Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Prohibition in the United States

Index Prohibition in the United States

Prohibition in the United States was a nationwide constitutional ban on the production, importation, transportation, and sale of alcoholic beverages from 1920 to 1933. [1]

239 relations: Abolitionism in the United States, Addiction (journal), African Americans, Alcohol and Drugs History Society, Alcoholic drink, Alcoholics Anonymous, Alcoholism, Alexander Hamilton, American Baptist Churches USA, American Civil War, American Journal of Public Health, American Mafia, American Quarterly, American Temperance Society, Anti-Saloon League, Armistice, Ballad, Bathtub gin, Bénédictine, Beer in the United States, Benjamin Rush, Billy Sunday, Binge drinking, Black market, Blue Monday (term), Bootleggers and Baptists, Brandy, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Bureau of Prohibition, California wine, Cambridge University Press, Canada, Cannabis (drug), Carrie Nation, Catholic Church, Catholic Total Abstinence Union of America, Charles Evans Hughes, Charles Norris (medical examiner), Charles Scribner's Sons, Chicago, Chicago Outfit, Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), Christian liturgy, Christian revival, Christian views on alcohol, Cider, Cirrhosis, Colonial history of the United States, Colonial Office, Congregational church, ..., Connecticut, Controlled Substances Act, Cornell University Library, Corruption in the United States, Cullen–Harrison Act, Democratic-Republican Party, Denatured alcohol, Detroit River, Distillation, Documentary film, Dram shop, Drug Enforcement Administration, Dry county, Dry state, Edward VIII, Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Episcopal Church (United States), Ethanol, Ethnocultural politics in the United States, Evangelicalism, Evangelism, Federalist Party, Frances Willard, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Free lunch, Free State of Galveston, Gallup (company), Gangster, George Cassiday, George V, Georgia (U.S. state), German Americans, Gluttony, Govenlock, Great Depression, Greenwood Publishing Group, H. L. Mencken, Hangover, Harry Browne, Heber J. Grant, Homebrewing, Hummingbird, Indian reservation, Industrialisation, Irving Fisher, Izzy Einstein and Moe Smith, Jazz, Jeffrey Miron, Jews, John D. Rockefeller Jr., John F. Kennedy School of Government, Journal of Social History, Kansas, Karen MacNeil, Kentucky, Ku Klux Klan, Labour law, Legal drinking age, Legal fiction, Life (magazine), Liquor, Lizabeth Cohen, Local option, Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod, Lutheranism, Maine law, Mainline Protestant, Mark A. Matthews, Mark H. Moore, Mars, Massachusetts General Court, Medicinal Liquor Prescriptions Act of 1933, Methanol, Methodism, Mexico, MIT Press, Moonshine, Mormonism and polygamy, Morris Sheppard, Mugler v. Kansas, Muscle car, Music of the United States, Napa Valley Register, Nassau, Bahamas, National Bureau of Economic Research, National debt of the United States, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Nativism (politics), New Orleans, New York (state), New York City, Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, North Carolina, Ogg, Old School–New School Controversy, Organized crime, Pietism, Political corruption, Prison, Progressive Era, Progressivism, Prohibition, Prohibition in Canada, Prohibition of drugs, Prohibition Party, Protestantism, Public Choice (journal), Public morality, Quakers, Rabbi, Repeal, Repeal of Prohibition in the United States, Rhode Island, Rocco Perri, Rum, Rum-running, Rum-running in Windsor, Ontario, Sabbath, Sacramental wine, Saint Valentine's Day Massacre, Second Great Awakening, Simon Patten, Sin tax, Sixteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, South Carolina, Southern Baptist Convention, Southern United States, Speakeasy, St. Louis, State governments of the United States, Sterno, SUNY Press, Teetotalism, Temperance movement, Tennessee, The American Economic Review, The Bahamas, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The New York Times, The Purple Gang, The Washington Post, Third Great Awakening, Third Party System, Thomas Edison, Thomas Jefferson, Thunder Road (film), Timothy Shay Arthur, Twenty-first Amendment to the United States Constitution, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Unintended consequences, United States Coast Guard, United States Congress, United States Constitution, United States Department of Justice, United States Department of the Treasury, United States presidential election, 1916, United States presidential election, 1932, United States Senate, University of Massachusetts Press, Untouchables (law enforcement), Urbanization, Utah, Vermouth, Veto, Vineyard, Virginia, Volstead Act, War on drugs, Warren G. Harding, Washington Monument, Wayne Wheeler, Webb–Kenyon Act, Wedge issue, Western Pennsylvania, Western saloon, Whiskey Gap, Alberta, Whiskey Rebellion, Whisky, Wine, Winston Churchill, Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Women's suffrage, Women's suffrage in the United States, Woodrow Wilson, World War I, World War II, Wyandotte Constitution, Yale University. Expand index (189 more) »

Abolitionism in the United States

Abolitionism in the United States was the movement before and during the American Civil War to end slavery in the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Abolitionism in the United States · See more »

Addiction (journal)

Addiction is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal established in 1884 by the Society for the Study of Addiction to Alcohol and other Drugs.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Addiction (journal) · See more »

African Americans

African Americans (also referred to as Black Americans or Afro-Americans) are an ethnic group of Americans with total or partial ancestry from any of the black racial groups of Africa.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and African Americans · See more »

Alcohol and Drugs History Society

The Alcohol and Drugs History Society (ADHS) is a scholarly organization whose members study the history of a variety of illegal, regulated, and unregulated drugs such as opium, alcohol, and coffee.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Alcohol and Drugs History Society · See more »

Alcoholic drink

An alcoholic drink (or alcoholic beverage) is a drink that contains ethanol, a type of alcohol produced by fermentation of grains, fruits, or other sources of sugar.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Alcoholic drink · See more »

Alcoholics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is an international mutual aid fellowship whose stated purpose is to enable its members to "stay sober and help other alcoholics achieve sobriety." It was founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith in Akron, Ohio.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Alcoholics Anonymous · See more »

Alcoholism

Alcoholism, also known as alcohol use disorder (AUD), is a broad term for any drinking of alcohol that results in mental or physical health problems.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Alcoholism · See more »

Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757July 12, 1804) was a statesman and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Alexander Hamilton · See more »

American Baptist Churches USA

The American Baptist Churches USA (ABCUSA) is a Baptist Christian denomination within the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and American Baptist Churches USA · See more »

American Civil War

The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and American Civil War · See more »

American Journal of Public Health

The American Journal of Public Health is a monthly peer-reviewed public health journal published by the American Public Health Association covering health policy and public health.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and American Journal of Public Health · See more »

American Mafia

The American Mafia (commonly referred to as the Mafia or the Mob, though "the Mob" can refer to other organized crime groups) or Italian-American Mafia, is the highly organized Italian-American criminal society.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and American Mafia · See more »

American Quarterly

American Quarterly is an academic journal and the official publication of the American Studies Association.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and American Quarterly · See more »

American Temperance Society

The American Temperance Society (ATS), also known as the American Society for the Promotion of Temperance, was a society established on February 13, 1826 in Boston, Massachusetts.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and American Temperance Society · See more »

Anti-Saloon League

The Anti-Saloon League was the leading organization lobbying for prohibition in the United States in the early 20th century.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Anti-Saloon League · See more »

Armistice

An armistice is a formal agreement of warring parties to stop fighting.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Armistice · See more »

Ballad

A ballad is a form of verse, often a narrative set to music.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Ballad · See more »

Bathtub gin

Bathtub gin refers to any style of homemade spirit made in amateur conditions.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Bathtub gin · See more »

Bénédictine

Bénédictine is a herbal liqueur beverage developed by Alexandre Le Grand in the 19th century and produced in France.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Bénédictine · See more »

Beer in the United States

Beer in the United States is manufactured by more than 3,000 breweries, which range in size from industry giants to brew pubs and microbreweries.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Beer in the United States · See more »

Benjamin Rush

Benjamin Rush (– April 19, 1813) was a Founding Father of the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Benjamin Rush · See more »

Billy Sunday

William Ashley Sunday (November 19, 1862 – November 6, 1935) was an American athlete who, after being a popular outfielder in baseball's National League during the 1880s, became the most celebrated and influential American evangelist during the first two decades of the 20th century.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Billy Sunday · See more »

Binge drinking

Binge drinking, or heavy episodic drinking, is a modern epithet for drinking alcoholic beverages with an intention of becoming intoxicated by heavy consumption of alcohol over a short period of time.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Binge drinking · See more »

Black market

A black market, underground economy, or shadow economy is a clandestine market or transaction that has some aspect of illegality or is characterized by some form of noncompliant behavior with an institutional set of rules.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Black market · See more »

Blue Monday (term)

In literature of the 1830s, Blue Monday referred to the hungover state of the labor workforce after a weekend spent drinking, and the association of the color blue with a depressed state of mind.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Blue Monday (term) · See more »

Bootleggers and Baptists

Bootleggers and Baptists is a concept put forth by regulatory economist Bruce Yandle, For much of the 20th century, Baptists and other evangelical Christians were prominent in political activism for Sunday closing laws restricting the sale of alcohol.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Bootleggers and Baptists · See more »

Brandy

Brandy is a spirit produced by distilling wine.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Brandy · See more »

Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) is a federal law enforcement organization within the United States Department of Justice.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives · See more »

Bureau of Prohibition

The Bureau of Prohibition (or Prohibition Unit) was the federal law enforcement agency formed to enforce the National Prohibition Act of 1919, commonly known as the Volstead Act, which elaborated upon the 18th Amendment to the United States Constitution regarding the prohibition of the manufacture, sale, and transportation of alcoholic beverages.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Bureau of Prohibition · See more »

California wine

California wine is wine made in the U.S. state of California.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and California wine · See more »

Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Cambridge University Press · See more »

Canada

Canada is a country located in the northern part of North America.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Canada · See more »

Cannabis (drug)

Cannabis, also known as marijuana among other names, is a psychoactive drug from the ''Cannabis'' plant intended for medical or recreational use.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Cannabis (drug) · See more »

Carrie Nation

Carrie Amelia Nation (forename sometimes spelled Carry; November 25, 1846 – June 9, 1911) was an American woman who was a radical member of the temperance movement, which opposed alcohol before the advent of Prohibition.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Carrie Nation · See more »

Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.299 billion members worldwide.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Catholic Church · See more »

Catholic Total Abstinence Union of America

The work of Father Mathew in promoting temperance across the U.S. led to the establishment of numerous separate and independent Catholic temperance groups.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Catholic Total Abstinence Union of America · See more »

Charles Evans Hughes

Charles Evans Hughes Sr. (April 11, 1862 – August 27, 1948) was an American statesman, Republican politician, and the 11th Chief Justice of the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Charles Evans Hughes · See more »

Charles Norris (medical examiner)

Charles Norris (December 4, 1867 - September 11, 1935) was New York's first appointed chief medical examiner (1918–1935) and pioneer of forensic toxicology in America.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Charles Norris (medical examiner) · See more »

Charles Scribner's Sons

Charles Scribner's Sons, or simply Scribner's or Scribner, is an American publisher based in New York City, known for publishing American authors including Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Kurt Vonnegut, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Stephen King, Robert A. Heinlein, Thomas Wolfe, George Santayana, John Clellon Holmes, Don DeLillo, and Edith Wharton.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Charles Scribner's Sons · See more »

Chicago

Chicago, officially the City of Chicago, is the third most populous city in the United States, after New York City and Los Angeles.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Chicago · See more »

Chicago Outfit

The Chicago Outfit (also known as the Outfit, the Chicago Mafia, the Chicago Mob, or The Organization) is an Italian-American organized crime syndicate based in Chicago, Illinois, which dates back to the 1910s.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Chicago Outfit · See more »

Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States in the Reformed tradition with close ties to the Restoration Movement.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) · See more »

Christian liturgy

Christian liturgy is a pattern for worship used (whether recommended or prescribed) by a Christian congregation or denomination on a regular basis.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Christian liturgy · See more »

Christian revival

Revivalism is increased spiritual interest or renewal in the life of a church congregation or society, with a local, national or global effect.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Christian revival · See more »

Christian views on alcohol

Christian views on alcohol are varied.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Christian views on alcohol · See more »

Cider

Cider is an alcoholic beverage made from the fermented juice of apples.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Cider · See more »

Cirrhosis

Cirrhosis is a condition in which the liver does not function properly due to long-term damage.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Cirrhosis · See more »

Colonial history of the United States

The colonial history of the United States covers the history of European colonization of the Americas from the start of colonization in the early 16th century until their incorporation into the United States of America.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Colonial history of the United States · See more »

Colonial Office

The Colonial Office was a government department of the Kingdom of Great Britain and later of the United Kingdom, first created to deal with the colonial affairs of British North America but needed also to oversee the increasing number of colonies of the British Empire.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Colonial Office · See more »

Congregational church

Congregational churches (also Congregationalist churches; Congregationalism) are Protestant churches in the Reformed tradition practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Congregational church · See more »

Connecticut

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Connecticut · See more »

Controlled Substances Act

The Controlled Substances Act (CSA) is the statute establishing federal U.S. drug policy under which the manufacture, importation, possession, use, and distribution of certain substances is regulated.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Controlled Substances Act · See more »

Cornell University Library

The Cornell University Library is the library system of Cornell University.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Cornell University Library · See more »

Corruption in the United States

Corruption in the United States is the act of a local, state or federal official using some form of influence or being influenced in some way, typically through bribery.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Corruption in the United States · See more »

Cullen–Harrison Act

The Cullen–Harrison Act, named for its sponsors, Senator Pat Harrison and Representative Thomas H. Cullen, enacted by the United States Congress March 21, 1933 and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt the following day, legalized the sale in the United States of beer with an alcohol content of 3.2% (by weight) and wine of similarly low alcohol content, thought to be too low to be intoxicating, effective April 7, 1933.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Cullen–Harrison Act · See more »

Democratic-Republican Party

The Democratic-Republican Party was an American political party formed by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison around 1792 to oppose the centralizing policies of the new Federalist Party run by Alexander Hamilton, who was secretary of the treasury and chief architect of George Washington's administration.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Democratic-Republican Party · See more »

Denatured alcohol

Denatured alcohol, also called methylated spirit (methylated spirits in Australia and New Zealand) or denatured rectified spirit, is ethanol that has additives to make it poisonous, bad tasting, foul smelling or nauseating, to discourage recreational consumption.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Denatured alcohol · See more »

Detroit River

The Detroit River (Rivière Détroit) flows for from Lake St. Clair to Lake Erie as a strait in the Great Lakes system and forms part of the border between Canada and the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Detroit River · See more »

Distillation

Distillation is the process of separating the components or substances from a liquid mixture by selective boiling and condensation.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Distillation · See more »

Documentary film

A documentary film is a nonfictional motion picture intended to document some aspect of reality, primarily for the purposes of instruction, education, or maintaining a historical record.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Documentary film · See more »

Dram shop

A dram shop (or dramshop) is a bar, tavern or similar commercial establishment where alcoholic beverages are sold.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Dram shop · See more »

Drug Enforcement Administration

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is a United States federal law enforcement agency under the United States Department of Justice, tasked with combating drug smuggling and use within the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Drug Enforcement Administration · See more »

Dry county

A dry county is a county in the United States whose government forbids the sale of any kind of alcoholic beverages.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Dry county · See more »

Dry state

A dry state is a state in the United States in which the manufacture, distribution, importation, and sale of alcoholic beverages are prohibited or tightly restricted.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Dry state · See more »

Edward VIII

Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Empire, and Emperor of India, from 20 January 1936 until his abdication on 11 December the same year, after which he became the Duke of Windsor.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Edward VIII · See more »

Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Eighteenth Amendment (Amendment XVIII) of the United States Constitution effectively established the prohibition of alcoholic beverages in the United States by declaring the production, transport, and sale of alcohol (though not the consumption or private possession) illegal.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution · See more »

Episcopal Church (United States)

The Episcopal Church is the United States-based member church of the worldwide Anglican Communion.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Episcopal Church (United States) · See more »

Ethanol

Ethanol, also called alcohol, ethyl alcohol, grain alcohol, and drinking alcohol, is a chemical compound, a simple alcohol with the chemical formula.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Ethanol · See more »

Ethnocultural politics in the United States

Ethnocultural politics in the United States (or ethnoreligious politics) refers to the pattern of certain ethnocultural or religious groups to vote heavily for one party.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Ethnocultural politics in the United States · See more »

Evangelicalism

Evangelicalism, evangelical Christianity, or evangelical Protestantism, is a worldwide, crossdenominational movement within Protestant Christianity which maintains the belief that the essence of the Gospel consists of the doctrine of salvation by grace through faith in Jesus Christ's atonement.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Evangelicalism · See more »

Evangelism

In Christianity, Evangelism is the commitment to or act of publicly preaching of the Gospel with the intention of spreading the message and teachings of Jesus Christ.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Evangelism · See more »

Federalist Party

The Federalist Party, referred to as the Pro-Administration party until the 3rd United States Congress (as opposed to their opponents in the Anti-Administration party), was the first American political party.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Federalist Party · See more »

Frances Willard

Frances Elizabeth Caroline Willard (September 28, 1839 – February 17, 1898) was an American educator, temperance reformer, and women's suffragist.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Frances Willard · See more »

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Sr. (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), often referred to by his initials FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd President of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Franklin D. Roosevelt · See more »

Free lunch

A free lunch is a sales enticement that offers a meal at no cost in order to attract customers and increase revenues from other offerings.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Free lunch · See more »

Free State of Galveston

The Free State of Galveston (sometimes referred to as the Republic of Galveston Island) was a whimsical name given to the coastal city of Galveston in the U.S. state of Texas during the early-to-mid-20th century.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Free State of Galveston · See more »

Gallup (company)

Gallup, Inc. is an American research-based, global performance-management consulting company.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Gallup (company) · See more »

Gangster

A gangster is a criminal who is a member of a gang.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Gangster · See more »

George Cassiday

George L. Cassiday, Sr. (1892–1967) was one of the leading Congressional bootleggers during National Prohibition.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and George Cassiday · See more »

George V

George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions, and Emperor of India, from 6 May 1910 until his death in 1936.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and George V · See more »

Georgia (U.S. state)

Georgia is a state in the Southeastern United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Georgia (U.S. state) · See more »

German Americans

German Americans (Deutschamerikaner) are Americans who have full or partial German ancestry.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and German Americans · See more »

Gluttony

Gluttony (gula, derived from the Latin gluttire meaning "to gulp down or swallow") means over-indulgence and over-consumption of food, drink, or wealth items.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Gluttony · See more »

Govenlock

Govenlock is an unincorporated community within Rural Municipality of Reno No. 51, Saskatchewan, Canada.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Govenlock · See more »

Great Depression

The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Great Depression · See more »

Greenwood Publishing Group

ABC-CLIO/Greenwood is an educational and academic publisher (middle school through university level) which is today part of ABC-CLIO.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Greenwood Publishing Group · See more »

H. L. Mencken

Henry Louis Mencken (September 12, 1880 – January 29, 1956) was an American journalist, satirist, cultural critic and scholar of American English.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and H. L. Mencken · See more »

Hangover

A hangover is the experience of various unpleasant physiological and psychological effects following the consumption of alcohol, such as wine, beer and distilled spirits.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Hangover · See more »

Harry Browne

Harry Edson Browne (June 17, 1933 – March 1, 2006) was an American writer, politician, and investment advisor.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Harry Browne · See more »

Heber J. Grant

Heber Jeddy Grant (November 22, 1856 – May 14, 1945) was an American religious leader who served as the seventh president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Heber J. Grant · See more »

Homebrewing

Homebrewing is the brewing of beer on a small scale for personal, non-commercial purposes.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Homebrewing · See more »

Hummingbird

Hummingbirds are birds from the Americas that constitute the family Trochilidae.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Hummingbird · See more »

Indian reservation

An Indian reservation is a legal designation for an area of land managed by a federally recognized Native American tribe under the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs rather than the state governments of the United States in which they are physically located.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Indian reservation · See more »

Industrialisation

Industrialisation or industrialization is the period of social and economic change that transforms a human group from an agrarian society into an industrial society, involving the extensive re-organisation of an economy for the purpose of manufacturing.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Industrialisation · See more »

Irving Fisher

Irving Fisher (February 27, 1867 – April 29, 1947) was an American economist, statistician, inventor, and Progressive social campaigner.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Irving Fisher · See more »

Izzy Einstein and Moe Smith

Isidor "Izzy" Einstein (1880–1938) and Moe W. Smith (1887–1960) were United States federal police officers, agents of the U.S. Prohibition Unit, who achieved the most number of arrests and convictions during the first years of the alcohol prohibition era (1920–1925).

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Izzy Einstein and Moe Smith · See more »

Jazz

Jazz is a music genre that originated in the African-American communities of New Orleans, United States, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Jazz · See more »

Jeffrey Miron

Jeffrey Alan "Jeff" Miron (born 1957) is an American economist.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Jeffrey Miron · See more »

Jews

Jews (יְהוּדִים ISO 259-3, Israeli pronunciation) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group and a nation, originating from the Israelites Israelite origins and kingdom: "The first act in the long drama of Jewish history is the age of the Israelites""The people of the Kingdom of Israel and the ethnic and religious group known as the Jewish people that descended from them have been subjected to a number of forced migrations in their history" and Hebrews of the Ancient Near East.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Jews · See more »

John D. Rockefeller Jr.

John Davison Rockefeller Jr. (January 29, 1874 – May 11, 1960) was an American financier and philanthropist who was a prominent member of the Rockefeller family.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and John D. Rockefeller Jr. · See more »

John F. Kennedy School of Government

The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University (also known as Harvard Kennedy School and HKS) is a public policy and public administration school, of Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and John F. Kennedy School of Government · See more »

Journal of Social History

The Journal of Social History, was founded in 1967 and has been edited since then by Peter Stearns.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Journal of Social History · See more »

Kansas

Kansas is a U.S. state in the Midwestern United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Kansas · See more »

Karen MacNeil

Karen MacNeil is an American author, journalist, wine educator and consultant based in Napa Valley, and the only person to have won every major wine award in the English language.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Karen MacNeil · See more »

Kentucky

Kentucky, officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a state located in the east south-central region of the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Kentucky · See more »

Ku Klux Klan

The Ku Klux Klan, commonly called the KKK or simply the Klan, refers to three distinct secret movements at different points in time in the history of the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Ku Klux Klan · See more »

Labour law

Labour law (also known as labor law or employment law) mediates the relationship between workers, employing entities, trade unions and the government.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Labour law · See more »

Legal drinking age

The legal drinking age is the age at which a person can legally consume alcoholic beverages.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Legal drinking age · See more »

Legal fiction

A legal fiction is a fact assumed or created by courts which is then used in order to help reach a decision or to apply a legal rule.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Legal fiction · See more »

Life (magazine)

Life was an American magazine that ran regularly from 1883 to 1972 and again from 1978 to 2000.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Life (magazine) · See more »

Liquor

Liquor (also hard liquor, hard alcohol, or spirits) is an alcoholic drink produced by distillation of grains, fruit, or vegetables that have already gone through alcoholic fermentation.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Liquor · See more »

Lizabeth Cohen

Lizabeth Cohen is the current Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies at Harvard University, as well as the Dean of Harvard's Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Lizabeth Cohen · See more »

Local option

A local option is the ability of local political jurisdictions, typically counties or municipalities, to allow decisions on certain controversial issues based on popular vote within their borders.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Local option · See more »

Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod

The Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod (LCMS), often referred to simply as the Missouri Synod, is a traditional, confessional Lutheran denomination in the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod · See more »

Lutheranism

Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity which identifies with the theology of Martin Luther (1483–1546), a German friar, ecclesiastical reformer and theologian.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Lutheranism · See more »

Maine law

The Maine Law (or "Maine Liquor Law"), passed in 1851 in Maine, was one of the first statutory implementations of the developing temperance movement in the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Maine law · See more »

Mainline Protestant

The mainline Protestant churches (also called mainstream Protestant and sometimes oldline Protestant) are a group of Protestant denominations in the United States that contrast in history and practice with evangelical, fundamentalist, and charismatic Protestant denominations.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Mainline Protestant · See more »

Mark A. Matthews

Mark A. Matthews (September 24, 1867 – 1940) was a Presbyterian minister in Seattle, Washington, from 1902 until his death.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Mark A. Matthews · See more »

Mark H. Moore

Mark H. Moore is the Hauser Professor for Nonprofit Organizations and Faculty Chair of the Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Mark H. Moore · See more »

Mars

Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second-smallest planet in the Solar System after Mercury.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Mars · See more »

Massachusetts General Court

The Massachusetts General Court (formally styled the General Court of Massachusetts) is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Massachusetts General Court · See more »

Medicinal Liquor Prescriptions Act of 1933

Medicinal Liquor Prescriptions Act of 1933 is a United States federal statute establishing prescription limitations for physicians possessing a permit to dispense medicinal liquor.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Medicinal Liquor Prescriptions Act of 1933 · See more »

Methanol

Methanol, also known as methyl alcohol among others, is a chemical with the formula CH3OH (a methyl group linked to a hydroxyl group, often abbreviated MeOH).

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Methanol · See more »

Methodism

Methodism or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity which derive their inspiration from the life and teachings of John Wesley, an Anglican minister in England.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Methodism · See more »

Mexico

Mexico (México; Mēxihco), officially called the United Mexican States (Estados Unidos Mexicanos) is a federal republic in the southern portion of North America.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Mexico · See more »

MIT Press

The MIT Press is a university press affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States).

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and MIT Press · See more »

Moonshine

Moonshine was originally a slang term for high-proof distilled spirits usually produced illicitly, without government authorization.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Moonshine · See more »

Mormonism and polygamy

Polygamy (most often polygyny, called plural marriage by Mormons in the 19th century or the Principle by modern fundamentalist practitioners of polygamy) was practiced by leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) for more than half of the 19th century, and practiced publicly from 1852 to 1890 by between 20 and 30 percent of Latter-day Saint families.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Mormonism and polygamy · See more »

Morris Sheppard

John Morris Sheppard (May 28, 1875April 9, 1941) was a Democratic United States Congressman and United States Senator from Texas.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Morris Sheppard · See more »

Mugler v. Kansas

Mugler v. Kansas,, was an important United States Supreme Court case in which the 8–1 opinion of Associate Justice John Marshall Harlan and the lone partial dissent by Associate Justice Stephen Johnson Field laid the foundation for the Supreme Court's later acceptance and defense during the Lochner era of Justice Field's theory of economic substantive due process under the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Mugler v. Kansas · See more »

Muscle car

Muscle car is an American term used to refer to a variety of high-performance automobiles.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Muscle car · See more »

Music of the United States

The music of the United States reflects the country's multi-ethnic population through a diverse array of styles.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Music of the United States · See more »

Napa Valley Register

The Napa Valley Register is a daily newspaper located in Napa, California.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Napa Valley Register · See more »

Nassau, Bahamas

Nassau is the capital and commercial centre of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Nassau, Bahamas · See more »

National Bureau of Economic Research

The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) is an American private nonprofit research organization "committed to undertaking and disseminating unbiased economic research among public policymakers, business professionals, and the academic community." The NBER is well known for providing start and end dates for recessions in the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and National Bureau of Economic Research · See more »

National debt of the United States

The national debt of the United States is the public debt carried by the federal government of the United States, which is measured as the face value of the currently outstanding Treasury securities that have been issued by the Treasury and other federal government agencies.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and National debt of the United States · See more »

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), as part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, supports and conducts biomedical and behavioral research on the causes, consequences, treatment, and prevention of alcoholism and alcohol-related problems.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism · See more »

Nativism (politics)

Nativism is the political policy of promoting the interests of native inhabitants against those of immigrants.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Nativism (politics) · See more »

New Orleans

New Orleans (. Merriam-Webster.; La Nouvelle-Orléans) is a major United States port and the largest city and metropolitan area in the state of Louisiana.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and New Orleans · See more »

New York (state)

New York is a state in the northeastern United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and New York (state) · See more »

New York City

The City of New York, often called New York City (NYC) or simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and New York City · See more »

Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Nineteenth Amendment (Amendment XIX) to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution · See more »

North Carolina

North Carolina is a U.S. state in the southeastern region of the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and North Carolina · See more »

Ogg

Ogg is a free, open container format maintained by the Xiph.Org Foundation.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Ogg · See more »

Old School–New School Controversy

The Old School–New School Controversy was a schism of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America which took place in 1837 and lasted for over 20 years.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Old School–New School Controversy · See more »

Organized crime

Organized crime is a category of transnational, national, or local groupings of highly centralized enterprises run by criminals who intend to engage in illegal activity, most commonly for money and profit.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Organized crime · See more »

Pietism

Pietism (from the word piety) was an influential movement in Lutheranism that combined its emphasis on Biblical doctrine with the Reformed emphasis on individual piety and living a vigorous Christian life.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Pietism · See more »

Political corruption

Political corruption is the use of powers by government officials or their network contacts for illegitimate private gain.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Political corruption · See more »

Prison

A prison, also known as a correctional facility, jail, gaol (dated, British English), penitentiary (American English), detention center (American English), or remand center is a facility in which inmates are forcibly confined and denied a variety of freedoms under the authority of the state.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Prison · See more »

Progressive Era

The Progressive Era was a period of widespread social activism and political reform across the United States that spanned from the 1890s to the 1920s.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Progressive Era · See more »

Progressivism

Progressivism is the support for or advocacy of improvement of society by reform.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Progressivism · See more »

Prohibition

Prohibition is the illegality of the manufacturing, storage in barrels or bottles, transportation, sale, possession, and consumption of alcohol including alcoholic beverages, or a period of time during which such illegality was enforced.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Prohibition · See more »

Prohibition in Canada

The prohibition of alcohol in Canada arose in various stages, from local municipal bans in the late 19th century, to provincial bans in the early 20th century, and national prohibition (a temporary wartime measure) from 1918 to 1920.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Prohibition in Canada · See more »

Prohibition of drugs

The prohibition of drugs through sumptuary legislation or religious law is a common means of attempting to prevent the recreational use of certain harmful drugs and other intoxicating substances.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Prohibition of drugs · See more »

Prohibition Party

The Prohibition Party (PRO) is a political party in the United States best known for its historic opposition to the sale or consumption of alcoholic beverages.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Prohibition Party · See more »

Protestantism

Protestantism is the second largest form of Christianity with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Protestantism · See more »

Public Choice (journal)

Public Choice is a peer-reviewed academic journal covering the intersection of economics and political science.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Public Choice (journal) · See more »

Public morality

Public morality refers to moral and ethical standards enforced in a society, by law or police work or social pressure, and applied to public life, to the content of the media, and to conduct in public places.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Public morality · See more »

Quakers

Quakers (or Friends) are members of a historically Christian group of religious movements formally known as the Religious Society of Friends or Friends Church.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Quakers · See more »

Rabbi

In Judaism, a rabbi is a teacher of Torah.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Rabbi · See more »

Repeal

A repeal is the removal or reversal of a law.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Repeal · See more »

Repeal of Prohibition in the United States

The repeal of Prohibition in the United States was accomplished with the passage of the Twenty-first Amendment to the United States Constitution on December 5, 1933.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Repeal of Prohibition in the United States · See more »

Rhode Island

Rhode Island, officially the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, is a state in the New England region of the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Rhode Island · See more »

Rocco Perri

Rocco Perri (born Rocco Perre on December 30, 1887; disappeared April 23, 1944) was an organized crime figure in Ontario, Canada in the early 20th century.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Rocco Perri · See more »

Rum

Rum is a distilled alcoholic beverage made from sugarcane byproducts, such as molasses or honeys, or directly from sugarcane juice, by a process of fermentation and distillation.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Rum · See more »

Rum-running

Rum-running, or bootlegging, is the illegal business of transporting (smuggling) alcoholic beverages where such transportation is forbidden by law.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Rum-running · See more »

Rum-running in Windsor, Ontario

Rum-running in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, was a major activity in the early part of the 20th century.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Rum-running in Windsor, Ontario · See more »

Sabbath

Sabbath is a day set aside for rest and worship.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Sabbath · See more »

Sacramental wine

Sacramental wine, Communion wine or altar wine is wine obtained from grapes and intended for use in celebration of the Eucharist (referred to also as the Lord's Supper or Holy Communion, among other names).

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Sacramental wine · See more »

Saint Valentine's Day Massacre

The Saint Valentine's Day Massacre is the name given to the 1929 murder of seven members and associates of Chicago's North Side Gang.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Saint Valentine's Day Massacre · See more »

Second Great Awakening

The Second Great Awakening was a Protestant religious revival during the early 19th century in the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Second Great Awakening · See more »

Simon Patten

Simon Nelson Patten (May 1, 1852 – July 24, 1922) was an economist and the chair of the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Simon Patten · See more »

Sin tax

A sin tax is an excise tax specifically levied on certain goods deemed harmful to society, for example alcohol and tobacco, candies, drugs, soft drinks, fast foods, coffee, sugar, gambling and pornography.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Sin tax · See more »

Sixteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Sixteenth Amendment (Amendment XVI) to the United States Constitution allows the Congress to levy an income tax without apportioning it among the states or basing it on the United States Census.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Sixteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution · See more »

South Carolina

South Carolina is a U.S. state in the southeastern region of the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and South Carolina · See more »

Southern Baptist Convention

The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a Christian denomination based in the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Southern Baptist Convention · See more »

Southern United States

The Southern United States, also known as the American South, Dixie, Dixieland, or simply the South, is a region of the United States of America.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Southern United States · See more »

Speakeasy

A speakeasy, also called a blind pig or blind tiger, is an illicit establishment that sells alcoholic beverages.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Speakeasy · See more »

St. Louis

St.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and St. Louis · See more »

State governments of the United States

State governments of the United States are institutional units in the United States exercising some of the functions of government at a level below that of the federal government.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and State governments of the United States · See more »

Sterno

Sterno ("canned heat") is a fuel made from denatured and jellied alcohol.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Sterno · See more »

SUNY Press

The State University of New York Press (or SUNY Press), is a university press and a Center for Scholarly Communication.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and SUNY Press · See more »

Teetotalism

Teetotalism is the practice or promotion of complete personal abstinence from alcoholic beverages.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Teetotalism · See more »

Temperance movement

The temperance movement is a social movement against the consumption of alcoholic beverages.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Temperance movement · See more »

Tennessee

Tennessee (translit) is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Tennessee · See more »

The American Economic Review

The American Economic Review is a peer-reviewed academic journal of economics.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and The American Economic Review · See more »

The Bahamas

The Bahamas, known officially as the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is an archipelagic state within the Lucayan Archipelago.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and The Bahamas · See more »

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), often informally known as the Mormon Church, is a nontrinitarian, Christian restorationist church that is considered by its members to be the restoration of the original church founded by Jesus Christ.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints · See more »

The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and The New York Times · See more »

The Purple Gang

The Purple Gang, also known as the Sugar House Gang, was a mob of bootleggers and hijackers, with predominantly Jewish members.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and The Purple Gang · See more »

The Washington Post

The Washington Post is a major American daily newspaper founded on December 6, 1877.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and The Washington Post · See more »

Third Great Awakening

The Third Great Awakening refers to a hypothetical historical period proposed by William G. McLoughlin that was marked by religious activism in American history and spans the late 1850s to the early 20th century.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Third Great Awakening · See more »

Third Party System

The Third Party System is a term of periodization used by historians and political scientists to describe the history of political parties in the United States from 1854 until the mid-1890s, which featured profound developments in issues of American nationalism, modernization, and race.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Third Party System · See more »

Thomas Edison

Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Thomas Edison · See more »

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson (April 13, [O.S. April 2] 1743 – July 4, 1826) was an American Founding Father who was the principal author of the Declaration of Independence and later served as the third president of the United States from 1801 to 1809.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Thomas Jefferson · See more »

Thunder Road (film)

Thunder Road is a black and white 1958 drama–crime film about running moonshine in the mountains of Kentucky and Tennessee in the late 1950s.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Thunder Road (film) · See more »

Timothy Shay Arthur

Timothy Shay Arthur (June 6, 1809 – March 6, 1885) — known as T. S. Arthur — was a popular 19th-century American author.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Timothy Shay Arthur · See more »

Twenty-first Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Twenty-first Amendment (Amendment XXI) to the United States Constitution repealed the Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which had mandated nationwide Prohibition on alcohol on January 16, 1919.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Twenty-first Amendment to the United States Constitution · See more »

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is the largest federal law enforcement agency of the United States Department of Homeland Security.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and U.S. Customs and Border Protection · See more »

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is a law enforcement agency of the Federal government of the United States under the jurisdiction of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement · See more »

Unintended consequences

In the social sciences, unintended consequences (sometimes unanticipated consequences or unforeseen consequences) are outcomes that are not the ones foreseen and intended by a purposeful action.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Unintended consequences · See more »

United States Coast Guard

The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is a branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the country's seven uniformed services.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and United States Coast Guard · See more »

United States Congress

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the Federal government of the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and United States Congress · See more »

United States Constitution

The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and United States Constitution · See more »

United States Department of Justice

The United States Department of Justice (DOJ), also known as the Justice Department, is a federal executive department of the U.S. government, responsible for the enforcement of the law and administration of justice in the United States, equivalent to the justice or interior ministries of other countries. The department was formed in 1870 during the Ulysses S. Grant administration. The Department of Justice administers several federal law enforcement agencies including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). The department is responsible for investigating instances of financial fraud, representing the United States government in legal matters (such as in cases before the Supreme Court), and running the federal prison system. The department is also responsible for reviewing the conduct of local law enforcement as directed by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994. The department is headed by the United States Attorney General, who is nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate and is a member of the Cabinet. The current Attorney General is Jeff Sessions.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and United States Department of Justice · See more »

United States Department of the Treasury

The Department of the Treasury (USDT) is an executive department and the treasury of the United States federal government.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and United States Department of the Treasury · See more »

United States presidential election, 1916

The United States presidential election of 1916 was the 33rd quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 7, 1916.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and United States presidential election, 1916 · See more »

United States presidential election, 1932

The United States presidential election of 1932 was the thirty-seventh quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 1932.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and United States presidential election, 1932 · See more »

United States Senate

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprise the legislature of the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and United States Senate · See more »

University of Massachusetts Press

The University of Massachusetts Press is a university press that is part of the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and University of Massachusetts Press · See more »

Untouchables (law enforcement)

The Untouchables were a group of nine U.S. federal law-enforcement agents led by Eliot Ness, who, from 1929 to 1931, worked to end Al Capone's illegal activities by aggressively enforcing Prohibition laws against Capone and his organization.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Untouchables (law enforcement) · See more »

Urbanization

Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban residency, the gradual increase in the proportion of people living in urban areas, and the ways in which each society adapts to this change.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Urbanization · See more »

Utah

Utah is a state in the western United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Utah · See more »

Vermouth

Vermouth is an aromatized, fortified wine flavored with various botanicals (roots, barks, flowers, seeds, herbs, and spices).

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Vermouth · See more »

Veto

A veto – Latin for "I forbid" – is the power (used by an officer of the state, for example) to unilaterally stop an official action, especially the enactment of legislation.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Veto · See more »

Vineyard

A vineyard is a plantation of grape-bearing vines, grown mainly for winemaking, but also raisins, table grapes and non-alcoholic grape juice.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Vineyard · See more »

Virginia

Virginia (officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) is a state in the Southeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Virginia · See more »

Volstead Act

The National Prohibition Act, known informally as the Volstead Act, was enacted to carry out the intent of the 18th Amendment (ratified January 1919), which established prohibition in the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Volstead Act · See more »

War on drugs

War on Drugs is an American term usually applied to the U.S. federal government's campaign of prohibition of drugs, military aid, and military intervention, with the stated aim being to reduce the illegal drug trade.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and War on drugs · See more »

Warren G. Harding

Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was an American politician who served as the 29th President of the United States from 1921 until his death in 1923.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Warren G. Harding · See more »

Washington Monument

The Washington Monument is an obelisk on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built to commemorate George Washington, once commander-in-chief of the Continental Army and the first President of the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Washington Monument · See more »

Wayne Wheeler

Wayne Bidwell Wheeler (November 10, 1869 – September 5, 1927) was an American attorney and prohibitionist.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Wayne Wheeler · See more »

Webb–Kenyon Act

The Webb–Kenyon Act was a 1913 law of the United States that regulated the interstate transport of alcoholic beverages.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Webb–Kenyon Act · See more »

Wedge issue

A wedge issue is a political or social issue, often of a controversial or divisive nature, which splits apart a demographic or population group.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Wedge issue · See more »

Western Pennsylvania

Western Pennsylvania refers to the western third of the state of Pennsylvania in the United States.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Western Pennsylvania · See more »

Western saloon

A Western saloon is a kind of bar particular to the Old West.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Western saloon · See more »

Whiskey Gap, Alberta

Whiskey Gap is a ghost town in southern Alberta, Canada.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Whiskey Gap, Alberta · See more »

Whiskey Rebellion

The Whiskey Rebellion (also known as the Whiskey Insurrection) was a tax protest in the United States beginning in 1791 during the presidency of George Washington.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Whiskey Rebellion · See more »

Whisky

Whisky or whiskey is a type of distilled alcoholic beverage made from fermented grain mash.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Whisky · See more »

Wine

Wine is an alcoholic beverage made from grapes fermented without the addition of sugars, acids, enzymes, water, or other nutrients.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Wine · See more »

Winston Churchill

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill (30 November 187424 January 1965) was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Winston Churchill · See more »

Woman's Christian Temperance Union

The Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) is an active temperance organization that was among the first organizations of women devoted to social reform with a program that "linked the religious and the secular through concerted and far-reaching reform strategies based on applied Christianity." It was influential in the temperance movement, and supported the 18th Amendment.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Woman's Christian Temperance Union · See more »

Women's suffrage

Women's suffrage (colloquial: female suffrage, woman suffrage or women's right to vote) --> is the right of women to vote in elections; a person who advocates the extension of suffrage, particularly to women, is called a suffragist.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Women's suffrage · See more »

Women's suffrage in the United States

Women's suffrage in the United States of America, the legal right of women to vote, was established over the course of several decades, first in various states and localities, sometimes on a limited basis, and then nationally in 1920.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Women's suffrage in the United States · See more »

Woodrow Wilson

Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was an American statesman and academic who served as the 28th President of the United States from 1913 to 1921.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Woodrow Wilson · See more »

World War I

World War I (often abbreviated as WWI or WW1), also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and World War I · See more »

World War II

World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and World War II · See more »

Wyandotte Constitution

The Wyandotte Constitution admitted Kansas as a free state, although it was not the first choice.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Wyandotte Constitution · See more »

Yale University

Yale University is an American private Ivy League research university in New Haven, Connecticut.

New!!: Prohibition in the United States and Yale University · See more »

Redirects here:

Alcohol during and after prohibition, Alcohol prohibition in the United States, American Prohibition, American prohibition, Blocks of wine, Bricks of wine, National Prohibition, Noble Experiment, Noble experiment, Prohibition (US), Prohibition (USA), Prohibition (United States), Prohibition Era, Prohibition US, Prohibition era, Prohibition in America, Prohibition in USA, Prohibition in the U.S., Prohibition in the US, Prohibition in the USA, Prohibition of alcohol, United States, Prohibition-era (US), The Noble Experiment, The Prohibition, U.S. prohibition, US prohibition, US-style Prohibition, USA prohibition, United states prohibition, Wets (Prohibition), Wine block, Wine blocks, Wine brick, Wine bricks.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prohibition_in_the_United_States

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »