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Power (physics)

Index Power (physics)

In physics, power is the rate of doing work, the amount of energy transferred per unit time. [1]

56 relations: Ampere, Angular velocity, British thermal unit, Calorie, Coal, Conservative force, DBm, Distance, Dot product, Electric current, Electrical resistance and conductance, Energy, Erg, Foot-pound (energy), Force, Gear train, Gradient, Gradient theorem, Horsepower, Intensity (physics), International System of Units, James Watt, Joule, Kilogram, Line integral, Mechanical advantage, Mechanics, Metre, Motive power, Ohm, Orders of magnitude (power), Pascal (unit), Pound (mass), Power density, Power gain, Pressure, Pulsed power, Resistor, Scalar (physics), Second, Signal strength in telecommunications, Simple machine, Sound power, The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Time, TNT, TNT equivalent, Ton of refrigeration, Torque, Velocity, ..., Volt, Voltage, Volumetric flow rate, Watt, Watt steam engine, Work (physics). Expand index (6 more) »

Ampere

The ampere (symbol: A), often shortened to "amp",SI supports only the use of symbols and deprecates the use of abbreviations for units.

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Angular velocity

In physics, the angular velocity of a particle is the rate at which it rotates around a chosen center point: that is, the time rate of change of its angular displacement relative to the origin.

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British thermal unit

The British thermal unit (Btu or BTU) is a traditional unit of heat; it is defined as the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit.

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Calorie

A calorie is a unit of energy.

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Coal

Coal is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock usually occurring in rock strata in layers or veins called coal beds or coal seams.

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Conservative force

A conservative force is a force with the property that the total work done in moving a particle between two points is independent of the taken path.

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DBm

dBm (sometimes dBmW or decibel-milliwatts) is unit of level used to indicate that a power ratio is expressed in decibels (dB) with reference to one milliwatt (mW).

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Distance

Distance is a numerical measurement of how far apart objects are.

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Dot product

In mathematics, the dot product or scalar productThe term scalar product is often also used more generally to mean a symmetric bilinear form, for example for a pseudo-Euclidean space.

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Electric current

An electric current is a flow of electric charge.

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Electrical resistance and conductance

The electrical resistance of an electrical conductor is a measure of the difficulty to pass an electric current through that conductor.

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Energy

In physics, energy is the quantitative property that must be transferred to an object in order to perform work on, or to heat, the object.

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Erg

The erg is a unit of energy and work equal to 10−7 joules.

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Foot-pound (energy)

The foot pound-force (symbol: ft⋅lbf or ft⋅lb) is a unit of work or energy in the Engineering and Gravitational Systems in United States customary and imperial units of measure.

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Force

In physics, a force is any interaction that, when unopposed, will change the motion of an object.

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Gear train

A gear train is a mechanical system formed by mounting gears on a frame so the teeth of the gears engage.

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Gradient

In mathematics, the gradient is a multi-variable generalization of the derivative.

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Gradient theorem

The gradient theorem, also known as the fundamental theorem of calculus for line integrals, says that a line integral through a gradient field can be evaluated by evaluating the original scalar field at the endpoints of the curve.

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Horsepower

Horsepower (hp) is a unit of measurement of power (the rate at which work is done).

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Intensity (physics)

In physics, intensity is the power transferred per unit area, where the area is measured on the plane perpendicular to the direction of propagation of the energy.

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International System of Units

The International System of Units (SI, abbreviated from the French Système international (d'unités)) is the modern form of the metric system, and is the most widely used system of measurement.

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James Watt

James Watt (30 January 1736 (19 January 1736 OS) – 25 August 1819) was a Scottish inventor, mechanical engineer, and chemist who improved on Thomas Newcomen's 1712 Newcomen steam engine with his Watt steam engine in 1781, which was fundamental to the changes brought by the Industrial Revolution in both his native Great Britain and the rest of the world.

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Joule

The joule (symbol: J) is a derived unit of energy in the International System of Units.

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Kilogram

The kilogram or kilogramme (symbol: kg) is the base unit of mass in the International System of Units (SI), and is defined as being equal to the mass of the International Prototype of the Kilogram (IPK, also known as "Le Grand K" or "Big K"), a cylinder of platinum-iridium alloy stored by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures at Saint-Cloud, France.

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Line integral

In mathematics, a line integral is an integral where the function to be integrated is evaluated along a curve.

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Mechanical advantage

Mechanical advantage is a measure of the force amplification achieved by using a tool, mechanical device or machine system.

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Mechanics

Mechanics (Greek μηχανική) is that area of science concerned with the behaviour of physical bodies when subjected to forces or displacements, and the subsequent effects of the bodies on their environment.

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Metre

The metre (British spelling and BIPM spelling) or meter (American spelling) (from the French unit mètre, from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in some metric systems, including the International System of Units (SI).

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Motive power

In thermodynamics, motive power is a natural agent, such as water or steam, wind or electricity, used to impart motion to machinery such as an engine.

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Ohm

The ohm (symbol: Ω) is the SI derived unit of electrical resistance, named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm.

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Orders of magnitude (power)

This page lists examples of the power in watts produced by various sources of energy.

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Pascal (unit)

The pascal (symbol: Pa) is the SI derived unit of pressure used to quantify internal pressure, stress, Young's modulus and ultimate tensile strength.

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Pound (mass)

The pound or pound-mass is a unit of mass used in the imperial, United States customary and other systems of measurement.

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Power density

Power density (or volume power density or volume specific power) is the amount of power (time rate of energy transfer) per unit volume.

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Power gain

The power gain of an electrical network is the ratio of an output power to an input power.

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Pressure

Pressure (symbol: p or P) is the force applied perpendicular to the surface of an object per unit area over which that force is distributed.

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Pulsed power

Pulsed power is the science and technology of accumulating energy over a relatively long period of time and releasing it very quickly, thus increasing the instantaneous power.

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Resistor

A resistor is a passive two-terminal electrical component that implements electrical resistance as a circuit element.

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Scalar (physics)

A scalar or scalar quantity in physics is a physical quantity that can be described by a single element of a number field such as a real number, often accompanied by units of measurement.

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Second

The second is the SI base unit of time, commonly understood and historically defined as 1/86,400 of a day – this factor derived from the division of the day first into 24 hours, then to 60 minutes and finally to 60 seconds each.

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Signal strength in telecommunications

In telecommunications, particularly in radio frequency, signal strength (also referred to as field strength) refers to the transmitter power output as received by a reference antenna at a distance from the transmitting antenna.

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Simple machine

A simple machine is a mechanical device that changes the direction or magnitude of a force.

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Sound power

Sound power or acoustic power is the rate at which sound energy is emitted, reflected, transmitted or received, per unit time.

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The Feynman Lectures on Physics

The Feynman Lectures on Physics is a physics textbook based on some lectures by Richard P. Feynman, a Nobel laureate who has sometimes been called "The Great Explainer".

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Time

Time is the indefinite continued progress of existence and events that occur in apparently irreversible succession from the past through the present to the future.

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TNT

Trinitrotoluene (TNT), or more specifically 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, is a chemical compound with the formula C6H2(NO2)3CH3.

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TNT equivalent

TNT equivalent is a convention for expressing energy, typically used to describe the energy released in an explosion.

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Ton of refrigeration

A ton of refrigeration (TR), also called a refrigeration ton (RT), is a unit of power used in some countries (especially in North America) to describe the heat-extraction capacity of refrigeration and air conditioning equipment.

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Torque

Torque, moment, or moment of force is rotational force.

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Velocity

The velocity of an object is the rate of change of its position with respect to a frame of reference, and is a function of time.

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Volt

The volt (symbol: V) is the derived unit for electric potential, electric potential difference (voltage), and electromotive force.

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Voltage

Voltage, electric potential difference, electric pressure or electric tension (formally denoted or, but more often simply as V or U, for instance in the context of Ohm's or Kirchhoff's circuit laws) is the difference in electric potential between two points.

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Volumetric flow rate

In physics and engineering, in particular fluid dynamics and hydrometry, the volumetric flow rate (also known as volume flow rate, rate of fluid flow or volume velocity) is the volume of fluid which passes per unit time; usually represented by the symbol (sometimes). The SI unit is m3/s (cubic metres per second).

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Watt

The watt (symbol: W) is a unit of power.

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Watt steam engine

The Watt steam engine (alternatively known as the Boulton and Watt steam engine) was the first type of steam engine to make use of a separate condenser.

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Work (physics)

In physics, a force is said to do work if, when acting, there is a displacement of the point of application in the direction of the force.

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Redirects here:

Instantaneous power, Mobile power, Power(physics), Specific rotary power.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_(physics)

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