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Phraates V

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Phraates V, known by the diminutive Phraataces (Φραατάκης), ruled the Parthian Empire from 2 BC to AD 4. [1]

12 relations: Armenia, Augustus, Gaius Caesar, Josephus, List of monarchs of Persia, Medes, Musa of Parthia, Orodes III of Parthia, Parthian Empire, Phraates, Phraates IV, Rome.

Armenia

Armenia (translit), officially the Republic of Armenia (translit), is a country in the South Caucasus region of Eurasia.

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Augustus

Augustus (Augustus; 23 September 63 BC – 19 August 14 AD) was a Roman statesman and military leader who was the first Emperor of the Roman Empire, controlling Imperial Rome from 27 BC until his death in AD 14.

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Gaius Caesar

Gaius Caesar (Latin: Gaius Julius Caesar; 20 BC – 21 February AD 4) was consul in AD 1 and the grandson of Augustus, the first emperor of the Roman Empire.

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Josephus

Titus Flavius Josephus (Φλάβιος Ἰώσηπος; 37 – 100), born Yosef ben Matityahu (יוסף בן מתתיהו, Yosef ben Matityahu; Ἰώσηπος Ματθίου παῖς), was a first-century Romano-Jewish scholar, historian and hagiographer, who was born in Jerusalem—then part of Roman Judea—to a father of priestly descent and a mother who claimed royal ancestry.

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List of monarchs of Persia

This article lists the monarchs of Persia, who ruled over the area of modern-day Iran from the establishment of the Achaemenid dynasty by Achaemenes around 705 BCE until the deposition of the Pahlavi dynasty in 1979.

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Medes

The Medes (Old Persian Māda-, Μῆδοι, מָדַי) were an ancient Iranian people who lived in an area known as Media (northwestern Iran) and who spoke the Median language. At around 1100 to 1000 BC, they inhabited the mountainous area of northwestern Iran and the northeastern and eastern region of Mesopotamia and located in the Hamadan (Ecbatana) region. Their emergence in Iran is thought to have occurred between 800 BC and 700 BC, and in the 7th century the whole of western Iran and some other territories were under Median rule. Its precise geographical extent remains unknown. A few archaeological sites (discovered in the "Median triangle" in western Iran) and textual sources (from contemporary Assyrians and also ancient Greeks in later centuries) provide a brief documentation of the history and culture of the Median state. Apart from a few personal names, the language of the Medes is unknown. The Medes had an ancient Iranian religion (a form of pre-Zoroastrian Mazdaism or Mithra worshipping) with a priesthood named as "Magi". Later during the reigns of the last Median kings, the reforms of Zoroaster spread into western Iran.

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Musa of Parthia

Musa was Queen of the Parthian Empire from c. 2 BC to 4 AD.

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Orodes III of Parthia

Orodes III (ارد سوم) was raised to the throne of the Parthian Empire around AD 4 by the magnates after the death of Phraates V (reigned c. 2 BC – AD 4).

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Parthian Empire

The Parthian Empire (247 BC – 224 AD), also known as the Arsacid Empire, was a major Iranian political and cultural power in ancient Iran and Iraq.

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Phraates

"'Phraates'" is the Greek transliteration of Parthian Farhad.

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Phraates IV

Phraates IV of Parthia (son of Orodes II), ruled the Parthian Empire from 37–2 BC.

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Rome

Rome (Roma; Roma) is the capital city of Italy and a special comune (named Comune di Roma Capitale).

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Redirects here:

Farhad V, Phraataces, Phraataces of Parthia, Phraatakes, Phraates V of Parthia, Phraates V of Persia.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phraates_V

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