Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Pontus (region)

Index Pontus (region)

Pontus (translit, "Sea") is a historical Greek designation for a region on the southern coast of the Black Sea, located in modern-day eastern Black Sea Region of Turkey. [1]

156 relations: A. I. Bezzerides, Achaemenid Empire, Alexander the Great, Alexios I Komnenos, Alyattes of Lydia, Amasya, Amazons, Anabasis (Xenophon), Anania Shirakatsi, Anatolia, Ancient regions of Anatolia, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, Argonauts, Ariobarzanes of Phrygia, Armeniac Theme, Armenian language, Assyrian people, Balkans, Bithynia, Black Sea, Black Sea Region, BlackBerry, BlackBerry Limited, Bronze Age, Bucellarian Theme, Byzantine Empire, Caucasus, Caucasus Greeks, Chaldia, Chepni people, Christianity, Chrysanthos Theodoridis, Cimmerians, Cius, Classical antiquity, Classical Greece, Client state, Colchis, Constantine the Great, Corinth, Crypto-Christianity, Culture of Greece, Devshirme, Diadochi, Diocese of Pontus, Diocletian, Diogenes, Eleftherios Venizelos, Empire of Trebizond, Encyclopædia Iranica, ..., Eunuch, Eusebius, Evagrius Ponticus, Fall of Constantinople, Fatsa, First Council of Nicaea, Fourth Crusade, Galatia, Gümüşhane, Geographical regions of Turkey, Georgia (country), Goths, Greek genocide, Greek mythology, Greek Orthodox Church, Greeks, Hayasa-Azzi, Helena (empress), Hellenistic period, Hemshin peoples, Heraclea Pontica, Heracles, Herodotus, Hinterland, History of Iran, History of Rome, Hittites, Hurrians, Ibora, Iran, Iron Age, Jason, Jerusalem, Jews, Justinian I, Karadeniz Ereğli, Kartvelian languages, Kaskians, Kızılırmak River, Kingdom of Pontus, Komnenos, Laz people, Lazica, Lesser Armenia, Leucosyri, Lydians, Macrones, Medieval Greek, Metropolitan bishop, Mike Lazaridis, Millet, Mithridates I of Pontus, Mithridates II of Cius, Mithridates VI of Pontus, Mithridatic Wars, Mossynoeci, Mushki, Mysia, Nero, New Testament, Niksar, Odysseus, Ottoman Empire, Paphlagonia, Paris Peace Conference, 1919, Pasargadae, Pazar, Rize, Pentecost, Persian Empire, Persian people, Phrygia, Polemon II of Pontus, Pompey, Pontic Greek, Pontic Greeks, Pontic Mountains, Poti, Praetor, Priscilla and Aquila, Prometheus, Ramsay MacMullen, Republic of Pontus, Rize, Roman Armenia, Roman Empire, Roman province, Sack of Constantinople (1204), Saint Peter, Samsun, Satrap, Scylax of Caryanda, Seljuk Empire, Side, Turkey, Sinop, Turkey, Stelios Kazantzidis, Strabo, Tibareni, Tigranes the Great, Trabzon, Trajan, Trebizond Vilayet, Turkey, World War I, Xenophon, Zeus, Zile. Expand index (106 more) »

A. I. Bezzerides

A.I. " Buzz" Bezzerides (August 9, 1908 – January 1, 2007) was an American novelist and screenwriter, best known for writing films noir and action motion pictures, especially several of Warners' "social conscience" films of the 1940s.

New!!: Pontus (region) and A. I. Bezzerides · See more »

Achaemenid Empire

The Achaemenid Empire, also called the First Persian Empire, was an empire based in Western Asia, founded by Cyrus the Great.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Achaemenid Empire · See more »

Alexander the Great

Alexander III of Macedon (20/21 July 356 BC – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander the Great (Aléxandros ho Mégas), was a king (basileus) of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon and a member of the Argead dynasty.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Alexander the Great · See more »

Alexios I Komnenos

Alexios I Komnenos (Ἀλέξιος Αʹ Κομνηνός., c. 1048 – 15 August 1118) was Byzantine emperor from 1081 to 1118.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Alexios I Komnenos · See more »

Alyattes of Lydia

Alyattes reigned as king of Lydia from c.610 BC to 560 BC.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Alyattes of Lydia · See more »

Amasya

Amasya (Ἀμάσεια) is a city in northern Turkey and is the capital of Amasya Province, in the Black Sea Region.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Amasya · See more »

Amazons

In Greek mythology, the Amazons (Ἀμαζόνες,, singular Ἀμαζών) were a tribe of women warriors related to Scythians and Sarmatians.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Amazons · See more »

Anabasis (Xenophon)

Anabasis (Ἀνάβασις, (literally an "expedition up from")) is the most famous work, published in seven books, of the Greek professional soldier and writer Xenophon.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Anabasis (Xenophon) · See more »

Anania Shirakatsi

Anania Shirakatsi (Anania Širakac'i, Անանիա Շիրակացի; 610–685 AD), also known as Ananias of Shirak or Širak) was an Armenian philosopher, mathematician, astronomer, geographer and alchemist. His most famous works are Ashkharatsuyts (Geography) and Cosmography and the Calendar. Robert H. Hewsen describes him as "Armenia's First Scientist".

New!!: Pontus (region) and Anania Shirakatsi · See more »

Anatolia

Anatolia (Modern Greek: Ανατολία Anatolía, from Ἀνατολή Anatolḗ,; "east" or "rise"), also known as Asia Minor (Medieval and Modern Greek: Μικρά Ἀσία Mikrá Asía, "small Asia"), Asian Turkey, the Anatolian peninsula, or the Anatolian plateau, is the westernmost protrusion of Asia, which makes up the majority of modern-day Turkey.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Anatolia · See more »

Ancient regions of Anatolia

The following is a list of regions of Ancient Anatolia, also known as "Asia Minor," in the present day Anatolia region of Turkey in Western Asia.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Ancient regions of Anatolia · See more »

Antigonus I Monophthalmus

Antigonus I Monophthalmus (Antigonos ho Monophthalmos, Antigonus the One-eyed, 382–301 BC), son of Philip from Elimeia, was a Macedonian nobleman, general, and satrap under Alexander the Great.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Antigonus I Monophthalmus · See more »

Argonauts

The Argonauts (Ἀργοναῦται Argonautai) were a band of heroes in Greek mythology, who in the years before the Trojan War, around 1300 BC, accompanied Jason to Colchis in his quest to find the Golden Fleece.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Argonauts · See more »

Ariobarzanes of Phrygia

Ariobarzanes (in Greek Ἀριoβαρζάνης), (Old Persian: Ariyabrdhna, Ariyaubrdhna) Ariobarzan or spelled as Ario Barzan or Aryo Barzan, perhaps signifying "exalting the Aryans" (death: crucified in c. 362 BCE), sometimes known as Ariobarzanes I of Cius, was a Persian Satrap of Phrygia and military commander, leader of an independence revolt, and the first known of the line of rulers of the Greek town of Cius from which were eventually to stem the kings of Pontus in the 3rd century BCE.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Ariobarzanes of Phrygia · See more »

Armeniac Theme

The Armeniac Theme (Άρμενιακόν, Armeniakon), more properly the Theme of the Armeniacs (Greek: θέμα Άρμενιάκων, thema Armeniakōn) was a Byzantine theme (a military-civilian province) located in northeastern Asia Minor (modern Turkey).

New!!: Pontus (region) and Armeniac Theme · See more »

Armenian language

The Armenian language (reformed: հայերեն) is an Indo-European language spoken primarily by the Armenians.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Armenian language · See more »

Assyrian people

Assyrian people (ܐܫܘܪܝܐ), or Syriacs (see terms for Syriac Christians), are an ethnic group indigenous to the Middle East.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Assyrian people · See more »

Balkans

The Balkans, or the Balkan Peninsula, is a geographic area in southeastern Europe with various and disputed definitions.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Balkans · See more »

Bithynia

Bithynia (Koine Greek: Βιθυνία, Bithynía) was an ancient region, kingdom and Roman province in the northwest of Asia Minor, adjoining the Propontis, the Thracian Bosporus and the Euxine Sea.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Bithynia · See more »

Black Sea

The Black Sea is a body of water and marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean between Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and Western Asia.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Black Sea · See more »

Black Sea Region

The Black Sea Region (Karadeniz Bölgesi) is a geographical region of Turkey.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Black Sea Region · See more »

BlackBerry

BlackBerry is a line of smartphones, tablets, and services originally designed and marketed by Canadian company BlackBerry Limited (formerly known as Research In Motion, or RIM).

New!!: Pontus (region) and BlackBerry · See more »

BlackBerry Limited

BlackBerry Limited is a Canadian multinational company specializing in enterprise software and the Internet of things.

New!!: Pontus (region) and BlackBerry Limited · See more »

Bronze Age

The Bronze Age is a historical period characterized by the use of bronze, and in some areas proto-writing, and other early features of urban civilization.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Bronze Age · See more »

Bucellarian Theme

The Bucellarian Theme (Βουκελλάριον θέμα, Boukellarion thema), more properly known as the Theme of the Bucellarians (θέμα Βουκελλαρίων, thema Boukellariōn) was a Byzantine theme (a military-civilian province) in northern Asia Minor (modern Turkey).

New!!: Pontus (region) and Bucellarian Theme · See more »

Byzantine Empire

The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire and Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium).

New!!: Pontus (region) and Byzantine Empire · See more »

Caucasus

The Caucasus or Caucasia is a region located at the border of Europe and Asia, situated between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea and occupied by Russia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, and Armenia.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Caucasus · See more »

Caucasus Greeks

Greek communities had settled in parts of the north Caucasus, Transcaucasia since well before the Christian and into the Byzantine era, especially as traders, Christian Orthodox scholars/clerics, refugees, or mercenaries who had backed the wrong side in the many civil wars and periods of political in-fighting in the Classical/Hellenistic and Late Roman/Byzantine periods.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Caucasus Greeks · See more »

Chaldia

Chaldia (Χαλδία, Khaldia) was a historical region located in mountainous interior of the eastern Black Sea, northeast Anatolia (modern Turkey).

New!!: Pontus (region) and Chaldia · See more »

Chepni people

The Chepni were an ancient Turkic boy or oymak (clan).

New!!: Pontus (region) and Chepni people · See more »

Christianity

ChristianityFrom Ancient Greek Χριστός Khristós (Latinized as Christus), translating Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ, Māšîăḥ, meaning "the anointed one", with the Latin suffixes -ian and -itas.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Christianity · See more »

Chrysanthos Theodoridis

Chrysanthos Theodoridis, or simply Chrysanthos.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Chrysanthos Theodoridis · See more »

Cimmerians

The Cimmerians (also Kimmerians; Greek: Κιμμέριοι, Kimmérioi) were an ancient people, who appeared about 1000 BC and are mentioned later in 8th century BC in Assyrian records.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Cimmerians · See more »

Cius

Cius (Kίος Kios), later renamed Prusias on the Sea (Prusias ad Mare) after king Prusias I of Bithynia, was an ancient Greek city bordering the Propontis (now known as the Sea of Marmara), in Bithynia (in modern northwestern Turkey), and had a long history, being mentioned by Aristotle, Strabo and Apollonius Rhodius.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Cius · See more »

Classical antiquity

Classical antiquity (also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the period of cultural history between the 8th century BC and the 5th or 6th century AD centered on the Mediterranean Sea, comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome, collectively known as the Greco-Roman world.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Classical antiquity · See more »

Classical Greece

Classical Greece was a period of around 200 years (5th and 4th centuries BC) in Greek culture.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Classical Greece · See more »

Client state

A client state is a state that is economically, politically, or militarily subordinate to another more powerful state in international affairs.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Client state · See more »

Colchis

Colchis (კოლხეთი K'olkheti; Greek Κολχίς Kolkhís) was an ancient Georgian kingdom and region on the coast of the Black Sea, centred in present-day western Georgia.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Colchis · See more »

Constantine the Great

Constantine the Great (Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus; Κωνσταντῖνος ὁ Μέγας; 27 February 272 ADBirth dates vary but most modern historians use 272". Lenski, "Reign of Constantine" (CC), 59. – 22 May 337 AD), also known as Constantine I or Saint Constantine, was a Roman Emperor of Illyrian and Greek origin from 306 to 337 AD.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Constantine the Great · See more »

Corinth

Corinth (Κόρινθος, Kórinthos) is an ancient city and former municipality in Corinthia, Peloponnese, which is located in south-central Greece.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Corinth · See more »

Crypto-Christianity

Crypto-Christianity is the secret practice of Christianity, usually while attempting to camouflage it as another faith or observing the rituals of another religion publicly.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Crypto-Christianity · See more »

Culture of Greece

The culture of Greece has evolved over thousands of years, beginning in Mycenaean Greece, continuing most notably into Classical Greece, through the influence of the Roman Empire and its successor the Byzantine Empire.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Culture of Greece · See more »

Devshirme

Devshirme (دوشيرمه, devşirme, literally "lifting" or "collecting"), also known as the blood tax or tribute in blood, was chiefly the practice where by the Ottoman Empire sent military officers to take Christian boys, ages 8 to 18, from their families in Eastern and Southeastern Europe in order that they be raised to serve the state.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Devshirme · See more »

Diadochi

The Diadochi (plural of Latin Diadochus, from Διάδοχοι, Diádokhoi, "successors") were the rival generals, families, and friends of Alexander the Great who fought for control over his empire after his death in 323 BC.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Diadochi · See more »

Diocese of Pontus

The Diocese of Pontus (Dioecesis Pontica, Διοίκησις Πόντου/Ποντικής) was a diocese of the later Roman Empire, incorporating the provinces of northern and northeastern Asia Minor up to the border with the Sassanid Empire in Armenia.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Diocese of Pontus · See more »

Diocletian

Diocletian (Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus Augustus), born Diocles (22 December 244–3 December 311), was a Roman emperor from 284 to 305.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Diocletian · See more »

Diogenes

Diogenes (Διογένης, Diogenēs), also known as Diogenes the Cynic (Διογένης ὁ Κυνικός, Diogenēs ho Kunikos), was a Greek philosopher and one of the founders of Cynic philosophy.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Diogenes · See more »

Eleftherios Venizelos

Eleftherios Kyriakou Venizelos (full name Elefthérios Kyriákou Venizélos, Ελευθέριος Κυριάκου Βενιζέλος,; 23 August 1864 – 18 March 1936) was an eminent Greek leader of the Greek national liberation movement and a charismatic statesman of the early 20th century remembered for his promotion of liberal-democratic policies.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Eleftherios Venizelos · See more »

Empire of Trebizond

The Empire of Trebizond or the Trapezuntine Empire was a monarchy that flourished during the 13th through 15th centuries, consisting of the far northeastern corner of Anatolia and the southern Crimea.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Empire of Trebizond · See more »

Encyclopædia Iranica

Encyclopædia Iranica is a project whose goal is to create a comprehensive and authoritative English language encyclopedia about the history, culture, and civilization of Iranian peoples from prehistory to modern times.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Encyclopædia Iranica · See more »

Eunuch

The term eunuch (εὐνοῦχος) generally refers to a man who has been castrated, typically early enough in his life for this change to have major hormonal consequences.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Eunuch · See more »

Eusebius

Eusebius of Caesarea (Εὐσέβιος τῆς Καισαρείας, Eusébios tés Kaisareías; 260/265 – 339/340), also known as Eusebius Pamphili (from the Εὐσέβιος τοῦ Παμϕίλου), was a historian of Christianity, exegete, and Christian polemicist. He became the bishop of Caesarea Maritima about 314 AD. Together with Pamphilus, he was a scholar of the Biblical canon and is regarded as an extremely learned Christian of his time. He wrote Demonstrations of the Gospel, Preparations for the Gospel, and On Discrepancies between the Gospels, studies of the Biblical text. As "Father of Church History" (not to be confused with the title of Church Father), he produced the Ecclesiastical History, On the Life of Pamphilus, the Chronicle and On the Martyrs. During the Council of Antiochia (325) he was excommunicated for subscribing to the heresy of Arius, and thus withdrawn during the First Council of Nicaea where he accepted that the Homoousion referred to the Logos. Never recognized as a Saint, he became counselor of Constantine the Great, and with the bishop of Nicomedia he continued to polemicize against Saint Athanasius of Alexandria, Church Fathers, since he was condemned in the First Council of Tyre in 335.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Eusebius · See more »

Evagrius Ponticus

Evagrius Ponticus (Εὐάγριος ὁ Ποντικός, "Evagrius of Pontus"), also called Evagrius the Solitary (345–399 AD), was a Christian monk and ascetic.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Evagrius Ponticus · See more »

Fall of Constantinople

The Fall of Constantinople (Ἅλωσις τῆς Κωνσταντινουπόλεως, Halōsis tēs Kōnstantinoupoleōs; İstanbul'un Fethi Conquest of Istanbul) was the capture of the capital of the Byzantine Empire by an invading Ottoman army on 29 May 1453.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Fall of Constantinople · See more »

Fatsa

Fatsa is a town and a district of Ordu Province in the central Black Sea region of Turkey.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Fatsa · See more »

First Council of Nicaea

The First Council of Nicaea (Νίκαια) was a council of Christian bishops convened in the Bithynian city of Nicaea (now İznik, Bursa province, Turkey) by the Roman Emperor Constantine I in AD 325.

New!!: Pontus (region) and First Council of Nicaea · See more »

Fourth Crusade

The Fourth Crusade (1202–1204) was a Latin Christian armed expedition called by Pope Innocent III.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Fourth Crusade · See more »

Galatia

Ancient Galatia (Γαλατία, Galatía) was an area in the highlands of central Anatolia (Ankara, Çorum, Yozgat Province) in modern Turkey.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Galatia · See more »

Gümüşhane

Gümüşhane or Gyumushkhana (Argyròpolis or Arghyropolis, Αργυρόπολις in Greek) is a city and the capital district of Gümüşhane Province in the Black Sea region of Turkey.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Gümüşhane · See more »

Geographical regions of Turkey

The geographical regions of Turkey comprise seven regions (bölge) which were originally defined at the country's First Geography Congress in 1941.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Geographical regions of Turkey · See more »

Georgia (country)

Georgia (tr) is a country in the Caucasus region of Eurasia.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Georgia (country) · See more »

Goths

The Goths (Gut-þiuda; Gothi) were an East Germanic people, two of whose branches, the Visigoths and the Ostrogoths, played an important role in the fall of the Western Roman Empire through the long series of Gothic Wars and in the emergence of Medieval Europe.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Goths · See more »

Greek genocide

The Greek genocide, including the Pontic genocide, was the systematic genocide of the Christian Ottoman Greek population carried out in its historic homeland in Anatolia during World War I and its aftermath (1914–1922).

New!!: Pontus (region) and Greek genocide · See more »

Greek mythology

Greek mythology is the body of myths and teachings that belong to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world, and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Greek mythology · See more »

Greek Orthodox Church

The name Greek Orthodox Church (Greek: Ἑλληνορθόδοξη Ἑκκλησία, Ellinorthódoxi Ekklisía), or Greek Orthodoxy, is a term referring to the body of several Churches within the larger communion of Eastern Orthodox Christianity, whose liturgy is or was traditionally conducted in Koine Greek, the original language of the Septuagint and New Testament, and whose history, traditions, and theology are rooted in the early Church Fathers and the culture of the Byzantine Empire.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Greek Orthodox Church · See more »

Greeks

The Greeks or Hellenes (Έλληνες, Éllines) are an ethnic group native to Greece, Cyprus, southern Albania, Italy, Turkey, Egypt and, to a lesser extent, other countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. They also form a significant diaspora, with Greek communities established around the world.. Greek colonies and communities have been historically established on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea and Black Sea, but the Greek people have always been centered on the Aegean and Ionian seas, where the Greek language has been spoken since the Bronze Age.. Until the early 20th century, Greeks were distributed between the Greek peninsula, the western coast of Asia Minor, the Black Sea coast, Cappadocia in central Anatolia, Egypt, the Balkans, Cyprus, and Constantinople. Many of these regions coincided to a large extent with the borders of the Byzantine Empire of the late 11th century and the Eastern Mediterranean areas of ancient Greek colonization. The cultural centers of the Greeks have included Athens, Thessalonica, Alexandria, Smyrna, and Constantinople at various periods. Most ethnic Greeks live nowadays within the borders of the modern Greek state and Cyprus. The Greek genocide and population exchange between Greece and Turkey nearly ended the three millennia-old Greek presence in Asia Minor. Other longstanding Greek populations can be found from southern Italy to the Caucasus and southern Russia and Ukraine and in the Greek diaspora communities in a number of other countries. Today, most Greeks are officially registered as members of the Greek Orthodox Church.CIA World Factbook on Greece: Greek Orthodox 98%, Greek Muslim 1.3%, other 0.7%. Greeks have greatly influenced and contributed to culture, arts, exploration, literature, philosophy, politics, architecture, music, mathematics, science and technology, business, cuisine, and sports, both historically and contemporarily.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Greeks · See more »

Hayasa-Azzi

Hayasa-Azzi or Azzi-Hayasa (Հայասա) was a Late Bronze Age confederation formed between two kingdoms of Armenian Highlands, Hayasa located South of Trabzon and Azzi, located north of the Euphrates and to the south of Hayasa.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Hayasa-Azzi · See more »

Helena (empress)

Helena, or Saint Helena (Greek: Ἁγία Ἑλένη, Hagía Helénē, Flavia Iulia Helena Augusta; –), was an Empress of the Roman Empire, and mother of Emperor Constantine the Great.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Helena (empress) · See more »

Hellenistic period

The Hellenistic period covers the period of Mediterranean history between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the emergence of the Roman Empire as signified by the Battle of Actium in 31 BC and the subsequent conquest of Ptolemaic Egypt the following year.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Hellenistic period · See more »

Hemshin peoples

The Hemshin people (Համշենցիներ, Hamshentsiner; Hemşinliler), also known as Hemshinli or Hamshenis or Homshetsi, are a diverse group of peoples who in the past or present have been affiliated with the Hemşin district in the province of Rize, Turkey.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Hemshin peoples · See more »

Heraclea Pontica

__notoc__ Heraclea Pontica (Ἡράκλεια Ποντική Hērakleia Pontikē) was an ancient city on the coast of Bithynia in Asia Minor, at the mouth of the river Lycus.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Heraclea Pontica · See more »

Heracles

Heracles (Ἡρακλῆς, Hēraklês, Glory/Pride of Hēra, "Hera"), born Alcaeus (Ἀλκαῖος, Alkaios) or Alcides (Ἀλκείδης, Alkeidēs), was a divine hero in Greek mythology, the son of Zeus and Alcmene, foster son of AmphitryonBy his adoptive descent through Amphitryon, Heracles receives the epithet Alcides, as "of the line of Alcaeus", father of Amphitryon.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Heracles · See more »

Herodotus

Herodotus (Ἡρόδοτος, Hêródotos) was a Greek historian who was born in Halicarnassus in the Persian Empire (modern-day Bodrum, Turkey) and lived in the fifth century BC (484– 425 BC), a contemporary of Thucydides, Socrates, and Euripides.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Herodotus · See more »

Hinterland

Hinterland is a German word meaning "the land behind" (a city, a port, or similar).

New!!: Pontus (region) and Hinterland · See more »

History of Iran

The history of Iran, commonly also known as Persia in the Western world, is intertwined with the history of a larger region, also to an extent known as Greater Iran, comprising the area from Anatolia, the Bosphorus, and Egypt in the west to the borders of Ancient India and the Syr Darya in the east, and from the Caucasus and the Eurasian Steppe in the north to the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman in the south.

New!!: Pontus (region) and History of Iran · See more »

History of Rome

Roman history has been among the most influential to the modern world, from supporting the tradition of the rule by law to influencing the American Founding Fathers to the creation of the Catholic church.

New!!: Pontus (region) and History of Rome · See more »

Hittites

The Hittites were an Ancient Anatolian people who played an important role in establishing an empire centered on Hattusa in north-central Anatolia around 1600 BC.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Hittites · See more »

Hurrians

The Hurrians (cuneiform:; transliteration: Ḫu-ur-ri; also called Hari, Khurrites, Hourri, Churri, Hurri or Hurriter) were a people of the Bronze Age Near East.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Hurrians · See more »

Ibora

Ibora was a city in the late Roman province of Helenopontus, which became a Christian bishopric.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Ibora · See more »

Iran

Iran (ایران), also known as Persia, officially the Islamic Republic of Iran (جمهوری اسلامی ایران), is a sovereign state in Western Asia. With over 81 million inhabitants, Iran is the world's 18th-most-populous country. Comprising a land area of, it is the second-largest country in the Middle East and the 17th-largest in the world. Iran is bordered to the northwest by Armenia and the Republic of Azerbaijan, to the north by the Caspian Sea, to the northeast by Turkmenistan, to the east by Afghanistan and Pakistan, to the south by the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman, and to the west by Turkey and Iraq. The country's central location in Eurasia and Western Asia, and its proximity to the Strait of Hormuz, give it geostrategic importance. Tehran is the country's capital and largest city, as well as its leading economic and cultural center. Iran is home to one of the world's oldest civilizations, beginning with the formation of the Elamite kingdoms in the fourth millennium BCE. It was first unified by the Iranian Medes in the seventh century BCE, reaching its greatest territorial size in the sixth century BCE, when Cyrus the Great founded the Achaemenid Empire, which stretched from Eastern Europe to the Indus Valley, becoming one of the largest empires in history. The Iranian realm fell to Alexander the Great in the fourth century BCE and was divided into several Hellenistic states. An Iranian rebellion culminated in the establishment of the Parthian Empire, which was succeeded in the third century CE by the Sasanian Empire, a leading world power for the next four centuries. Arab Muslims conquered the empire in the seventh century CE, displacing the indigenous faiths of Zoroastrianism and Manichaeism with Islam. Iran made major contributions to the Islamic Golden Age that followed, producing many influential figures in art and science. After two centuries, a period of various native Muslim dynasties began, which were later conquered by the Turks and the Mongols. The rise of the Safavids in the 15th century led to the reestablishment of a unified Iranian state and national identity, with the country's conversion to Shia Islam marking a turning point in Iranian and Muslim history. Under Nader Shah, Iran was one of the most powerful states in the 18th century, though by the 19th century, a series of conflicts with the Russian Empire led to significant territorial losses. Popular unrest led to the establishment of a constitutional monarchy and the country's first legislature. A 1953 coup instigated by the United Kingdom and the United States resulted in greater autocracy and growing anti-Western resentment. Subsequent unrest against foreign influence and political repression led to the 1979 Revolution and the establishment of an Islamic republic, a political system that includes elements of a parliamentary democracy vetted and supervised by a theocracy governed by an autocratic "Supreme Leader". During the 1980s, the country was engaged in a war with Iraq, which lasted for almost nine years and resulted in a high number of casualties and economic losses for both sides. According to international reports, Iran's human rights record is exceptionally poor. The regime in Iran is undemocratic, and has frequently persecuted and arrested critics of the government and its Supreme Leader. Women's rights in Iran are described as seriously inadequate, and children's rights have been severely violated, with more child offenders being executed in Iran than in any other country in the world. Since the 2000s, Iran's controversial nuclear program has raised concerns, which is part of the basis of the international sanctions against the country. The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, an agreement reached between Iran and the P5+1, was created on 14 July 2015, aimed to loosen the nuclear sanctions in exchange for Iran's restriction in producing enriched uranium. Iran is a founding member of the UN, ECO, NAM, OIC, and OPEC. It is a major regional and middle power, and its large reserves of fossil fuels – which include the world's largest natural gas supply and the fourth-largest proven oil reserves – exert considerable influence in international energy security and the world economy. The country's rich cultural legacy is reflected in part by its 22 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the third-largest number in Asia and eleventh-largest in the world. Iran is a multicultural country comprising numerous ethnic and linguistic groups, the largest being Persians (61%), Azeris (16%), Kurds (10%), and Lurs (6%).

New!!: Pontus (region) and Iran · See more »

Iron Age

The Iron Age is the final epoch of the three-age system, preceded by the Stone Age (Neolithic) and the Bronze Age.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Iron Age · See more »

Jason

Jason (Ἰάσων Iásōn) was an ancient Greek mythological hero who was the leader of the Argonauts whose quest for the Golden Fleece featured in Greek literature.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Jason · See more »

Jerusalem

Jerusalem (יְרוּשָׁלַיִם; القُدس) is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Jerusalem · See more »

Jews

Jews (יְהוּדִים ISO 259-3, Israeli pronunciation) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group and a nation, originating from the Israelites Israelite origins and kingdom: "The first act in the long drama of Jewish history is the age of the Israelites""The people of the Kingdom of Israel and the ethnic and religious group known as the Jewish people that descended from them have been subjected to a number of forced migrations in their history" and Hebrews of the Ancient Near East.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Jews · See more »

Justinian I

Justinian I (Flavius Petrus Sabbatius Iustinianus Augustus; Flávios Pétros Sabbátios Ioustinianós; 482 14 November 565), traditionally known as Justinian the Great and also Saint Justinian the Great in the Eastern Orthodox Church, was the Eastern Roman emperor from 527 to 565.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Justinian I · See more »

Karadeniz Ereğli

Karadeniz Ereğli is a city and district in Zonguldak Province of Turkey, on the Black Sea shore at the mouth of the Kılıçsu River.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Karadeniz Ereğli · See more »

Kartvelian languages

The Kartvelian languages (ქართველური ენები, Kartveluri enebi, also known as Iberian and formerly South CaucasianBoeder (2002), p. 3) are a language family indigenous to the Caucasus and spoken primarily in Georgia, with large groups of native speakers in Russia, Iran, the United States, the European Union, Israel, and northeastern parts of Turkey.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Kartvelian languages · See more »

Kaskians

The Kaska (also Kaška, later Tabalian Kasku and Gasga) were a loosely affiliated Bronze Age non-Indo-European tribal people, who spoke the unclassified Kaskian language and lived in mountainous East Pontic Anatolia, known from Hittite sources.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Kaskians · See more »

Kızılırmak River

The Kızılırmak (Turkish for "Red River"), also known as the Halys River (Ἅλυς), is the longest river entirely within Turkey.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Kızılırmak River · See more »

Kingdom of Pontus

The Kingdom of Pontus or Pontic Empire was a state founded by the Persian Mithridatic dynasty,http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/pontus which may have been directly related to Darius the Great and the Achaemenid dynasty.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Kingdom of Pontus · See more »

Komnenos

Komnenos (Κομνηνός), Latinized Comnenus, plural Komnenoi or Comneni (Κομνηνοί), is a noble family who ruled the Byzantine Empire from 1081 to 1185, and later, as the Grand Komnenoi (Μεγαλοκομνηνοί, Megalokomnenoi) founded and ruled the Empire of Trebizond (1204–1461).

New!!: Pontus (region) and Komnenos · See more »

Laz people

The Laz people or Lazi (ლაზი, lazi; or ჭანი, ch'ani; Laz) are an indigenous Kartvelian-speaking ethnic group inhabiting the Black Sea coastal regions of Turkey and Georgia.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Laz people · See more »

Lazica

Lazica (ეგრისის სამეფო, Egrisi; ლაზიკა, Laziǩa; Λαζική, Lazikē; لازستان, Lazistan; Եգեր, Yeger) was the Latin name given to the territory of Colchis during the Roman/Byzantine period, from about the 1st century BC.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Lazica · See more »

Lesser Armenia

Lesser Armenia (Փոքր Հայք, Pokr Hayk; Armenia Minor), also known as Armenia Minor and Armenia Inferior, comprised the Armenian–populated regions primarily to the west and northwest of the ancient Kingdom of Armenia (also known as Kingdom of Greater Armenia).

New!!: Pontus (region) and Lesser Armenia · See more »

Leucosyri

Leucosyri, or Leucosyroi (Singular: Leucosyros), also known as Leucosyrians or White Syrians, are an ancient tribe that existed in Anatolia.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Leucosyri · See more »

Lydians

The Lydians were an Anatolian people living in Lydia, a region in western Anatolia, who spoke the distinctive Lydian language, an Indo-European language of the Anatolian group.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Lydians · See more »

Macrones

The Macrones (მაკრონები) (Μάκρωνες, Makrōnes) were an ancient Colchian tribe in the east of Pontus, about the Moschici Mountains (modern Yalnizçam Dağlari, TurkeyKavtaradze, Giorgi L. (2002),, pp. 63-83. Sprache und Kultur #3. Staatliche Ilia Tschawtschawadse Universität Tbilisi für Sprache und Kultur. Institut zur Erforschung des westlichen Denkens, Tbilissi.). The Macrones are first mentioned by Herodotus (c. 450 BC), who relates that they, along with Moschi, Tabal, Mossynoeci, and Marres, formed the nineteenth satrapy within the Achaemenid Persian Empire and fought under Xerxes I. There are many other subsequent references to them in the Classical accounts.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Macrones · See more »

Medieval Greek

Medieval Greek, also known as Byzantine Greek, is the stage of the Greek language between the end of Classical antiquity in the 5th–6th centuries and the end of the Middle Ages, conventionally dated to the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Medieval Greek · See more »

Metropolitan bishop

In Christian churches with episcopal polity, the rank of metropolitan bishop, or simply metropolitan, pertains to the diocesan bishop or archbishop of a metropolis (then more precisely called metropolitan archbishop); that is, the chief city of a historical Roman province, ecclesiastical province, or regional capital.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Metropolitan bishop · See more »

Mike Lazaridis

Mihal "Mike" Lazaridis, OC, O.Ont, FRS (Μιχαήλ (Μιχάλης) Λαζαρίδης; born March 14, 1961) is a Greek-Canadian businessman, investor in quantum computing technologies, and founder of BlackBerry, which created and manufactures the BlackBerry wireless handheld device.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Mike Lazaridis · See more »

Millet

Millets (/ˈmɪlɪts/) are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown around the world as cereal crops or grains for fodder and human food.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Millet · See more »

Mithridates I of Pontus

Mithridates I Ctistes (in Greek Mιθριδάτης Kτίστης; reigned 281–266 BCE), also known as Mithridates III of Cius, was a Persian nobleman and the founder (this is the meaning of the word Ctistes, literally Builder) of the Kingdom of Pontus in Anatolia.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Mithridates I of Pontus · See more »

Mithridates II of Cius

Mithridates of Cius (in Greek Mιθριδάτης or Mιθραδάτης; lived c. 386–302 BCE, ruled 337–302 BCE) a Persian noble, succeeded his kinsman or father Ariobarzanes II in 337 BCE as ruler of the Greek town of Cius in Mysia (today part of Turkey).

New!!: Pontus (region) and Mithridates II of Cius · See more »

Mithridates VI of Pontus

Mithridates VI or Mithradates VI (Μιθραδάτης, Μιθριδάτης), from Old Persian Miθradāta, "gift of Mithra"; 135–63 BC, also known as Mithradates the Great (Megas) and Eupator Dionysius, was king of Pontus and Armenia Minor in northern Anatolia (now Turkey) from about 120–63 BC.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Mithridates VI of Pontus · See more »

Mithridatic Wars

There were three Mithridatic Wars between Rome and the Kingdom of Pontus in the 1st century BC.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Mithridatic Wars · See more »

Mossynoeci

Mossynoeci (მოსინიკები, Μοσσύνοικοι, Mossynoikoi "dwellers in wooden towers") is a name that the Greeks of the Euxine Sea (Black Sea) applied to the peoples of Pontus, the northern Anatolian coast west of Trebizond.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Mossynoeci · See more »

Mushki

The Mushki were an Iron Age people of Anatolia who appear in sources from Assyria but not from the Hittites.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Mushki · See more »

Mysia

Mysia (UK, US or; Μυσία, Mysia, Misya) was a region in the northwest of ancient Asia Minor (Anatolia, Asian part of modern Turkey).

New!!: Pontus (region) and Mysia · See more »

Nero

Nero (Latin: Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus; 15 December 37 – 9 June 68 AD) was the last Roman emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Nero · See more »

New Testament

The New Testament (Ἡ Καινὴ Διαθήκη, trans. Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē; Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, based on the Hebrew Bible.

New!!: Pontus (region) and New Testament · See more »

Niksar

Niksar /'niksar/ (Νεοκαισάρεια, Neokaisáreia) is a city in Tokat Province, Turkey.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Niksar · See more »

Odysseus

Odysseus (Ὀδυσσεύς, Ὀδυσεύς, Ὀdysseús), also known by the Latin variant Ulysses (Ulixēs), is a legendary Greek king of Ithaca and the hero of Homer's epic poem the Odyssey.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Odysseus · See more »

Ottoman Empire

The Ottoman Empire (دولت عليه عثمانیه,, literally The Exalted Ottoman State; Modern Turkish: Osmanlı İmparatorluğu or Osmanlı Devleti), also historically known in Western Europe as the Turkish Empire"The Ottoman Empire-also known in Europe as the Turkish Empire" or simply Turkey, was a state that controlled much of Southeast Europe, Western Asia and North Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Ottoman Empire · See more »

Paphlagonia

Paphlagonia (Παφλαγονία, Paphlagonía, modern pronunciation Paflagonía; Paflagonya) was an ancient area on the Black Sea coast of north central Anatolia, situated between Bithynia to the west and Pontus to the east, and separated from Phrygia (later, Galatia) by a prolongation to the east of the Bithynian Olympus.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Paphlagonia · See more »

Paris Peace Conference, 1919

The Paris Peace Conference, also known as Versailles Peace Conference, was the meeting of the victorious Allied Powers following the end of World War I to set the peace terms for the defeated Central Powers.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Paris Peace Conference, 1919 · See more »

Pasargadae

Pasargadae (from Πασαργάδαι, from Old Persian Pāθra-gadā, "protective club" or "strong club"; Modern Persian: پاسارگاد Pāsārgād) was the capital of the Achaemenid Empire under Cyrus the Great who had issued its construction (559–530 BC); it was also the location of his tomb.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Pasargadae · See more »

Pazar, Rize

Pazar (Laz and Georgian: ათინა, Atina; Greek: Αθήνα, Athína) is a town and district of Rize Province in the Black Sea region of Turkey, 37 km east of the city of Rize.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Pazar, Rize · See more »

Pentecost

The Christian feast day of Pentecost is seven weeks after Easter Sunday: that is to say, the fiftieth day after Easter inclusive of Easter Sunday.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Pentecost · See more »

Persian Empire

The Persian Empire (شاهنشاهی ایران, translit., lit. 'Imperial Iran') refers to any of a series of imperial dynasties that were centred in Persia/Iran from the 6th-century-BC Achaemenid Empire era to the 20th century AD in the Qajar dynasty era.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Persian Empire · See more »

Persian people

The Persians--> are an Iranian ethnic group that make up over half the population of Iran.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Persian people · See more »

Phrygia

In Antiquity, Phrygia (Φρυγία, Phrygía, modern pronunciation Frygía; Frigya) was first a kingdom in the west central part of Anatolia, in what is now Asian Turkey, centered on the Sangarios River, later a region, often part of great empires.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Phrygia · See more »

Polemon II of Pontus

Marcus Antonius Polemon Pythodoros, also known as Polemon II of Pontus and Polemon of Cilicia (Μάρκος Ἀντώνιος Πολέμων Πυθόδωρος; 12 BC/11 BC–74) was a prince of the Bosporan, Pontus, Cilicia and Cappadocia.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Polemon II of Pontus · See more »

Pompey

Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (29 September 106 BC – 28 September 48 BC), usually known in English as Pompey or Pompey the Great, was a military and political leader of the late Roman Republic.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Pompey · See more »

Pontic Greek

Pontic Greek (ποντιακά, pontiaká) is a Greek language originally spoken in the Pontus area on the southern shores of the Black Sea, northeastern Anatolia, the Eastern Turkish/Caucasus province of Kars, southern Georgia and today mainly in northern Greece.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Pontic Greek · See more »

Pontic Greeks

The Pontic Greeks, also known as Pontian Greeks (Πόντιοι, Ελληνοπόντιοι, Póntioi, Ellinopóntioi; Pontus Rumları, Karadeniz Rumları, პონტოელი ბერძნები, P’ont’oeli Berdznebi), are an ethnically Greek group who traditionally lived in the region of Pontus, on the shores of the Black Sea and in the Pontic Mountains of northeastern Anatolia.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Pontic Greeks · See more »

Pontic Mountains

The Pontic Mountains or Pontic Alps (Turkish: Kuzey Anadolu Dağları, meaning North Anatolian Mountains) form a mountain range in northern Anatolia, Turkey.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Pontic Mountains · See more »

Poti

Poti (ფოთი; Mingrelian: ფუთი; Laz: ჶაში/Faşi or ფაში/Paşi) is a port city in Georgia, located on the eastern Black Sea coast in the region of Samegrelo-Zemo Svaneti in the west of the country.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Poti · See more »

Praetor

Praetor (also spelled prætor) was a title granted by the government of Ancient Rome to men acting in one of two official capacities: the commander of an army (in the field or, less often, before the army had been mustered); or, an elected magistratus (magistrate), assigned various duties (which varied at different periods in Rome's history).

New!!: Pontus (region) and Praetor · See more »

Priscilla and Aquila

Priscilla (Priskilla) and Aquila (Akylas) were a first century Christian missionary married couple described in the New Testament and traditionally listed among the Seventy Disciples.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Priscilla and Aquila · See more »

Prometheus

In Greek mythology, Prometheus (Προμηθεύς,, meaning "forethought") is a Titan, culture hero, and trickster figure who is credited with the creation of man from clay, and who defies the gods by stealing fire and giving it to humanity, an act that enabled progress and civilization.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Prometheus · See more »

Ramsay MacMullen

Ramsay MacMullen (born March 3, 1928 in New York City) is an Emeritus Professor of history at Yale University, where he taught from 1967 to his retirement in 1993 as Dunham Professor of History and Classics.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Ramsay MacMullen · See more »

Republic of Pontus

The Republic of Pontus (Δημοκρατία του Πόντου, Dimokratía tou Póntou) was a proposed Pontic Greek state on the southern coast of the Black Sea.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Republic of Pontus · See more »

Rize

Rize is the capital city of Rize Province in the eastern part of the Black Sea Region of Turkey.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Rize · See more »

Roman Armenia

Roman Armenia refers to the rule of parts of Greater Armenia by the Roman Empire, from the 1st century AD to the end of Late Antiquity.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Roman Armenia · See more »

Roman Empire

The Roman Empire (Imperium Rōmānum,; Koine and Medieval Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Ῥωμαίων, tr.) was the post-Roman Republic period of the ancient Roman civilization, characterized by government headed by emperors and large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean Sea in Europe, Africa and Asia.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Roman Empire · See more »

Roman province

In Ancient Rome, a province (Latin: provincia, pl. provinciae) was the basic and, until the Tetrarchy (from 293 AD), the largest territorial and administrative unit of the empire's territorial possessions outside Italy.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Roman province · See more »

Sack of Constantinople (1204)

The siege and sack of Constantinople occurred in April 1204 and marked the culmination of the Fourth Crusade.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Sack of Constantinople (1204) · See more »

Saint Peter

Saint Peter (Syriac/Aramaic: ܫܸܡܥܘܿܢ ܟܹ݁ܐܦ݂ܵܐ, Shemayon Keppa; שמעון בר יונה; Petros; Petros; Petrus; r. AD 30; died between AD 64 and 68), also known as Simon Peter, Simeon, or Simon, according to the New Testament, was one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus Christ, leaders of the early Christian Great Church.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Saint Peter · See more »

Samsun

Samsun is a city on the north coast of Turkey with a population over half a million people.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Samsun · See more »

Satrap

Satraps were the governors of the provinces of the ancient Median and Achaemenid Empires and in several of their successors, such as in the Sasanian Empire and the Hellenistic empires.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Satrap · See more »

Scylax of Caryanda

Scylax of Caryanda (Σκύλαξ ο Καρυανδεύς) was a renowned Greek explorer and writer of the late 6th and early 5th centuries BCE.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Scylax of Caryanda · See more »

Seljuk Empire

The Seljuk Empire (also spelled Seljuq) (آل سلجوق) was a medieval Turko-Persian Sunni Muslim empire, originating from the Qiniq branch of Oghuz Turks.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Seljuk Empire · See more »

Side, Turkey

Side (Σίδη) is an ancient Greek city on the southern Mediterranean coast of Turkey, a resort town and one of the best-known classical sites in the country.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Side, Turkey · See more »

Sinop, Turkey

Sinop (Σινώπη, Sinōpē, historically known as Sinope) is a city with a population of 36,734 on the isthmus of İnce Burun (İnceburun, Cape Ince), near Cape Sinope (Sinop Burnu, Boztepe Cape, Boztepe Burnu) which is situated on the most northern edge of the Turkish side of the Black Sea coast, in the ancient region of Paphlagonia, in modern-day northern Turkey.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Sinop, Turkey · See more »

Stelios Kazantzidis

Stylianos "Stelios" Kazantzidis (Greek: Στέλιος Καζαντζίδης) (29 August 1931 – 14 September 2001) was a prominent Greek singer.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Stelios Kazantzidis · See more »

Strabo

Strabo (Στράβων Strábōn; 64 or 63 BC AD 24) was a Greek geographer, philosopher, and historian who lived in Asia Minor during the transitional period of the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Strabo · See more »

Tibareni

The Tibareni (Georgian: ტიბერია, Tiberia. Greek Τιβαρηνοί, Tibarenoi; Tubal, Thobeles in Josephus) were a people referred to in Herodotus, Xenophon, Strabo and other classical authors.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Tibareni · See more »

Tigranes the Great

Tigranes II, more commonly known as Tigranes the Great (Տիգրան Մեծ, Tigran Mets; Τιγράνης ὁ Μέγας Tigránes ho Mégas; Tigranes Magnus) (140 – 55 BC) was King of Armenia under whom the country became, for a short time, the strongest state to Rome's east.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Tigranes the Great · See more »

Trabzon

Trabzon, historically known as Trebizond, is a city on the Black Sea coast of northeastern Turkey and the capital of Trabzon Province.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Trabzon · See more »

Trajan

Trajan (Imperator Caesar Nerva Trajanus Divi Nervae filius Augustus; 18 September 538August 117 AD) was Roman emperor from 98 to 117AD.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Trajan · See more »

Trebizond Vilayet

The Vilayet of Trebizond or Trabzon was a first-level administrative division (vilayet) in the north-eastern part of the Ottoman Empire and corresponding to the area along the eastern Black Sea coastline and the interior highland region of the Pontic Alps.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Trebizond Vilayet · See more »

Turkey

Turkey (Türkiye), officially the Republic of Turkey (Türkiye Cumhuriyeti), is a transcontinental country in Eurasia, mainly in Anatolia in Western Asia, with a smaller portion on the Balkan peninsula in Southeast Europe.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Turkey · See more »

World War I

World War I (often abbreviated as WWI or WW1), also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.

New!!: Pontus (region) and World War I · See more »

Xenophon

Xenophon of Athens (Ξενοφῶν,, Xenophōn; – 354 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher, historian, soldier, mercenary, and student of Socrates.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Xenophon · See more »

Zeus

Zeus (Ζεύς, Zeús) is the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion, who rules as king of the gods of Mount Olympus.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Zeus · See more »

Zile

Zile, anciently known as Zela (Ζῆλα) (still as Latin Catholic titular see), is a city and a district of Tokat Province, Turkey.

New!!: Pontus (region) and Zile · See more »

Redirects here:

Ancient pontus, Cappadocian Pontus, Classical pontus, Diospontus, Galatian Pontus, Helenopontus, Pontica, Pontos (region), Pontus Galaticus, Pontus Polemoniacus, Πόντος.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontus_(region)

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »