Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Prudentius

Index Prudentius

Aurelius Prudentius Clemens was a Roman Christian poet, born in the Roman province of Tarraconensis (now Northern Spain) in 348. [1]

48 relations: Allegory in the Middle Ages, Ambrose, Ausonius, Basilica, Bible, C. S. Lewis, Calahorra, Christian, Divinity, Dualistic cosmology, Epiphany (holiday), Faith, Gnosticism, Gratian, Henry d'Andeli, Hispania Tarraconensis, Horace, Hymn, Idolatry, Jesus, Lust, Marcion of Sinope, Martyr, Mural, Of the Father's Heart Begotten, Paganism, Paulinus of Nola, Photo caption, Poet, Pope Damasus I, Psychomachia, Quatrain, Quicumque Christum Quærtis, Quintus Aurelius Symmachus, Roman citizenship, Roman Empire, Roman Senate, Sidonius Apollinaris, Spain, Statius, Tarragona, Tertullian, Theodosius I, Trinity, Vice, Victoria (mythology), Virtue, Zaragoza.

Allegory in the Middle Ages

Allegory in the Middle Ages was a vital element in the synthesis of biblical and classical traditions into what would become recognizable as medieval culture.

New!!: Prudentius and Allegory in the Middle Ages · See more »

Ambrose

Aurelius Ambrosius (– 397), better known in English as Ambrose, was a bishop of Milan who became one of the most influential ecclesiastical figures of the 4th century.

New!!: Prudentius and Ambrose · See more »

Ausonius

Decimus or Decimius Magnus Ausonius (– c. 395) was a Roman poet and teacher of rhetoric from Burdigala in Aquitaine, modern Bordeaux, France.

New!!: Prudentius and Ausonius · See more »

Basilica

A basilica is a type of building, usually a church, that is typically rectangular with a central nave and aisles, usually with a slightly raised platform and an apse at one or both ends.

New!!: Prudentius and Basilica · See more »

Bible

The Bible (from Koine Greek τὰ βιβλία, tà biblía, "the books") is a collection of sacred texts or scriptures that Jews and Christians consider to be a product of divine inspiration and a record of the relationship between God and humans.

New!!: Prudentius and Bible · See more »

C. S. Lewis

Clive Staples Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963) was a British novelist, poet, academic, medievalist, literary critic, essayist, lay theologian, broadcaster, lecturer, and Christian apologist.

New!!: Prudentius and C. S. Lewis · See more »

Calahorra

Calahorra (Calagorra, Calagurris) La Rioja, Spain is a municipality in the comarca of Rioja Baja, near the border with Navarre on the right bank of the Ebro.

New!!: Prudentius and Calahorra · See more »

Christian

A Christian is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus Christ.

New!!: Prudentius and Christian · See more »

Divinity

In religion, divinity or godhead is the state of things that are believed to come from a supernatural power or deity, such as a god, supreme being, creator deity, or spirits, and are therefore regarded as sacred and holy.

New!!: Prudentius and Divinity · See more »

Dualistic cosmology

Dualism in cosmology is the moral or spiritual belief that two fundamental concepts exist, which often oppose each other.

New!!: Prudentius and Dualistic cosmology · See more »

Epiphany (holiday)

Epiphany, also Theophany, Little Christmas, or Three Kings' Day, is a Christian feast day that celebrates the revelation of God incarnate as Jesus Christ.

New!!: Prudentius and Epiphany (holiday) · See more »

Faith

In the context of religion, one can define faith as confidence or trust in a particular system of religious belief, within which faith may equate to confidence based on some perceived degree of warrant, in contrast to the general sense of faith being a belief without evidence.

New!!: Prudentius and Faith · See more »

Gnosticism

Gnosticism (from γνωστικός gnostikos, "having knowledge", from γνῶσις, knowledge) is a modern name for a variety of ancient religious ideas and systems, originating in Jewish-Christian milieus in the first and second century AD.

New!!: Prudentius and Gnosticism · See more »

Gratian

Gratian (Flavius Gratianus Augustus; Γρατιανός; 18 April/23 May 359 – 25 August 383) was Roman emperor from 367 to 383.

New!!: Prudentius and Gratian · See more »

Henry d'Andeli

Henry d'Andeli was a 13th-century Norman poet notable for his work La Bataille des Vins (English Battle of the Wines), and for the satirical poem Battle of the Seven Arts.

New!!: Prudentius and Henry d'Andeli · See more »

Hispania Tarraconensis

Hispania Tarraconensis was one of three Roman provinces in Hispania.

New!!: Prudentius and Hispania Tarraconensis · See more »

Horace

Quintus Horatius Flaccus (December 8, 65 BC – November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus (also known as Octavian).

New!!: Prudentius and Horace · See more »

Hymn

A hymn is a type of song, usually religious, specifically written for the purpose of adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a deity or deities, or to a prominent figure or personification.

New!!: Prudentius and Hymn · See more »

Idolatry

Idolatry literally means the worship of an "idol", also known as a cult image, in the form of a physical image, such as a statue or icon.

New!!: Prudentius and Idolatry · See more »

Jesus

Jesus, also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth and Jesus Christ, was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.

New!!: Prudentius and Jesus · See more »

Lust

Lust is a craving, it can take any form such as the lust for sexuality, lust for money or the lust for power.

New!!: Prudentius and Lust · See more »

Marcion of Sinope

Marcion of Sinope (Greek: Μαρκίων Σινώπης; c. 85 – c. 160) was an important figure in early Christianity.

New!!: Prudentius and Marcion of Sinope · See more »

Martyr

A martyr (Greek: μάρτυς, mártys, "witness"; stem μάρτυρ-, mártyr-) is someone who suffers persecution and death for advocating, renouncing, refusing to renounce, or refusing to advocate a belief or cause as demanded by an external party.

New!!: Prudentius and Martyr · See more »

Mural

A mural is any piece of artwork painted or applied directly on a wall, ceiling or other permanent surface.

New!!: Prudentius and Mural · See more »

Of the Father's Heart Begotten

Of the Father's Heart Begotten alternatively known as Of the Father's Love Begotten is a Christmas carol based on the Latin poem Corde natus by the Roman poet Aurelius Prudentius, from his Liber Cathemerinon (hymn no. IX) beginning "Da puer plectrum," which includes the Latin stanzas listed below.

New!!: Prudentius and Of the Father's Heart Begotten · See more »

Paganism

Paganism is a term first used in the fourth century by early Christians for populations of the Roman Empire who practiced polytheism, either because they were increasingly rural and provincial relative to the Christian population or because they were not milites Christi (soldiers of Christ).

New!!: Prudentius and Paganism · See more »

Paulinus of Nola

Paulinus of Nola (Paolino di Nola; Paulinus Nolanus,; also Anglicized as Pauline of Nola; – June 22, 431), born Pontius Meropius Anicius Paulinus, was a Roman poet, writer, and senator who attained the ranks of suffect consul and governor of Campania (–1) but—following the assassination of the emperor Gratian and under the influence of his Spanish wife Therasia—abandoned his career, was baptized as a Christian, and (after Therasia's death) became bishop of Nola in Campania.

New!!: Prudentius and Paulinus of Nola · See more »

Photo caption

Photo captions, also known as cutlines, are a few lines of text used to explain or elaborate on published photographs.

New!!: Prudentius and Photo caption · See more »

Poet

A poet is a person who creates poetry.

New!!: Prudentius and Poet · See more »

Pope Damasus I

Pope Damasus I (c. 305 – 11 December 384) was Pope of the Catholic Church, from October 366 to his death in 384.

New!!: Prudentius and Pope Damasus I · See more »

Psychomachia

The Psychomachia (Battle of spirits or soul war) by the Late Antique Latin poet Prudentius, from the early fifth century AD, is probably the first and most influential "pure" medieval allegory, the first in a long tradition of works as diverse as the Romance of the Rose, Everyman, and Piers Plowman. In slightly less than a thousand lines, the poem describes the conflict of vices and virtues as a battle in the style of Virgil's Aeneid. Christian faith is attacked by and defeats pagan idolatry to be cheered by a thousand Christian martyrs.

New!!: Prudentius and Psychomachia · See more »

Quatrain

A quatrain is a type of stanza, or a complete poem, consisting of four lines.

New!!: Prudentius and Quatrain · See more »

Quicumque Christum Quærtis

Quicumque Christum Quærtis is the opening line of the twelfth (in honour of the Epiphany) and last poem in the "Cathemerinon" of Prudentius.

New!!: Prudentius and Quicumque Christum Quærtis · See more »

Quintus Aurelius Symmachus

Quintus Aurelius Symmachus (c. 345 – 402) was a Roman statesman, orator, and man of letters.

New!!: Prudentius and Quintus Aurelius Symmachus · See more »

Roman citizenship

Citizenship in ancient Rome was a privileged political and legal status afforded to free individuals with respect to laws, property, and governance.→.

New!!: Prudentius and Roman citizenship · See more »

Roman Empire

The Roman Empire (Imperium Rōmānum,; Koine and Medieval Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Ῥωμαίων, tr.) was the post-Roman Republic period of the ancient Roman civilization, characterized by government headed by emperors and large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean Sea in Europe, Africa and Asia.

New!!: Prudentius and Roman Empire · See more »

Roman Senate

The Roman Senate (Senatus Romanus; Senato Romano) was a political institution in ancient Rome.

New!!: Prudentius and Roman Senate · See more »

Sidonius Apollinaris

Gaius Sollius Modestus Apollinaris Sidonius, better known as Saint Sidonius Apollinaris (5 November of an unknown year, 430 – August 489 AD), was a poet, diplomat, and bishop.

New!!: Prudentius and Sidonius Apollinaris · See more »

Spain

Spain (España), officially the Kingdom of Spain (Reino de España), is a sovereign state mostly located on the Iberian Peninsula in Europe.

New!!: Prudentius and Spain · See more »

Statius

Publius Papinius Statius (c. 45c. 96 AD) was a Roman poet of the 1st century AD (Silver Age of Latin literature).

New!!: Prudentius and Statius · See more »

Tarragona

Tarragona (Phoenician: Tarqon; Tarraco) is a port city located in northeast Spain on the Costa Daurada by the Mediterranean Sea.

New!!: Prudentius and Tarragona · See more »

Tertullian

Tertullian, full name Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus, c. 155 – c. 240 AD, was a prolific early Christian author from Carthage in the Roman province of Africa.

New!!: Prudentius and Tertullian · See more »

Theodosius I

Theodosius I (Flavius Theodosius Augustus; Θεοδόσιος Αʹ; 11 January 347 – 17 January 395), also known as Theodosius the Great, was Roman Emperor from AD 379 to AD 395, as the last emperor to rule over both the eastern and the western halves of the Roman Empire. On accepting his elevation, he campaigned against Goths and other barbarians who had invaded the empire. His resources were not equal to destroy them, and by the treaty which followed his modified victory at the end of the Gothic War, they were established as Foederati, autonomous allies of the Empire, south of the Danube, in Illyricum, within the empire's borders. He was obliged to fight two destructive civil wars, successively defeating the usurpers Magnus Maximus and Eugenius, not without material cost to the power of the empire. He also issued decrees that effectively made Nicene Christianity the official state church of the Roman Empire."Edict of Thessalonica": See Codex Theodosianus XVI.1.2 He neither prevented nor punished the destruction of prominent Hellenistic temples of classical antiquity, including the Temple of Apollo in Delphi and the Serapeum in Alexandria. He dissolved the order of the Vestal Virgins in Rome. In 393, he banned the pagan rituals of the Olympics in Ancient Greece. After his death, Theodosius' young sons Arcadius and Honorius inherited the east and west halves respectively, and the Roman Empire was never again re-united, though Eastern Roman emperors after Zeno would claim the united title after Julius Nepos' death in 480 AD.

New!!: Prudentius and Theodosius I · See more »

Trinity

The Christian doctrine of the Trinity (from Greek τριάς and τριάδα, from "threefold") holds that God is one but three coeternal consubstantial persons or hypostases—the Father, the Son (Jesus Christ), and the Holy Spirit—as "one God in three Divine Persons".

New!!: Prudentius and Trinity · See more »

Vice

Vice is a practice, behaviour, or habit generally considered immoral, sinful, criminal, rude, taboo, depraved, or degrading in the associated society.

New!!: Prudentius and Vice · See more »

Victoria (mythology)

Victoria, in ancient Roman religion, was the personified goddess of victory.

New!!: Prudentius and Victoria (mythology) · See more »

Virtue

Virtue (virtus, ἀρετή "arete") is moral excellence.

New!!: Prudentius and Virtue · See more »

Zaragoza

Zaragoza, also called Saragossa in English, is the capital city of the Zaragoza province and of the autonomous community of Aragon, Spain.

New!!: Prudentius and Zaragoza · See more »

Redirects here:

Aurelius Clemens, Aurelius Clemens Prudentius, Aurelius P. Clemens, Aurelius Prudentius, Aurelius Prudentius Clemens, Marcus Aurelius Clemens Prudentius, Peristephanon, Prudentius, Aurelius Clemens.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prudentius

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »