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Quantitative easing

Index Quantitative easing

Quantitative easing (QE), also known as large-scale asset purchases, is an expansionary monetary policy whereby a central bank buys predetermined amounts of government bonds or other financial assets in order to stimulate the economy and increase liquidity. [1]

119 relations: Abenomics, Adam Posen, Alan Greenspan, Andrew Sentance, Ann Pettifor, Asset-backed security, Bank, Bank of England, Bank of Japan, Bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers, BBC, BCA Research, Ben Bernanke, Bloomberg L.P., BRIC, Capital outflow, Central bank, Chair of the Federal Reserve, CNNMoney, Commercial paper, Creditor, Currency war, Currency War of 2009–11, David Graeber, De Nederlandsche Bank, Deflation, Deleveraging, Devaluation, Economic history of Japan, Economic policy, European Central Bank, European Union, Eurozone, Excess reserves, Exchange rate, Federal funds, Federal funds rate, Federal Open Market Committee, Federal Reserve Bank, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, Federal Reserve Board of Governors, Federal Reserve System, Financial asset, Financial crisis of 2007–2008, Financial economics, Financial Times, Fixed exchange-rate system, Foreign Affairs, ..., Fractional-reserve banking, Gilt-edged securities, Government bond, Great Depression, Group of Seven, Guy Standing (economist), Helicopter money, History of Federal Open Market Committee actions, Inflation, Interbank lending market, Interest rate, International Monetary Fund, Jeremy C. Stein, Jeremy Corbyn, John B. Taylor, John Muellbauer, Labour Party (UK) leadership election, 2015, Liquidity trap, London School of Economics, Lost Decade (Japan), Mario Draghi, Mark Blyth, Market liquidity, Martin Feldstein, Milton Friedman, Molly Scott Cato, Monetary base, Monetary policy, Monetary Policy Committee, Monetization, Money creation, Money supply, Mortgage-backed security, Official bank rate, Open market operation, Pennsylvania, People's Quantitative Easing, Portmanteau, Prime Minister of Japan, Protectionism, Quantitative tightening, Reason Foundation, Richard W. Fisher, Robert D. McTeer, Robert Skidelsky, Baron Skidelsky, Royal Bank of Scotland Group, Shinzō Abe, Simon Wren-Lewis, Stephen Hester, Steve Keen, Stimulus (economics), Stock, Sveriges Riksbank, Swiss National Bank, Systemic risk, The Economist, The Guardian, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Theresa May, United States Department of the Treasury, United States Treasury security, University of Southampton, Willem Buiter, World Pensions & Investments Forum, Yield (finance), Yield curve, Zero interest-rate policy, Zero lower bound. Expand index (69 more) »

Abenomics

refers to the economic policies advocated by Shinzō Abe since the December 2012 general election, which elected Abe to his first term as Prime Minister of Japan.

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Adam Posen

Adam Simon Posen (born 1966 in Brookline, Massachusetts) is an American economist and President of the Peterson Institute for International Economics (where he has worked since July 1997).

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Alan Greenspan

Alan Greenspan (born March 6, 1926) is an American economist who served as Chairman of the Federal Reserve of the United States from 1987 to 2006.

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Andrew Sentance

Andrew Sentance, CBE (born 1958) is a British business economist.

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Ann Pettifor

Ann Pettifor is a UK-based analyst of the global financial system, director of Policy Research in Macroeconomics (PRIME) a network of economists concerned with Keynesian monetary theory and policies; an honorary research fellow at the Political Economy Research Centre at City University, London (CITYPERC) and a fellow of the New Economics Foundation, London.

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Asset-backed security

An asset-backed security (ABS) is a security whose income payments and hence value are derived from and collateralized (or "backed") by a specified pool of underlying assets.

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Bank

A bank is a financial institution that accepts deposits from the public and creates credit.

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Bank of England

The Bank of England, formally the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, is the central bank of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the model on which most modern central banks have been based.

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Bank of Japan

The is the central bank of Japan.

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Bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers

The filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection by financial services firm Lehman Brothers on September 15, 2008, remains the largest bankruptcy filing in U.S. history, with Lehman holding over in assets.

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BBC

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is a British public service broadcaster.

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BCA Research

BCA Research Inc. is an independent provider of global investment research and investment strategy advice.

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Ben Bernanke

Ben Shalom Bernanke (born December 13, 1953) is an American economist at the Brookings Institution who served two terms as Chairman of the Federal Reserve, the central bank of the United States, from 2006 to 2014.

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Bloomberg L.P.

Bloomberg L.P. is a privately held financial, software, data, and media company headquartered in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.

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BRIC

In economics, BRIC is a grouping acronym that refers to the countries of '''B'''razil, '''R'''ussia, '''I'''ndia and '''C'''hina, which are all deemed to be at a similar stage of newly advanced economic development.

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Capital outflow

Capital outflow is an economic term describing capital flowing out of (or leaving) a particular economy.

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Central bank

A central bank, reserve bank, or monetary authority is an institution that manages a state's currency, money supply, and interest rates.

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Chair of the Federal Reserve

The Chair of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System is the head of the Federal Reserve, which is the central banking system of the United States.

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CNNMoney

CNNMoney.com is a financial news and information website, operated by CNN.

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Commercial paper

Commercial paper, in the global financial market, is an unsecured promissory note with a fixed maturity of not more than 364 days.

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Creditor

A creditor is a party (for example, person, organization, company, or government) that has a claim on the services of a second party.

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Currency war

Currency war, also known as competitive devaluations, is a condition in international affairs where countries seek to gain a trade advantage over other countries by causing the exchange rate of their currency to fall in relation to other currencies.

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Currency War of 2009–11

The Currency War of 2009–2011 was an episode of competitive devaluation which became prominent in the financial press in September 2010.

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David Graeber

David Rolfe Graeber (born 12 February 1961) is an American anthropologist and anarchist activist, perhaps best known for his 2011 volume Debt: The First 5000 Years.

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De Nederlandsche Bank

De Nederlandsche Bank (DNB) is the central bank of the Netherlands.

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Deflation

In economics, deflation is a decrease in the general price level of goods and services.

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Deleveraging

At the micro-economic level, deleveraging refers to the reduction of the leverage ratio, or the percentage of debt in the balance sheet of a single economic entity, such as a household or a firm.

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Devaluation

In modern monetary policy, a devaluation is an official lowering of the value of a country's currency within a fixed exchange rate system, by which the monetary authority formally sets a new fixed rate with respect to a foreign reference currency or currency basket.

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Economic history of Japan

The economic history of Japan is most studied for the spectacular social and economic growth in the 1800s after the Meiji Restoration, when it became the first non-European great power, and for its expansion after the Second World War, when Japan recovered from devastation to become the world's second largest economy behind the United States, and from 2013 behind China as well.

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Economic policy

The economic policy of governments covers the systems for setting levels of taxation, government budgets, the money supply and interest rates as well as the labour market, national ownership, and many other areas of government interventions into the economy.

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European Central Bank

The European Central Bank (ECB) is the central bank for the euro and administers monetary policy of the euro area, which consists of 19 EU member states and is one of the largest currency areas in the world.

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European Union

The European Union (EU) is a political and economic union of EUnum member states that are located primarily in Europe.

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Eurozone

No description.

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Excess reserves

In banking, excess reserves are bank reserves in excess of a reserve requirement set by a central bank.

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Exchange rate

In finance, an exchange rate is the rate at which one currency will be exchanged for another.

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Federal funds

In the United States, federal funds are overnight borrowings between banks and other entities to maintain their bank reserves at the Federal Reserve.

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Federal funds rate

In the United States, the federal funds rate is the interest rate at which depository institutions (banks and credit unions) lend reserve balances to other depository institutions overnight, on an uncollateralized basis.

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Federal Open Market Committee

The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC), a committee within the Federal Reserve System (the Fed), is charged under the United States law with overseeing the nation's open market operations (e.g., the Fed's buying and selling of United States Treasury securities).

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Federal Reserve Bank

A Federal Reserve Bank is a regional bank of the Federal Reserve System, the central banking system of the United States.

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Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas

The Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas covers the Eleventh Federal Reserve District, which includes Texas, northern Louisiana and southern New Mexico, a district sometimes referred to as the Oil Patch.

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Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City

The Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City is located in Kansas City, Missouri and covers the 10th District of the Federal Reserve, which includes Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Wyoming, and portions of western Missouri and northern New Mexico.

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Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

The Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco (informally referred to as the San Francisco Fed) is the federal bank for the twelfth district in the United States.

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Federal Reserve Board of Governors

The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, commonly known as the Federal Reserve Board, is the main governing body of the Federal Reserve System.

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Federal Reserve System

The Federal Reserve System (also known as the Federal Reserve or simply the Fed) is the central banking system of the United States of America.

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Financial asset

A financial asset is a non-physical asset whose value is derived from a contractual claim, such as bank deposits, bonds, and stocks.

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Financial crisis of 2007–2008

The financial crisis of 2007–2008, also known as the global financial crisis and the 2008 financial crisis, is considered by many economists to have been the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression of the 1930s.

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Financial economics

Financial economics is the branch of economics characterized by a "concentration on monetary activities", in which "money of one type or another is likely to appear on both sides of a trade".

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Financial Times

The Financial Times (FT) is a Japanese-owned (since 2015), English-language international daily newspaper headquartered in London, with a special emphasis on business and economic news.

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Fixed exchange-rate system

A fixed exchange rate, sometimes called a pegged exchange rate, is a type of exchange rate regime where a currency's value is fixed against either the value of another single currency, to a basket of other currencies, or to another measure of value, such as gold.

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Foreign Affairs

Foreign Affairs is an American magazine of international relations and U.S. foreign policy published by the Council on Foreign Relations, a nonprofit, nonpartisan, membership organization and think tank specializing in U.S. foreign policy and international affairs.

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Fractional-reserve banking

Fractional-reserve banking is the practice whereby a bank accepts deposits, makes loans or investments, but is required to hold reserves equal to only a fraction of its deposit liabilities.

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Gilt-edged securities

Gilt-edged securities are bonds issued by the UK Government.

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Government bond

A government bond or sovereign bond is a bond issued by a national government, generally with a promise to pay periodic interest payments and to repay the face value on the maturity date.

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Great Depression

The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States.

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Group of Seven

The Group of Seven (G7) is a group consisting of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

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Guy Standing (economist)

Guy Standing, FAcSS (born 9 February 1948) is a British professor of Development Studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, and co-founder of the Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN).

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Helicopter money

Helicopter money is a proposed unconventional monetary policy, sometimes suggested as an alternative to quantitative easing (QE) when the economy is in a liquidity trap (when interest rates near zero and the economy remains in recession).

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History of Federal Open Market Committee actions

This is a list of historical rate actions by the United States Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC).

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Inflation

In economics, inflation is a sustained increase in price level of goods and services in an economy over a period of time.

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Interbank lending market

The interbank lending market is a market in which banks extend loans to one another for a specified term.

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Interest rate

An interest rate is the amount of interest due per period, as a proportion of the amount lent, deposited or borrowed (called the principal sum).

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International Monetary Fund

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is an international organization headquartered in Washington, D.C., consisting of "189 countries working to foster global monetary cooperation, secure financial stability, facilitate international trade, promote high employment and sustainable economic growth, and reduce poverty around the world." Formed in 1945 at the Bretton Woods Conference primarily by the ideas of Harry Dexter White and John Maynard Keynes, it came into formal existence in 1945 with 29 member countries and the goal of reconstructing the international payment system.

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Jeremy C. Stein

Jeremy Chaim Stein (born October 17, 1960) is the Moise Y. Safra Professor of Economics at Harvard University and an investment industry consultant.

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Jeremy Corbyn

Jeremy Bernard Corbyn (born 26 May 1949).

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John B. Taylor

John Brian Taylor (born December 8, 1946) is the Mary and Robert Raymond Professor of Economics at Stanford University, and the George P. Shultz Senior Fellow in Economics at Stanford University's Hoover Institution.

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John Muellbauer

John Norbert Joseph Muellbauer, FBA (born 17 July 1944) is a British applied economist who is a professor at the University of Oxford.

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Labour Party (UK) leadership election, 2015

The 2015 Labour Party leadership election was won by Jeremy Corbyn with a landslide victory.

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Liquidity trap

A liquidity trap is a situation, described in Keynesian economics, in which, "after the rate of interest has fallen to a certain level, liquidity preference may become virtually absolute in the sense that almost everyone prefers cash holding a debt which yields so low a rate of interest."Keynes, John Maynard (1936) The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, United Kingdom: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007 edition, A liquidity trap is caused when people hoard cash because they expect an adverse event such as deflation, insufficient aggregate demand, or war.

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London School of Economics

The London School of Economics (officially The London School of Economics and Political Science, often referred to as LSE) is a public research university located in London, England and a constituent college of the federal University of London.

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Lost Decade (Japan)

The is a period of economic stagnation in Japan following the Japanese asset price bubble's collapse in late 1991 and early 1992.

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Mario Draghi

Mario Draghi (born 3 September 1947) is an Italian economist serving as the President of the European Central Bank since 2011.

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Mark Blyth

Mark Blyth (born 1967) is a British political scientist from Scotland and a professor of international political economy at Brown University.

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Market liquidity

In business, economics or investment, market liquidity is a market's feature whereby an individual or firm can quickly purchase or sell an asset without causing a drastic change in the asset's price.

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Martin Feldstein

Martin Stuart "Marty" Feldstein (born November 25, 1939) is an American economist.

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Milton Friedman

Milton Friedman (July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was an American economist who received the 1976 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his research on consumption analysis, monetary history and theory, and the complexity of stabilization policy.

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Molly Scott Cato

Sarah Margaret "Molly" Scott Cato (born 21 May 1963) is a British Green politician, academic, environmental and community activist, and green economist who is the current Member of the European Parliament (MEP) for the South West England electoral region for the Green Party.

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Monetary base

In economics, the monetary base (also base money, money base, high-powered money, reserve money, outside money, central bank money or, in the UK, narrow money) in a country is defined as the portion of a commercial bank's reserves that consist of the commercial bank's accounts with its central bank plus the total currency circulating in the public, plus the currency, also known as vault cash, that is physically held in the bank's vault.

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Monetary policy

Monetary policy is the process by which the monetary authority of a country, typically the central bank or currency board, controls either the cost of very short-term borrowing or the monetary base, often targeting an inflation rate or interest rate to ensure price stability and general trust in the currency.

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Monetary Policy Committee

The Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) is a committee of the Bank of England, which meets for three and a half days, eight times a year, to decide the official interest rate in the United Kingdom (the Bank of England Base Rate).

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Monetization

Monetization (also written monetisation) is the process of converting or establishing something into legal tender.

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Money creation

Money creation is the process by which the money supply of a country, or of an economic or monetary region,Such as the Eurozone or ECCAS is increased.

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Money supply

In economics, the money supply (or money stock) is the total value of monetary assets available in an economy at a specific time.

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Mortgage-backed security

A mortgage-backed security (MBS) is a type of asset-backed security that is secured by a mortgage or collection of mortgages.

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Official bank rate

The official bank rate (also called the Bank of England base rate or BOEBR) is the interest rate that the Bank of England charges Banks for secured overnight lending.

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Open market operation

An open market operation (OMO) is an activity by a central bank to give (or take) liquidity in its currency to (or from) a bank or a group of banks.

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Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania German: Pennsylvaani or Pennsilfaani), officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States.

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People's Quantitative Easing

People's Quantitative Easing (PQE) is a policy proposed by Jeremy Corbyn during the 2015 Labour leadership election, which would require the Bank of England to create money to finance government investment via a National Investment Bank.

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Portmanteau

A portmanteau or portmanteau word is a linguistic blend of words,, p. 644 in which parts of multiple words or their phones (sounds) are combined into a new word, as in smog, coined by blending smoke and fog, or motel, from motor and hotel.

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Prime Minister of Japan

The is the head of government of Japan.

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Protectionism

Protectionism is the economic policy of restricting imports from other countries through methods such as tariffs on imported goods, import quotas, and a variety of other government regulations.

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Quantitative tightening

Quantitative tightening (QT) is a contractionary monetary policy applied by a central bank to decrease amount of liquidity within the economy.

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Reason Foundation

The Reason Foundation is an American libertarian think tank founded in 1978.

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Richard W. Fisher

Richard W. Fisher (born 1949) is the former President and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, having assumed that post in April 2005 and retired in 2015.

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Robert D. McTeer

Robert D. McTeer is an American economist, and has been a fellow at the US National Center for Policy Analysis since January 2007.

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Robert Skidelsky, Baron Skidelsky

Robert Jacob Alexander, Baron Skidelsky, FBA (born 25 April 1939) is a British economic historian of Russian origin and the author of a major, award-winning, three-volume biography of British economist John Maynard Keynes (1883–1946).

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Royal Bank of Scotland Group

The Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc (also known as RBS Group) is a British banking and insurance holding company, based in Edinburgh, Scotland.

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Shinzō Abe

is a Japanese politician serving as the 63rd and current Prime Minister of Japan and Leader of the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) since 2012, previously being the 57th officeholder from 2006 to 2007.

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Simon Wren-Lewis

Simon Wren-Lewis is a British economist.

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Stephen Hester

Stephen A. M. Hester (born 14 December 1960) is an English businessman and former banker, the chief executive officer (CEO) of RSA Insurance Group and former CEO of the RBS Group.

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Steve Keen

Steve Keen (born 28 March 1953) is an Australian economist and author.

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Stimulus (economics)

In economics, stimulus refers to attempts to use monetary or fiscal policy (or stabilization policy in general) to stimulate the economy.

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Stock

The stock (also capital stock) of a corporation is constituted of the equity stock of its owners.

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Sveriges Riksbank

Sveriges Riksbank, or simply Riksbanken, is the central bank of Sweden.

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Swiss National Bank

The Swiss National Bank (SNB) is the central bank of Switzerland, and is therefore responsible for the monetary policy of the nation of Switzerland and also for the issuing of Swiss franc banknotes.

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Systemic risk

In finance, systemic risk is the risk of collapse of an entire financial system or entire market, as opposed to risk associated with any one individual entity, group or component of a system, that can be contained therein without harming the entire system.

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The Economist

The Economist is an English-language weekly magazine-format newspaper owned by the Economist Group and edited at offices in London.

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The Guardian

The Guardian is a British daily newspaper.

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The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

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The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal is a U.S. business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City.

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Theresa May

Theresa Mary May (Brasier; born 1 October 1956) is a British politician serving as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and Leader of the Conservative Party since 2016.

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United States Department of the Treasury

The Department of the Treasury (USDT) is an executive department and the treasury of the United States federal government.

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United States Treasury security

A United States Treasury security is an IOU from the US Government.

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University of Southampton

The University of Southampton (abbreviated as Soton in post-nominal letters) is a research university located in Southampton, England.

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Willem Buiter

Willem Hendrik Buiter CBE (born 26 September 1949) is a Dutch-born American-British economist.

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World Pensions & Investments Forum

The World Pensions & Investments Forum is a research and policy-oriented conference organised by the World Pensions Council (WPC), also known as the International Association of Pension Funds (IAPF), in partnership with regional and supranational organisations, large public and private institutional investors from G10 countries, the emerging nations of Eastern Europe, Latin America, Asia and the MENA area.

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Yield (finance)

In finance, the yield on a security is the amount of cash (in percentage terms) that returns to the owners of the security, in the form of interest or dividends received from it.

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Yield curve

In finance, the yield curve is a curve showing several yields or interest rates across different contract lengths (2 month, 2 year, 20 year, etc....) for a similar debt contract.

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Zero interest-rate policy

Zero interest-rate policy (ZIRP) is a macroeconomic concept describing conditions with a very low nominal interest rate, such as those in contemporary Japan and December 2008 through December 2015 in the United States.

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Zero lower bound

The Zero Lower Bound (ZLB) or Zero Nominal Lower Bound (ZNLB) is a macroeconomic problem that occurs when the short-term nominal interest rate is at or near zero, causing a liquidity trap and limiting the capacity that the central bank has to stimulate economic growth.

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Redirects here:

Credit easing, Fiscal easing, Monetary loosening, QE2 (monetary policy), Quantative easing, Quantitative Easing, Taper tantrum.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantitative_easing

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