Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, twelve independent republics emerged from the USSR: Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and the Baltic states regained independence: Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania; the Russian SFSR reconstituted itself as the Russian Federation and is recognized as the continuing legal personality and a successor of the Soviet Union. It is governed as a federal semi-presidential republic. The Russian economy ranks as the twelfth largest by nominal GDP and sixth largest by purchasing power parity in 2015. Russia's extensive mineral and energy resources are the largest such reserves in the world, making it one of the leading producers of oil and natural gas globally. The country is one of the five recognized nuclear weapons states and possesses the largest stockpile of weapons of mass destruction. Russia is a great power as well as a regional power and has been characterised as a potential superpower. It is a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council and an active global partner of ASEAN, as well as a member of the G20, the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO), the Council of Europe, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), and the World Trade Organization (WTO), as well as being the leading member of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) and one of the five members of the Eurasian Economic Union (EEU), along with Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.

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Sacred Books of the East

The Sacred Books of the East is a monumental 50-volume set of English translations of Asian religious writings, edited by Max Müller and published by the Oxford University Press between 1879 and 1910.

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Sannomiya

is a district of Chūō-ku, Kobe-shi, Hyogo, Japan.

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Scofield Reference Bible

The Scofield Reference Bible is a widely circulated study Bible edited and annotated by the American Bible student Cyrus I. Scofield, which popularized dispensationalism at the beginning of the 20th century.

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Share (finance)

In financial markets, a share is a unit used as mutual funds, limited partnerships, and real estate investment trusts.

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Sheet music

Sheet music is a handwritten or printed form of music notation that uses modern musical symbols to indicate the pitches (melodies), rhythms or chords of a song or instrumental musical piece.

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Sheldonian Theatre

The Sheldonian Theatre, located in Oxford, England, was built from 1664 to 1669 after a design by Christopher Wren for the University of Oxford.

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Shorter Oxford English Dictionary

The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary (SOED) is an English language dictionary published by the Oxford University Press.

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Simon Winchester

Simon Winchester, (born 28 September 1944) is a British-American author and journalist.

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Sinecure

A sinecure (from Latin sine.

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Sir Thomas Hanmer, 4th Baronet

Sir Thomas Hanmer, 4th Baronet (24 September 1677 – 7 May 1746) was Speaker of the House of Commons of Great Britain from 1714 to 1715, discharging the duties of the office with conspicuous impartiality.

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Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge

The Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (SPCK) is the oldest Anglican mission organisation, and the leading publisher of Christian books in the United Kingdom.

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Somerville College, Oxford

Somerville College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England.

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South Africa

South Africa, officially the Republic of South Africa (RSA), is the southernmost country in Africa.

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St Barnabas Church, Oxford

St Barnabas Church is a Church of England parish church in Jericho, central Oxford, England, located close to the Oxford Canal.

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Star Chamber

The Star Chamber (Latin: Camera stellata) was an English court of law which sat at the royal Palace of Westminster, from the late to the mid-17th century (c. 1641), and was composed of Privy Councillors and common-law judges, to supplement the judicial activities of the common-law and equity courts in civil and criminal matters.

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Swaziland

Swaziland, officially the Kingdom of Eswatini since April 2018 (Swazi: Umbuso weSwatini), is a landlocked sovereign state in Southern Africa.

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Syriac language

Syriac (ܠܫܢܐ ܣܘܪܝܝܐ), also known as Syriac Aramaic or Classical Syriac, is a dialect of Middle Aramaic.

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The Athenaeum (British magazine)

The Athenaeum was a literary magazine published in London, England from 1828 to 1921.

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The Blitz

The Blitz was a German bombing offensive against Britain in 1940 and 1941, during the Second World War.

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The Concise Dictionary of National Biography

The Concise Dictionary of National Biography: From Earliest Times to 1985 is a dictionary of biographies of people from the United Kingdom.

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The Crown

The Crown is the state in all its aspects within the jurisprudence of the Commonwealth realms and their sub-divisions (such as Crown dependencies, provinces, or states).

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The English Hymnal

The English Hymnal is a hymn book which was published in 1906 for the Church of England by Oxford University Press.

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The Meaning of Everything

The Meaning of Everything is a 2003 book by Simon Winchester.

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The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians

The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians is an encyclopedic dictionary of music and musicians.

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The Oxford Book of Carols

The Oxford Book of Carols is a collection of vocal scores of Christmas carols and carols of other seasons.

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The Oxford Book of English Madrigals

The Oxford Book of English Madrigals was edited by Philip Ledger, and published in 1978 by the Oxford University Press.

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The Oxford Book of Tudor Anthems

The Oxford Book of Tudor Anthems is a collection of vocal scores of music from the Tudor era of England (c.1550-1625).

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The Oxford Companion to Music

The Oxford Companion to Music is a music reference book in the series of Oxford Companions produced by the Oxford University Press.

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The Oxford History of South Africa

The Oxford History of South Africa is a two volume history of South Africa published by Clarendon Press in 1969 (Vol. I) and 1971 (Vol. II).

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The Oxford History of the British Empire

The Oxford History of the British Empire is a five-volume history of the British Empire published by the Oxford University Press in 1998 and 1999.

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The Oxford History of Western Music

The Oxford History of Western Music is a narrative history from the "earliest notations" (taken to be around the eighth century) to the late twentieth century.

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Theoderic Rood

Theoderic (Theodoric or Theodericus) Rood was a printer of incunabula at Oxford, England.

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Thomas Combe

Thomas Combe (1796–1872) was an English printer, publisher and patron of the arts.

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Thomas Gaisford

Thomas Gaisford (22 December 1779 – 2 June 1855) was an English classical scholar and clergyman.

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Thomas Guy

Thomas Guy (1644 – 27 December 1724) was a British bookseller, speculator and de facto founder of Guy's Hospital, London.

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Thomas Hearne (antiquarian)

Thomas Hearne or Hearn (July 1678 – 10 June 1735) was an English diarist and prolific antiquary, particularly remembered for his published editions of many medieval English chronicles and other important historical texts.

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Thomas Randolph (academic)

Thomas Randolph D.D. (1701–1783) was an English academic, President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and Christian theologian.

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Toronto

Toronto is the capital city of the province of Ontario and the largest city in Canada by population, with 2,731,571 residents in 2016.

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Trans-Siberian Railway

The Trans-Siberian Railway (TSR, p) is a network of railways connecting Moscow with the Russian Far East.

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Turl Street

Turl Street is an historic street in central Oxford, England.

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Tyrannius Rufinus

Tyrannius Rufinus, also called Rufinus of Aquileia (Rufinus Aquileiensis; 344/345–411), was a monk, historian, and theologian.

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United Kingdom

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed with some organisations, including the and preferring to use Britain as shorthand for Great Britain is a sovereign country in western Europe.

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United Kingdom corporation tax

In the United Kingdom, corporation tax is a corporate tax levied in the United Kingdom on the profits made by UK-resident companies and on the profits of entities registered overseas with permanent establishments in the UK.

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University Chest

The University Chest is a term used at the University of Oxford in connection with the financial aspects of the university and its administration.

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University of Cambridge

The University of Cambridge (informally Cambridge University)The corporate title of the university is The Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the University of Cambridge.

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University of Oxford

The University of Oxford (formally The Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of Oxford) is a collegiate research university located in Oxford, England.

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University of Tokyo

, abbreviated as or UTokyo, is a public research university located in Bunkyo, Tokyo, Japan.

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University press

A university press is an academic publishing house specializing in academic monographs and scholarly journals.

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Walton Street

Walton Street is on the eastern edge of the Jericho district of central Oxford, England.

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Wangui wa Goro

Wangui Wa Goro (born 1961) is a Kenyan academic, social critic, researcher, translator and writer based in the UK.

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Warehouse

A warehouse is a commercial building for storage of goods.

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William Blackstone

Sir William Blackstone (10 July 1723 – 14 February 1780) was an English jurist, judge and Tory politician of the eighteenth century.

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William Caxton

William Caxton (c. 1422 – c. 1491) was an English merchant, diplomat, writer and printer.

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William Delaune

William Delaune D.D. (14 April 1659 – 23 May 1728) was an English clergyman and academic, President of St John's College, Oxford, and chaplain to Queen Anne.

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William Henry Hadow

Sir William Henry Hadow CBE (27 December 1859 – 8 April 1937) was a leading educational reformer in Great Britain and a musicologist.

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William Holman Hunt

William Holman Hunt (2 April 1827 – 7 September 1910) was an English painter and one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.

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William Laud

William Laud (7 October 1573 – 10 January 1645) was an English archbishop and academic.

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William Roger Louis

William Roger Louis CBE FBA (born May 8, 1936), also known as Wm.

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William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 (baptised)—23 April 1616) was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as both the greatest writer in the English language, and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.

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William Walton

Sir William Turner Walton, OM (29 March 19028 March 1983) was an English composer.

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Wolvercote

Wolvercote is a village that is part of the City of Oxford, England.

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World War I

World War I (often abbreviated as WWI or WW1), also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.

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World War II

World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier.

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Worshipful Company of Stationers and Newspaper Makers

The Worshipful Company of Stationers and Newspaper Makers (until 1937 the Worshipful Company of Stationers), usually known as the Stationers' Company, is one of the livery companies of the City of London.

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Yale University Press

Yale University Press is a university press associated with Yale University.

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2018

2018 has been designated as the third International Year of the Reef by the International Coral Reef Initiative.

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2019

2019 (MMXIX) will be a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2019th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 19th year of the 3rd millennium, the 19th year of the 21st century, and the 10th and last year of the 2010s decade.

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"Oxford Bibles", Clarendon Paperbacks, Clarendon Press, Clarendon Press, Oxford, H. Frowde, Henry Frowde, OUP, OUP Oxford, OUP.com, Oup.com, Oxford Academic, Oxford Bibles, Oxford Clarendon Press, Oxford English Dictionaries, Oxford Handbooks Online, Oxford Journals, Oxford Presents, Oxford Reference, Oxford Reference Online, Oxford Scholarship Online, Oxford U.P., Oxford UP, Oxford Univ Pr, Oxford Univ. Pr., Oxford Univ. Press, Oxford University Press (USA), Oxford University Press Museum, Oxford University Press US, Oxford University Press USA, Oxford University Press, Inc., Oxford University Press, USA, Oxford University press, Oxford press, Oxford university press, Oxfordartonline.com, Oxfordmusiconline.com, The Clarendon Press, University Press Scholarship Online, University of Oxford Press.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_University_Press

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