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Pyaemia

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Pyaemia (or pyemia) is a type of septicaemia that leads to widespread abscesses of a metastatic nature. [1]

26 relations: Abscess, American Civil War, Antibiotic, Bacteria, Blind Boy Fuller, Durham, North Carolina, Embolism, Empyema, Fathers and Sons (novel), Ignaz Semmelweis, Ivan Turgenev, Jane Swisshelm, Manager (baseball), Metastasis, Miller Huggins, New York Yankees, Nihilism, Portal vein, Preventive healthcare, Pus, Sepsis, Staphylococcus, The Principles and Practice of Medicine, Thrombus, William Osler, 1929 Major League Baseball season.

Abscess

An abscess is a collection of pus that has built up within the tissue of the body.

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American Civil War

The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865.

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Antibiotic

An antibiotic (from ancient Greek αντιβιοτικά, antibiotiká), also called an antibacterial, is a type of antimicrobial drug used in the treatment and prevention of bacterial infections.

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Bacteria

Bacteria (common noun bacteria, singular bacterium) is a type of biological cell.

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Blind Boy Fuller

Blind Boy Fuller (born Fulton Allen, July 10, 1904 or 1907February 13, 1941) was an American blues guitarist and singer.

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Durham, North Carolina

Durham is a city in the U.S. state of North Carolina.

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Embolism

An embolism is the lodging of an embolus, a blockage-causing piece of material, inside a blood vessel.

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Empyema

An empyema (from Greek ἐμπύημα, "abscess") is a collection or gathering of pus within a naturally existing anatomical cavity.

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Fathers and Sons (novel)

Fathers and Sons («Отцы и дети»; Ottsy i deti,; archaic spelling Отцы и дѣти), also translated more literally as Fathers and Children, is an 1862 novel by Ivan Turgenev.

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Ignaz Semmelweis

Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis (Semmelweis Ignác Fülöp; 1 July 1818 – 13 August 1865) was a Hungarian physician of ethnic-German ancestry, now known as an early pioneer of antiseptic procedures.

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Ivan Turgenev

Ivan Sergeyevich Turgenev (ɪˈvan sʲɪrˈɡʲeɪvʲɪtɕ tʊrˈɡʲenʲɪf; September 3, 1883) was a Russian novelist, short story writer, poet, playwright, translator and popularizer of Russian literature in the West.

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Jane Swisshelm

Jane Grey Cannon Swisshelm (December 6, 1815 – July 22, 1884) was an American journalist, publisher, abolitionist, and women's rights advocate.

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Manager (baseball)

In baseball, the field manager (commonly referred to as the manager) is the equivalent of a head coach who is responsible for overseeing and making final decisions on all aspects of on-field team strategy, lineup selection, training and instruction.

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Metastasis

Metastasis is a pathogenic agent's spread from an initial or primary site to a different or secondary site within the host's body; it is typically spoken of as such spread by a cancerous tumor.

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Miller Huggins

Miller James Huggins (March 27, 1878 – September 25, 1929) was an American professional baseball player and manager.

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New York Yankees

The New York Yankees are an American professional baseball team based in the New York City borough of the Bronx.

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Nihilism

Nihilism is the philosophical viewpoint that suggests the denial or lack of belief towards the reputedly meaningful aspects of life.

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Portal vein

The portal vein or hepatic portal vein is a blood vessel that carries blood from the gastrointestinal tract, gallbladder, pancreas and spleen to the liver.

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Preventive healthcare

Preventive healthcare (alternately preventive medicine, preventative healthcare/medicine, or prophylaxis) consists of measures taken for disease prevention, as opposed to disease treatment.

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Pus

Pus is an exudate, typically white-yellow, yellow, or yellow-brown, formed at the site of inflammation during bacterial or fungal infection.

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Sepsis

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that arises when the body's response to infection causes injury to its own tissues and organs.

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Staphylococcus

Staphylococcus (from the σταφυλή, staphylē, "grape" and κόκκος, kókkos, "granule") is a genus of Gram-positive bacteria.

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The Principles and Practice of Medicine

The Principles and Practice of Medicine: Designed for the Use of Practitioners and Students of Medicine is a medical textbook by Sir William Osler.

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Thrombus

A thrombus, colloquially called a blood clot, is the final product of the blood coagulation step in hemostasis.

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William Osler

Sir William Osler, 1st Baronet, (July 12, 1849 – December 29, 1919) was a Canadian physician and one of the four founding professors of Johns Hopkins Hospital.

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1929 Major League Baseball season

The 1929 Major League Baseball season.

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Redirects here:

Pyemia, Pyohemia.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyaemia

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